Skip to main content

Full text of "The New York Clipper (April 1919)"

See other formats


THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



• 4 1' * , "-. . 






in 1 in m i j 11 * iii in m m m m i*i 1 1 1 jv* m m ^i m 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 




Copyrighted, 1919, and published weekly by the Clipper Corporatiom, 1604 Broadway, New York. Entered at the Post-office at New York, June 34, 1879, aa tecond-daaa mail matter under Act of March 3. 117* 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. 1853* 



NEW YORK, APRIL 2, 1919 



VOLUME LXVtt- No. * 
Price. Tea Cents. $4.00 a Year 



BOOST RENTS ON 

THEATRICAL 

OFFICES 

PUTNAM BLDG. HARD HIT 



• Theatrical people having offices in build- 
ings throughout the Rialto Bection, will 
suffer an Increase in their already targe 
office expenses, by reason of a rental raise 
which goes into effect the first of next 
month. For, with one exception, the land- 
lords . of the Broadway buildings occupied 
for the moat part by theatrical people, 
.hare notified their tenants that their rents 
will be raised, beginning May 1, from ten 
to fifty per cent more than they are now 
paying. 

' The tenants in the Putnam building, 
owned by Vincent Astor, who also owns 
a' large number of the sites in the neigh- 
borhood upon which theatres now stand, 
were notified early, in January that their 
rent would be ■ raised, beginning in May. 
from 7 Va to 15 per cent This building 
houses ' more vaudeville booking agents 
than any other building in New York and 
this la the first rental increase for' this 
building in three years. 

The Mitchell Mark Realty Company, of 
which Max Spiegal . is a director, and 
which owns the Strand Theatre building, 
at Broadway and Forty-seventh street, has 
notified its tenants of a rental increase 
amounting to from 15 to 25 per cent, ef- 
fective May 1. 

Other buildings where rental increases 
will go into effect next month, but whose 
tenantry consists of others than theatrical 
people, are the Longacre building, at 
Broadway and Forty-second street, owned 
by die Longacre Land Company, and the 
Fitzgerald building, directly next door,' to 
the north, which houses the George M. 
Cohan Theatre. 

' The former building is owned by the 
Longacre Land Company, which has. in- 
creased the rents of its tenants from 10 
to 60 per cent. The latter building is 
owned by the 1482 Broadway Corporation, 

E. K. Stallo, president, which has also 
raised the rent from-10 to- 80 per. cent 
more for each tenant. 

None of the theatrical people whose 
rent has been raised will move on that 
account, chiefly for .the reason that they 
would be. up against the same state of 
affairs in any building they chose to move 
into. Besides, the scarcity of office space 
in any of the buildings at this time al- 
most makes removal, impossible. And the- 
atrical people who have recently acquired 
space in buildings for the conduct of their 
business, hare in almost every- case been 
taken Into an office .already occupied and 
which they share, with other occupants. 

The one exception to the rental raise" in 
buildings where theatrical men' have their 
offices is the Palace Theatre building,, at 
Broadway near Forty-seventh street The 
management has not raised the rent of 
tenants, in. the building since, it was. first 
opened * for occupancy several years ago. 
The buBding has fifty-five tenants, each of 
whom, almost without exception, is in the 
theatrical business. 

It is also interesting to note that there 
are no vacancies in'the building. ' 



RAISE FUSS OVER HOYT SHOW 

Euoba, N. Y., March 29.— Quite a fuss 
was stirred up here this week over Hoyt's 
Revue when Mrs. Harry M. Beardsley, 
president of the Wednesday Morning Club, 
protested against the appearance of the 
show at Rorick'a Glen, this Summer. Mrs. 
Beardsley stated that the Revue would be 
disastrous to the welfare of the young 
. people Of the city as well as to the popu- 
larity of Rorick'a Glen. 

. General Manager F. H. Hill, of the El- 
mira Water, Light and Railroad. Company, 
replied to the letter, stating that Mrs. 
Beardsley V letter was the first intima- 
tion he had' received that the Revue would 
present any attraction which in any way 
might be detrimental to' anyone. Previous 
to the engagement of the Hoyt Company a 
poll of Reticle's patrons was taken through 
the newspapers to ascertain what sort of 
amusement was most desired' and of. the 
replies received, the majority voted musi- 
cal comedy, he said. The company is 
now playing in New England and Mr. Hill 
has refused to cancel the engagement, 
eaying he had heard nothing but good re- 
ports about it. 

DEMPSEY SHOW OPENS 

. Ohbsteb, Pa., March 31.— The Jack 
Dempsey Athletic Carnival opened here 
to-night at the Armory under the direction 
of Barney Gerard and will continue for 
twenty- five days playing the largest eities 
for one night. Dempsey is to receive 
$2,000 per day or $50,000 for the tour. A 
large number of athletes will accompany 
Dempsey. 

Many fighters who have toured under 
Gerard's banner have won a champion- 
ship, including Joe Gans, Jack Johnson, 
Battling Nehion and Freddy Welsh. Ger- 
ard's staff includes Eddie Shafer, man- 
ager; Fred Follett, treasurer; Billy Mc- 
Camey, press representative; James Pow- 
ers and Julius Bookbinder in advance. 



OBJECTS TO POSTERS 

"Suggestive, indecent; immoral, impure," 
were- the adjectives used by the Rev. 
Thomas B. Larkin, of St. Bridget's R. C. 
Church, Jersey City, in referring to posters 
on the billboards throughout that city in a 
letter to Mayor Hague last week. When 
called on the phone, Rev. Larkin said he 
could not state the names of the shows to 
which the, posters referred. The mayor 
had the matter taken up with Mr; 
O'Mealia, acting head of the Jersey City 
Poster Advertising Company. It is said 
that an objection was made to the adver- 
tising of "The Modern Magdalen," which 
was put on a few weeks ago at the Hudson 
Theatre, Union Bill, by the stock company 
there. 



WILL BUILD BALCONY 

The Little Theatre, on West Forty- 
fourth Street, will have a balcony contain- 
ing 250 additional seats next season, if 
Wmthrop Ames, the owner of the 300-seat 
house; can obtain a suitable bid from a 
builder, it was learned last week. 

The balcony would give the theatre a 
seating capacity" of 650, and would make 
the house a desirable one in which to pre-; 
sent intimate ' musical •• comedies of the 
Princess variety, as well as farces, come- 
dies and dramas, of the average type. 

The stage of the Little Theatre is not 
only larger than the one at the Princess, 
but it is also two feet deeper than the 
stage at the Booth Theatre, the latter 
house being also owned by Wintbrop 
Ames.' 



QUERY 10 MORE WITNESSES 

IN VA UDE. IN VESTIGATION 

Frank Fogarly, Dan Hennessy, Harry Weber, Eddie Clark, Jack 

Curtis and Others Questioned Before Sessions Are 

Again Indefinitely Adjourned 

witness's previous testimony with refer- 
ence to the subject be stricken out. The 
motion was over-ruled. 

Fay was then asked whether he eould 
remember the names of any other acts 
besides the McNally Sisters, who can- 
celled their bookings at Providence,, or 
any other of his theatres. He stated 
that he had not made any attempt to re- 
member the names of such acts, because 
his houses had often played acta under 
what appeared to be assumed names. He 
did remember Boyle and Brazil, however, 
as one act that had cancelled. There 
were hundreds, he added, but ho could 
not remember their names. 

In answer to a request by Goodman to 
furnish the names of any well known acts 
that had played his Providence theatre. 
Fay mentioned Harry Bulger, Marco 
Twins, Keough and Nelson, and Lee 
Beggs, as acts that would fit that descrip- 
tion. On being aaked to name any act 
that might be called a box office attrac- 
tion which had played Providence under 
an assumed name, Fay replied that he 
thought that "Bob Tenney" was an act 
that could be placed in this category, but 
he waa not. sure whether Tenney was the 
real or an assumed name of the act in 
question. 

Fay's description of the "Bob Tenney" 
specialty, incidentally, caused a general 
laugh throughout the court room whe- 
he said that there was one piece of busi- 
ness in the turn which stood out particu- 
larly, in which the artist did a trick with* 
a trombone and made his trousers shot 
up in the air. 

Mr. Goodman then went into the sub- 
ject of the $250 weekly guarantee that 
Sheedy was alleged to have told Fay he 
would have to have, If Gordon people, 
of Boston, should pull their theatres out 
of the Sheedy agency, as a result of Fay's 
theatre receiving bills from the latter. " 

Fay, in giving his testimony, mentioned 
the word blacklist" which met with an 
immediate objection from the V. M. P. A. 
attorney. The objection was over-ruled, 
however, by Examiner Moore. It devel- 
oped that Fay never had to pay the $250 
weekly, hut he did have to pay Sheedy 
an extra $25, in addition to the regular 
$25 booking fee, for booking Fay's Provi- 
dence. 

Sheedy received the extra feo because 
he had experienced great trouble in get- 
ting acts to go to Providence, according 
to Fay. Sheedy*s acquirement of a 20 
per cent interest in Fay's Providence 
house next was gone into by Goodman, 
who inquired aa to the data and other 
details, relative to the buying-In pro final 

Fay waa aaked whether ha had made a 
success of Us three theatrical ventures 
and he replied that he had, as far aa 
Providence and Ro che s t er were co n c ern ed. 
Philadelphia could not be termed a suc- 
cess, however, Fay stated, 
' Mr. Goodman then aaked Fay iinramer- 
abla questions with respect to th e buying 
of scenery, routing of acts, and other mat- 
( Continued on t*ge» 80, 81 swd 88.) 



Harry Weber, Frank Fogarty, Eddie 
Clark, Dan Hennessy, Harry D. Wallen, 
Jack Curtis, Harry Bulger, Edward M. 
Fay, Tom. Quigley and Edward Keough, 
were c-iiled last week and examined when 
hearings of the Federal Trade , Commis- 
sion into the vaudeville situation were 
resumed. last Wednesday. All were ques- 
tioned by Chief Councel John Walsh and 
cross examined by Maurice Goodman and 
John- M. Kelly, attorneys for the re- 
spondents. On Saturday, after four days' 
work, further hearings were adjourned 
subject to the call of the Commission. 

Each of the "witnesses waa queried re- 
garding matters with which' he was be- 
lieved to "be specially familiar. It la pos- 
sible that, when' the hearings are resumed, 
Gaylord Hawkins, assistant to Mr. Walsh, 
will take up the' thread of the investiga- 
tion for the Government. 

Wednesday 

Wednesday's session started with Ed- 
ward M. Fay, who has vaudeville the- 
atres in Providence, Rochester and Phila- 
delphia, on the witness stand, and Mr. 
Goodman, continued the cross-examination 
in which he was interrupted at the time 
of the adjournment, Feb. 7th. His initial 
move was an effort to establish the fact 
that numerous acts which played for Fay 
in -.Providence and- Philadelphia, subse- 
quently appeared at houses booked by 
Keith and Marcus Loew, both concerns, 
a.i the respondent's counsel pointed out, 
being members of the Vaudeville Mana- 
gers' ' Protective Association. 

A list offered in evidence by Goodman 
and containing the names of many acts 
that J. J. Fitzgerald, Fay's attorney, said 
were checked off by M. F. Sheedy, as hav-. 
ing appeared at Fay's Providence and 
Philadelphia houses, occasioned consider- 
able discussion before it was finally ad- 
mitted, owing to the fact that several 
were duplicated. Fay was uncertain about 
the list and Goodman experienced great 
difficulty in ascertaining anything definite 
about it from him. Fitzgerald's explana- 
tion, however, cleared the matter up sat- 
isfactorily. 

. Mr. Goodman then took up the matter 
of a list of acta prepared by the Sheedy 
office, which were said to Lave been acts 
to which Sheedy had to pay more money 
to play Fay's Theatre than they le- 
ceived in other theatres booked by the 
Sheedy agency. 

Shepheard and Ott was specifically cited 
aa having .received $135.00 from Fay, in- 
stead of $126.0C ne weekly salary sup- 
posed to have bees paid by another man- 
ager. Goodman waa very anxious to find 
out the name of the manager who paid 

the act $125.00, the city ft appeared in, 
and other •■""tails connected with the 
transaction. Fay stated that be could 
not give 'he information desired. Pressed, 
later, by Goodman, to give the name of 
any act that he had paid more money to 
than another manager, the witness finally 
admitted that ha eould not do so. Good- 
man, th e re up on, moved that all of the 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April ,2, 4919 



LONDON ACTORS 

THREATEN 

STRIKE 

COCHRAN OPPOSES UNION 



LOHBOlt, Kng., March 31. — Believing 
that their recent agitation for tatter work- 
ing conditions and salary daring rehearsals 
Is on the verge of failure and learning that 
London' managers, led by Arthur Bouchier, 
are working for the Introdnction of Son- 
day shows, actors thronghont the United 
Kingdom today are threatening a general 
strike. The matter was brought to a head, 
the actors say, when O. B. Cochran, the 
well known manager, made the announce- 
ment that he was determined to employ in 
his companies in the future no actor who 
was a member of the Actors' Association. 

This determined reply to all the recent 
trouble caused the executive committee of 
the actors' ' organisation, with which all 
theatrical employes, musicians, and vaude- 
ville performers are co-operating, to hold 
a general meeting, at which a resolution 
Was framed to Ore effect that no member 
of the association appear in a cast not 
composed entirely of members of the so- 
ciety. This resolution is expected to pass 
at another meeting next Sunday, and it 
can only mean one tiling, a walkout of 
the actors. If Cochran lives up to hil 

threat, some London theatres may be dark 
before the week-end. 

"Union recognition'' are the two words 
uppermost in the minds of actors through- 
out the country today, and the association 
Is determined to push the issues to a suc- 
cessful conclusion, now that Oochran has 
taken that position. 

Encouraged by the fact that a majority 
of the places of amusement in the city are 
open on Sundays for "league" concerts 
and similar shows, which are in reality 
variety entertainments, London managers 
have recently made a strong plea for Sun- 
day performances. They claim that the 
no-called intellectual plays cannot be pro- 
duced on weekdays, because they are not 
money-getters, and advance the idea that 
Suhdsy is the proper day for ibis enter- 
tainment. Thus, a Sunday license is 
wanted, with a clause stipulating that the 
play presented on Sunday shall not be pre- 
sented the other six days of the week. By 
this method, managers say, tiiey win be 
able to produce plays for which no the- 
atre can now be found. 

Another argument they put forward is 
that the Sunday shows would enable the 
manager to test the work of new play- 
wrights and young actors and actresses. 

Managers also advance the statement 
that the Sunday show would be the means 
of keeping men out of public bouses and 
might prove more attractive than Sunday 
evening Bolsheviki meetings. 

Thespians declare that the One consid- 
eration back of the desire to have Sunday 
shows is dollars and cents, and that these 
performances would be run solely as a 
commercial proposition, putting mors bur- 
den on the actor and more money into the 
pockets of the managers. 

"The introduction of matinees brought 
no increase of salary to the actor and 
contracts are now calling for eight, ten 
and twelve performances a week," said a 
prominent member of the association. 

"The Sunday evening show would soon 
be followed by the Sunday matinee, and 
the actor would be called upon to play 
fourteen performances for the same salary 
he receives today." 

Variety Artiats* Federation is one of the 
strongest opponents. of the Sunday shows 
in the regular theatres, the society holding 
that once established in theatree, 8uadajr 
performances of the bills now being given 
during the. week would follow. The V. A. 
F. calls to mind -what happened when the 
change was made: from one house a night 
to two houses a -night. The change saved 
the manager i money, but did not benefit 
t£« performer in spite of tile fact that he 
was called sja) to do doable. the amount 
of work he had" previously done. 



SPANIARDS LEASE PARK 

The Spanish Theatre, inc., has taken an 
indefinite lease of the Park Theatre and 
will open it oil April 19 with a bill in- 
cluding "Manila," an opera in two acts 
by Amadeo Vives, and a musical revue. 
Leoncio MosqUera is president of the com- 
pany; Andreas P. de Segurola, honorary 
president, and Manuel Noriega, director. 
With the opening of the company, the 
Park will cease to be, as the house will be 
christened the Spanish Theatre. - - 

It is the idea of the promoters of the 
enterprise to make it a permanent insti- 
tution, or, as they term it, "Spain's Em- 
bassy of Art." 

Only worka by Spanish authors will be 
presented and will include operas, oper- 
ettas, musical comedies, comedies and 
dranuu, with a new bill each week. The 
talent will come from Spain, Mexico, Cuba 
and the South American countries. 

The opening company will number 
sixty members, with an orchestra of forty 
pieces. There will be a chorus of thirty 
and twelve dancers. 

Among the principals engaged are Ra- 
mon Blanchard, the bsrtitone, who sang 
in the original production of "La Tosca" 
at Milan; Louisa B. Rovira, a soprano, 
from tho Royal Theatre, Madrid, and the 
Liccum, Barcelona; Isabel Marquetti and 
Adelina Vehi, also sopranos; Jose Llnron 
and Leopold Legorreta, tenors, and Aroza- 
raeua and Santaeana, bassos. 

The conductor is Fernando L. CsbeHo, 
who hag wielded the baton in the leading 
Spanish opera houses in the world," in- 
cluding the Royal and Zasuela, Madrid; 
the Arben and Principal, Mexico; . the 
Colon, Buenos Aires, and tho Albion, 11a- 



Rehearaals of the chorus and minor 
members of the company are already un- 
der way. 



NEW DILLINGHAM PIECE READY 

Wahhinqtow, March 31.— "A New 
Oirl," Charles Dillingham's latest musical 
production, written by Anne Caldwell and 
Jerome Kern, will open here next Sunday 
night at the National Theatre. The cast 
will include the following principals : Helen 
Shipman. Douglas Stevenson, Anna Orr, 
Scott Welsh, Duncan Sisters, Olin How- 
land, Nellie Fillmore, James O. Marlowe, 
Gertrude Maitland, Alexander Clark, Flor- 
ence Edney, Jay Wilson, Elsie Lawson, 
Florence Bruce, Pauline Hall and Irene 
Wilson. 



WALSH RESIGNS AS COUNSEL 

John Walsh, chief counsel for the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission, announced ' Us 
resignation from that office last week, the 
same to become effective on April 16. Mr. 
Walsh has personally conducted the 'cur- 
rent investigation of the V. M. P. A. and 
the U. B. O.-Koith interests thns far. He 
win practice law in Washington. His 
successor as chief counsel to the Federal 
Trade Commission has not been named as 
yet. 



JOLSON TO DO J6O.000 
Washington, D. C, March 31.— Sixty 
thousand dollars will probably be cleaned 
up here by "Stoned" during its two weeks' 
stay. One of the most remarkable advance 
■ales known in Washington has been rolled 
up. The box office at Poli's did $10,000 
worth of business last Tuesday, the first 
day of the advance sale. On Saturday, 
the day before JoIson*s local engagement, 
the advance had resetted $25,000. 

CLAIRE ROCHESTER WINS 

Memphis, Tcnn., March 27. — An order 
waa granted Claire Rochester, In the pro- 
bate court here, last week, for one year's 
support, to be taken from the estate of 
her husband, John Margerum, who was 
killed in an automobile accident several 
months ago. 

Previous to her marriage to Margerum, 
Miss Rochester was the wife of Carl Helm, 
now manager of the 350th Infantry Band, 
on tour. . 



ALL NEW PLAYS 

BEING FIXED 

ON ROAD 

SOME HALT FOR REPAIRS 



close April 12™ 

The "Tailor. Made Man" Company will 
dose at the Broadway Theatre, Brooklyn, 
April 12. • 



'Practically every show sent out of New 
York for "tryi ng out" recently is now 
undergoing changes preparatory to an 
opening on Broadway this Spring or in 
the early Fall. Some are being rewrit- 
ten entirely, others partially Or wholly 
recast and a few are having minor changes 
made, in the script, scenery or personnel. 

"Tiah" has been brought in from Atlan- 
tic City and is undergoing a few changes 
in the cast and script, after which it will 
play over to Chicago for a Summer run. 
In the Fall it will be brought into New 
York. Two weeks' time will see this show 
on the road again. 

"Live Forever," which opened at' Balti- 
more February 17, is being rewritten and 
will be sent out later in the Spring. It 
is a circus play, produced by George Tyler. 

"The Girl in Stateroom B" opened in 
Atlantic City early in March, but was 
soon pulled in for revision. It is not likely 
that it will go out again. The play was 
originally intended for the one-night 

stands. 

"It Happens to Everybody" will re- 
open about Easter Monday. George Pro- 
bert, who plays Donald Brown, the young 
boarder, will be replaced in the cast. 
Several are being tried out for the part. 

"The Violation," with King Baggot, is 
going good in the middle west. It will not 
be brought into New York before next 
season. 

"She Would and She Did," Grace 
George's new piece, has closed in Cleve- 
land, and will be held over until next sea- 
son. 

"The Merry Month of May," the Ruth 
Chatterton piece, is now In the middle 
west. Frederick Fietfing and Katberine 
Emmett have recently been added to the 
cast 

The chorus of "The Water's Fine," 
starring May Irwin, will be increased to 
sixteen, and some new comedy dialogue 
written by Aaron Hoffman. A few Changes, 
to be done by Edgar MacGregor, are also 
to be made in the staging. 

"Come on Charley," which opened and 
closed at Albany and was later rewritten, 
will next be seen at Washington. .Mfllle 
Butterfield, a stock star of the Pacific 
Coast, will have a big part in the play. 

The staging of "Dome Along" baa 
undergone a few changes,, and was re- 
opened last week at Hartford, Conn. 

SINGERS CLOSING GOOD SEASON 

Playing to an average of $8,100 a week, 
the Society of American Singers closed 
the twenty-seventh week of its twenty- 
nine-week operatic engagement at the 
Park Theatre Saturday, having played to 
a total of $218,700 since ft opened there 
September 23, last. The company expects 
to play to $20,000 more before it closes its 
engagement on April 12th, which win bring 
the total receipts up to $238,700, a figure 
which puts the organization on t he ho tter 
than even side of the ledger. William 
Wade Hlnshaw is president and one of 
the founders. 

The society 'rafted the Park Theatre 
from Lawrence J. Anhalt, the lesee and 
manager, on a percentage basis, opening 
for what was to be only a four-week run. 
However, the .success of the venture caused 
the rim to be extended twenty-five weeks 
longer. 

The percentage arrangement with. An- 
halt. provided for 55-45 up to $7,000 
weekly, then 00-40 above 97,000 to $8,000, 

then finally, 65-35 of the weekly gross 

above $8,000, the society in each case re- 
ceiving the larger share of the percentage. 
Thirty-one operatic and musical comedy 
stars appeared at various times in the 
twenty-one different operas presented by 
the organisation, each/of wham received a 
fixed, amount, for expenses plus a certain 
percentage of the receipts as salary. 



"SUSAN LENOX" IS "FROST 1 ' 

WaiMngton ; D. % March 3L— George 

V. Hobarfs adaptation of David Graham 

Phillips' hovel "The Fall and Rise of Susata 

.Lenox," produced by the Shuberte under 

.'the title of "Susan Lenox" and presented 

1 at the Shubert-Belasco Theatre here last 

night,, waa generally rated a complete 

"frost" by local critics. Although Hobart 

has preserved the narrative of Phillips' 

story faithfully and has used no leas than 

thirteen scenes in. three acts to tell his 

story with an almost film-like oontinuancy, 

he has dismally failed to even approach 

. the atmosphere and the technique of the 

public work. 

Last night's audience nearly ruined a 
first act scene by laughing outright at one 
of the supposed serious scenes — the mar 
riage of Susan Lenox, impersonated by 
Mona Brans, to a brutal farmer, the latter 
role assumed by John Nicholson. The 
mechanical handling of the production at 
its opening night here was execrable and 
the constant succession of scenes kept the 
audience fidgeting for house lights, which 
were only flashed on during the intermis- 
sion between acts. 

The cast reflects the mediocre character 
of the production itself. Mona Brans' 
work was received luke-warmly and 
Nicholson waa credited with the best char- 
acter personation of the cast, although 
even that left much to be desired. John 
iloWen was verbose and flamboyant to a 
painful degree and there waa hardly & 
flash of real acting throughout the piece. 

Prominently featured in the cut were 
Ethel Brandon, Madeline Marshall, Averell 
Harris, William Frederick, Walter Lewis 
and Adaline Thompson. 

The story, as preserved by Hnhart, tells 
the story of Susan Lenox the daughter of 
a woman who had made -the usual error 
through the brutality of townspeople. 
She is finally forced into a marriage with 
an impossible boor from which -she escapes 
to the degradation of the purlieus of a big 
city. From that point she begins her rise 
to love and happiness. 

The production is little more than saw 
mill melodrama flavored with hokum. 

VETERANS TURN ACTORS 

A large number of soldiers and sailors 
recently discharged who gained a little 
"fame" among their comrades for their 
prowess and ability to entertain. Are now 
trying to break into vaudeville. 

Most of these lads have never been on 
the stage before, but, having a little nat- 
ural ability, got "bits" together In the 
camps and behind the lines* in ■ Europe 
which went over so big that they now 
want to take a whirl at the real filing 
and are camping on the trail of agents 
and managers. 

Some such acts have got engagements 
and are making their appeal for applause 
mainly because they wear the uniform 
and, very frequently, gold or silver service 
stripes and 'wound insignia. Those un- 
able to make good in the big sea coast 
towns are going into the interior of the 
country where more of a fuss is made 
over the overseas men. 

COMEDIAN IS MARRIED 

fiaixrAX, N. 9., March SO— Bflly Ban- 
gor, principal comedian with the "King 
Musi cal Comedy Company," and Blanche 
Williams, of the same show; now In its 
twentieth week at the Gayety Theatre 
here, were married on March 26. They 
were unable, to secure a minister to per- 
form the ceremony on the stage and had 
to go to the Rev. J. Daly's home, where 
they were married. Tom Senna was best 
man and Billy Rhodes the bridesmnid. 

FRED STONE HURT 

Boston, .March 27.— Fred Stone, with 
the "Jack O'Lantem" company, here, fell 
while practising some acrobatic stunts oa 
Tuesday and strained some of the muscles 
in Mi groin. Dr. James L. Koch was im- 
mediately called and patched him up. 



OLIVE TELL LEAVES APJJSS 

Bos-roi-, March 27.— Olive Tell 'left tin- 
cast of "The Well Remembered Voice," 
playing here with George Arlise to fulfill 
a motion 'picture engagement. Her I place 
was taken by Elsie Maekay. 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



THOUSANDS OF 

PERFORMERS 

SEEJ1UB 

E. F. ALBEE WELCOMES ALL 



Beginning last Wednesday, when the 
doors of the new club house of the Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists, Inc., were 
thrown open, thousands of performers 
from New York and nearby cities have 
viewed their new home. 

This week will be spent by Henry 
Chesterfield, the club's secretary, and bis 
aides, in transferring everything from the 
old N. V. A. quart era at Broadway and 
Forty-eighth Street, and, when Saturday 
night arrives, practically everything be- 
longing to the organization will nave been 
removed to the new dab house on West 
Forty-sixth Street 

The last of the formalities which marked 
the opening of the new palatial quarters, 
took place on Friday night, when E. F. 
Albee, head of the Keith vaudeville inter- 
ests, and under whose direction the new 
house wag designed, built and furnished, 
addressed the members of the club and 
welcomed them to their new home by plac- 
ing the key of the building in the hands of 
Henry Chesterfield. The latter introduced 
Mr. Albee from the stage of the ballroom 
on the first floor, and the applause which 
greeted the Keith head as he stepped forth 
to speak, lasted several minutes. When 
the applause had subsided, a performer 
standing in 'the center of the ballroom 
floor remarked, in a voice that could be 
heard by all : "Gee, he stopped the show." 
"I've criticised you for the last thirty- 
five years in vaudeville, and now, if I'm 
no good, you may put me on the small 
time," began Mr. Albee after the applause 
had died down. "I have built vaudeville 
theatres for the last thirty-seven years, 
and during the last two years have found 
myself in the hearts of vaudeville perform- 
ers. Thirty-eight years ago, in the old 
Museum days in Boston, Keith and I 
worked together and scrubbed the theatre 
daily. In those days George M. Cohan, 
whose picture now adorns this lobby, and 
bis late father, Jerry Cohan, one of the 
grandest men in the show business, worked 
at the Museum and played ten shows 
daily, besides writing and staging their 
own material. Then George M. Cohan 
wrote 'The Governor's Son,' which was 
ttte beginning of the Four Cohans. 

"Ton here tonight are realizing what 
we have striven for during the last twenty- 
five years. We have gone through many 
vicissitudes, we may have done wrong at 
times, but we can excuse ourselves in the 
light of what we have accomplished in 
gathering together a multitude of theatres 
throughout the United States. Nor are 
we yet through with our building, tor 
there are to be new theatres in Providence, 
Syracuse, Cincinnati and the Bronx. 
Which means that there will be more work 
for vaudeville artists. 

"Any shortcomings op to the time we 
planned and built these theatres may be 
forgiven when you realize, as we do, that 
they have been buUt and are now open for 
you, without reserve, so that you may have 
work— plenty of work— and thereby be 
happy. 

"That some of you have had cause for 
grievance I fully admit, but that time is 
passing now, as it surely must, for we do 
not purpose that any of . your complaints 
snail go unheard. When you go into the 
office of a booking agent and make a con- 
tact with him, you may consider it as 
good as the Bank of England. For we 
purpose to eliminate any rash promises on 
t&e part of booking agents. And if they 
violate that contract, they pay for it 
themsdves. If yon feel you nave a griev- 

•ud it wm be attended to. Nor wfli doing 
•° *"wredit you in any way. 

We purpose- to have reforms and we 
Pnrpo-e that these reforms: shall be sub- 
stantial, ao that the integrity of the people 



in this business shall be as solid as the 
foundations of the business. Come to me 
if you fail to get results. We are living 
in a new era ; we are going to have re- 
forms, and we are going to live up to 
everything that this club stands for. 
(Cheers.) My office is open to you and 
your grievances at any time and I'll take 
it up in preference to any business I may 
have. 

"Now, Mr. Chesterfield, I am going to 
present to you the key of this club. I 
charge you to carry out the principles for 
which it was built. To the ladies of the 
profession I wish to say that they have 
not been forgotten. I am planning to 
buUd^n.,new. home for them, where they 
can have- all the comforts the men have 
here, and just as soon as I can acquire 
the adjoining property it will be done. 

"Spread what yon have heard here to- 
night; tell the members of the profession 
what we want to do. It is for you, so 
that you may have plenty of work and be 
happy. If you can't get work on the 
Keith Circuit, don't wait on the one cir- 
cuit. Go to other circuits. Go to Loew, 
Fox, Moss, Pantages, or anybody else. It 
won't deprive you at any time, of getting 
work on the Keith Circuit 

"The two years just about to close have 
been filled with golden opportunity. Ton 
by your devotion have placed this business 
on a higher plane than it has ever been 
before." 

After paying a tribute to the perform- 
ers who went "Over There," and those 
who proved their usefulness here during 
the war, Mr. Albee introduced Sam Hodg- 
don, with the remark that "He is a gentle- 
man who has been in the show business 
for the last forty years and there isn't a 
soul living who has a grievance against 
him." 

Mr. Hodgdon told about the early days 
when he, too, was a performer, saying: 

"This qualifies me to tell you that I 
feel I am quite aware of the hopes and 
aspirations of performers. But I know 
that the great fault of the performer is 
temperament Without it he'd be a had 
performer. But there must be a dividing 
line between temperament and common 
sense. I believe that in that mystical 
realm which we call Heaven, the great God 
is looking down on this assembly tonight 
and is bestowing saintly benediction on the 
immortal B. P. Keith and George Fuller 
Golden." 

After he bad finished Mr. Hodgdon 
suggested that there be a few momenta of 
silent meditation as a mark of respect to 
the late B. F. Keith, A. Paul Keith and 
George Fuller Golden. 

Following and previous to the address 
by Mr. Albee, there was dancing in the 
ballroom to music played by S. W Law- 
ton's Orchestra,, consisting of twelve mi- 
ahaans, and a buffet dinner was served 
downstairs in the billiard room. ■ 
_ The entire building was open for the 
inspection of the members and their guests 
and almost everybody who came availed 
themselves of the privilege of inspecting 
the beautiful rooms upstairs, above the 
mezzanine floor. The rates for sleeping 

2oSJ ePI ™ tte dnl> *** * rom $LCO to 
$3.00 a day,, there being no special rate 
for permanent guests. 

During the course of the evening, Mr. 
Albee made the rounds of the two floors 
on which the members and their guests 
had congregated, meeting and shaking 
hands with performers and stopping to ex- 
change a few words with them. J. J. 
Murdoch, Sam Hodgdon, and A. Lv Robert- 
son, the latter Mr. Albee'a secretary, also 
went about the club greeting the guest*. 

Motion pictures were taken of the as- 
"HH™ SP"** 8 *■ ▼*<*»"■ P«rta of the dub 
which will be shown on the screens in the 
vsnous vaudeville theatres throughout the 
United States and Canada. 

The following were among the perform- 
ers and guests who attended the dub on 
Friday night: 

Blanche Ring, Harry Weber, Julie Ring, 
Max Gordon, Lou Holtz, Jimmy Hussey. 
Nat Siegel, Thomas Fitspatrick, Charlie 
Fitspatrick. Leo Fitzgerald, Sim Kerner. 
Alee Hanlon, Sam Liebert, Frank Walsh, 
JuJes Bernheim, J. D. Chadwick and wife, 
Frank Griffiths, Dorothy Kelley, Al Leroy! 
■ (Continued on page 35.) 



CIRCUS COMBINE 
CHANGES ALL 
DEP'THEADS 

SOME EXECUTIVES LET GO 



The amalgamation of the Ringling 
Brothers and the Barnum and Bailey cir- 
cuses has let out some of the men for- 
merly connected with the two organisa- 
tions, for each employed a bead of each 
department, and the combination cuts the 
force in half. 

For the department heads of the com- 
bined shows, the Ringlinga have chosen 
seventeen men from the Ringling show, 
and twelve from the Barnum and Bailey 
show. Fred Worrell, formerly general 
manager of the Ringling Show, becomes 
general manager of the combined shows. 
This position has been vacant with the 
B. and B. show since the resignation of 
Sam McCracken several years ago. 
Charles Hutchinson, treasurer; Carl Hath- 
away, assistant treasurer; Fred De Wolfe, 
auditor, and Frank Mclntyre, superin- 
tendent in front, all B. and B. men, are 
retained in their old positions. 

In the press department there only re- 
mains one B. and B. man. Jay Rial, the 
others, J. F. Donaldson, Ed. P. Norwood 

and W. H. Williams, having been with the 
Ringling Show for more than six years. 
Frank Cook, the B. and B. adjuster for 
years, will continue to smooth out mat- 
. tera for the show on its travels. The 
twenty-four hour men are W. J. Conway. 
B. and B., and William Carr, Ringling. 
W. H. Horton, general agent for the lat- 
ter show, will have the same berth with 
the combined shows. Lew Graham, side 
show manager; Nick Pettit, general con- 
tracting agent; Oily Webb, superintend- 
ent of the commissary department; Frank 
Doyle, superintendent of ring stock; 
George Denman, superintendent of ele- 
phants; Jimmy Whelan, superintendent 
of canvas; John Brlce, head detective; 
George W. Goodhart, manager Car No. 1: 
Tom Daly, car No. 2, and Charles flnow- 
hill, car No. 3, all former Ringling em- 
ployees, are retained. 

James Patterson, superintendent of the 
menagerie; Tom Lynch, superintendent of 
baggage stock; John McLoughlin, super- 
intendent of trains, and Chick Bell, in 
charge of tickets, of the B. and B. forces 
complete the list of heads of the business 
forces. 

Fred Bradna, B. and B, and John Agee, 
Ringling, are the equestrian directors. 
The only new engagement is Merle 
Evans, who has been secured as band- 
master. 

TO KEEP THE FULTON 

Oliver Bailey wiahea it known that a re- 
port to the effect that he was about to 
relinquish the lease on the Fulton Theatre 
is incorrect; that he intends to remain in' 
possession of the house and that Mme 
Kalich in "The Riddle Woman" and 
Please Get Married," have both done ex- 
eellcnt business there. As a matter of 
fact, he says, he is preparing to produce. 
a new play there himself, as soon as It is 
available. 



BELASCO HAS NEW PLAY 

David Belasco has a new play by Averv 
Hopwood, the title of which has not yet 
been announced. The show wfll have 'its 
premiere some time in September, with 
Ruth_ Perry, now in Morosco's "Lombardi. 
Ltd., in one of the roles. During the 
Summer she will be in a show for Weber 
and Anderson. 



ARMY SHOW BIG HIT 

Alucut, France, March S. — "The Front 
Line Review," a show composed entirely 
of men who have either been wounded or 
gassed, and under the business manage- 
ment of Harry Lenetska, formerly of the 
New York offices of the Orpheum Circuit, 
is very popular here because there are a 
number of professionals in the cast 

The show consists of a musical pro- 
gram, divided into two parte and five 
olio acts. Jack E. Mann, Bill Collins, 
Roy Jensen and Billy Tepy, of AL G. 
Fields minstrels, are the four end men 
of a minstrel review put on aa the first 
act. The interlocutor is Samuel B. Har- 
nett, while Jade Levinson, Frank Nobbe, 
Earl Tegido, Claude Titaworth, MeClure 
Wardle, Oswald McLaughlin, Russd J. 
Francis, Gustave Tarkanny and BUI Col- 
lins render solos. Incidentally, the min- 
strels' work is done in white face. 

The olio program is begun by Lindsay 
MacPfaail in a planologne. MacPhau 
has studied with Ludwig Beck of Chicago, 
and is also a. composer, having written 
ten musical numbers for the show Ha 
is followed by Billy Terry, Jack Levinson, 
Walter Miller, Earl Tegido, Claude Tito- 
worth and Gustave Tarkanny, known aa 
the front line sextette, and styled "The 
Whirs Bangs of Harmony." Collins, Jade 
Mann, Reginald Herin and Samuel Fink 
have the parts of patients and Clayton 
Sutton that of a nurse in a eomedy bur- 
lesque playlet on a ward in an A. E. F. 
•hospital. Bussel Francis Plays the role 
of the ward surgeon and Waiter Verberg 
that of the ward master. Elbridge 
Cnarleton, who has played in the Or- 
pheum Orchestra and at the French Opera 
in New Orleans, furnishes a number of 
violin solos, both elaaale and jaasy, in 
the fourth number of the Olio program. 
Samuel Fink is an eccentric comedian and 
renders Impersonations of Doc O'NeflL 
Willie Weston, Ben Welch and other wall 
known performers. 

A scene in a French wine shop is the 
dosing number. Four man impersonate 
women in this portion of the show. Jack 
Mann, BUI Collins, Bitty Terry, Roy Jen- 
sen. Clayton Sutton, Bonel H1U and Lino 
de Credaro are included in the cast and 
Moors, who does a sort of semi-oriental 
dassle dance, is the feature. 

Lieutenant Larry W. Smith, formerly 
of the team of Wilbur and Mask, has the 
ahow under his personal direction. 

"Tho Front Lino Review" also has a 
Jj'wrf-plece orchestra including Lindsay 
MacFhail, the pianist and director; El- 
bridge Charleton, first violinist; Frank 
Robertson, violinist; Oliver Wood *cd- 
BW. Charles R. Holland, viola, Rollo 
Plckford, clarinet; Tony Fortuna, cornet; 
I«Roy Hevena, John Greenwood, flutists! 
John WflUams, trap drummer, and Jack 
Marshal , trombone player. . 

"DARJCTOWN PLAYERS" OPENS 

Kahsab Crnr, Mo., March 27.— The 
"Darktown Players," 8. H. Dudley's show, 
opened here this week and is playing to 
capacity business. The show wUl stay 
here until April 6. It opens in St. 
i* uiB -S3. ADrfl 7 at the Coliseum, which 
has 7,000 seats. S. H. Dudley is expected 
to appear with the show in St. LouU. 

BALDWIN JOINS "LETS CO." 
Saw nasi Cisco. March 27.— Jack Bald- 
win, formerly at the Winter Garden, New 
York,, joined the -"Let's Go" company at 
toe Casino at the beginning of this week. 
He formerly played with Jack Wilson, one 
of the chief comedians of the "Let's Go" 
show which Fancbon and Marco are put- 
ting on. * 



ADAM FOREP AUG H DIES 
Philadelphia. March 29.— Adam Fora- 
paugh, at one time a circus owner, died of 
paralysis tonight at his home here. He 
had been in m health a number of years. 
Mr. Forepaugh was in the fifties. He was 
interested in theatrical affairs the greater 
part of his life. In distinction to his 
father, a pioneer in circus shows, the son 
was often called "Adam the Younger." 



VETERAN MANAGER TO RETIRE. 

Paris, LU, March 29,— L. A. G. Shoaff. 
owner of Sboaffs Opera House, and man- 
ager of that theatre for fifty-five years. 
has dedded to retire. L W. BulUngton. 
of Huntington, West Virginia, win take 
charge of the theatre on July 1. 

OPELS OPEN APRIL 28 
Houakp, 0„ Mar. 27.— The Opels wfll 
open in this town on April 28 for the 
benefit of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica lodge. They have been booked solid 
for the season for one night stands. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



vo«?cr 




KEITH THEATRES 

SHELTER COLD 

SOLDIERS 

FURNISH COMFORT DURING STORM 



Recently discharged men is uniform mnd 
those on furlough who found themselves 
without funds for sleeping quarters during 
the storm of last week found a haven of 
rest when the New York Keith and Proc- 
tor circuits kept their houses open and 
warm. Besides a cozy place to sleep, the 
men were served with hot coffee, sand- 
wiches, doughnuts and cigarettes. 

Orders were sent the different managers 
last Friday to announce that men in uni- 
form would he welcome. In some of the 
houses a sign was placed in the lobby. 
At Proctor's Fifth Avenue all men in uni- 
form were admitted free of charge after 
6 o'clock in the afternoon. About twenty- 
five slept in the building. 

Forty men made their headquarters at 
Proctor's Twenty-third street house. One 
sailor came in about 1 o'clock in the morn- 
ing, costless, stating that his coat had 
been stolen. Some left "calls" so they 
could get an early morning train. A hot 
"feed" was served, also cigarettes, and the 
talent among the men staged a little im- 
promptu show. 

Ill the vicinity of Keith and Proctor 
houses district police were notified the 
theatres would be open. About twenty- 
five men slept in the Palace, six at tne 
Colonial, three at the Bushwick, three at 
the Harlem Opera House and four at the 
125th Street. 

Many of the men stated they did not 
care to stay at rooming houses kept by 
different organisations for soldiers because 
of the uncertainty of having any of their 
clothes or other articles left when they 
awoke in the morning. Some did not have 
money for a bed and others preferred to 
stay in the theatres rather than go out 
into the storm looking for a place. Civili- 
ans were not turned away. 



ALBEE AIDS PALACE EMPLOYEES 

Three rooms in the basement of the 
Palace Theatre building hsve been deco- 
rated and furnished by G. F. Albee per- 
sonally, at an expenditure of approxi- 
mately $20,000, for the use of the em- 
ployees of the building. 

The apartment contains a dining room, 
kitchen and washroom, and is to be used 
by the employees as a sort of luncheon 
club, where coffee, tea and soup will be 
served free. This benefaction on the part 
of Mr. Albee is one of his methods of 
showing the personal appreciation he feels 
for the faithfulness of the building's em- 
ployees, most of whom have worked there 
since the building was first opened in Jan- 
uary, 1913. M. P. Ryan is superintend- 
ent of the building. 



NEW ACT NEARLY READY 

"The Doctor in Brooklyn," a farce play- 
let by Grace Sibyl Meehan, which has 
been played in England and Canada, but 
never in this country, is scheduled to 
open here within the next two weeks. 
Besides the author, who is to be the fea- 
tured player in the act, the cast includes 
the following: J. McCormiek Beeten, 
Florence Stewart and Alice Irwin. 



MA-BELLE'S NEW ACT READY 

Ma-Belle's Ballet Is scheduled to open 
in one of the Fox houses next Monday. 
The act, which has been stag ed and 
directed by Ma-Belle, baa eight people, of 
whom three are principal*. These are 
Juan Montalvo, "Victoria and Sylvia 
WinkeL Sam Fallow la booking the act 



FIFTH AVENUE HAS A MYSTERY 

A mystery hangs over the salary which 
a member of the Four Roses act claims 
she did not receive for the turn's services, 
after finishing an engagement at Proctor's 
Fifth Avenue, last week. According to 
report, the member of the act who is 
charged with the duty of collecting the 
act's salary, signed a receipt, which was 
handed to her by someone connected 
with the. house staff. The person who 
handed the receipt to the performer, is 
said to assert that he placed the money 
on a table and walked away assuming 
that the performer who had signed the 
receipt would pick it up. Bill Quaid is 
conducting an investigation to find out 
what became of the missing pay envelope. 

TRICK HORSES SOLD 

Three trick hones belonging to Milt 
Mooney, who had a horse act in the Hip- 
podrome show four years ago, were sold 
at auction last week at Demand's Biding 
Academy. The first of the horses, brought 
$190, the second $100 and the third $90, a 
total of $380. 

The reason given for the sale of the 
horses at this time was because' there is 
a hoard bill due for the stabling of the 
animals far in excess of the amount re- 
ceived for thorn at the Sale.; 

Before joining the Hippodrome show, 
Mooney presented his horse act in the 
Ringling Bros, circus. 

CLAIMS NAME INFRINGEMENT 
Frank Garfield, of Garfield and Smith, 
has informed the N. V. A. that there is an 
act playing in vaudeville calling them- 
selves Smith and Garfield. Garfield has 
requested the N. V. A. to ask the Smith 
and Garfield act to cease using their pres- 
ent names for professional purposes. The 
complaint is being investigated. 

YEOMANS SAYS FAGAN LIFTED 

George Yeomans has registered a com- 
plaint against Noodles Fagan, in which he 
advises the N. Y. A. that Fagan is using 
some of his stsge material. Yeomans did 
not go into particulars in his letter, how- 
ever, and the N. V. A. Complaint Board 
haa communicated with him, aaMiig for 
more detailed information regarding the 
alleged lift 



HALT FOR REPAIRS 

Two of Herman' Becker's musical acts 
have been temporarily halted and were 
undergoing fixing last week before being 
sent ont again. They are "Help Police," 
with nine people and headed by Al Lavan, 
Jack Barton and Jo Taylor, and "Oh, Yon 
Devil," also with nine people, of whom 
Jack Davis and Jack Marcus are the prin- 
cipals. 



SAUBER HAS NEW ACT 

"The League of Nations" is the name 
of a new act Harry Sauber is producing. 
The principals are: Claude West, Bob 
Stone, Jane Cheaney, The Army and Navy 
Singing Four, consulting of the following, 
Walter Hanover, Shep Waldman, Harry 
Mortimer and' Sammy Schwartz. 

JEANNETTE KAHN ENGAGED 
Jeannette BTahn, secretary to Henry 
Chesterfield, of the National Vaudeville 
Artists, announced her engagement last 
week to Myron Stewart. The wedding is 
scheduled to take place some time in June. 
Mr. Stewart is a suc cessfu l young business 
man. 



McKEE JOINS DURAND 

John B. McKee, son of Sam McKee, has 
joined the staff of . Paul Durand: Mr. 
McKee will dig up new material and book 
acta on the floor for the Durand office. 



WANT BUCKNER 

ARRESTED, SAY 

CREDITORS 

GOES INTO BANKRUPTCY 



Arthur Buckner, the booking agent 
against whom an involuntary petition in 
bankruptcy was filed last week, is to have 
bis recent business transactions aired be- 
fore the Federal Grand Jury if the efforts 
of attorneys representing his alleged cred- 
itors are successful. 

. Last Thursday afternoon Charles Gold- 
enberg, attorney for the petitioning cred- 
itors, visited United States Assistant. Pis- 
trict Attorney Joyce in an effort to -obtain 
a warrant for the arrest of Buckner. 
Goldenberg charged that Buckner had re- 
cently used the mails to defraud, while 
obtaining partners in his theatrical busi- 
ness. The conference between Goldenberg 
and Joyce waa adjourned until sometime 
this week, at which time, Goldenberg 
stated, he will again try to have the war- 
rant issued. . . 

Buckncr'a booking office was at 1562 
Broadway, and on February 18, last it is 
alleged, be obtained $1,000 from Charles 
A. Hahn, a recently discharged sailor, the 
money being paid by Hahn for a fourth 
interest in the Bnckner theatrical busi- 
ness. An agreement was drawn, under 
the terms of which Buckner wss to re- 
ceive one-fourth of the profits and was to 
contribute to the rent telephone and post- 
age, expenses. . The rent was not- to ex- 
ceed $21.25 per week, the telephone $5 
per week, postage $5 per week and in- 
cidentals. $5 per week. Beyond these max- 
imum amounts Buckner was to furnish 
the money. Buckner was also to be re- 
sponsible for all debts. 

However, it is alleged that Buckner 
afterward took in other partners, whose 
collective interest in the business amounted 
to more than the three-fourths interest 
that Bnckner held after his partnership 
agreement with Hahn. 

Judge Learned Hand appointed John L. 
Lyttle receiver of the business, and the 
latter is making an investigation of 
Buckner's affairs. Last Saturday the re- 
ceiver examined Sigmund Werner, owner 
of the cafe at 1412 Broadway,* and F. W. 
Kingsley, of the Parisienne Restaurant 
945 Eighth avenue, where Buckner pre- 
sented revues, furnishing the girls and the 
costumes for the respective cabarets. 
Buckner also ran the show at the Arcadia 
Cafe, Brooklyn. 

Kingsley told the receiver that he paid 
Buckner $500 a week for the show and an 
additional fifteen per cent of • the gross 
above $3,000. Werner stated that he paid 
Buckner ten per cent of the gross receipts 
of the show. . At the present time, both 
testified, Joe Mann Is running their revues. 
The receiver instructed both of the cabaret 
owners to retain the costumes famished 
by Bnckner until further instruction as to 
their disposition by the Court 

WANTS $100 ALIMONY . 

Schinectady, N. Y., March 27. — It is 
up to Justice Henry V. Borst, of the Su- 
preme Court in Amsterdam, to decide 
whether or not Grace La Rue win get the 
$100- a week alimony that she demands 
from Byron Chandler. Miss La Hue was 
granted an interlocutory decree of divorce 
from Chandler by Justice Borst and the 
question of the alimony will be settled at 
a later, hearing. 



PATRICOLA CHANGES AGENTS 

Petrieola, formerly booked through the 
Harry Weber office, haa changed her hook- 
ing affiliations to William S. Hennessy. 



SAIL FOR AUSTRALIA 

San Fhanctsco. Cal., March 29.— 
Larsson and Jackson sailed from this city 
today for Australia. They have been 
booked by Roehm and Richards, of -New 
York, to appear at Melbourne and Sidney. 



CLAIMS NAME OF ACT 

Charles Hunter, of Capes and Hunter, 
threatened last week to take action against 
Lewis and Gordon, who recently presented 
a new act in vaudeville, entitled. "In Bed 
and Out" 

Hunter says that he is the owner of a 
copy-righted act entitled "In Bed and 
Out,'' the title of which is being infringed 
upon at present by Lewis and Gordon, he 
says. He does not claim that any part of 
his story is in the Lewis and Gordon act 
however. 

Whether Hunter will place the matter 
in the hands of his attorney or file a com- 
plaint with the N. V. A. la a question that 
had hot been decided by him late hut 
week. He is at present rehearsing a new 
act with Edith Mae Capes, formerly of 
Capes and Snow. Ray Deusern and Flor- 
ence Conrad are also to be in the Gapes 
and Hunter act 



SAYS TRIO IS USING NAME 

George Skipper, formerly of the act 
known as Skipper, Kennedy and Reeves, 
has filed a: complaint with the N. V. A. 
against the above mentioned act h> which 
he alleges that the combination is using 
his name, although he is no longer with 
the turn. Skipper, who is now doing an 
act with Herbert Ashley, claims that the 
use of his name in the Skipper, Kennedy 
and ' Reeves combination tends to cause 
confusion in the booking offices, and con- 
sequently has asked the N. V. A. to re- 
quest the trio to eliminate Ms monaker 
from their billing hereafter. The N. V. A 
has written the Skipper, Kennedy, and 
Reeves turn, informing them of Skipper's 
Uck. 



TO FIGHT CABARETS 
Philadelphia, April 1. — Local liquor 
Interests are going to put up a united fight 
to prevent saloons from violating the cab- 
aret law and to have all saloonkeeper* 
who do so prosecuted to the full extent 
of the law. The Philadelphia Retail 
Liquor Dealers' Protective Association has 
united with the Philadelphia Lager Beer 
Brewers' Association to see to it that the 
law is upheld in regard to dancing in 
places where liquor is sold. A meeting of 
the associations, held jointly in the Pens 
Building last week, was productive of a 
resolution that both organizations would 
do ail they could to eliminate breaking the 
cabaret law. 



CLAIM HEALEY IS USING BIT 

Fen ton and Fields filed a complaint last 
week with the N. Y. A. against Ted Hea- 
ley, in which they ' state that Healey is 
using a piece of business which they de- 
scribe as "singing an Italian opera off- 
stage and then entering in black-face." 

Fields alleges that he has been identi- 
fied with the business in question for 
years. . The N. V. A. is taking the matter 
np for adjustment. 



"HITCHY-KOO" SCENE IN VAUDE 

8am Shannon is producing the photo- 
graphic scene from "Hitchy-Koo," with 
Frank Shea in the Hitchcock role, and 
with . Mildred Elaine and Johnny Weber 
supporting him. Harry Murray, Helen 
Meponough and Jimmy Rogers are also 
in the .act which has special music by 
Walter L. Roaemont It is scheduled to 
open Thursday at the Prospect 



JOE COOK JOINS BEDIM 

Joe Cook has been engaged to appear in 
the Jean Bedini summer snow, which will 
hold forth at the Columbia. Cook is un- 
der .the management of the Weber office. 

HAVEZ GOES TO CALIFORNIA 

Jean Haves has gone to' California, 
where he is to write a number of new acts 
and also do some work on a pew musical 
comedy.; ■:.•■". •/*.' ' :: 



April 2, 191* 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




■ ■■ 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 




PALACE 



With Phina and company, Shelia Terry, 
Jack N'orworth and Van and Schenck all 
appearing in the first half of the bill, a 
fast pace was set for the balance of the 
show to follow. Franklyn Ardell was out 
on account of illness and Van and 
Schenck, who are doubling at the River- 
side, were brought down to fin the 
vacancy. This brought four singing acts 
in a row, each one of which scored a gen- 
uine hit. 

The Four Roeders, two men and two 
women, opened with some well put over 
acrobatic stnnts and feats of strength. 
The finishing bit, in which one of the 
women, without apparent effort, walks off, 
carrying five people, made an effective end- 
ing. 

Phina and her Picks, with some new 
songs, most of which were . of the pub- 
lished variety, and the clever dancing 
which has met with such success in all 
the local houses, scored strongly in the 
second position. A new special song, sung 
by Phina, describes the act and its his- 
tory, and scored well. 

Sheila Terry did excellently in her 
musical playlet, "Three's a Crowd." Writ- 
ten by William B. Friedlander, the little . 
piece is bright with clever lyrics. antf* tune- 
ful with sparkling melodies. She was as- 
sisted by Ben Bard and Gattison Jones, 
who contributed considerably to the sac- 
cess of the offering, written as a vehicle 
for the exploitation of Miss Terry's 
many talents. 

Jack Norworth found the fourth posi- 
tion all too easy and, with some new 
songs, a clever little colored girl who 
works with him in the final song number, 
and some new and bright patter, stopped 
the show completely. Seldom has a big- 
ger hit been scored by this clever artist 
than at the Monday afternoon perform- 
ance. Fred Meade plays Norworth's ac- 
companiments artistically, while the songs, 
themselves, are gems as rendered by this 
clever performer. The singing waiter 
number scored strongly and the "Pick- 
aninny's Paradise" song, with the little 
colored girl seated on the piano, for the 
Suish, brought Norworth back for innum- 
erable bows. The applause ended only 
after Norworth had announced the appear- 
ance of Tan and Schenck. 

After three months away from the city. 

Von and Schenck returned with a son' 

r-pertoire which, rendered in their artistic 
n anner, was a delight to the ear. A com- 
edy number telling of the origin of the 
Shimmie dance got many laughs. Ac- 
. cording to the lyric of the song, the new 
dance craze comes from France, and its 
peculiar movements can be traced directly 
to the effect of the raids of the cooties on 
the soldiers. A good Irish scng was well 
received and a comedy Italian duet in 
which the merits of ragtime and grand 
opera were compared, got a big hand. A 
well rendered ballad was finely received 
and another clever number brought the act 
to an applause riot finish. 

Lou Holts opened after intermission 
and did well, notwithstanding the fact that 
there is room for improvement in so far 
as his choice of material is concerned. His 
songs are good, but the talk fails to keep 
pace with them. Holts has a fair voice 
and considerable personality and, with 
better material, would do excellently. 

Marie Dressier, who, according to her 
program billing, is "benefiting" herself 
after having devoted herself for two years 
to Liberty Loan Campaign, and entertain- 
ing the soldiers and sailors.- Miss Dress- 
ler's performance will be reviewed under 
"New Acts." 

Toney and Norman found the next to 
closing position a bard one and experi- 
enced difficulty in keeping the audience 
seated. The act Is rather slow and quiet 
for so late a spot. Toner's knock-kneed 
dance tat m. big hand for the finish. 

Winston's Water lions and Diving 
Nymphs, a marvel from the acquatie act 
standpoint, closed the bJH and did excel- 
lently. W. V. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Continued OB p«*e t) 



RIVERSIDE 

De Witt, Burns and Torrence in their 
novelty offering, "The Awakening of the 
Toys," opened the show and started the 
bill off in excellent shape. 

Harry Masters and Jack Kraft did well 
with their satire on the song and dance " 
man of the past, present and. future. The 
boys dance well, snd this portion of their 
act is pleasing. Their singing, however, 
leaves much to be desired. 

Edmond Hayes in the Arthur Hopkins 
sketch "Moonshine," - gave an excellent 
characterization of a mountaineer moon- 
shiner who, while operating his. illicit still, 
kept alive a feud started by his grand- 
father. The original cause of the trouble 
had been forgotten years before, but the 
mountaineer kept the flame of hatred burn- 
ing, and as fast as a member of tile enemy 
family grew to manhood^ sought him out 
and' killed hint TKr'story '6f ; -th*-'lJttie * 
playlet revolves around a revenue officer 
who the mountaineers bad sworn to kill, 
but .when captured skillfully talks his way 
to freedom. Hayes does excellent work in 
the sketch, but the piece is too quiet and 
moves rather slowly for these days of 
rapid-fire vaudeville. 

Lillian Shaw scored a big hit with a 
well selected and finely song repertoire of 
popular and special numbers. Opening 
with a comedy Italian number, her act 
started off in excellent shape and im- 
proved with the introduction of a clever 
Hebrew comedy lyric, which questions the 
why of the ham in Abraham- Her bride 
number was next, and its sequel, with the 
baby carriage, ended the act with big ap- 
plause and numerous curtain calls. 

The Ford Sisters, with Arthur Anderson 
at the piano, closed the first part with 
their revue, one of the best costumed, 
staged and executed dancing acts in all 
vaudeville. The work of the sisters is 
too well known to need farther comment, 
and their offering is all that could be de- 
sired. One of the hits of the show was 
scored by them. 

Chilson Obrman, the prima donna, with 
Boyde Wells at the piano, opened after 
intermission, and rendered a program of 
classical and operatic numbers. Her 
voice is a pure, light soprano, particularly 
pleasing in the upper register and used 
with excellent taste. Some striking gowiis 
were worn by the prima donna, who made 
a remarkably quick change during the 
playing of a selection by Wells. 

Bert Williams, who scored a hit of 
enormous proportions at this house a few 
weeks ago, is back with some new songs 
and stories, and duplicated his previous 
success. Williams is an artist of the first 
grade, every bit of his material is selected 
with the greatest care, and in patting it 
over he is in a class all by himself 

Van and Schenk , received almost as 
much applause at their entrance as a good 
act gets at its finish. The boys are great 
favorites at this house and a consider- 
able portion of the big audience that wit- 
nessed the Monday night performance 
joined in the welcome. The clever sing- 
ing pair have for their reappearance at 
this house one of the best song repertoires 
with which they have ever been identified. 
Each one of the numbers seemed exactly 
fitted to the singer and each one scored. 
One of the big hits of the bill was scored 
by the singers, who could have remained on 
almost indefinitely. 

Margaret Edwards, billed as the perfect 
girl from California, closed the show with 
some physical culture exhibitions and a 
hit of dsnrtng While Miss Edwards is 
clever and her offering is interesting, it 
needs speeding up in a number of places 
before it can hope to hold such a late posi- 
tion on the bilL .Closing a. big vaudeville 
show Is a difficult undertaking, and to' be 
successful- the interest must not be at 
lowed to lapse for a second. W. V. 



ROYAL 

The bill this week was not up to stand- 
ard and dragged very much. Mme. Petrova 
was badly handicapped by a nerve-racking 
cough, and it remained for Georgie Price/ 
to save the show. * He did so in a manner 
that would be a credit to any veteran 
vaudevillian. 

The Gliding O'Mearas' opened the show 
with' a. number of dances gracefully ex- 
ecuted. Both present a pleasing appear- 
ance and have good personalities. The 
dancing is a relief from the run of jazz 
and eccentric .stepping now seen in vaude- 
ville, and scored* a generous hand. 

DeVine and Williams did not have any 
trouble in the - second spot with a so- 
called variety offering. They start with 
both taking the parts of drummers, the 
male member as a "laughing-gas tablet" 
salesman and the lady selling infants' 
headwear. .They delivered some ordinary 
patter and then -put over a burlesque on. 
a melodrama that wag- -good for a few 
giggles. The pair closed witb 8ome~p*s- : 
sable imitations of how they thought cer- 
tain big time stars wonld deliver & song. 
Karl Emmy and his pets found the 
going easy and took a big hand./Emmy 
has some new dogs in his collection and 
wonld do well to get some new patter. 
The canines performed in their usual live 
manner and brought forth a lot of laughter 
with their comedy antics. 

Josie Heather, assisted at the piano by 
William Casey and by Bobbie Heather, 
who comes in for one number, o ffere d a 
selection of character songs by William 
Friedland and Jean Havez. She started 
with a. good comedy number, bewailing the 
fact that she could never hold on to a 
beau. Casey revealed capable ability on 
the ivories in a solo and Miss Heather 
delivered a Scotch number in which. Bob- 
bie Heather, taking the part of a Scotch 
laddie to perfection, came in for the 
chorus- A Highland fling was gracefully 
performed. A few other numbers by Miss 
Heather sent her off to a fair hand. 

Henry Keane, with Miss Renee Noel 
and Willard McKegney, closed the first 
half with a pleasing sketch by Aaron 
Hoffman entitled "The Unexpected." The 
plot is strong and the presentation 'ex- 
cellent. 

The Ward Brothers opened the second 
half with their "Bertie and Archie" skit, 
in which one takes the part of an English- 
man visiitng America and the other of 
an American. The* boys put over their 
act well, but are in need of newer ma- 
terial. Every act with an English com- 
edian seen in vaudeville uses the same line 
of patter. The dancing end of the turn 
could be worked up to better advantage, as 
it went over well 

The baseball hit, which gave an idea of 
the English views on the great national 
game, was excellent. 

Olga Petrova found a wonderful recep- 
tion awaiting her and was not permitted 
to leave without a curtain speech. She 
offered her old songs as an opener, among 
which was her well known parrot number. 
The dramatic bit, which she calls "The 
Shulamite," was very well done. Mme. 
Petrova has a very bad cough which con- 
tinually interrupted her numbers, and only 
hex wonderful personality saved the offer- 
ing. * 

George Price, assisted by Henri Young 
at the piano, took the house by storm and 
made one of the biggest hits of the season 
at this house. He stopped the show, and 
was not permitted to leave the stage nntQ 
he had rendered- three more imitations of 
different big time stars. Price is no longer 
a comer, but has arrived in the big time 
headliner class to stay. 

The Belledaire Brothers closed the show 
with a number of thrilling acrobatic feats. 
They "held the house to their last bow. . 

-^_ ' '. , ~G;-.Ji M. 



ORPHEUM 

John' Regay and the Lorraine Sisters 
led off with a dancing act that, outside of 
a few weak spots, went well. 

Regay started with a "Rube" song, sung 
while he was in corresponding costume. 
When he finished, what were apparently 
two scare-crows suddenly came to life and 
-turned out to be the Lorraine. Sisters. The 
trio did a dance, followed by some step- 
ping by Regay, alone. All of this hap- 
pened in one, after which the drop was 
lifted, disclosing a special' Betting in three. 
Some dancing by the girls that was not 
so good, was followed by a corking eccen- 
tric dance by the male member of the 
trio. They did a. dance ' ensemble for the 
finish and received a fair-sized hand. 

Libonati played a number of .popular and 
one or two classical tunes upon the xylo- 
phone in a manner that won him two en- 
cores. He is a capable musician and has 
selected a repertoire of song hits, which, 
played in his way, will please almost any 
audience. He started with a popular waltz 
melody and followed with" two jazzy tunes. 
A classical piece, rendered under a white 
spotlight, was the feature of the offering. 
Billy Gaxton offered "The Junior Part- 
ner," assisted by Jane Elliot, Bertha Hally , 
Gay .B. ..Kibbee and Alphonse. Gaxton 
had the role of Hal Jepson and the others 
played the parts of Dot Jepson, Mrs. Van 
Dinwiddie, Henry Dinwiddle and Jim Bas- 
set, respectively. The theme of the "play- 
let is a well-worn one, but is worked out 
nicely and Gaxton's clever performance 
more than keeps up the interest. Alphonse 
Lincoln provoked mirth as the human ad- 
vertisement and the rest of the cast did 
creditably. * 

Russel Mack and Blanche Vincent sang 
and talked their way into favor. Mack is 
a personable chap and his partner assists 
ably. A number of funny stories by Mack 
started the turn off in fine fashion, al- 
though one of the gags is rather sugges- 
tive and should be omitted. Some dia- 
logue, started when Miss Vincent appeared, 
was good for a few laughs and the "Ophe- 
lia" song, which followed, went well. The 
patter and a prohibition song, in addition 
to one or two other songs were well 
liked. 

Gus Edwards, supported by Vincent 
ODonnell, Beatrice Curtis and Alice Fur- 
ness, presented a" song revue that drew 
a full measure of applause. Edwards sings 
well and the fact that he composes his 
own music helps pake him popular. He 
is finely assisted by the two girls and little 
ODonnell who perform excellently. The 
act is "all there." 

Bobby O'Neill sang a number of songs 
and did some talking together with Eve- 
lyn Keller, who made her presence felt. 
One song was put across with a punch 
and a soft shoe dance by the principal hit 
its mark. The two songs at the end 
were cleverly rendered by the duo and were 
liked. They tarried' a bit too long, how- 
ever, to get the best results. It would 
be a good idea to cut the offering a bit. 

Marie Caiill sang a few snatches from 
some of her former successes, rendered 
one or two new songs, and delivered her 
telephone talk in her usual clever manner. 
Following the medley of bits from her old 
melodies, she did her talking, drawing 
numerous laughs. A dramatic little ditty 
by Jim Europe went- over with a punch, 
and her concluding "Dixie" number, scored 
solidly. Miss Cahill is a performer of rare 
ability and makes every moment she is 
upon the stage delightfuL Carl Gray pro- 
vided the piano accompaniment. 

Moss and Frye registered one of the big 
hits of the bin with a series of nonsensical 
remarks and a few ballads, sung in pleas- 
ing fashion. The talking, delivered with 
a sort of mock solemnity, and not pos- 
sessing a semblance of sense, was a riot 
of laughter. They are one of the funniest 
pairs in vaudeville. 

Howard's . Spectacle, an animal act. 

'closed the .show and found it hard holding 

the crowd in. The lateness of the hour 

raads tire closing position a hard one for 

' the dogs and ponies. I. S. 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 





ALHAMBRA 

Dancing prevails at the show this week, 
and a general switch was made in the 
arrangement of . the acts. 

e«tor Gems opened with --» pretty tab- 
leaux offering. The different poses shown 
were symbolic pf various nations, mainly. 
The girls all hare pretty figures and do 
their work welL The offering scored 
nicely as an opening number. 

Ted Doner started with a new opening 
gong and then offered his imaginary girl 
number. A new "blues" number is also a 
good feature of his skit and was rendered 
in a "blues" manner that went over great. 
His imitations were well done, and his own 
dance took a big band. Doner has put 
some fresh material into his offering and 
the new numbers are ones that are sure to 
please. 

"The Singing School," a "rube" act with 
seven men- and three women, found easy 
going, with an offering of songs and com- 
edy. The scene is laid in a room which is 
a cross between a kitchen and a parlor, 
where the company is meeting to sing at 
the county fair. The singing by the en- 
tire company showed fair harmony, and a 
few solos went over well. A number on 
the guitar, with the player yodelling at 
the same time, took a big hand and was 
well rendered. Some slap-stick comedy, 
with what was supposed to be ice cream 
and some real Keystone staff, with a stove 
pipe and blacking, brought some laughter, 
but was a bit overdone. A boy singing in 
a soprano voice and a young lady with a 
male voice sent the act off to a big hand, 
with the company joining in the chorus of 
a "glad" number. 

George Price, assisted by Henri Young 
at the piano, was up at this house but a 
few weeks ago and found a cordial recep- 
tion awaiting him. Price is doubling at 
this house with the Royal in the Bronx, 
and omitted bis opening bit. He offered 
his "handkerchief" number, and gave his 
imitations, stopping the chow. George has 
put some new material in his imitations 
of Jimmy Hussey, Belle Baker and Pat 
Rooney. all of which were excellently 
done. 

Francis Nordstrom and William Pink- 
ham closed the first half with "The Mem- 
ory Book." The offering is well presented, 
has a pretty setting and the work on the 
part of all, including the two kiddies, is 
commendable. 

Frank Joyce and Flo Lewis found the 
opening after intermission smooth run- 
ning. Joyce's eccentric dance can easily 
rank with the best of its kind, and Miss 
Lewis makes a very pleasing comedienne. 
' She should pay more attention to her 
make-up, however, especially around the 
eyes. While the patter has nothing new in 
it, it is nicely delivered and is good for 
some laughs. The dancing on the part of 
both, especially the Egyptian burlesque, is 
very well done. The team has good per- 
sonalities and are comers. 

George White, with Ethel Delmar, Lois 
Leigh and Dorothy St. Glair, found the 
going easy, despite all the imitating done 
before. Tot Quarters was not present 
Monday evening, due to the fact that "she 
bought a new car and stepped out of it 

while it was going and hurt her foot," as 
announced by White. 

A stage hand, Jimmy Miller, took her 
part in the "doctor" bit, and did very well. 
White has added a lot of new material in 
the line of dances and costumes to his 
offering and also some new imitations. 

Stuart Barnes followed with a number 
of songs and some patter, most of which 
was along prohibition lines, and took a 
big hand. Barnes has a. few new gags, 
but could easily use a great many more. 
His songs are delivered in the same man- 
ner as his patter, which is good for a 
laugh in any house. 

The Mellete Sisters, with Lew Pollock 
at the piano, held the house to their last 
number with a variety of songs and dances. 
' G. J. H. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(CeatlmMd from pas* () .;.'. .-'; — 



COLONIAL 

The management will undoubtedly re- 
arrange the bill after the initial perform- 
ance, as the first half, with the exception 
of Whiting and Burt and Perrone and 
Oliver, contained little of merit. All but 
two acts carried special sets and, at times, 
the curtains were tangled, but it was not 
the fault of the hanging. 

The Four Ishikawa Brothers opened 
after the pictures and offered a good rou- 
tine of hand-balancing and contortion. 

Count Perrone and Trix Oliver sang 
themselves into immediate favor. They 
opened with two operatic arias, then sang 
a southern medley and followed with the 
choruses of two ballads. Miss Oliver of- 
fered a classic selection in splendid voice 
and accompanied herself on the piano. 
Perrone sang a French number with a 
laughing finish and also received a big 
hand on an old-time classic. The sing- 
ing pair were well received. 

"Crosby's Corners," an act consisting 
of ten men, featuring Felix Rush, failed 
to impress the audience, dne to poor gags. 
The playing on the brass instruments, and 
a solo, were the only things worth while. 

Whiting and Burt scored the first big 
hit of the bill. A few special numbers 
and a well selected routine of popular 
songs were delivered in an excellent way. 
Miss Burt can surely "put over" a kid 
number and she received a big hand. 
Whiting delivered a new pop number 
which tells of the folks who want a key 
to his cellar. This was a riot, due to 
the manner in which he rendered it. The 
pantomime part of the chorus had the 
house shrieking with delight. Whiting 
and Bnrt have long been recognized as 
vaudeville's premier song delineators and 
they truly own their distinction. 

The Twenty-seventh Division Boys did 
well with their war playlet. It was a 
good idea for one of the men to announce, 
prior to their appearance, that the audi- 
ence should overlook the acting, as they 
were only recently returned soldiers. 

Mignon appeared after intermission and 
gave impersonations of stage celebrities. 
The Nan Halperin number is new, and 
Mignon' deserves credit for the impression, 
as the voice intonation was almost perfect. 
The audience showed much appreciation. 
She danced a la Bernard Granville, imi- 
tated Eddie Leonard and Henry Lewis 
and impersonated Marie Dressier to the 
delight Of all. 

Herman Timberg and his company, in- 
cluding Billy Abbott (formerly Abbott 
and White) and five violin girls, were 
heartily enjoyed. The skit is replete with 
excellent violin playing and a splendid 
grotesque dance by Timberg. Abbott did 
well in the introductory portion, but did 
not seem to put over his singing numbers, 
probably due to a sore throat The prin- 
cipals did not take their full quota of 
bows, either. 

Sidney Philips used good judgment by 
working fast, as the hour was late. He 
sang a "coon" song for the opening, told 
a few war "gags," one of which caused 
laughter, and finished with a patriotic re- 
citation put to the tune of a song. He 
scored a hit of huge proportions. 

Gretchen Eastman and a well selected 
company went through a number of finely 
executed songB and dances that held the 
house intact. Miss Eastman danced upon 
her toes and displayed much poise. John 
Guiran offered a solo, displaying a routine 
of steps that almost stopped the show. 
Walter Donegan and Mile. Margnerite 
sang and danced well, and Billy Griffiths 
played the accompaniments on the piano. 
The act is set exquisitely and with a bet- 
ter position would undoubtedly have scored 
one of the big bits of the show. J. D. 



RINGLING BROS. AND 

BARNUM AND BAILEY 



FIFTH AVENUE 

Mahoney and Auburn occupied the in- 
itial spot with a routine of club juggling, 
and a steady line of patter to give it dash. 

Lou and Jean Archer were a hit from 
the start They are a neat looking pair, 
who know how to sing and dance and, in 
addition, have, material that enables them 
to make the best of their talent They 
started with a double song, squatting side 
by side. Lou Archer then sang a lively 
song and did a soft-shoe dance. The 
"peach" song was excellently rendered by 
the duo, the male member of the team 
drawing laughter with a few farcical 
antics. A prohibition song by the man 
was followed by a "alum" song, and a 
tough dance concluded the offering. The 
closing song and dance was given a clever 
rendition by this skillful pair and earned 
a big hand for them, although the rest of 
the act was also well liked. 

Billy Halligan and Danna Sykes offered 
a comedy skit that was' well received, and 
pleased, up to the dosing number, when, 
for some reason not apparent, there was 
an evident paucity of applause. The turn 
is an excellent comedy offering. Halligan 
is a comedian of more than ordinary 
ability and is ably supported by Danna 
Sykes, who presents a fine appearance. 
Halligan started with a comedy song in 
one. Miss Sykes then appeared and some 
patter ensued. The drop was raised and 
the interior of a real estate office disclosed 
in two.' As G. H. Heddie, the real estate 
agent, Halligan started to sell property to 
his fair partner. He drifted from his point 
in the talking, but the material was 
nevertheless clever and well handled. 

Hill and Whitaker, a man and woman 
combination, presented a musical act that 
was good in places and not as good in 
others. The man who played the 'violin 
did not appear to be at his best on that 
instrument, but did much better on the 
banjo. His partner played the harp and 
sang. Her singing disclosed a voice that 
took a pitch remarkably low for a woman, 
and was liked. A plantation melody was 
applauded at the finish. 

Yip Tip Yaphankerg, an aggregation of 

soldiers in uniform, all of whom were with 

the "Yip Yip Yaphank" show, registered 
the big applause hit of the bill in an act 
that included a aeries of whirlwind aecro- 
batic stunts, some instrumental work and 
comedy. Sergeant Frank Melino, who 
plays a sort of leading part in the proceed- 
ings, is a young man of no small ability, 
snd the rest of the cast is quite up to. 
the mark. For action, there is nothing 
in vaudeville that approaches it. The con- 
cluding portion, where the boys go through 
a series of somersaults, hand-stands, band- 
springs and other stunts, is a thriller, and 
sore to score heavily. 

Rita Boland, the petite comedienne, is 
suffering from a slight cold. Miss Boland, 
who is possessed of a splendid personality 
and is a talented performer, was a favorite 
from the start and, when she departed, the 
applause was great. The lisping song at 
the start was put across cleverly. An- 
other comedy number drew some laughs, 
but her Irish selection turned out to be 
the best The different versions of the 
kiss song wound up in great shape. 

The Stanley Trio, with an act that has 
had a few changes made in it garnered a 
copious quantity of laughter and applause. 
The man upon the stage instead of the 
ventriloquist now impersonates a come- 
dian. There are also a few changes in 
the dialogue, one noticeable one being the 
addition of the cootie gag. It is noth- 
ing short of nasty and should be elimin- 
ated. 

Sheilla, Gladys and Dorothy closed with 
a classy dance offering that held the big 
crowd in until the very finish. I. S. 



The Ringling Brothers and Barnum and 
Bailey Combined Shows opened last Satur- 
day afternoon at Madison Square Garden 
for the* regular * tour- week Spring circus- 
season and the big crowd present voted 
It was the "beat ever." 

There are many excellent acta In this 
season's show. Two of the outstanding 
ones are presented by May Wlrth and the 
Hanneford Family. 

Misa Wlrth Is the acknowledged queen of 
equestriennes, and, as such, is given the 
center rlnic where she has the arena all to 
herself. She eschews the simpler stunts of 
bareback riding and con Ones herself to 
feats, any one or which would make a star 
of any other woman rider. She does many 
backward somersaults while riding, rides 
In all kinds of difficult positions, makes 
leap after leap from the ground to the 
horse's back and, aa a climax, with each 
foot fastened In a ten-Inch basket, makes 
a flying leap to the back of her horse. 

The Hanneford Family is also accorded 

the entire arena while their act Is being 
presented. They come to the circus direct 
from the Hippodrome, but this fact that 
their work has . been seen by admiring 
thousands at New York's biggest play- 
house In no way detracts from their worth, 
for in the arena at the Garden, the value 
of their performance is enhanced many 
fold. 

Another star feature of the bin Is that of 
the statue horses, introduced by SSna 
Claren. For this act seven pedestals are 
placed at regular Intervals from one end 
of the arena to the other. On these ped- 
estals a series of tableaux are presented 
which show varied postngs by white 
horses and dogs, with girls dressed in 
white. ^ 

The Cromwells, a man and woman, pre- 
sent a most daring high double trapese act 
that places them among the top-notchers. 
They perform many feats, but one of the 
outstanding ones Is that for which the man. 
hanging by his hands from the trapese. 
holds the woman by his feet and twirls her 
from left to rlKbt four or five tunes. 

Miss Tiny Kline performs on a revolving- 
trapeze placed at the very roof of the Gar*, 
den, among the big Iron girders. On this 
trapeze she starts swinging back and forth 
until, finally, the trapeze "goes over the 
top." 

Hillory Long appears twice on the pro- 
gram. His first act la a "slide for life," 
head downwards, down a wire stretched 
from the upper tier to the hippodrome 
track. His head rests on a little wheel 
and the danger the performer la In can be- 
understood when It Is realised that should 
the wheel slip from the wire. Long would 
be dashed to the ground. 

The Four Comrades, a quartette of clever 
acrobats, present . an act which disclose* 
much cleverness and grotesque comedy. 
These boys are contortionists as well as 
comedians and acrobats, and their stunts) 
draw both applause and laughter. 

The Two Arleya are styled Europe's 
greatest high-perch performers, and their 
work upholds the appellation. One of the 
boys balances the perch on bis shoulders 
while his partner performs a wide range of 
stunts at the perch top. A thriller from 
start to finish. 

The Jung Brothers do a comedy acro- 
batic act that wins applause and laughter. 
They are clever entertainers, good come- 
dians and skilled acrobats. 

The Wlrth Family of five, two men and 
three women, present an equestrian act 
which includes many difficult riding feats 
and some comedy interpolations. It Is a 
highly attractive act. 

The Andresen Brothers have an aerial 
balancing act which rivals the best of Its 
kind. The boys are experts In their line 
and what they do not do In the balancing 
line Is of little moment. 

Alf Loyal'* dogs are a most wonderful 
troupe of trained canines. They go 
through a routine of feats with almost hu- 
man Intelligence. "Toque" and "Chtqulta" 
are featured In the act and the former 
rides, leaps, and Juggles in human fashion, 
while Chiqulta Is a clown dog who seems 
to possess a real knowledge or the ridicu- 
lous. 

Laura and Pat Valdo present a boom- 
erang throwing act that commands atten- 
tion. They are skillful workers and many 
of their feats drew forth many plaudits. 

The Slegrlat- Silborn Troupe, nine In 
number, have an aerial act that commands 
attention. The men and women perform 
on the flying trapezes and do a Series of 
"returns" and "passings" that are most 
puzzling to the spectator. 

There are many other acts on the bill 
which find favor. Among these are three 
groups of marvelously trained elephants, 
the Clarkonians, Bird Mlllman. two groups 
of trained seals, the Neapolitans, J. MUores 
and Slg. Manola. wire performers: Madame 
Bradna and the Joe DeKoes Troupe. 

Joe Casino Introduced bis many up-to-date 
novelties Including the illuminating face, in 
which the long; thin nose and bright eyes 
brought howls of langhter. A tiny dog 
threw several perfect somersaults and disap- 
peared In one of the huge compartments of 
Casino's cost 



10 



* VW& ^GW-lrORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 




MARIE DRESSLER 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Comedy tinging. 

Time— Twenty minute*. 

Setting— Special. 

Marie Dressier, famous as a come- 
dienne in the old Weber and Field days, 
woo deserted the speaking stage for the 
pictures several years ago, is snowing a 
new act, a large part of which is made 
up of the bits which made audiences 
roar with laughter a score of years or 
more ago. 

Before a grey plush drop, Miss 
Dressier appeared and for her first num- 
ber sang a song in which the modern 
stage was burlesqued. The Ibsen drama, 
which she Bang, is "Not what you do 
but what you think"; the Russian 
dance craze, and the grand opera, fad 
were handled in ton. While the song 
may be new, the grand opera bit with 
the calliope imitations of the prima 
donna, hearkens back to the days when 
Miss Dresser appeared in musical com- 
edy with the late Dan Daly. 

A comedy recitation followed, and 
told of a soldier stationed in Washing- 
ton during the war. He was the only 
private in the entire city and wore his 
life away saluting the innumerable 
officers he was continually meeting. 

A coon, song in which a darky be- 
wailed the hardships of army life fol- 
lowed, and a war recitation ended the 
act. 

Miss Dressler's film work has taken 
none of her old ability to make the most 
of a humorous situation or to get every 
laugh possible from her material, which 

• in her new act is not of the beat. While 
portions of it are good, others are rem- 
iniscient of the old days when audiences 
saw humor in lines and situations which 
for some unaccountable reason do not 
amuse today. 

With the addition of some new and 
up-to-the-minute material Miss Dres- 
sier' s vehicle will be a far better vaude- 
ville attraction. W. V. 



NEW ACTSS&ND REAPPEARANCES 



LOVETT AND DALE 

Theatre— Proctor't 23rd St. 

Style — Sinking and talking. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

Some talking and singing are done 
by a man and woman in this offering, 
which is slow aa far as both material 
and rendition are concerned. The dia- 
logue consists of a number of gags and 
quips that must have been originated 
in some bygone age and the singing also 
left much to be desired. The offering 
appears to be destined for a stay on the 
small time. 

The act started with some talk, part 
of which missed its mark. A ballad by 
the woman member of the team was not 
put over very effectively. Some more 
talking followed, after which came a 
parody by the man that waa neither 
a clever nor ably Bung number. Some 
more patter, a double song, and, at the 
finish, a medley of parodies on popular 
tunes, all went poorly. I. S. 



KEENE AND FOXWORTH 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Route. 

Style — Singing and Dancing. 

Time — Fourteen Minutet. 

Setting— In one. 

Two light-colored boys, presenting a 
neat appearance in Eton full dress 
suits, make up this act. They started 
with a song which revealed that they 
have good voices. A soft-shoe dance 
followed, showing pleasing ability in 
that line also. Some jazz numbers and 
a> few single songs and dances filled the 
rest of the act. 

The boys have pleasing voices of the 
negro tenor type, which generally gets 
over and their dancing is really a pleas- 
ure to watch. G. J. H. 



LANGFORD & FREDERICKS 

Theatre — Proctor't Fifth Ave. 

Style — Talking, tinging and dancing. 

Time — Fourteen minutet. 

Setting — Boxed, in two. 

In "Shopping" Langford and Fred- 
ericks have a bright, snappy skit, which 
they put over with a bang. 

The scene represents a lingerie shop, 
in which is displayed corsets and filmy 
creations, and Langford, representing a 
salesman, enters, giving a dash of a 
song. He is joined by Miss Fredericks, 
who says she 1b "shopping," and the two 
indulge in some snappy repartee. The 
talk finally leads np to love making, and 
at the close the salesman and his cus- 
tomer depart to get married. 

During this they sing three songs and 
do a dance, and Miss Fredericks does a 
dance alone. There is a song finish. 

The act is well written, the lines are 
bright and witty, and the performers 
make the most of their many oppor- 
tunities. 

Longford is a capital light comedian, 
with a pleasing personality, and his 
partner is pretty, pleasing and clever. 

Altogether "Shopping" is one of the 
brightest bits of its class this season 
has turned out, and as presented by 
Langford and Fredericks should be a 
winner on any bill. E. W. 



LEHR, EDMONSON & MARR 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Fourteen Minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

These are three boys recently dis- 
charged from the army who work in 
their uniforms. All wear campaign 
bars and service stripes. 

Marr, who is a song-writer, took his 
place at the piano, while the other two 
started off with an announcement in 
song and then went into an army par- 
ody on "Hesitation Blues," delivered in 
good voice. Some patter and "nut" 
comedy followed between Edmonson 
and Lehr, which fetched a good number 
of laughs. One of the boys delivered a 
"Salvation" number and took a big 
hand. Some more comedy and songs 
followed, all making up a very pleasing 
act. 

The boys have good voices and per- 
sonalities and a corking good comedian 
in the one wearing the Chaplin mus- 
tache. They stopped the show here and 
then were not permitted to leave the 
stage without taking two more encores. 

G. J. H. 



DAVIS AND DARNELL 

Theatre — Twenty-third St. 

Style; — Singing and talking. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

Davis and Darnell, a man and woman 
team, work well together. The man is 
a capable comedian and his partner 
supports him well. The material Is 
good, the performers know how to han- 
dle it, and generally provide good enter- 

. tainment. Another song included would 
not be amiss. The woman would do 
well to add a kid number. The turn is 
a good one for the better small time and 
may land on the big time. 

They started with some dialogue that 
went over well. The woman then sang 
a song that was well received, both be- 
cause of its clever lyric and the way in 
which she put it over. The man made 
his reappearance after this number and 
the two engaged In some talking that 
provoked much mirth. Some rulMng Dy 
the man alone was followed by more 
dialogue, with business. I. 3. 



"NEGLECT" 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Sketch. 

Time — Eighteen Minutes. 

Setting— Full Stage, Special. 

This is a playlet which toured vaude- 
ville fonr years ago, and, although suc- 
cessful then, it is doubtful if it will be 
grod for anything but pop houses now. 
The main character opens with an 
announcement about a sketch, in which 
he introduces different characters, start- 
ing with an old negro who has been a 
family servant for years and then in- 
troducing the others in the play, a man 
and woman who, for some reason or 
other, come up from the audience. The 
announcement 1b also entirely unneces- 
sary, as it tells nothing about the sketch. 
The story tells of an author who has 
written a book on neglect and preaches 
to husbands to be careful and not neg- 
lect their wives. At the same time, his 
own wife has left him and taken their 
daughter, because of his neglect of them, 
with her. She wants, to come back, but 
he refuses to see her. The negro ser- 
vant remonstrates with him and the 
author threatens to strike him. 

The servant then leaves the room and 
the author falls asleep. Here another 
man steps in and what follows is sup- 
posed to be a dream. The new man is 
"Inspiration" and plays his part in a 
manner to inspire one to fall asleep for 
the rest of the play. He shows the au- 
thor what terrible things will happen to 
bis daughter and wife if he does not stop 
neglecting them, refusing to see them, 
etc. The author then awakes and calls 
for his wife, who comes from the next 
room and the couple are re-united. 

As the sketch is now presented, it is a 
nightmare to the audience. The acting 
is amateurish and, in fact, the whole 
thing is poor. If it were presented in a 
farcical manner or even as burlesque, it 
would go great and, either that should 
be done or it should be thrown out al- 
together. . G. J. H. 



SULLY AND HOUGHTON 

Theatre— Proctor'* 23rd St. 
Style — Singing and dancing. 
Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting— Two. 

There is a wealth of class to this 
singing and dancing offering. The man 
wears clothes like a leading man of the 
legitimate and the woman is equally 
strong on appearance. The material of- 
fered is pretty much the same aa the 
routine stuff presented by most singing 
and dancing combinations. The man 
dances very well at times, and at other 
times seems to be a bit too heavy on 
his feet to be truthfully described as 
graceful. The woman has a corking 
singing voice, which she uses to excel- 
lent advantage in one particularly well 
delivered semi-classical number. The 
man does not know how to tell a gag 
and should either learn how or stop 
trying, inasmuch as the one gag now 
told by him flops very badly, simply be- 
cause he talks so fast that the audi- 
ence can't understand him. 

The man, as above stated, is a natty 
chap, whose clothes fit him like the pro- 
verbial glove. He handles the conversa- 
tional patter very well with his part- 
ner, and shows a flash of real two-dol- 
lar show "class" in one or two of his 
solo dances, and in all of his double 
stepping numbers with his partner. 

As it stands, Sully and Houghton's 
aet can hold down a spot in any of the 
pop houses. With just the slightest bit 
of patching up here and there, the team 
could give a dandy account of them- 
selves in any big time house. H. E. 



SCOTT MOORE AND CO. 

Theatre — Keith's, Jersey City. 

Style — Dramatic Playlet. , 

Time — Fourteen Minutet. 

Setting— Fun Stage. 

:...... "The Turn of the Cards" is the title 

of this sketch. It is a dramatic playlet 
that, in addition to being badly writ- 
ten, is about as poorly presented by a 
cast of four as anything played here- 
abouts in some time. The girl who has 
the part of Bess, recites her lines like 
a school girl, the man in the role of 
the thief is little better, the wicked 
married man delivers his lines in a 
blase manner, and his mistress, outaide 
of the weeping, shows little of nothing 
in the leading role. 

The theme also is weak in numerous 
places, details remain unexplained, and 
the offering is . built upon a structure 
of truly remarkable coincidences. The 
dramatic moments in the piece caused 
scarcely any excitement and the finish 
brought very little applause. 

The heroine has been living in an 
apartment furnished by the married 
man whom she loves. When she finds 
out that he is neglecting her, she 
pleads with him to give her his love, 
but he spurns her and marches out to 
go home to his wife. She weeps bitter 
tears until Bess appears upon the scene 
and comforts her, advising her to fol- 
low the advice once given by Horace 
Greeley and "Go West." But she loves 
the man too much and cannot make up 
her mind to leave. "Woe is me," she 
says, "the cards have always been turn- 
ing against me black all 'along." 

Bess then departs and the heroine is 
left alone, still weeping. Meanwhile, 
someone is observed crouching under 
the table. He steps out and explains 
that he is a burglar and that the other 
residents of the house will soon be after 
him. He forces her to sit down at a 
table with him and they nonchalantly 
indulge in some poker, or whatever 
other game it may be. Of course, when 
people inquire, the thief puts them on 
the wrong track. 

Just then the married man returns 
and, lo and behold, the thief turns out 
to be his "good-for-nothing brother-in- 
law." He announces that he has been 
under the table all along and heard it 
all. His powerful personality then be- 
comes evident. He tosses a handful of 
bills to his brother-in-law's lady friend 
and explains that he expects her to 
vanish. Bess is called and agrees to 
pack the trunk. Just as they are ar- 
ranging things, a deck of cards is 
thrown to the floor and all turn ou£* 
to be red. The curtain then, falls as 
the fact is observed. I. S. 



:* BRENNAN AND RULE 

Theatre — Eighty -Fir at St. • » 

Styhs — Singing. 

Time — Eleven Minute*. 

Setting — One. 

J. Keirn Brennan and Bert Rule, 
song-writing singers, will win any au- 
dience at once with their pleasing man- 
ner and high class offering of ballade. 
With Rule at the piano, .they open by 

singing some of their old-time and re- 
cent hits and the only thing an au- 
dience won't like is that they hear too 
little of each. 

Both Brennan and Rule also sing in- 
dividual number*. One of the ballads 
is dedicated to the old 69th Regiment. 
Brennan recites a few lines after this 
number. It is an excellent piece of 
verse and fits in well with the rest of 
the act. 

The audience at the Eighty-first 
Street Theatre forced the two song- 
writers back several times and was 
loud in its praise of the heart-stirring 
lyrics. They should be favorably re- 
ceived -in. the best houses in the coun- 
try. J. L. 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 



Founded in 1IB by Frank Qaeaa 

PanUshed by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Frederick a Mullex ..Treaurm 

OxUnd W. VraiUii President mod Secretary 

1604 Broadway, New York 

Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUCHAN, EDITOR 

Paul C. Swdnhart. M anag in g Editor 



NEW YORK, APRIL 2, 1919 



Entered Jnne 24. 1S79, at the Pott Office at 
New York/N. Y.. as ascend, class matter, un- 
der the met o£ March 3. 1879. 
THE CLIPPER U Issued every WEDNESDAY. 
Form* Oose on Monday at 5 P. M. 
SUBSCRIPTION 
One year, in advance. 84; six months, 83; 
three month.. $1. Canada and foreign pottage 
extra. Single copies win be sent, postpaid, on 
receipt of 10 cents. 

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 



Chicago Office— Room 214. 35 S. Dearborn St. 
Haut F. Ron, Mahasu. 



Address All Communications to 

THE NEW YORK CUPPER 

MM Broadway, Now York 

Rtfi'tered CM* Addnu. "AuTHoartv." 

Tats Curraa cak sa ostainxd wnoiasAta ako 
eitaw. at oor agents, Donnge . American «ewa 
Agency. 17 Green Street, Charing Cross Road, 
London. W. C. England; Brentano's New. De- 
pot. 37 Avenue de rOpera. Pans. France: Cor- 
don & Gotch. 123 Pitt Street, Sydney. N. S. W.. 
Australia. 



GIBSON SAYS HE KNOWS 

Editor, New York Glifpeb: 

Dear Sir: Referring to Billy Watson's 
letter in your iaaue of March 19. it ia not 
a difficult puzzle to solve why they throw 
out his "Orientals." 

I looked this show over at Pittsburgh, 
and it ia only fair to say that no mistake 
was made in this case. 

Yours . truly, 

frank: GIBSON. 

Pittsburgh, March 28, 1019. 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Col. Win. A. Sells died at Topeka, Kan. 

Walter Jones was with the "1492" 
Company. 

Chas. E. Evans and Win. Hoey dissolved 
partnership. 

Bob Gordon and Carl lick were with 
the London Belles. 

"Utopia Limited" was produced at the 
Broadway Theatre, New York. 

Maud Huth and Billy S. Clifford played 
Tony Pastor's Theatre, New York. 

"Princess Bonnie" was produced at the 
Chestnut Street Theatre, Philadelphia. 

"I Loved yon, Kate, in Ireland" waa 
published by Willis Woodward & Go. 

"A Cruel Hire" and "The Songs My 
Mammy Sang" were published by Will 
Rossiter. 

Maud Adams and John Drew appeared 
in "The Butterflies" at Palmer's Theatre, 
New York. 



THE NAME OF BARNUM 

The fact that the name of Ringling is 
placed first in the billing of the Ringling 
Brothers and Barnum and Bailey com- 
bined circus, and the fact that the two 
shows have been combined, lends color to 
the belief that it is the ultimate inten- 
tion of the owners of the two ahowa to 
make the Barnum and Bailey trademark 
subsidiary to that of Ringling, if indeed 
it is not their intention to wipe it out 
entirely. 

The wisdom of such a course is ques- 
tionable. The name of Barnum has been 
identified with "circus" in the United 
States and the country lying east of the 
Mississippi for upwards of three-quarters 
of a century. It has, in fact, become so 
much a part of it that the two words 
"Barnum" and "Circus" are synonymous. 

P. T. Barnum is by many regarded as 
the father of the circus in America, and 

there is a sentimental value attached to 
his name that gives it a commercial value 
beyond that of any name ever connected 
with the tented show in this or any other 
country. 

It matters not whether Phineas T. Bar- 
num ever had his equal as a showman, 
which few admit. The fact remains that 
he wag the man to found the circus on 
Its present gigantic basis; that he was 
the first to use the methods of today in 
bringing it before the public, and his name 
will live in hintory-as the greatest tented 
showman who ever 'lived. 

For several years the Barnum and 
Bailey Circus was in Europe. During its 
absence other circuses were presented 
here, but none took its place, and when 
it returned it wag welcomed with open 
arms. And no circus has ever been the 
favorite in New York and the East that 
it lias. 

In the West and Middle West the Ring- 
ling Brothers' Show is most popular. But 
so is the Barnum and Bailey Show, and 
the latter can always be depended on to 
"clean up" in any part of the country 
from Maine to California. 

This being so, the advisability of mak- 
ing the Barnum and Bailey name sub- 
sidiary to any other will be doubted by 
the circus world in general, for old circus 
men believe that the value of the name of 
Barnum can never be equaled by . any 
other. 



BL B.— A. H. Woods produced "On With 
the Dance." Write to him. He can. give 
you definite information about the mat- 
ter. . 

GEORGE.— The Watson Sisters ap- 
peared at Kaith'i Boston that week. Yea, 
Laurie and Bronson were on the bill with 
them. 



Answers to Queries 



S. P. — "Gass'," the clown's real name, 
Who stumbles over people's knees, 



W. H. — There was a show by the name 
of "September Morn." 



D. A. I. — We have not heard anything 
of Yale Boss in years. 

F. B. — Leon Erroll was formerly with 
the Ziegfeld "Follies." 

B. 8.— Julia Arthur waa never the 
leading lady at the Empire. 

R. T. C— The Wonderland Theatre and 
Musee, Buffalo, N. Y., opened in 1889. 

D. S., Philadelphia.— -Proctor ft Mans- 
field dissolved partnership in May, 1892. 

C. A. — Aubrey Boucicalt died in the 
New York Hospital on July 10, 1913. 



N. A. S. — Robert Edeaon appeared in 
"Classmates" and also in "Strongheart." . 

L. W., Fhila. — Address Roehm and 
Richards, Strand Theatre Building, New 
York. 



M. K. J. — Nan Campbell married a non- 
professional whose name was Wm. W. 
Miller oil Oct. 29, 1914. 

A. T. — Marjorie Gateaon waa in the 
cast of "Her Soldier Boy." The Shuberte 
produced it. 

L. L. — We do not know his address. 
Write to the Universal Film Company, 
1600 Broadway. 



G. N.— Idylla Vyner baa retired and 
Uvea on Long Island. Clyde Darrow died 
several years ago. 



D. D— George M. Cohan dramatized 
George Randolph Chester's "Get Rich 
Quick Wallingford" stories. 



J. C. — It was a stock company that 
playing there at that time. Consequently 
it is not on the road now. 



P. S. T.— References to "The Keith 
Time" also pertain to the Proctor houses, 
since they are booked out of the Keith' 
Vaudeville Exchange. 



R. E.— Herbert Rawlinson is no longer 
with the Universal. He ia now in films 
for the Oliver Company, at 308-314 East 
Forty-eighth Street. 



Miss A. P. — The Howard Johnson ap- 
pearing in "The Tailor Made Man" ia not 
the songwriter. The writer of songs is 
still in the United 8tatea Navy. 



P. V. C. — -The person to whom you refer 
ia under the management of Roehm and 
Richards. Write to them and they will 
tell you where you can find her. 



G. D. R.— Billie Potter and Erne Hart- 
well presented the act called "I Don't 
Have to Shut Up" in vaudeville. 



R. B. D. — Herbert Maraden made his 
debut at the Grand Opera House, New 
Orleans. You have the date wrong; it 
was ten years before. The exact date is 
Sept. 19, 1889. 

F. O. — Katherlne Solsor, who waa ia 
vaudeville, waa married to Alfred Cooper 
at Appleton, Wis., in May, 1917. No, he 
has not at any time been connected with 
the profession. 

Y. J.— "She" waa produced by William 
A. Brady at the People's Theatre in thU 
city and opened on Sept. 9, 1889. (2) 
Yea, it was adapted from the novel of 
Rider Haggard. 

F. H— Cecil Moore waa killed while re- 
hearsing in a theatre in Duluth, Minn., 
during May, 1917. Yea, he has a sister, 
Alma Russell, who waa with Gas Ed- 
wards' act, "School Days." 

J. L. — We do not answer queries per- 
taining to the pergonal affairs of thea- 
trical people. Why not write to himt 
He should know beat of all about it. Hia 
office is in the Strand Theatre building. 

A. H. — The music Roscoe Aila, usee in 
doing the dance to which you refer ia 
"By Heck." Al K. Hall and Bobby Barry 
in the duel scene in the first act of that 
show use the Anvil Chorus from "II Tro- 
vatore." 



F. L. A. — All queries regarding the ad- 
dresses of actors are answered as soon as 
the parties can be located. Please write 
again, giving names and last known en- 
gagements and addresses, if possible, will 
be furnished. 



Rialto Rattles 



"UNIFORM ACTS." 

Vaudeville acts are becoming more uni- 
form. 



T. N. KL— "The White Pilgrim" made 
its first appearance in America in the 
Detroit Opera House on Sept. 4, 1889. 



G. K. T.— Lydell, formerly of the team 
of Lydell and Bagging, ia now playing in 
vaudeville in the act called "Old Cronies," 
with Carleton Maeey aa his partner. Hig- 
gins' joining the army waa the cause of 
breaking up the old act. 

R. N. — Yes, the Juanita Hansen who 
is to appear in support of William S. Hart 
is the same person who was starred by 
the Universal in the film, "The Sea 
Flower." She hag also been seen in sup- 
port of Crane Wilbur this year. 

D. M.— L. Wolf Gilbert, now playing in 
vaudeville aa a member of the team of 
Gilbert and. Friedland, and one of the 
proprietors of the Gilbert & Friedland 
Music Publishing Co., waa formerly pro- 
fessional manager for Joe. W. Stern. 

J. C. H. — It ia not necessary to have a 
song poem copyrighted. Write your name 
and addreas and the date at its head and 
yon can safely submit it Yon can ad- 
dress AL Jolson, in care of the "Sinbad" 
Company. Forty-fourth Street Theatre, 
New York. 



THIS FROM JOE FLYNN. 

"If a boy of 20 years of age ia able to 
steal $46,000 how much should a man of 
36 be able to get away with?" 

FAMOUS SOLILOQUIES. 

"If they book me at the Palace, I'll stop 
the show."— Small Time Performer. 

"1 used to be a fool and work the legit 
stuff."— Moving Picture Actor. 

HARRY WOKE UP. 

Harry Steinfeld, the theatrical attorney, 
says that he thought the war waa over 
until he saw the 27th division marching 
away to whip the Kaiser last week. 

JUST ONE WILL DO. 

The musicians are preparing 159 new de- 
mands. But we will gamble that, if they 
win the one giving them a raise in sal- 
ary, the other 158 will be forgotten. 

EVERYTHING BUT THESE. 

The opening of the circus at Madison 
Square Garden disclosed a specimen of 
everything except a Bolshevild and a 
Cootie, those two marvelous examples of 
civilization. 

A LUCKY COMMITTEE. 

The committee representing the Catholic 
Church Bulletin, which condemned thir- 
teen out of twenty-six plays it went to 
see, waa lucky. Most folks don't get a 
chance to see that many shows in a year. 

HIS FAVORITE PLANT. 

Drawn into an argument hut week in 
which he was asked what was hia favorite 
plant, Arthur MacHugh, press agent for 
the Amalgamated Vaudeville Agency, 
shouted "Moss" at the top of hia voice and 
ran for his office. 



DOMT BELIEVE IN LEAGUES. 

Al Leichter says that he doesn't believe 
in any leagues such aa President Wilson 
is trying to put over because, once when 
he asked an agent in Erie, Pa., with 
whom he waa in league, to collect a bill 
of $70 for him, the agent did so, but kept 
the money. 

SAFE, WE THINK. 

Inasmuch as the jury before which 
she was tried hag twice failed to convict 
her, owing, the prosecution says, to the 
fact that her ankles were kept well within 

the sight of 'the jurymen during both 
trials, it is perfectly safe, we believe, to 
observe that Mrs. Betty Inch is "every 
inch a lady." 



E. E. SICE FURNISHES THIS— 
"Who growls and says the play is badt 
Who at the usher waxes mad? 
Who calls the manager a cad? 
The deadhead. 

"Who, at the most affecting part*, 
When ladies weep with aching hearts. 
GetB up, and for the entrance starts T 
The deadhead. 

"Who says the house is full of fleas? 
Who stumbles over peoples' knees. 
And likes to hack, and lovea to sneeze? 
The deadhead. 

"Who, just before the curtain falls, 
To some acquaintance loudly calls, 
'To let us go and have a ball?' 
The deadhead. 

"Who comes back smelling like a still. 
And makes the lady next him ill, 
Until her escort longs to kill? 
The deadhead. 

"Who as a nuisance takes the bun. 
And should by all be gat upon? 
This vile, male offspring of a gun, 
"The deadhead.' 7 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 



CHICAGO NEWS 



HAWKINS AND WEBB PLAN JONES, LINICK AND SCHAEFER 

THREE SUMMER COMPANIES LEASE SITE FOR 3,500 HOUSE 



With One Already Established at Flint, Michigan, Will Open 
Others at Muskegon and Bay City Within 
Few Weeks' Time 



Fust, Midi., March 31. — Hawkins and 
Webb have three atock companies under 
way for the Summer season, the first of 
which win open May 4, and the other two 
a week later. 

The Hawkins-Webb Company at the 
Majestic Theatre, this city, is rounding 
oat its thirty-third successful week. This 
company, with the exception of the lead- 
ing lady, Florence Lewin, will go to Sagi- 
naw, this State, opening on May 11. 

Miss Lewin, at the head of an entirely 
new company, win move to Muskegon. 
where she will start the season on May 4 
in "Common day." 



DUBINSKY HAS NEW PIECE 

Edward Dnbinsky, well known in the 
middle west as a stock manager, is going 
to present a big city production. On April 
21 he will open "The Dangerous Age" in 
Chicago, at the Blackstone Theatre. Ben 
Johnson, who closed in "The Net," a short 
while ago, will have the leading role. 
Others in the cast are Albert James, seen 
recently in "Seventeen," Stuart Walker's 
production: Dwight Frye, James Mar- 
shall, Thomas V. Morrison, J. Burke Mor- 
gan, Grace Anderson and George Kinnear. 
The play is now in rehearsal under the 
direction of Henry Trader. 



HAMILTON STOCK TO CONTINUE 

Hamilton, Can.. March 26. — Manager 
George Stroud definitely announces that 
the Savoy Players will remain through 
the Spring and Summer. Business with 
the company has continued good, the Len- 
ten season having little effect upon the 
attendance. Doris Underwood joined tse 
Pla yers last week as second woman and, 
in "What's Tour Husband Doing?" scored 
a personal hit. Another new member is 
David Rogers, who has been engaged for 
general business. This week "Not With 
My Money" is being offered. Next week 
"Seven Keys to Baldpate." 



TOM KANE BACK AT DESK 

Tom Kane, of the Century Play Co., 
was discharged from the hospital last 
Thursday and reached his office in the 
afternoon and was welcomed by a delega- 
tion of friends. Mr. Kane has made a 
good recovery from his auto accident of 
seven weeks ago, and while his left leg is 
a little stiff, his physician expects him to 
be back to his normal condition in a few 
weeks. 



MORRISON WILL PRODUCE 
Walter Morrison, who has appeared in 
stock and on Broadway in juvenile roles, 
is to produce next season. In May, he 
will open a stock at Haverhill, Mass., 
playing the leading roles himself. Two of 
the plays in which he will be seen there, 
an to be given a Broadway presentation 
later, after being rewritten. Edmund 
Shaw and Leon Gordon wrote the plays. 
' Among those who Morrison has placed 
under contract to appear in his Broadway 
productions, are Cordelia MacDonald, 
Arthur C Howard, Anna Cleveland, Flor- 
ence Earle, Edward Keumm, Sarah En- 
wright and Howard Johnson. 

MeARDLE TO GIVE NEW PLAT 

Sokehvhxe, Mass., March 31. — Man- 
ager Clyde McArdle, of the Somerville 
Players, has secured a new play written 
by a Boston newspaper man, entitled 
"Pants and Petticoats" which he will 
produce the week of April 21, opening 
Easter Monday. The play is described as 
a comedy with a touch of melodrama and 
a strong heart interest. Manager Mc- 
Ardle will give it a scenic production and 
has already begun preparations for it. 

PROSSER ORGANIZING CO. 
W. W. Prosser, manager of Keith's The- 
atre, Columbus, O., arrived in New York 
last week for the purpose of organizing 
a Summer ' dramatic stock company. 
Manager Prosser has signed Roland Ed- 
wards as stage director and will engage a 
company of capable players and sign up 
for a list of the best and latest stock re- 
leases. 



COAST BRANCH FOR WOLFORD 
Los Angeles. Cal., March 27. — Aronold 
Wolford, of Darcy & Wolford, has estab- 
lished a branch of his firm here and is 
supplying the stock companies in the Coast 
States with their plays. Wolford came 
here some time ago on a pleasure trip. He 
mixed business with pleasure and found it 
so profitable that the establishment of a 
Western branch of Darcy & Wolford fol- 
lowed. 



PHELAN AFTER NEW PLAYS 

E. V. Phelan, manager of the stock at 
Halifax, N. 8 V was in New York last 
week selecting new plays for his company. 
Manager Whelan reports that the Lenten 
season has had little effect on his busi- 
ness and that the attendance is to capac- 
ity at nearly every performance. 

PRINCESS STOCK OPENING SET 

"Kahsas Ctty, Mo., March 31. — The 

Princess Stock is about completed and 

win start rehearsals the week of April 14 

and open two weeks later. 



HARKINS STOCK DOING WELL 

Windsor, Conn., March 26. — The W. S. 
Harkins Stock Co. opened here tonight to 
a big house with "A Stitch in Time" as 
the bill The bill tomorrow night win be 
"The Woman on the Index," and the 
heavy advance sale foretells a capacity 
house. 



TAGGART WITH "EDDIE" CO. 

Coxuubus. Om March 26. — Hal Taggart 
is jobbing this week in "Very Good, Eddie" 
with the stock at the Grand Theatre. 



JOINS CHICAGO COMPANY 

Chicago, March 29. — Virginia Valli, 
formerly with the Essanay Film Com- 
pany, has joined the North Shore Stock 
Plavers at the Wilson Avenue Theatre. 



STOCK GETS "WAY DOWN EAST" 

"Way Down East," which for more than 
twenty years has successfully toured the 
country, has been released for stock. 

TULLEY RELEASES PLAYS 

William A. Tulley has released his 
plays, "Not Such a Fool" and "Shadows 
That Follow » for stock. 



Get Property at Corner of State and Monroe Streets for Fifteen 
Years Beginning 1922. Will Play Vaude- 
ville and Pictures 



The third Hawkins-Webb organization 
will be located in Bay City, where the 
season win start on May 11. 

The rosters of the two new companies 
are nearly completed and rehearsals for 
the Muskegon organization will begin in 
two weeks. The Bay City Company will 
open a week later and the one at Saginaw 
on May 1. 

Messrs. Hawkins and Webb are nego- 
tiating for two other houses which they 
hope to secure, and these, if arrangements 
are made, wiU bring the number of Sum- 
mer companies under the management of 
this firm up to five. 



A theatre with a seating capacity of 
3,500, the largest in Chicago, and costing 
more than $1,000,000 will be erected here 
at the southwest corner of State and Mon- 
roe streets, where the Frederick Ayer 
building is situated. The site has been 
leased by Jones, Linick and Scbaefer from 
the Ledyard Trustees for a period of fif- 
teen years from May 1, 1822, at a rental 
which, with taxes and insurance, will total 
$3,000,000. It is one of the largest leases 
ever closed in this city. 

The Ayer Building has a frontage of 120 
feet on South State Street and 120 feet 
on Monroe Street and is opposite the old 
Hotel Plamer. Part of the building is 



now occupied by Jones, Linick and 
Schaefer's Orpneum Theatre, a motion pic- 
ture house. 

Numerous lease offers have been made 
for the property, which is considered one 
of the best sites in Chicago. The new 
building will stand beside the American 
Express Building, the site Alexander Pan- 
tages considered for his local theatre, and 
opposite the Majestic Theatre, on the 
Orpheum Circuit. 

The theatre win outseat the Statelake. 
The house will play a policy of vaudeville 
and pictures. Plans for the house are in 
the hands of Thomas Lamb, the New Yotk 
architect. 



FUND BENEFIT GETS $8,000 
The Actors' Fund benefit, held at the 
Auditorium Theatre on Friday afternoon, 
netted that organization $8,000. This is 
said to have been one of the most success- 
ful events ever held by this organization. 
The programme included Cyril Maude, 
Betty Murray and Guy Bates Post Cyrus 
Wood acted a special one act playlet, oe- 
ing assisted by Sue MacManamy, Ed- 
ward Mourdannt, Alfred Kappeler and 
William LyteL One of the features was 
the production of the original Floradora 
Sextette, with Donald Brian, De Wolf 
Hopper, Charles Cherry, Frank Craven, 
Lionel Braham, Carl Randall, Patricia 
Collinge, Francine Larrimore, Gilda Ben- 
nett, Margery Wood, Helen Bolton and 
Lina ArbarbaneU. This part of the pro- 
gram was conducted by Charles Previn, or 
"Behind the Gun" Company. 

Frank Tinney prepared a special treat 
and injected much comedy and many nov- 
elties into the programme". Elizabeth Brice, 
Will Morrissey and C. Nordstrom repre- 
sented "The Overseas Revue" in the pro- 
gramme. Alexander Carr and Barney Ber- 
nard officiated as members of "Business 
Before Pleasure." Zbyszko, the champion 
wrestler, was another of the novelties that 
proved interesting, as weU as entertain- 
ing. A burlesque by Edgar Allen Woolt , 
entitled "Sarsaparina," was enacted by 
Laura Hopes Crews and John E. Hazara. 
The various vaudevUle houses in Chicago 
contributed many of their headliners and 
other novelty turns. 

HEAR THAT LION ESCAPED 
Word was received here this week teU- 
ing of the escape of a ferocious Iron from 
the Al. G. Barnes Circus in California. 
The ani mal seriously injured two of his 
trainers before he was captured and again 
safely lodged in his cage. An elephant, 
which escaped from one of the local mo- 
tion picture plants is said to have killed 
three men before he was finally cap- 
tured. 



WALKED OUT OF BILL 

The Orpheum Theatre, in Hammond, 
Ind., was turned into a battling arena, 
last week, according to reports received 
here when "The Girl from Starland," after 
a short battle with her manager-husband. 
walked off the bill and refused again to 
appear. According to report reaching this 
city, the actress had concluded her turn 
and had asked the stage manager to 
cany her clothes to her dressing room. 
Her husband objected, stating that he 
would attend to them. This -started the 
trouble and the battle is alleged to have 
followed. 

Manager James Michelstetter gave out 
the information to the press and public 
that "the act had met with a. slight 
accident." Helen Brinkman is "The Star- 
land Girl" and Charles Brinkman her man- 
ager-husband. 

WILL FIGHT DAHUN TRIO CASE 

The suit instituted by Carl Dahlin, of 
the Dahlin Trio, will be defended by 
Amanda C. Dahlin, at present living in 
this city. She plans to go to Washing- 
ton and fight the case. She alleges that 
his allegations of desertion are false. She 
asks the custody of her children and prop- 
erty in Seattle, Wash., and also i.1 
Chicago. 

MADE STATE LAKE TREASURER 

David Idzal, for some time in the box 
office of the Garrick and the Princess, is 
now treasurer of the New State Lake 
Theatre, having succeeded Eddie Saun- 
ders, who resigned. Dick Jonathan, for- 
merly at McVicker's, has been appointed 
assistant superintendent of the house. 



WENT TO NEW YORK 

Mort H. Singer, C. S. Humphrey and 
Herman Fehr journeyed to New York last 
last week in order to be present at the 
dedication of the New Club House of the 
National Vaudeville Artists. 



ACKERMAN LOSES MOTHER 

Fred Ackerman, treasurer of the Majes- 
tic Theatre, was called to Randolph, S. D., 
on Thursday, on account of the death of 
his mother,' who has been suffering for 

some time from cancer. 



DOYLE HAS MINSTREL SHOW 

Frank Q. Doyle, formerly booking man- 
ager of the Marcus Loew Western Cir- 
cuit and • the Jones, linick and Schaef er 
Circuit, has organized a minstrel show, 
which bears the title of "The Yankee 
Doodle Minstrels." 



TO BUILD BIG FILM HOUSE 

A. L. Haynie is planning on erecting in 
the outlying districts an immense pic- 
ture house. It is planned to break ground 
early in May. The location has not been 
made pubUc. 

P ANT AGES HERE SEEKING SITE 

Alexander Pantages is in Chicago in an 
endeavor to secure a choice spot for his 
local theatre. The site presently occupied 
by the Grant Hotel is under consideration. 



BURLESQUER WANTS DIVORCE 

Dorothy Kane, a member of the Lew 
Kelly Shows, and known in private life 
as May Mitchell, has filed suit for divorce 
in the circuit court of Cook County 
against Thomas Mitchell. 



"PASSING SHOW" OPENS MAY 14 

"The Passing Show of 1919" will begin 
an all-summer engagement at the Palace 
Music HaU, May 14th. 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




NEWARK HOUSE 

LEASED BY 

AMERICAN 

BOOKINGS START NEXT SEASON 

The American Burlesque Association 
has taken over the lease of the Carlton 
Theatre, Newark, and will commence 
booking the house next August. This de- 
cision was made at a special meeting of 
the board of directors last Friday. 

The Carlton was formerly Waldman's 
Theatre and played the attractions of the 
Colombia Amusement Company up to sir 
years ago, when a number of houses of 
the old Empire Circuit were taken over 
by the Columbia people. At that time. 
Miner's Empire, which had been playing 
Empire shows, went over with some other 
houses and the Columbia shows were 
transferred to the Miner house on Wash- 
ington Street. The Carlton is centrally 
located on Market Street, not far from the 
Strand, Proctor's and Keeney's, and 
around the corner from the Em pire. It 
is now under the direction of William Fox 
and is showing pictures. The location is 
one of the best in Newark. 

It is said the new National Burlesque 
Association will have a house in the vi- 
cinity of Broad and Market Streets in 
Newark next year, in addition to the Co- 
lombia and American circuits. 

Robert E. Deady, proprietor of the 
Trocadero Theatre, Philadelphia, was 
granted a five-year franchise for a show 
on the American circuit, commencing next 
season, at the meeting. 

Directors Peck, Jennings, Lothrop and 
Franklin attended the special meeting 
Friday. 

NAMES COMEDIAN IN DIVORCE 

Joe Brooks, stage manager of the Casino 
Theatre, Brooklyn, is suing his wife, 
known on the stage as Florence Wilmot, 
for divorce. He has named "Eddie" Col- 
lines, the Irish comedian, as co-respondent. 
' The case was tried last week in the 
Supreme Court before Judge Faber, 
where Mrs. Sarah B. Collins, wife of the 
co-respondent, testified that, in Septem- 
oer, 1916, at Rome, N. Y., her husband 
and Mrs. Brooks were registered at a 
hotel as man and wife. Mrs. Collins 
testified that her husband told her he 
would rather go to the penitentiary than 
give up Miss Wilmot. The Collinses 
have two children. , 

Miss Wilmot, who is at present leading 
woman in the same burlesque show with 
Collins, married Brooks in 1908 and they 
■have two children. It was also testified 
that the Brookses have hot lived together 
since November, 1914. Judge Faber re- 
served decision. 



BUILDING HOTEL AT DIX 
Wbichtstowk, N. J., March 31. — Plans 
are being prepared for a hotel here cost- 
ing $S5.000, for Benjamin Lavine, part 
owner of the Army Theatre, Camp Dix, 
•M'htMSj of the Grand Theattv of this 
City. The structure will accommodate vis- 
itors to Camp Dix and theatrical com- 
panies that play various theatres in this 
vicinity. • 



McCAULEY HAS A RAFFLE 

Jack McCauley raffled off his cut glass 
last week for the benefit of St. Michael's 
Home, Staten Island. Paddy Mullen, a 
city detective, won first prize, Arthur 
Wolf second and Jacob Stiefel third. 



SKIN FOR NEXT SEASON 

Mae Barlowe and Anna Armstrong have 
signed contracts with Strouse and Frank- 
lyn for next season. They are with the 
"Girls from the Follies" this season. 



STONE BACK WITH SHOW 

George Stone, after two and a half 
weeks' layoff, opened with his show last 
week at Miner's, Bronx. 

It was learned after an ex-ray photo 
had been taken of his limb, that it was 
fractured. He did not play the first three 
days of this week, as his leg was encased 
in a plaster of paris cast. 

JOIN "CHEER UP AMERICA" 

PHTT.Anfj.PHiA. Pa., March 31. — 'Billy 
Welp, Ben Ruben, Hilda Le Boy and 
Irene Cassini opened here today at the 
Casino with the "Cheer Up America" 
company. They filled the places left vacant 
by Leo Hayes, Edward Lambert, Betty 
Powers and Edna Maze.. 



KAHN GETTING NEW SEATS 

Ben Kahn has given out contracts to the 
American Seating Company, of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., for the reseating of his 
entire orchestra floor. The new seats will 
be installed about the first of the month. 
Kahn will place these seats in the balcony 
of his/ new house when it is built next 
year. 

RE-SIGN FOR NEXT SEASON 

Barney Gerard has re-signed Watson 
and Cohan for two years more, commenc- 
ing next season. He also re-signed Harry 
Welsh for the same period. 

George F. Hayes has also signed with 
Gerard. His contract calls for three years, 
commencing next season. 



WILL CLOSE NEXT WEEK 

Philadelphia, Pa., March 3L — Mich- 
ealene Pennetti and Billy Holberg will 
close with the "Sightseers" at the Palace, 
Baltimore, next week. Ruth Bosemond 
will play Miss Pennetti' s part the balance 
of the season. 



DICK PATTON IS BETTER 

Buffalo, N. Y., March 29.— Dick Pat- 
ten, manager of the Gayety Theatre, who 
has been 01 with pneumonia, has been dis- 
charged from the hospital and is doing 
nicely at his home here. He expects to be 
able to get out shortly. 



SUTTON TO PRODUCE STOCK 

Brad Sutton has been engaged by Fred 
Stair to produce stock at the Star The- 
atre, Toronto, this Summer. He will start 
rehearsals May 5th and open the 12th. He 
will also work in the shows. 



SPENCER CASE SIGNED 

Spencer Case, who was compelled to 
close with the "Grown Up Babies" early 
in the season on account of illness, has 
been engaged for next season by Jacobs 
and Jermon. 



WILL PRODUCE AGAIN 

Pittsburgh, Pa., March 26. — Ned 
Woodley has been re-engaged to produee 
tbe shows by Manager Joffe at the Acad- 
emy. Bessie Crandall will produce the 

numbers. 

HY JANSEN CLOSES 

Rochester, N. Y., March 27. — Hy Jan- 
sen closed with Jack Reid's "Record 
Breakers" last week in Chicago and has 
returned to his home here. 



"BOZO" SNYDER SIGNED 

Barney Gerard last week signed Thomas 
"Bozo" Snyder to a four year contract 
commencing next season for one of his 
Columbia Circuit Shows. 



EVA LEWIS JOINS "PIRATES" 

Eva Lewis was booked through Roehm 
and Richards office last Thursday with 
the "Pirates." She joined the show in 

Buffalo. 

LEO STEVENS QUITS 

Niagara Falls, N. Y., March 29. — Leo 
Stevens closed, here tonight with the "Mili- 
tary Maids." He has returned to New 
York. 



BURLESQUE MAY 

INVADE ARMY 

CIRCUITS 

WOULD SHOW DURING SUMMER 



A number of burlesque producers last 
week began negotiations with the Enter- 
tainment Committee of the Army Camps 
looking to the presentation of burlesque 
shows over the camp circuit after the 
closing of the regular season within the 
next six weeks. 

The latter months having been success- 
ful financially for burlesque producers, 
they are loth to close their season at tills 
time, while there appears to be a possi- 
bility of gathering more coin by keeping 
their shows running well into tbe Sum- 
mer. ' 

While the producers who hold wheel 
franchises may book their shows in inde- 
pendent houses after the closing of the 
regular season, they feel it would be much 
more profitable to present them oyer the 
army camp circuit, where musical shows 
in general are popular with the soldiers. 

The army camps entertainment commit- 
tee has not looked favorably on burlesque 
shows in the past, as a result of which 
no burlesque shows have been booked over 
the circuit. But, it was learned last week, 
in their eagerness to book their shows in 
the various camp theatres, the lurleaqne 
producers have offered to let the committee 
suggest such changes in the shows as will 
cause the committee to lift the ban. 



DRESSING ROOMS ROBBED 

St. Louis, Mo.. March 27. — Thieves 
broke into the dressing rooms at the Ly- 
ceum Theatre, here, while the Sam Howe 
Show was playing that house. Jim, Congh- 
lin lost a diamond pin and cuff buttons, 
shirts, etc., amounting to $300. Lester 
Dorr and Basil Buck were cleaned out 
completely. All the goods have been re- 
covered and the police are shipping them 
on. Hattie Beall lost a dozen photos and 
Aug. Flaig only a few pairs of socks as 
they could not pry their trunks open. 



FRIED EL OUT OF ARMY 

Habjusbitbo, Pa., March 25. — Soottie 
Friedel was honorably discharged from the 
army here today and given a farewell re- 
ception by the Rotary Club. He left at 
once with Mrs. Friedel for bis home' in 
Baltimore. 



"AVIATORS" HAD AN EXTRA 

Boston. Mass., March 29. — Helen Hel- 
dreth and Company were an added attrac- 
tion with the "Aviators" at the Howard 
here last week. Ike Weber, of New York, 
booked the act in. 



RE-SIGNED FOR NEXT SEASON 

St. Louis. Mo., March 29. — Hattie 
Beall and Aug. Flaig have been re-signed 
by Sam Howe for next season. Miss Beall 
will be featured with tbe show along with 
Sam Howard. 



GOING INTO VAUDEVILLE 

Chubby Drisdale, soubrette of the 
"Beauty Trust," will open in a three-act 
in vaudeville next season with her sisters, 
Flo and Nell Drisdale. 



STICK TO COLUMBIA 

Paterson, "N. J., March 29. — The Or- 
pheum, this city, will play the attractions 
of the Columbia Amusement Company 
again next season. 



JOINS KAHN STOCK 

Ethel De Veau joined Ben Kahn'g Stock 
Company at the Union Square Monday. 



"BOWERY BURLESQUERS" 
LAUGHING SHOW" 
FROM END TO END 

Few shows at the Columbia this season 
have had so many laughs crowded Into one 
performance as had Joe Hurtlg's "Bowery 
Burlesquers" Monday afternoon. While the 
comedians were on the stage. It mattered 
not what they did or said. They wars 
funny and the audience liked all of than 
and showed Its appreciation in more than 
one way. 

The "Health Hunters" la the title of the 
book and there are enough comedy situa- 
tions In It to please an. 

Billy Foster and Frank Harcourt are the 
comedians, and the manner In which they 
handle their lines and situations, and the 
easy way they have of working, place) them 
in the first rank of comedians. They work 
well together and. as a team, we would like 
to see any better In burlesque. 

Foster, with his funny mannerisms, and 
peculiar laugh, and with an amusing style 
of mugging, won favor at once. He is a 

hard worker and a fast one. 

Harcourt. who has a style all his own. 
was equally as funny. An eccentric coma* 
dlan. who stands out In his line, shared 
equal honors In the comedy line with Fos- 
ter. He Is a snappy talker, Is witty and a 
clever dancer also. He amused In many 
ways, one of which -was his Imaginary Jug- 
gling bit. And then again, tbe tricks he 
did with his hat, as well as many others, 
were good. 

Grace Anderson, the prima donna, was In 
good voice and looked splendid. 

Pam Lawrence, a good looking, shapely, 
and a very cute little soubrette, with a 
personality that radiated out over the foot- 
lights, was another bright spot In the show. 
Miss Lawrence reads lines well, but shines 
when she offers her numbers, getting 
plenty of encores with each. She is grace- ■ 
ful and her dresses are attractive. In fact, 
there has been no other soubrette seen this 
season at this house that looked better. 

Llbby Hart, the Ingenue, has Improved a 
great deal In her work since we last saw 
her. She does a .neat French part that 
easily gets over. She did wen with her 
numbers. Her wardrobe Is pretty and she 
looks well in tights. 

. Mable Lyncat Is In a few bits and does 
nicely. 

Marty Semon and Joe Bannon make a 
good appearance In dress suits and handle 
what they have to do very wen. 

The "money and check" bit was most 
amusing and repeated Its success of last 
season as done by Foster and Harcourt. 

Semon was a big success In his specialty, 
In which he offered two numbers, both go- 
ing well. He has a good voice and knows 
how to get a number over. 

Harcourt followed, doing a song and 
dance specialty which went big. His eccen- 
tric dance was clever and deserved the ap- 
plause It received. 

Harcourt and Miss Hart pleased In an- 
other specialty In which Miss Hart sang 
and Harcourt worked up a little comedy. 

The "table" bit, with the "horse's neck," 
had the audience In an uproar. It was wan 
worked up and not overdone. Foster, Har- 
court and Miss Anderson were In it. Fos- 
ter wanted a drink of beer, but Harcourt 
insisted In selUng him a horse's neck, it 
ended with Foster getting a large glass or 
beer, of which he took good care. 

Foster and Miss Anderson have a good 
scene together, which was nicely worked 
up. There were many good lines and 
funny situations here. Had they been In 
less capable hands, however, the scene 
would not have gone over nearly so well. 

Alias I^awrence had a pick-out number 
which she offered differently than the usual 
number of this type. It was generously 
encored. 

Semon and Miss Lawrence were a de- 
cided success In a duet that was most 
pleasingly presented. 

The chorus was prettily costumed and 
the girls worked hard. There are eight 
ponies In this show who can really dance. 

The electrical effects and scenery pleased 
and helped to round out a good show. 

The ''Bowery Burlesquers" Is a great 
comedy offering and a fine singing show. 
It gave entire satisfaction. Sid. 



Bur le sque New s inmrimud as Page 33 



GOING TO LONDON 

Jimmie Savo and company will open 
in London the first week in July. He is 
now playing the Keith time with a girl 
aa partner. 

SET FOR NEXT SEASON 

Joe Ennis, agent of the 'Burlesque Re- 
view," has re-signed for next season with 
Jacobs and Jermon. It is not known 
which show the firm will place him with, 
as yet. 

BOOKED FOR PRODUCTION 

Harold vVhelan has been booked for one 
of Comstock and Elliott's shows next i 
son. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



EXCEPTIONAL NOVELTY RAG SONG! 



~ . 






- 



- 
- - 



...... • ■- ;. .. 

. .• ... 



• • . ■ . . . • ■ 



'"--•■'• • & 



■ : 



'.':■ . .*V'-*i' 



- :~c.~ *. -- • .• --■ 




YOU 

CANT GO 
WRONG WITH A 
"FEIST" SONG 



SING A 

"FEIST" 

SONG. BE A 
STAGE HIT 



_-■-■ •_ 



. 






-" ' - 
■ 



. . ■ 






CHICAGO 



BOSTON 
181 Tramoi 
PHILADELPHIA 
Globs Thirtri 

NEW ORLEANS 
118 Uui i fUj Placs 



LEO. FEIST, Inc. 



135 West 44th Street, New York 

CLEVELAND. 308 Bugor *Ui 
BUFFA LO, 485 Main St. 
PITTSBURGH, 311 Schmidt Bid* 



DETROIT, 213 Woodward Aw. 
KANSAS CITY. G*yety Thctre BUg. 
LOS ANGELES, 838 San Fcmude Bid, . 



ST. LOUIS 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Pantaga Thoati* 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Lyric Theatr. Beildia* 

SEATTLE 

301' ChleWia* Hmll 



April 2. 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 





NEXT SEASON TO SEE 
NEW MUSIC CONCERNS 



Big Boom In Publishing BnsfriMm During 

War Responsible for Plan* to 

Launch Now Companies. 

The big boom experienced throughout 
the muxie publishing business hut year, 
coupled with the big success scored by 

some of the young firms, has started a 
Bomber of writers and business men con- 
nected with the industry to planning the 
formation of several new publishing con- 
cerns next season. 

The Irving Berlin Company is the first 
to formally announce its entry into the 
field, and it is reported that before the 
month is out, the announcement of at 
least two more music publishing concerns 
will be made. 

Tbe war, which ruined so many busi- 
nesses, had just the opposite effect on the 
music publishing industry, which not only 
enjoyed a period of unprecedented pros- 
perity during the conflict, but promises to 
constantly improve. 

The singing army, recruited in America 
and- spread over Europe, was directly re- 
sponsible for die big music boom, as the 
singing in the camps and on the battle 
fields awoke in the soldier a love for music, 
which was in innumerable cases unsus- 
pected. To keep that interest up when the 
soldier returns to his home, is the work of 
the publisher, writer and others directly 
interested in music. If it can be contin- 
ued tbe growth of the sheet music indus- 
try in America will continue at an enor- 
mous rate. 

The success of several young firms last 
year is' proof positive of music's big 
strides, ' for in spite of the low price at 
which music is sold, and the increased cost 
of doing, business, the profits made by some 
of the houses were exceptionally large. 

Few new music firms launched in the 
past ten yean survived the long dull 
period which fortunately came to an ab- 
rupt end shortly after America's entry 
into the war. If this business prosperity 
continues, the outlook for new music pub- 
lishing firms was never brighter. 



BERLIN TO START JUNE 1ST 

Irving Berlin, who after receiving nu- 
merous nattering offers from the leading 
music publishers, decided to go into busi- 
ness for Mmaoif, will begin operations on 
or about June 1 . 

Max Winslow, for several years past 
the general manager of the Waterson, Ber- 
lin & Snyder Company, will be associated 
with him, and the new firm will publish 
both popular and high class compositions. 

The new Ann will be located at No. 224 
West 47th Street, occupying the old Sha- 
piro, Bernstein & Co. quarters. 

Winslow severed his connection with the 
Waterson Company on Saturday and will 
take a vacation before starting in his new 
venture. 

Berlin has two new musical productions 
completed and placed for production early 
next season, and these will probably be 
among the first to be published by the new 
house. Berlin is also said to have been en- 
gaged to write the music for next season's 
Hippodrome production, in addition to an- 
other big musical piece, the title of which 
has not yet been announced. 



FREY SIGNS WITH HARMS CO. 

Hugo Prey, the composer, has signed a 
contract with T. B. Harms A Francis, 
Day A Hunter, by the terms of which all 
his compositions for a period of years will 
be published try this house. 

Mr. Prey's latest work is the score of a 
new production to be presented by Richard 
Lambert, the exclusive publication rights 
of which are vested in the Harms Com- 
pany. 



DALY WINS INJUNCTION 

Justice George V. Mullan, of the Su- 
preme Court, has granted the application 
of Arthur J. Daly, the song writer, for a 
writ of injunction restraining the Emerson 
Phonograph Co. from making any more 
records of Ha combination medley, "Over 
There" and "Cotton Pickin' Time in Ala- 



YANKEE TUNES SCORE 

IN FOREIGN LANDS 



Daly, in addition to asking for the in- 
junction, also fiaima damages amounting 
to $10,000. The judge declined to assess 
damages and Daly's attorney announced 
that he would begin action for the amount. 

Daly is the author of the song, "Cotton 
Pickin' Time in Alabam," and this in con- 
junction with Cohan's "Over There" was 
used by the Emerson Co. in making a 
medley record which is called "Over There 
Medley." At first credit was given to 
both Cohan and Daly, but finally Daly's • 
name was eliminated from the records and 
the suit followed. 

The company contended that it acquired 
the rights to the use of the song from 
Daly, and took the position that it could 
do as it pleased with it. Daly's attorney 
resisted the contention and declared that 
the fame which belongs to Daly could not 
be taken from him. 



CLARK'S BALL ON APRIL 3rd 

The benefit and ball for Dave Clark will 
he held on Thursday evening, April 3rd, at 
the Amsterdam Opera House. In addition 
to the dancing a big show in which some 
of Broadway's best entertainers will be 
seen is to be presented and Dabney*s Syn- 
copated Orchestra from Ziegf eld's Midnight 
Frolic will furnish the music. 

The songwriters and music men are in- 
terested in the affair and are determined 
to put it over in great shape. Clark ia 
a songwriter whom illness has incapaci- 
tated for work and the funds raised are 
to be donated for his support. 



PIANTADOSI SUED FOR DIVORCE 

George W. Piantadosi, brother of Al. 
Piantadosi, the song writer and music 
publisher, has been sued for divorce by 
Mrs. Mary Violet Piantadosi. She also 
has brought suit against Josie Ryan Hal- 
lacy for $50,000 damages for alienation of 
affections. Mrs. Piantadosi alleges that 
she and her husband "were living happily 
together" and he "manifested great love 
and affection" for her, when Josie Hallacy 
"caused her husband to leave his home." 



CHARLOTTE MEYERS SCORES HIT 

Charlotte Meyers went into the Or- 
pheum, Detroit, bill on Monday, replacing 
"The Lawrences." Miss Meyers appeared 
in the No. 2 position, but after her first 
show was moved down to next to closing. 
Her two big songs were "Heart Breaking 
Doll" and "When You Look in the Heart 
of a Rose." Both are published by Leo 
Feist. 



HENRY MARSHALL PLACES SHOWS 

Henry Marshall has completed the score 
of a new play by James Sullivan and Paul 
Potter and the piece will be presented next 
season by the Shuberts. Mr. Marshall is 
now at work on Frank Smithson's latest 
book, "She's My Daisy." 



BARNES SINGS NEW SONGS 

Stuart Barnes at the Alhambra Theatre 
this week is featuring two new comedy 
songs. They are "At the Prohibition Ball," 
and "They May Be Old But They Want to 
Be Loved." Both are by Alex. Gerber and 
Abner Greenberg and are published by M. 
Witmark A Sons. 



GRANVILLE SINGS "FRIENDS" 

Bernard Granville, who made his vaude- 
ville reappearance at the Riverside Theatre 
last week, introduced a new song called 
"Friends," which scored the big hit of his 
act. It is one of the' recent releases from 
the Feist house. 



Big Demand for Publication Rights of 

American Songs In All the Allies' 

Countries. 

With the ending of the war there has 
arisen in all the allies' countries a big de- 
mand for the publication rights of the 
American songs. Scarcely a mail reaches 
a music publishers' desk that does not con- 
tain a request for the foreign rights to his 
catalogue. 

American songs have long enjoyed a big 
sale 'in England and Australia, but it ia 
only recently that France, Italy and other 
countries have fallen in line. 

Naturally, it was tbe introduction of 
the American songs by the soldiers which 
has created the demand for the catchy 
tunes abroad and foreign publishers on 
the outlook for an increase in business are 
making American connections as fast as 
possible. 

Practically all the larger publishing 
houses have representatives abroad, but 
the smaller ones are fast "«""| connec- 
tions, especially ia France and England 
where the demand is greatest. 

So big ia the- demand from HJ"g'»"d that 
the establishment of several London 
branches by the larger* houses is likely 
within the near future. 



MORE PUBLICITY FOR DREISER 

Theodore Dreiser, the novelist, who re- 
cently received considerable publicity in 
musical circles on account of the publica- 
tion in an afternoon newspaper that he 
was the writer of "The Wabash,** has 
broken into the dailies again. 

The Detroit Free Press in a recent issue 
said, "Theodore Dreiser is a novelist of 
repute, hut his books are apt to be very 
long— 700 or 800 pages, in fact. 

"There are aermona in stones," Mr. Drei- 
ser said at a Greenwich Village tea, where- 
upon a young lady sculptress interrupted 
him. 

"Yes, that is very true," she said, "but 
you ought to remember that the precious 
stones are all small, and that they require 
a lot of cutting." 



HARRIS IN WRITING COMBINE 

Charles K. Harris, who has met with 
much success in the writing of motion pic- 
ture scenarios, and Adeline Leitzbach, the 
playwright-scenarioist, have entered into 
an arrangement whereby they will collab- 
orate on a series of twenty feature film 
stories, several of which are to be based 
on the famous Harris songs. 

The first has been completed and tells 
of a thrilling story of Broadway cabaret 
life under the title of "Fools in Bohemia." 



NEW BALL BALLAD READY 

Ernest R. Ball's new ballad, "To-Day. 
To-Morrow and Forever," is going strong. 
It meets the needs of the army of ballad 
singers who have long wished for a song 
of this character. 

Among the latest acts to record a big 
success with the number is Howard and 
Shaw, who are now on the Poli time. They 
say it looks as though they will have to 
go on singing "To-Day, To-Morrow and 
Forever." 



. WINSLOW IN HOT SPRINGS 

Max Winslow, who resigned as general 
manager of the-Waterson, Berlin A Snyder 
Co. last week is spending a month's vaca- 
tion in Hot Springs. 



BERLIN FOR VAUDEVILLE 
Irving Berlin . is considering a short 
vaudeville engagement prior to opening his 
music publishing house in June. 



CLUB HONORS JACK MILLS 

Jack Mills, professional manager of the 
McCarthy A Fisher Co., was the guest of 
honor at the Pen and Pencil Club of Phila- 
delphia on Sunday, a week ago. 

The clubhouse was crowded to the doors 
with friends of the young manager, who 
for a number of years made Philadelphia 
his home. Acta from several of the near- 
by theatres were present and the enter- 
tainments was one of the best seen at the 
clubhouse this year. 

Among those who appeared were Murray 
Leslie, Patsy Flick, Walter Hoben. Kate 
Elinore, Sam Williams, Jimmy Dwyex, 
Louis Herscher, Walter Stanton, Nan 
Travaline, Jack Glagou and Fred Fisher. 



WALTER POND TO PUBLISH 

Walter Pond, a song writer and vaude- 
ville performer, has entered the music pub- 
lishing business and has opened offices at 
312 West 122nd street, New York City. 

Mr. Pond, who haa several popular publi- 
cations to his credit, was formerly con- 
nected with the Hamilton 8. Gordon Co. 
and also contributed numbers to the Je- 
rome H. Remick and G. Schlnner cata- 
logues. 

HENRY HAS WALTZ HIT 

"Kentucky Dreams,'' a recently issued 
S. R, Henry and D. ■ Onfvaa number, U 
meeting with such success that it is bains; 
pronounced the successor of "Indianola" by 
the same writers. 

Its sales are very large and it Is being 
featured by hundreds of the best bands 
and orchestras. The song edition is rival- 
ing the instrumental in point of popu- 
larity. 

FRENCH NOVELTY SONG SCORES 
"Put Him to Sleep With the Marseil- 
laise," the new Harry Von Tilzer novelty 
song, is scoring a big success with many 
well-known singers, Among the leaders 
who are using it are Mildred Haywood, 
Janet of France, the Young Sisters and 
Moss A Fry e. 

FIFER RELEASES "HAPPY DAYS*" 
"Happy Days" is the title of a new some 
released this week by the C. Arthur Fifer 
Music Co., of Quincy, III. It's a "dry* 
song which Fifer describes as a "water 
wagon waiL" 

EDELHETT OUT OF ARMY 

Harry Edelheit, who was with the 77th 
Division in France and was wounded at 
Vesle River, has been discharged from the 
army and is now with Waterson, Berlin 
A Snyder. 



LEE DAVID PLACES NEW SONGS 

- Lee David, composer of "Wild Honey," 
has placed "Just Lonesome" with the 
Harry Von Tilzer Co. and "Thipping 
Thider Thru a Sthraw" with Joseph W. 
Stern A Co. 



HUGHES 4 CO. TO PUBLISH 

J. H. Hughes A Co., of South Bend, In A, 
have entered the music publishing field ana 
for their first number have released a song 
celled "We're Bound for the V. S. A." 



NEW MUSIC CO. STARTS 

The World Music Publishing Corpora- 
tion, the latest addition to the ranks of 
music publishers, has opened offices at 250 
West 46th street. 



BERT MOSS MARRIED 

Miss Bert Moss, of the Charles K. Har- 
ris professional department, was married 
on Thursday to Eddie Airman. 



MAX SILVER WELL AGAIN 

Max Silver, manager of the Gilbert A 
Friedland Co., is back at his desk after a 
severe attack of pneumonia. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



STARS 

OF 

THE 



RING 







> 



GR 



LING 
M 

EATEST SH 






, 



IMA 



■ 


■ 


p- 


IE 


. 




.V 




















1 * He! 








Jr 







FAMILY 



CHARLY SIEGRIST TROUPE 

Greatest Aerialists on Earth 

One of the Features 



MISS ENA CL AREN 

Presents Her Creations of 

PLASTIC STATUARY 



■ 

■ ■ 

■ ■ •. ■ 
■ - -v, 






HILLARY 
LONG 






■ 



JACK HEDDERS 4 COMRADES 

America's Greatest Comedy Acrobats 

Uth SEASON 



Sensational Head Balancer 



ALF LOYAL 



MADISON SQUARE 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



MD 




A R 



A 




NUM S ™ RS 
Al LEY the 



)W O 




;queatrlan 



EARTH 



• " v ># 



! l 



31 ■ " • 



!r«ct« 



: 3 ---/i-^ \t 



■ 



THE INCOMPARABLE 



: ■ - ; 



' ! . ' 



- 



MAY 




2 ARLEYS ^ CO. 

One Lady and Two Gentlemen 
astern Rep. PETE MACK Western Rep. EARL and YATES 



DARING CROMWELLS 

WORLD'S FASTEST TRAPEZE ACT 

FEATURING 

JENNIE CROMWELL, " THE TANGUAY OF THE AIR " 



THE 

ANDRESEN BROS. 



LAURA 

AND 

PAT 
VALDO 



TINY 
KLINE 



LOOPING 
THE LOOP 



JOE CASINO & CO. 



12th Consecutive 



with his original. 
novelties 



JUNG BROS. 

MARSH an. 
TAYLOR 

CLOWNS 
COMEDY ACROBATS 
and BUMPERS 



GARDE 





O W 



C* &J*^Hn 



18 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER April- 2.-1919 

MHM|M|^^HBpHnnn KBMnHIBIUHVBIlKflSfSlllfn IUBI9MWHWmBtllQIi}HlIfftf W?l9MflBB^9HBB9BVi^RB9BBflBDflBHBn^ - f^^? i 1 '1 r - J^ 9Ci " ■ " *. ■_, _~_^ \s_— jl _ 7w* ~ "T™ 1 



te 



WE'LL SAY IT'S SOME HIT 

The Danciest and Singiest number published 

SINGAPORE 

If you get a chance hear Victor, Columbia, Emerson, Pathe, Edison Records 
The new Song language. You "talked" it when a child. Grown-ups also 

PIG LATIN LOVE 

l-YAY OVE-LAY OO-YAY EARiE-DAY 

A wholesome comedy song 
Sung by more headliners than any other five songs on the market . 

BRING BACK THOSE 
WONDERFUL DAYS 



A Topical hit — The authors write ten new choruses a day — especially for "you" 
We discovered Cliff Friend , Al Jolson's protege. He wrote 

HINDOO LADY 

Los Angeles may well be proud of this new hit writer 



ANOTHER TULIP AND A ROSE 

ON 
THE 



RAINBOW TRAIL 



By EDWARD MADDEN and EUGENE PLATZMAN 
An Excellent March Ballad 



GILBERT & FRIEDLAND, Inc. 

Musfo Publishers 
New York City, 232 West 46th Street - - MAXWELL SILVER, Gen'l Mgr. 
Chicago, Grand Opera House Bldg. MORT BOSLEY, Mgr, 



WIWIIliM 



, April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



O LD01UE ESPEEO hma recovered from 



her illness. 



Florence Webber hma joined the east of 

Come Along," 

Gilda Varesi baa signed a contract with 
the Shuberts for two yean. 

Reginald DeKoven's new opera baa closed 
after a short try out on the road. 

BeflecUirq Bros, open at the Palais 
Royal, April 16, for fifteen weeks. 

Carlita and Dick Lewis are baring new 
scenery painted by Joseph Caraleoli. 

Do Wolf Hopper has signed with Mr. 
and Mrs. Co bom for the next Season. 

Saxon King and Harold West hare been 

engaged for the cast of "Propinquity." 

Sam Schoeniger has established an 
office in the Columbia Theatre Building. 

Frauds Byrne has signed with Adolph 
Klauber to play a role in "Nightie Night." 

Dea Hesly is mourning the loss of his 
father, John J. Hesly, who died last week. 

Sidney Forbes and Billy Bernard have 
formed a new combination for vaudeville. 

Margaret Summerville will return to the 
spoken drama in "The Bonds of Interest." 

Grace Valentine has been placed under 
a three-year contract by Oliver Morosco. 

Sophie Tucker's appearances at Reiaen- 
weber's reached the 100 mark on Satur- 
day. 

Arthur Ashley has been engaged by Wil- 
liam Harris, Jr., for the cast of "First Is 
Last." 

Jimmy Flynn, the song writer, left the 
Victoria bill Saturday to appear at the 
circus. 



Inez Bellaires has opened in Chicago 
with hrr new act, "Four Jacks and a 
Queen." ■ 

Lew Kelly, now with the Lew Kelly 
Show, has signed a contract with Jack 
Singer. 

Brice's Review opened in Rome, N. Y., 
on Monday. It is a new musical comedy 

tabloid. 



Cecil Grey, prima donna of the Terrace 
Gardens, Chicago, arrived in New York 
but week. 



Alice M. Poole is in the new version of 
"Pinafore" in the role of Buttercup, at 
the Hippodrome. 



Freda Leonard and Jean Gibson are 
forming a new act which will open in 
Chicago, shortly. 

Babe Powers is spending a few weeks 
at Palm Beach and expects to return to 
New York in May. 

George Sidney, diaries Sow Clark and 
Jane Cooper have been added to the cast 
of "Welcome Stranger." 

Mae Melville has passed the 100th per- 
formance mark for the War Hospital En- 
tertainment Association. 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



B. mBjsalstj the musician, was confined 
at the American Theatrical Hospital, Chi- 
cago, hut week. 

Dorothy Kane has filed suit for divorce 
in the circuit court of Cook county against 
Thomas Mitchell. 



Clara Markim was added to the cast of 
"Keep It to Yourself" at the Thirty-ninth 
Street, Monday night 

F. R_ Mullin, a bill poster, underwent an 
operation last week at the American The- 
atrical Hospital, Chicago. 

Stria Mitchell hma joined Leo Ditrich- 
stein's company and will play character 
comedy parts for nine weeks. 

Willette Kershaw baa been engaged for 
the leading role of Owen Davis' new com- 
edy entitled, "Oh Peggy, Behave." 

Claude Beerbohm, son of the bite Sir 
Herbert Beerbohm Tree, will produce a 
one-act play, "The Boy Comes Home." 

Gypsy O'Brien, Gilbert Douglas and 
Richard Dix have been engaged for Will- 
iam Le Baron's new farce, "I Love You." 

Maurice Raphael of the press department 
of the B. F. Keith theatres has been dis- 
charged from the Motor Transport Corps. 

York Averill has been named as the new 
press representative for the Canadian Vic- 
tory Shows, managed by Victor J. Niess. 

Victor La Salle and Loretta, now play- 
ing the Keith theatres out of town, will 
return to New York in a new act shortly. 

James Barry is confined to St. Francis 
Hospital with pneumonia. He is secre- 
tary of the International Actors' Union No. 
1. 



Ella M. Wain pier, known off the stage 
as Ella M. McKinney, is asking for a di- 
vorce in the Chicago courts from Louis R. 
McKinney. 

Brady's Dogs mad Girls, an act which 
has played vaudeville hereabouts, opens 
in Lowell, Mass., on April 10, with the 

Victoria shows. 



Abe Shapiro and Art Hall have joined 
hands and will open in Chicago in a> new 
two-man comedy talking turn. 

Bertha Kalich is writing her memoirs, 
in which she says she has been on the 
stage for twenty -seven years. 



Lieut. George Brandon Peters, known 
on the stage as Brandon Peters, is return- 
ing from France on the George Washing- 
ton. 



W. B. Patton will be starred in "His 
Friend, the Widow" next season by the 
Empire State Producing Company, of Mis- 



Marjorie Rambeau is selling the furni- 
ture and art objects in her Riverside Drive 
apartment and her Pclham Manor resi- 
dence. 

Phoebe Foster has been signed by Will- 
iam Harris for "First to Last," Samuel 
Shipman and Percfval Wilde's new 
comedy. 

James E. M ri Phea r n hma been engaged 
for "The Wrong Number," Edgar Smith's 
new musical play which the Shubert's will 
produce. 

Margaret Mayo has returned to New 
York vis Halifax, after being away for 
over a year spent in entertaining soldiers 
in France. 



Edith SOfaf new play "Claudia- has been 
placed in rehearsal "Clandia" is a star- 
ring vehicle for Josephine Victor. 

Arthur Moakowits has been appointed 
manager of LoeWs Garrick, St. Louis. He 
was with the 77th Division in France. 



George Sidney, Charles Dow Clark and 
Jane Cooper will have the principal roles 
in "Welcome Stranger," a new comedy by 
Aaron Hoffman. 



Billy B. Van and Fred Stone appeared 
at a benefit for wounded Elks returning 
from France at the Colonial Theatre in 
Boston hut week. 



John Fogarty bad charge of a vaude- 
ville entertainment held under the auspices 
of the Jewish Welfare Board mt Fort 
Howard, Md, March 20. 

Fay Warren, singing and dancing sou- 
brette with Matt Eolb's "Darlings of 
Paris," is a patient at the American The- 
atrical Hospital, Chicago. 

Lieut. Walter W anger has returned to 
New York from overseas. Lieut. Wanger, 
who was with the signal corps, aviation 
branch, saw service in Italy. 

B. H. Sothern and hia wife, Julia Mar- 
lowe, returned to this country last week 
after being mustered out of the service of 
the overseas entertaining unit. 

Jennie Gordon, a young mezzo-soprano 
of the Creatore Grand Opera Company, 
has been engaged by the Metropolitan 
Opera Company for next season. 



Hal Johnson and Company have dosed 
at the Empress Theatre, Chicago, and lift 
for a tour of the Butterfield Circuit, which 
will be followed by a trip over the Or- 
pheum time to the coast. > 

Lou Housman has left Chicago for Hot 
Springs for his health. He was injured in 
an automobile accident recently. Upon 
hia recovery, he will return to Chicago to 
re-engage in the theatrical business, 

Helen Falconer and Gene Buck, the for- 
mer leading ingenue with Fred Stone, and 
the latter associated with soma of Flo 
Ziegfeld'a offerings, were engaged in Boa- 
ton last week. They will be married in 
June. 



Lasaova and Gflmorm, who have just 
completed a tour of the Orpheum Circuit. 
are now rehearsing a new singing and 
dancing act. 

jack Ehna is now located in the Astor 
Theatre Building. He will rep r e sent , book 
and route independent road attractions, 
theatres, etc. 

John Hughes, of Adelaide and Hughes, 
has a brother and sister, Stanley and Mai - 
de Hughes, whom he will shortly present 
in vaudeville. 

James H. Decker, advance man for 
Melntyre and Heath, will take a minstrel 
troupe, headed by Lew Dockstader, to 
England and Australia next season, he 
says. 



Billy Do Haven and Jack White, the 

"klassy klowns" will shortly appear in 
vaudeville in "The Barber and the Porter," 
a new act written by themselves. 

Amelia Sununerville has been engaged 
to appear in "The Bonds of Interest." 
The show opens at the Garrick on April 
14. The Theatre Guild is producing. 

Joseph Maglin, stage manager at Keith's 
Prospect, has been promoted to be assis- 
tant manager, and Daniel McHugh, for- 
merly electrician, has succeeded him. 

Harry Faulkner and Abe Shapiro, who 
recently formed a vaudeville partnership 
in Chicago, have dissolved, and Shapiro 
will appear with a new straight man. ■ 

Yule and Foster have been given a long 
routing over the Carrell Circuit. Follow- 
ing this journey, they are routed through 
the South for the Marcus Loew Circuit. 

Frank Gladden, Chicago agent, is con- 
fined in the American Theatrical Hospital, 
Chicago, with a ruptured appendix. Dr. 
Max Tborek has performed an operation. 

Raymond F. Hodgdon, captain Co. H. 
106th Inf., 27th Div., has been cited by 
Major General OTlyan. Captain Hodgdon 
returned with the division from overseas. 

Douglas Bedell, formerly assistant the- 
atrical director to Norman Hackett at 
Camp Dix, is among the 27th Division men 
who wOl be mustered out of service this 
week. 

Ethel Townaend, formerly leading lady 
with the Beyer- Vincent Stock Company, 
Boston, was operated on hut week at the 
American Theatrical Hospital, and is re- 
ported to be doing splendidly. 

Edith Gresham has a prominent part in 
"30 East," Rachel Crothers new comedy 
which opened at the Broadhurst but Mon- 
day n%ht. She is the daughter of 
Herbert Gresham, the stage director. 



William G. Tinadale, manager of the 
Majestic, Chicago; Fred Steward, manager 
of the Palace Music Hall, and Jack Lsit 
have been made members of the board 
of directors of The American Theatrical 
Hospital Association, , 

Lon HascsJL of "The Overseas Revue," 
baa returned to the cast of the show in 
Chicago after spending two days in Mil- 
waukee, where he went to sea his father, 
who is seriously ill. Tom Penf old filled 
HaacaU'a place during his absence. 

Rosamond Whiteside, daughter of Wal- 
ker Whiteside, Dan Yankonlts, Florence 
Meredith and Margaret Wheeler enter- 
tained the men in the hospital at Camp 
Upton hut Monday night at a show ar- 
ranged by The Stage Women's War Re- 
lief. 



Carl Seamon, Jack Edwards, Siegel and 
Edmonds, Aricko, Henrietta Byron, Frank 
Markley, Lombard Brothers, Astor Four 
and Pierce and Fenton appeared recently 
at General Hospital No. 3, Kahway, N. J., 
for the War Hospital Entertainment As- 
sociation. 



The Strong Brothers, who have been in 
Camp Grant, Rockford. I1L, for the last 
year, were discharged from the Army but 
week and immediately returned to vaude- 
ville. They were routed by the George 
Webster Circuit for five weeks and, fol- 
lowing this work, plan to go to New York 
City. 

Dorothy Jardon, of the Chicago Opera 
Company, is to sing at the Hippodrome 
on April 27, at a concert at which Cantor 
Joseph Rosenblatt the tenor, Max Geg- 
ner, 'cellist and a symphony orchestra 
conducted by Nathan Franko, will appear. 
This will be her debut on tile concert 
stage. 

Margaret Anglin, who planned to give 
her Greek tragedy, "Iphigenia in Tauris," 
with music by Walter Damrosch, tills 
Summer, has, been forced to abandon the 
project until next season, due to the fact 
that Damrosch is to sail for France, where 
he will conduct a number of symphony 
concerts this month. 

Marie Nelson, leading woman of the Wis- 
consin Avenue Stock Company, Chicago 
made a quick jump to' Milwaukee last 
Friday. There she delivered a lecture on 
health and beauty at the Davidson Thea- 
tre, where a fashion show was held She 
returned to Chicago in time to fasti part 
in the evening f "* " »"^pt. 

Corporals Ord Weaver and Guy Feet. 
and Cadet TO J. Haney, all of whom 
have been discharged from the army re- 
cently, will shortly present a song and 
dance skit in vaudeville. At present, they 
are appearing with Peoples and Green- 
wall's "Show of Wonders." Lee P. Mnek- 
enfmes is the agent for the act 

John Drew, Henry Mffler, WUUam Gil- 
lette, Julia Marlowe, Otis Skinner, Ger- 



aldiae Farrar, John Luther Long, Edward 
K. Sothern, David Balaam, Jatta Arthur, 
Walter Pritchard, Eaton, Welter Dam- 
rosch, Fiancee Starr, Norman Hapgood, 
Jaques Cope* u, Los Teuegen, Mary Shaw 
and Harrison Grey Fiike win be among 
the guests of honor and speakers at a din- 
ner to be given to Mrs. Fiike by the So- 
ciety of Arts and Sdences at the BUtmore 
on Sunday evening, April ft. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




SONG 

^ntgi.i £11111 .. 




:--;:-.;".v;-.} 



■&:■■ 



THE CLIMAX OF THIS SONG, BOTH I 



- 
i ■"■ 









RNESTR.BALL 

With MRS. BALL (Maude Lambert) 

resumed his vaudeville tour last week at Shea's 
Theatre, Buffalo. " 

In a telegram received after his opening, 
among other things, he said: 

"All songs went fine. 'YOU'RE 

MAKING A MISER OF ME' 
jcaririot be stopped, in my entire 
career I cannot remember a song 
of mine that was so satisfying or 
easy to sing and to which the 
audience responded, more gener- 
ously. If the way it was received 
here is any criterion, 1 have every 
rea$6h to believe that it will be- 
come as popular as any of my 
former successes/' >": i •.,•;■ 



EVERYTHING 

READY 

FOR YOU 

Professional Copies 

and Orchestrations in 

Seven Keys 

A» (c to c>, B b <d to d), C (e to 
e), D (f to I), E h (g to g), F (a to 
a), G (b to b). 

QUARTETS 
for all voices 

VOCAL BAND 

In Two Keys: B* — C 

All of which can be obtained from 
any Of the offices in 

OUR COAST 

TO COAST 

SERVICE 



W^*^^Vl»w*^»»>»<*«m)^»y»v^m^yvw^MWM W 



April 2, .1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



::^-.-.^;-.:T::::>;;.".-".v." : ;^.-r.:;::-.' 





IB®[FHI 




iiS 



S BALL H A S S^iKI" 

„ DUBIN — IS A DRAMA 

fc MUSIC , IS SO STRONG, IT CARRIES ITSELF TO SUCCESS 



feiiiiiiiaiiii 



You're Making A Miser Of Me 



REFRAIN Tndtrl, 




y™ «U m)r haul art Mat, Wilt ham I In I* 
>r- ^y ttoqaai «f y«. Taw Iw la all I 



EB 



^ 



P 



ip¥l. ' I <i V 



# 



(na* 



isas 



r p r -m ■ =■*«■ j- i f fl f ,j 1 1 - -^^m 

lit - tl« tadla, .a til- Ua Haa, Aid cam. o - riea tkat kn ToaV 



I jiMt 411 tt» aaOa >-wr Mdi Ut-Oa (aOt tui —at ■» fc -. «t-«t jaat 




• law' .1 al-waja «**> far jot, m> kn tm l i uart ' to areaa.. 



Totfra 

How 



]7p\pi (uTJur^M 



1 ' i . ' J V ■ -i 1 J r r ' J - J ^^ 

• what lift mU W, My heart ha* kaara IotA call; Bat 

* VT ar* fb* boon, "When I ait sy 



alar* I an* «r - 'rr let - tar jn aart aa, J Mat taaa, warn 




*=■ 



pjljt? l jf»ljTflfffljyy I - 



ir 



< i i f 1 1 " i r m ' ' "' 'it iM-tf-f-f 

ae aaa eaM aaa;. 1W a* laaa.Iaaw JV1 , r+ra aa, tta nara a»*a. I 




«•»• *D r« 1"», Then j-lr. m* aaa* at all! 

■ ■* - • - aaartt, art • tm ant aat - la . flaal- 



/* f 



i r t i r i ^J^^^^^ 



n u 1 1. j j 



Jar a «!• «r it ■»! 



'fftilU 



CapTrical HCHin by tLWiUauk 1 Son. 



4 




K & SONS 






mm: 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 




April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



B. K. KEITH'S VAUDE. EXCHANGE 

HEW YORE UITI. 
»«fc-— »~ — «■**»— Japs — Samaras A Sonla — 
Mr. * Mra. Melborne— NeflUn * West— Ward A 



liverside — Rogsy A Lorraine sisters — Bdw. 
Hares * Co. — James * Bonnie Morgan — Howard's 
Ponies. 

Colonial— "Ertord's Sensation"— Pallia * Co. — 
Dole * Co.— Tony A Norman— WUrord Clark * 
Co. — Gilbert * Frledlander — Skene, Terry A Co. — 
Juliet— Ben Berne. 

Royal — "Motor Boating" — Francis Remolds — 
Mlrsno Bros.— Bert Williams— O'DonneU A Blair— 
Ward Bros. ••' i_,; 

ttd Street (Mar. Sl-Apr.2)— Wire A Walker- 
Lieut. Harry Berry * Co. — Hendricks * Evens— 
Billet IS — Wright A Dletrlek — Ja Da Trio— Leah, 
Bdmondson at Marr. (Apr. 8-6)— Stone * Dog- 
Edward Marshall— Vlnle Daly— CoU Santos Band. 

Sin Arena* (Mar. 81-Apr. 2)— Meboney A Au- 
burn — Lew Ac Oene Archer — "Tip Tip Taphankera 
—Rita BoUnd— Hill * Whlttaker— Stan Stanley— 
Dorothy. Gladys A Shellah. (Apr. S-6)— Ah Bin A 
Chin Toy — Al Raymond — Four Moras Sisters. 

115th Street (Mar. 81-Apr. 2) — Curson Bisters — 
Lillian McNeil— Archer A Belford — Al Raymond — 
Bernard A Dnffy — Gantler*a Bricklayers. (Apr. 
86)— Lament Trio — Joe Maxwell A Co.— Bart A 
Harry Gordon — Boyarr Troupe. 

Mth Stnot (Mar. 81-Apr. 2)— Williams A Bemle 
— Eme Lawrence A Co. — Keegen A O'Bourke— Xva 
Shirley A Band — Temple Quartette — The Vivians. 
' (Apr. 8-8) — Elaine A Titans— Lewis A I-eonia— 
Otto A Sheridan — Belle Montrose — KorwalL Daly 
A Co.— Harris A Moray. 

» ■ BROOKLYN. 

Buahwlok— Cecil Jessell— Carl Emmy's Pete— 
Challeo A Kako — Bell Clair Bros. — Devlne A 
Williams — Olga Petrova — Ashley A Skipper. 

Orphenm — Fred Allen — Josle Heather A Oo. — 

1'eronne A Oliver — SeTen Honey Boys — Tin A 

Sehtnck— Alan Brooke A Co. — Apollo Trio. 
ALBANY, N. T. 
Prootor'a (Apr, 8-4) — Rosamond A Dorothy — 
Lawrence A Edwards — Ed Morton — Frank Da 

Boise A C». 

buffalo, N. T. 

Shea's— Nash -;A O'DonneU— Dooley A Bales— 
Green A DeUer— Imboff, Conn A Oorrene — Rath 
Roye — Wellington Cross. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Keith's — Rose A Moor. — Iran Bankoff A Oo. — 
Herbert Clifton — Hickman Bros.— Three Jahni — 
The V Irian* — Norton A Nicholson — Bmma Cams. 
BOBTOsT, MAS8. 

Keith's — Walter C, Kelly — Dresser A Gardner — 
Csrtwell A Harris — Msck A Vincent — Nelson A 

Chain — "Memory Book." 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 
Keith's — Helena Davis— Gordon A Rica — Crans 
A LaSalle — Edna Goodrich A Co. — Brace Daffet A 
Co.— Four Haley slaters. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 
Keith's — Ars Sisters — Gardner A Hsrtman — Mar- 
coni A Fltagthbons — Bvs Tanguay — Adroit Bros. — 
Creasy A Payne — Wilbur slack A Co. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO, 

Keith's — Clifton Crawford — Ethel Hopkins — Jan. 
J. Morton— Cycling Brunettes — Burt A Rosedsle — 
Mercedes — Gold, Rosco A Edwards. 
DETROIT, MICH. 
Keith's- -Florence Tempest A Co.— Bert Bwor — 
Al Bbayne — Connelll A Gibson — Degnon A Clifton 
— Haygne A Lockett— Miller A Bradford — OorgelUa 
Trio. 

DATTOV, OHIO. 
Keith's— "Petticoats"— The Dnttoas— Geo. Me- 
Farland— Ethel McDonoogb— Rita Maria orches- 
tra — Aerial Mitchells— Cahlll A Bomalne. 
ELIZABETH, N. I. 
Prootor'a (Mar. 81-Apr. 2) — Kay KendaU A Co. 
— Stone A Doc — Will Oakland A Co. — The Geralde 
— minora A Williams — Romas Troupe. (Apr. S-6) 
— Three Voya — Sol Ward A CO. — Rappaport — Stan 
Stanley, 

XXIX, PA. 
Keith's— Marx Bros.— Loney Haskell. 

GRANT! RAPIDS, MICH. 
Keith's— Al A Fannie Stedman — Koban Japs— 
Grenadier Glrle— Harry Cooper. 

INDIANAPOLIS, LED. 
Keith's— Arnold 'A Allman— Ftorens Duo— 
S ch ws Ha Bros. — Gertrude Hoffman — Morsn A 
Mack— The . Gladlolaa. 

LO DIB VALUE, XT. 
Xaltk's — Jean Adair A Co. — Aron Four — Morton 
A Glass — Sensational Oerards — Hallea A Fuller — 
Sylvester A Vanee. 

XtT. VERNON, V. T; 
Prootor'a (Mar. Sl-Apr.2)— Belle * 
Marie Da Mario— Qulxe» Fbur— Harry 
Harry Green A Oo. — Four Monk sisters. (Apr. 

t-S)— Lillian A Twin Bisters— Powers A Wallace 
•Grace Da Mar— Stone A Kallaa— Jlmmle Hnaaay A 
Co.— Gaotler-e Animals. 

PlTTRBUBSH. PA. 
KeMfc'e— Nlta Jo— Sally Flatter A Co.— Btendel 
•A Bnrt— LeMair A Hayes— Pattoo A Marks— Bias 
Baeggex— Llghtner A Alexander. 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

For IVearf Weeic 



•OUTS ail HI arts sL, PA. 
Loaw'a (First Half)— FneTea^aiU&nTCh— Brown- 
ing A Davis— Reel Guys. (T J aas~sTalf>— Back A 
Stone — Camlile Peraonne A Co ; P esslos A Brown. 



snTf.in rt.sini pa. 
Keith's— James Watts A Co. — Hairy A 
Seymonr— Olaen A Johnson — Frank Fay— C. B. 
Navy Jass Band— Green A Parker— Wright A 
Perdval— A donas A Dog. 

PBO VXDENOE, X, I. 
Keith's— "Not Yet Marie"— Halllgan A Sykes— 
Emily Darrell— Stuart Barnes — Mayo A Lynn — 
Maria I-o — Meredith A Baooaer. 

ROCHESTER. V. T. 
Temple— Sybil Vane— Melnotte Doe— Mrs. Gene 
Hughes— Harry nines A Co. — Lomer Girls — Gray 
A Byron — Rice A Werne r — Fred Barrens.' 
SCHZHEOTADT, H. T. . 
Prootor'a (Apr. 3 8)— Claude. Boode A Francis— 

Brans A Chase — McWaters A Tyson — Howard A 

Sadler— "Futurlatlo Revue." 

: SHOT. M. T. 
Proctor's (Apr. 3-8)— Fire Avallons— Hemhaw A 
Avery — Lowery A Prtnce^-Bruce Dnffett A Co. — 
Mary MalviUe A Co. — Melody Garden. 
TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith's— Scotch Lads A Lassies— Bob Albright- 
Harry Watson A Co.— Kltmar A Resney— Frank 
Gaby — Orvllle Stanun, 

T0BOHT0, CAB. 
Keith's— Frances Kennedy — Geo. N. Brown A Co. 
— Boouey A Bent — Guerro A Carman — Bddle 
Leonard A Co.— Mr. A Mrs. Jimmy Barry— De Wist 

Young A Sister. 

WASHINGTON. D. 0. 
Keith's— J. 0. Nugent A Co.— The 8harroeka<- 
Belle Baker— Raymond Wllbert— Geo. H. Price A 
Co. — Rlgotetto Bros. — Geo. White A Co.— Texas 
Comedy Four. 

WILMINGTON, DEL, 
Oarrlek— Le Oroha— Alice's Peto — "Somewhere in 
C. 1." Ruatlno A Barrett! — Jack Marlsy— Msr- 
eball A Adelaide— The Rosellos— Willie Hale A 

Bros. 

YONKEBS, H. T. 
Prootor'a (Mar. 81-Apr. 2) — Alice Nelson A Oo. 
— Bughle Clarke A Co. — Grnber'a Animals. (Apr. 
8-8) — Howard A Boss — Temple Quartette. 
YOTTNOSTOWN. OHIO. 
Keith's— Blanche Ring— Van Cellos— Hall A 
Brown— Cantwell A Walker— Ford Bisters. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAOO, ILL. 
' Palace — Sirens— "Dream Fantasies" — Santos 
Hayes — Margaret Farrell — Grace Nelson, — Mr. 
Mrs. Gordon Wilde — Laurie A Bronson. 

Majsstlo— Bessie Clayton A Co.— Henry Lewis- 
Ames A Wlnthrop— Whitfield A Ireland— "Maid of 
France" — Barr Twins— Stanley A Blrnea — Susan 
Tompkins — J. A K. Demaco. 

CAIOART, CAM. 
Orphenm — Annette Kellermsnn — Great Lester — 
Margaret Young — Gene Green— Eddie A Edith 
Adair— Alec A Dot Lamb. 

DEB MOINES, IA. 
Orphenm — Stella Msybew — Heracbel Henlera A 
Co. — Bamsdella A Hero — Bailey A Cowan — San- 
sona A Delilah— Lee Kohlmar A Co. — Chaa. A 

Madeline Dunbar. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphenm — Jos. Howard'a Revue— Claudius A 
Scarlet— Walter Fenner A Co.— Vellecltae Leopards 
— Hampton A Blake — Three Bennett Sitters— 

Street Urchin. 

DULUTH, MINN. 
Orphsum — Trials Frlgsnsa — Mand Earl — Mike 
Bernard— Clifford A Wills — Wilson Aubrey Trio- 
Muriel Worth A Co. 

KANSAS CUT, .MD 

Orphenm — "Only Glrt"i — Kenner A Booney— Four 
Harmony Kings — Win. Smyths — Hector — Josefsson 
Troupe — Lunette 81aters. 

LOB ANGELES, OAL. 
Orphanm— Valeska Boratt A Co.— Henry B. 
Toomer — Le Volos — Bid Townee— Geo. Yeoman — 
John B. Hymer A Co. — McKay A Ardlne. 
LINCOLN, NEB. 
Orphanm — "Heart of -Annie Wood" — Best Baker 
A Co.— Bums A Frablto — Westony A Lorraine — 
Scot Qlbaon— Shrapnel Dodgers— Three Mliun os. 



A 

A 



Shrapnel 
MEMPK 




Orphenm — Bea Wolf — "Through Thick and Tain" 
— Lydell A Maesy— Bison City Four— M. A O. 

Ellsworth. 

knEsTEAPOLIS, um. . 
Orphenm — Blossom Seeley A Co.— Patrleola A 
Myers— I. A B. Smith— Jennings A Mack— Sylvia 
Loyal A Partner— Oeaki A Takl— Carolina Kohl A 
Co. - ' 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Orphenm — Pit O' Brien — "Sweeties" — Walter 
Wenms— Bowers, Walter A Crocker— P rosper A 
Market— Katbr yn M urray. 

EBW OELEABB, LA. 

Orphenm— "For Plty'e Bake"— Lillian Fltagarald 
_ Marmeln Slater* A ichoolaa— Joe Browning— Bart 
Barle A Olrlsv-XaadaBa, . . . 

OAKLAND, OAL. 

Orphenm -Theo. Kosloff -A Co. — Jean Barrios— 
Ooekley A Dunlevy— The Flsiiilnis Mai Ilia HaaaU* 
ton A Co.— Ethel Natalie A Co.— Bert Wheeler' A 
Oo. 

OMAHA, MSB. V 

Orphsnsn — White Coopone— Bobinson's lffspfisnta 
—nail A Went— Cameron Devltt A " 
King A Oo. — Santna A Hayes ' Baa 
POETLAVD. ORE. 

Orphenm — Sam Mann— Chaa. Irwin. — Berry A 
jonanl — Helen Beholder— Polly Moran— Fantlno 
Troupe— Mooconl Bros. 

ST. PAUL. MUTE. 

Oilihsain "An American Ace"— Jos. H. Bernard 
A Co;— Dunham A Howards— C. A B. Barry— 
Aerial Bnawa— Leo Bear. 

■ALT LAKE OTTT, UTAH. 
Orphenm— Florence Roberta A Co.— Sue Smith— 
Branek'a Models— Wanner A Palmar— Everest" a 
Keats— Primrose Four— Diane A BnblnL 

SXATIXJa, WASS. 
Orphanm— "Miracle" -Davie A Bleb— Bicker 
Brwi^-Rnth St. Denis— Harriet Bampel A 
Oenaro at Gold— Paul La Varra A Bra. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Grape-win A Co. — Jimmle Lneaa 
A Co.— Oarer Vokea A Don— Syrria Clark— Dale 
A Brock — LeMelre A Crouch. 

SAX FEAECISCO. OAL. 
Orphanm— Paul Dickey A Co. — Adams A Orlfllth 
—"Girl of the Altitude"— Hobsou A Beatty— Chaa. 
Wilson— Klrksmlth SUters— Mclntyres— Eddla Fey 

A Co. 

SACRAMINTO. STOCKTON A FRESNO, OAL. 
Orphenm Foot Husbands — Rockwell A Fox — 
Flanagan A Edwards— Lewis A White — Nolan A 
Nolan— Demareat A Cottette— Kate A Wiley. 
VANCOUVER. CAN. 
Orphenm— "Reckless Bee"— Crawford A Brod- 
erlck — Nlta Johnson — Bessie Rempel A Co. — Max- 
rltt A Bridewell — Sterlings. 

wunriPEO. can. 

Orphanm — Lucille Cavanagh A Co. — Bessie 
Browning— Mason A. Kaeler— Clark A Verdi— Bee- 
backs— Lome A Dupree. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

NEW YORK CITY. 
American (First Half)— Clauds Austin— Francis 
A Connolly— Lai Balbtu! — Brown A Jackson Mas- 

ler Twins A Co. — Ubert Csrleton — Dorotsy Carle- 
ten— Dorothy Hayes A Oo. — Deraa Bros. (Last 
Half)— Bert A Peggy Dale— Henderson A Halll 



i Fslaes (First Half)— Kremka Bros.— lack A 
Jusauraaghlla— "Old Fashioned Girl"— Joe Dare*— 
"BanTM'ijjage." (Last Halt)— The Lslseds— sastf 

A.JkUtk Adams— "Tate's Motoring"— Starling A 
Marguerite. •. 

TORONTO, OAH. 
wsseps (ssaaaS Montambo A Nap — Walsh A SkV 
warde— McOormsek A Irving— Carllale A Roemsr— 
| -Ja ck A Tommy Wler— Whirlwind Gypsies. 

POLI cmcurr 

BEIDOEPOET, CONN. 



/— Mttarord A 



Foil (First Half)— Staasay- 
— Winston's Water IJonsv (Last 
Pndtt— Murphy A White— Winston's Water Uoaa. 

Elaaa (First Half)— JuveaDa Rsvisw. (Last 
Half)— Oh. George— Alice Manning— Margaret 
Hill's Comedy Circna. 

HARTFO RD, OO KN 

EsU (First Half )— Chaa. Marrtp— J. 
nan A B. Rule — Harvey. Henay ASJra; 
Daring Sisters. (Last Half)— Wlnton 
Manning A Lee— Ben Smith — "What Uappsoed ss 
Both"— Jones A Greenlee— "Candy Shop." 

NEW HAVEN. OOMM. . - . . ^i 

Palaos (First Half)— BUI Prultt— MnrphyXA 
White— Colour Genu. (Last Halfl— Mnauara M 
Stanley. * — 

aajen (First Bait) — Alice Manning— Glrne A 
Seven Cyclones — Mahoney Bros. — Margaret- HUPs 
Comedy ClrenaC (Last Tlalf) HIsiiMi TaisasTa 
Bavtow. 

BPRIKOyTEXD, MASS. :~ 

(First Half)— Nakae Japs— Wlaket . 



H a™" Dean— "What Happened 
— -FoSs? taw — "Anions? Those P 



ret * 

day-Koko Camlvil-Marstoo A ManUy-Foa* ulv^Among' "rhiaseHprvesnt. '^ lLest*°alalrW 

laurels-Paul Bolln— Cnung Wsh Comedy Four— Bamt Bros^-Krnest DuVpme-Manon^ooAEaMe 

^^B- (Flrrt H.If)-Sk». A CklTWt- * g ' > * " 1 * ^S SS ^ ' m^f ^ ^ 

^Wp. Pouce." «-et Half,-Man« W A »„, ^ rJS^SSf' J^Dymctnl-EBI I * 

Boulevard (First Half)— Panl BoUn— "Pretty M V a lJ5*2 , SL ,ior, ' n ft 2 r ? 7 ^?? laB • * f*£*f 

Soft"-Mnrphy A White— Wilbur A Lyke. (Last r^v"^.**"^ 7 - "SS. 1 ^""'."'^ ^55t 

Half)— Thiesson's Dogs-Bd Lynch— Brad, .V Ha . }gzl?£ * aSflW 8 *^ ???1 * °°ST |i""» 

honey— Bars ban A Oroha. ' Three— AdtlaVto Bell A Clef Club Jssa Band. 

Dataaosy Street (First Hair)— Green A Piatt— WO ROES TEX, MA Ba. 

Bayes A England — Jim Reynolds— Mayo A Nerlna Plana (First Half)— Bums Bros.— Manoo Pas* 

— Aah A Hyams — "Temptation." (Last Half) — — Ernest Duppllle— Oh. George. (Last Half)— 

Frank Hartley— Cornelia A Adele — "Man from Winkle A Dean. 

Denver" — Murphy A White— Three Blanoa. Pell (First Half) — Ben Smith — Archer A Bel- 

Orealey Sonars (First Half)— Gagnell A Mack — ford — Howard A Sadler — Venetian Oypslss. (Last 

Mel Beatman— Marstoa A Manley— Friend A Half)— Nsksa Japs— Arthur Whituw— oirUe A 

Downing— Submarine F-7. (Last Half) — Olaoue Seven Cyclones. 



AusUn — Mayo A Nerlna— Ferns A Howell— Bessie 

LeCount — Submarine F-T, 

Iinoola Square (First Half)— LaPatlta Jennie A 
Co.— Morlsy A McCarthy Sisters— Cuss. Morstl A 
Co. — Barry McConnack A Co.— Three Blanoa. (Last 

Malt) — Aronty Bros Jewett A Elgin — Ash A 

Hy e nas Carols Trio— Lela Selblni. 

National (First Hslf) — Pepplno A Perry— Orben 
A Dixie — "Finders Keepers" — Carols Trio— Cols 
A Denahy. (Last Hslf) — Green A Piatt— Dorothy 
Doyle — "Married Life" — Jim ' Reynolds — Richard, 
the Great. 

Orphaom (First Half)— Dlx A Dials — Jewett A 
Elgin — Bessie LeOount — "Man from Denver" — 
Brady A Mahoney — Richard the Greet. (Last 
Half) — Gengler'e Dogs— Mabel Best— Cbsa. Morstl 
A Co. — Zlegler Twins A Co. 

Victoria (First Half) — Thiesson's Dogs — Ward 
A Cullen — Cblaholm A Breem — Ward A Wilson — 
Lyons A Tosco. (Last Half)— LaPcJU Jennie A 
Co. — Ubert Carleton— Brown A Jackson — Lyons A 
Tosco. 

BXOOSXTX. 

DsXslb (First Half)— Bert A Peggy Dale— Mabel 
Beat — Maurice Freeman A Co. — Ferns A Howell — 
Aronty Broa. (Last Halt)— Ward A CnUen— 
Dorothy Hayes A Co.— Carl McCnllough — Wilbur 
A Lyke. 

Fulton (First Half) — Oangler'a Dogs— Dorothy 
Doyle— Ed Lynch A Co.— Carl McCnllough— Koko 
Carnival. (last Half)— Mo rley- McCarthy Sisters 
— Francis A Connolly — Msuiice Freeman A Co. — 
Friend A Downing — Daraa Broa. 

Metropolitan (first Half)— Frank Hartley— 
Harrla A Lyman — Chung Wah Comedy Foot— Bexa- 
bsn A Oroha. (Last Half) — Cole A Deneby— 
Chlsholm.- A Bresn — Barry MeOormack — "Tempta- 
tion." 

Palaos (First Half )— Mahoney A Roger s Arthur 
Pickens A Co. — Elsie White— Maynon'a Birds. 
(Last Hslf)— Orben A Dixie— William Dick— 
"Help, Police " 

Wanrlek (First Half)— Camilla Person! A Co.— 
William Dick. (Last Half)— Arthur Plcksns A 
Co. — Henry Fray — Naynon's Birds. 



Orphanm (First Half)— Peeardo Bros.— Lane A 
Harper— Hsxel Harrington A Oo. — Jnllsn Hall 
CnaUonto Sliters (Last HalD-Ooeta A Duffy— 
"A Regular Business Man"— Hodtor, Stein A 
rhinips— Msrgot A Franeola. 

BAXTXMOBX, MB. 
glppi'lslss Funk Shields — Tyler A OzeUaa — 
Onaa. Mack A Co.— Tilyou A Ward— Golden 
Troupe. 

. FALL ElYEE, MASS, 

EUen (First Half)— Goets A JhuTy— "A Begamr 
Business Man"— Bndler. Stein A Phillips— Msrgot 
A Han t aan . (Last Half) — Preeardo Bros. — Lane 

A Harper — Julian Hall — Cbalfonte Slaters. 

HOEOKEN. M. J. 
Lyrlo (Pint Half)— Beck A Stone— The 
Starter"— Broaias A Brawn. (Last Hair)— For- 
rest A Church — "Suite 18" — Browning A Davis — 
Nurste A the Dog. 

HAMILTON, CAM. 
Leew's— Zlta— Fentel A CeeB— Regal A Msck— 
"Olives" — Joe Cook. 

MONTREAL. CAN. 
Leew's— Johnson. Baker A Johnson— Cliff Clark 
— Van A Carrie Avery— Shea A Bowman — PemikeaT 
A Rose Ballet. 

MEW samrsvte sj. Y . 

Loew's (First Half)— Partae— Freecotts. (Last 
Hslf)— Frescotta ' ' "~ • 

PSOVTDXNGE, K. L' 
Emsry (First Half )— The Lelanos— Billy * Edith 
Adams— '-Tata's Motoring" — Sterling A Mar- 
guerite. (Last Half)— Kremka Broa.— lack A. 
June Langhlin— "Old Fashioned Girl"— Joe Darry 
"— ,l Bon ToTtS». ,r 



WrXEES-BAESE, PA. 
PoU (First Hair)— Simmons A Bradley— L 

Green— Eddie Heme A Co lIliaillTIU lilelaMa 

Bell A Cleff Club Jaaa Band. (Last-Half >— Hart 
A Dymond— Bill A Maude Keller— Morgan A Qrny 
— Robins A Psrtnsr — Amorce * Obey. 
WATEBBUET, OfTawf. 
Poll (Pint Half)— Wlnton Broa.— Manning A 
Lee— Kelso A Lelgntoa — Jones A OnsnTsa 
"Candy Shop." (Last HsU)— Three Daring Sla- 
ters— Chss. Martin— Harvey. 'HenQ-'A On 
J. K. Brennan A B. Eels — "Colour Gems." 

PANTAGES CIRCUIT 

BUTTE, MONT. ";'* 
Pantagss (Four Days) — (liutlrQs Toy 
Fox A Brltt— Wlllard'a FsnUsy ofTlewrla — Bookie 
Lewht — Vine A Temple — Harry buds. 

CALOART. OAM. 

Pantagss— Guy Wesdlck's stsrapede Bldsra— 

Eddhr , sasss— Haines A Goodrich— Dsnlahawa 
ndon'A Day. 

. COLO. 

Pantagss— Odlva— Noodles, Fsgia A Co.— Perelra 
Sextette— Hngo Lntgens — Tybell Slatere. 
EDMONTON. CAN. 

Pan t s g as C altes Broa. A Co.— Race A Edge— 
Ret k^St. D enis— Alice Teddy— "Wrecked Unf'— 

OBEAT FALLS, MONT. 
Psstagss (First Half)— Dorothy Roys— Msnnattl 
A BldsUl-Jobn 0. Sparks A Co.— Denn - 
Klaas A Tsrmln>— Hooaler Girls. 

LOS AEQKLKS, OAL. 
Pan t agss P a Hn sss Tro u pe Spencer A 
— Little Burglar— Weir A 

Tyre.li,. - . - •• 

OAXLAED, OAL. 

Pantagss— "World Wide Bene— Nad 
A Co.— Prorol— "Out Time Dsrklss" 
Mareeaa A Deftaa. •- 

'■:■-„■ 00 DEN. UTAH. 

Psa takes - J « Roy. Talma A B 
Gertie Van Drks A Rro— FrancU A WHIM Will 
Stanton A CO. 

PORTLAND. OEM, 

Pantagss Spanish Dancers— Barnes A 
— Sandy Donaldson — Aleko, Paathaa A 
Pall La Tusks. 

BEMEA, our. 
Paartaaea (First Half)— Camp Dig Jaaa 

Tom Kelly— Mortha Bmvsell A sasnswS 

Winifred— Lney Talmont A Co. 

(Conlinotd on Par" 3« <"d 18.) 





24 THE NEW YORK CLIPPER April 2, 1919 



v - •■». •■■ 



. . - • 



T. B. Harms and Francis Day & Hunter 

• • - 

Announce the Opening of their ,...>:;•! i -i 

PROFESSIONAL OFFICES 

--< .•.■■■-,.■.-=-.-• ■ . . ■..■■ .; .-■ - - : ■ 

.-•>'.. ■- . - - . : ...... . ' .-....-- 

WEST 45th STREET, NEW YORK 
GRAND OPERA HOUSE, CHICAGO, ILL. 

ARTISTS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO CALL AT EITHER OFFICE FOR THE LATEST 

. . ,. -. : '-'•■■ • ' 

AND BEST NUMBERS SUITED TO THEIR REQUIREMENTS 




ARE YOU IN WITH IT? WHAT? 

THE RE D RA T BALL 

UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE 

David «J. Clark Association 

A "get together" affair for the Broadway bunch 
YOU ALL KNOW DAVE! -„ HE'LL BE THERE! 

THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 3, 1919 



■ 


■ 


F 




















■ 














■ 


J 


'■: 














DANCING AND ENTERTAINMENT AT 9 P. M. 



West 44th St., Bet. 8th and 9th Ave*. 

DANCING AND ENTERTAINMENT AT 9 P. M. 
Music by Dabney's Syncopated Orchestra from Ziegf eld's Midnight Frolic 

Tickets §1.00 
Boxes $15 to $25 

SNEAK Of AN) TAKE A PEEK:! A DOLLAR A BELT! DON'T MISS IT! 



THE 

IRVING BERLIN 
E, RAY GOETZ 
GEORGE W. MEYER 
MAX WINSLOW 
HARRISON FISHER 
CHARLIE KING 


COMMITTEE 

phil kornheber . 
louis bernstein 
sime silverman 
johnny o'connor 
joe McCarthy 
mose gumble 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



DRAMATIC AMD MUSICAL 
fcbOaMMatl 

Saturday 

\rllss, George — Hollla. Boston. Mass., lndef. 
."Atta Boy" — Olympic, Chicago, lndef. 

"Adam and Eva"— Park Sq,, Boston. Man.. 
lndef. _. 

"Business Before Pleasure" — Woods, Chi- 
cago, lndef. 

"Better 'Ole" — (Mr. and Mrs. Cobnrn) — 
Cort, N. T. City, lndef. 

"Better "Ole" (B) — Seattle, Wash., «-12. 

"Better "Ole" (C)— His Majesty's, Mont- 
real. Can.. Sl-Aprll S. 

"Better 'Ole" CD.)— National. Washington, 
Sl-AprU S. _ 

"Better 'Ola" (E.1— Illinois. Chicago, BX, 
lndef. 

Bayes. Nora— Lyric, Philadelphia, lndef. 

"Biff Chance, The" — Majestic, Boston, ln- 
def. •_ . • ' 

"Burgomaster of Belgium" — Belmont, New 
York City, lndef. _ 

"Bird Of Paradise" — Shubert-Belasco, 
Washington, D. C, 7-13. _^ 

"Cappy fficks" — Morosco. New Tot* City, 

Chicago Grand Opera Co.— A. of M, Phila- 
delphia, Fa., lndef. 

Carmelo's, Ted, Musical Comedy Co. — 
Sherman. Regina, Saak., Canada, lndef. 

"Crowded Hour" (Jane Cowl) — Manhattan 
O; H.. N. Y. City, lndef. , - . 

"Dear Brutus"— Empirer New York City, 
lndef. 

"Dark town Frolics" — Auditorium. Karma » 

City. Mo.. Sl-Apr. 5. . ' . 

Drew. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney— Detroit, Mich., 

30-Apr. 5. . „ _ 

Dempsey, Jack, Show — Poughkeepsle. N. X., 

Apr:- 8: Newburgh, S; Schenectady. 4; 

Syracus.e, 6. 
Ditrichsteln. Leo. — A. of M., Baltimore, 

Md.. 7-12. - - ■-...-.- , ... 

"Everything"— Hippodrome, New York 

. City, lndef. 

"East'-.Ts- 'West" — Astor. New York City. 

lndef. ... . : - .. . 

"Eyes of Youth" — Walnut, - Philadelphia, 

lndef. . 
"Friendly Enemies" — Hudson, New York 

City, lndef. 
"Forever After" — Playhouse, New York 

City.- lndef. . ... '.'. . 

"Fiddlers 3"-^OIymplc. Chicago, lndef. . 
"Fortune Teller"— Republic. New York 
. City, lndef. 

"Flo Flo" — Forest. Philadelphia. lndef. 
Gilbert ft- Sullivan Operaa^-Park. New York 
City, lndef. 

"Good Morning Judge" — Shubert. New 

York, lndef. 
"Going Up" — Cohan's O. H-, Chicago, TIL 
"Glorianna" — Colonial. Chicago, 31-lndef. 
"Good Bad Woman" — Ford's. Baltimore. 

Md., Sl-Apr. 6: Harris, New York, 7-ln- 

def. 
Hall, Billy— Bath, Me., 31-Apr. 6. . 
"Happiness" — Broad Street, Philadelphia, 

Pa., lndef. ...•'. 
"Hobohemla" — Greenwich Vfiage, New 

York City. (Last week.) 
"Invisible Foe, The"— Harris, New York 

City. (Last week.) 
"Jack O'Lantern" — Colonial. Boston, lndef. 
"Kiss Burglar"— Broadhurst. N. Y. City. 

lndef. 
"Keep It to Yourself— 39th Street, New 

York City, lndef. 
"Ldghtnln' "— Gayety, New York City, ln- 
def. 
"Listen X*ster" — Knickerbocker, New York 

City, lndef. 
"Little Journey. The" — Vanderbllt, New 

York City, lndef. 
"Little Simplicity" — Shubert, Philadelphia, 

lndef. 
"Let's Beat It" — Century Theatre, New 

York City, lndef. 
"Luck In Pawn" — 18th Street Theatre, New 

York City, lndef. 
"Melting of Molly"— Chestnut St.. Phila- 
delphia. Pa., lndef: 
"Midnight Whirl" — New Century. New 

York City. lndef. 
"Masquerader. The" — Studebaker. Chicago, 

lndef. 
"Miss Nellie of New Orleans" — Henry Mil- 
ler. New York City, lndef. 
"Monte Crlsto, Jr." — Wintergarden. New 

York City, lndef. 
Mantell. Robert — Baltimore. Md. 
"Mollere"— Liberty. New York City, lndef. 
"Mutt & Jeff Co." — Spokane. 7-9: 'Wallace. 

Mont.. 10; Missoula, 11; Helena, 12; Great 

Falls. 13-14. 
"Moonlight & Honeysuckle" — (Ruth Chat- 

terton) Power's, Chicago, 31-lndef. 
"New Girl The" — National. ■Washington, 

D. C. Apr. 6-12. 
'Night Off. A"— Ford's. Baltimore. Md.. 

7-12. 
Opera Comique — Park. New York City, 

lndef. 
"Oh. My Dear" — Princess. New York City. 

lndef. 
"Oh. Look" — Shubert. Boston, lndef. 
"Oh. Lady! Lady!!" — La Salle, Chicago, 

lndef. 
"Please Get Married" — Fulton, New York 

City, lndef. 
"Prince There Was" — Cohan, New York 

City, lndef. 
"Penny Wise" — Punch ft Jndy, New York 

City, indef. 
"Parlor. Bedroom and Bath" — Adelphi. 

Philadelphia, lndef. 
"Playthings" — Binghamton. N. Y., 4-5. 
Olcott, Chauncey — O. H.. Providence, R. I., 

31-Apr. S. 
"Redemption" — Plymouth. New York City. 

(Last week.) 
"Royal Vagabond, The" — Cohan ft Harris, 

New York City, lndef. 
"Rainbow Girl Co." — Treraont, Boston, 31- 
Apr. 12. 
"Riddle Woman"— Shubert Riviera. N. Y.. 

31-Apr. 5. 





"Slnbad"— Poll's, Washington. D. C. lndef. 

"Sometime" — Casino. New York City, ln- 
def. 

Stone, Fred — Colonial, Chicago, lndef. 

"Sleepless Night" — BUou. New York City. 
lndef. 

Skinner, Otis— Globe. New York City, lndef. 

"Scandal"— Garrick. Chicago, lndef. 

"Sleeping Partners" — Majestic, Providence, 
R. I.7»l-Apr. 5. 

"September Morn"— Chicago, DL, SO-Apr. 6. 

"Sweet lnnlafallen" — Lexington, New York 

City, lndef. 
"She 'Walked In Her Sleep" — Plymouth, 
Boston, Mass.. lndef. 

Susan Lenox — Shubert-Belasco, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Sl-Apr.- S; Majestic Provi- 
dence, R. L. 7-13. 

"Tea for Three"— Maxlne Elliott. New York 
City, lndef. 

"Throe Faces East" — Longacre, New York 
City, Inde x, 

"Three Wise Fools" — Criterion, New York 
City, lndef. 

"Tiger! TUter!"— (With Frances Starr)— 

Belasco, New York City, lndef. 
"Tailor-Made Man" — Standard, New York 
City, Sl-Apr. S. 

"Tobya Bow" — Comedy. New York- City, 
lndef. 

. Thurston— G. O. H., Terre Haute, Ind., 3-5; 

Lyric, Cincinnati. (-13. . 
"TlUie"— Blackstone. Chicago, lndef. 
"Thirty Days"— Cort. Chicago, lndef. 
"Tumble Inn"— Selwyn, New York City, 

lndef. 
"Twin Beds" — National, Chicago, Sl-Apr. B. 
Taylor. Laurette — Broad Street. ' Phlladel- 
■ phia, Pa., lndef. ..... 

Tellegeh. Lou — Providence, R. L. 7-12. 
"Turn to the Right"— Garrick. Philadelphia. 

lndef. 
"Thirty-nine East" — Broadhurst, New York 

City, lndef. 
"Thirteenth Chair" — Loew's Seventh Ave- 
. nue. New York. 31-Apr. 5. 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin- Ob." — Reading, Pa., 
. 4-6; Trenton, N." J., 7; Orange. 8. 

"Unknown Purple, the" — Lyric, New York 
, City, lndef. 

"Velvet Lady" — New Amsterdam. New 
. York City, indef. 

"Woman In Room 13, The" — Booth, New 
York City, indef. 

■•Zlt-sfC-ld Midnight Frolic" — Hew Amster- 
dam Roof, New York City, indef. 
COLUMBIA CIRCUIT 

Al Reeves Big' Show — Orpheum, Paterson, 
N. J., 31-April 6; Majestic, Jersey City, 
7-12. 

"Best Show In Town" — Empire, Toledo, O.. 
31- April 6: Lyric. Dayton. 7-12. 

"Beauty Trust" — Newburgh, N. Y., Sl- 
Aprll 2: Poughkeepsle, S-S: Orpheum, 
Paterson, 7-12. 

"Behman Show" — Empire. Brooklyn. Sl- 
Aprll 6; Newburg, N. Y., - 7-9; Pough- 
keepele, 10-12. __ 

"Bon Tons" — Empire. Albany. N. Y., 31- 
Aprll S: Casino, Boston, 7-12. 

"Bostonians" — Olympic, Cincinnati. Sl- 
Aprll E; Columbia. Chicago, 7-12. 

"Bowery" — Columbia, New York, Sl-Aprll 
S; Casino, Brooklyn, 7-12. 

"Burlesque Wonder Show" — Empire, New- 
ark, N*. J., 31-Apr. S; Casino, Philadel- 
phia. 7-12. 

"Ben Welch" — Gayety. Washington, Sl- 
Aprll 5 ; Gayety, Pittsburgh, 7-12. 

Burlesque • Revue — Casino, Brooklyn, 31- 

Aprll 5; Empire, Newark. 7-12. 

"Cheer Up America" — Casino. Philadelphia, 
81-April 5; Miner's 149th St., New York, 
7-12. . 

Dave Marlon's — Gayety, Buffalo, 31- April 5; 
Gayety. Rochester, 7-12. 

"Follies of the Day" — Open 31-Aprll S; 
Gayety. St Loula. 7-12. . 

"Girls de Looks" — Gayety, Detroit, 31-Aprll 
5.; Gayety, Toronto, Ont., 7-13. . * 

"Golden Crooks" — Star. Cleveland, 31-Aprll 
5: Empire. Toledo. O.. 7-12. 

"Girls of the U. S. A." — Gayety. Boston, 
31-Aprll S: Grand, Hartford. Conn., 7-12. 

"Hip, Hip Hooray"- : -Star and Garter, Chi- 
cago, 31-April S; Berchel, Des Moines, la., 
6-10. 

"Hello America" — Majestic, Jersey City, 31- 
Aprll 5: Peoples, Philadelphia, 7-12. 

Harry Hastings — Gayety, Rochester, 31- 
April S; Bastable, Syracuse, N. Y.. 7-9; 
Lumbers, Utlca, 10-12. 

trwin's Big Show — Gayety. Montreal, Can.. 
31-Aprll S: Empire. Albany. N. Y.. 7-12. 

Lew Kelly Show — Gayety. Kansas City, 31- 
April 5: open, 7-12; Gayety, St. Louis, 

14-19. 

"Liberty Girls" — Gayety. Toronto, Ont., 31- 
Aprll 5; Gayety. Buffalo. 7-12. 

Mollle Williams' Show — Bastable. Syracuse. 
N. Y., Sl-Aprll 2; Lumberg, Utica, S-6; 
Gayety, Montreal, Can., 7-12. 

"Maids of America" — Hurtlg ft Seamon's, 
New York. 31-April 6; Park, Bridgeport. 
Conn., 10-12. 

"Majesties" — Grand. Hartford, Conn., 31- 
Aprll 6: Jacques. Waterbury, Conn.. 7-12. 

"Merry Rounders" — Colonial, Providence, 
31-Aprll 5: Gayety. Boston. 7-12. 

"Million Dollar Dolls" — Miner's 149th Street. 
New York. 31-April 5; Empire, Brooklyn. 
7-12. 

"Oh, Girls" — Berchel, Des Moines, la., 31- 
Aprll 3; Gayety, Omaha, Neb., 7-12. 

"Puss. Puss" — Palace, Baltimore, 31-April 
6; Gayety. Washington, 7-12. 

"Roseland Girls" — Jacques. Waterbnry. Ct.. 
31-April $; Hurtlg ft Seamon's, New York, 

7-12. 
Rose SydeU's — Akron, O.. 31-April 2; 
Youngstown. 3-5: Star. Cleveland. O.. 
7-12. 



Sam Howe's Show— Gayety.' St. Louis. Sl- 
Aprll E; Star and Garter, Chicago, 7-12. 

"Sight Seers" — People's, Philadelphia, 31- 
April S; Palace, Baltimore, 7-13. 

"Social Maids" — Park, Bridgeport. April 5- 
5; Colonial. Providence, 7-12. 

"Sporting Widows" — Casino, Boston. Sl- 
Aprll 5 ; Columbia, New York. 7-12. 

Star and Garter Shows — Columbia, Chicago, 
Sl-Aprll E; Gayety. Detroit. 7-13. 

"Step Lively Girls" — Gayety. Omaha. Neb., 
29- April 4; Gayety. Kansas City. 7-13. 

"Twentieth Century Maids"— Gayety. Pitts- 

i burgh, Sl-Aprll 6; Akron. O., 7-9: Youngs- 
town, 10-13. 

"Watson's Beef Trust"— Lyric Dayton. O., 
31-April 5 ; Olympic, Cincinnati. 7-12. 

American circuit 

American — Star, Brooklyn, SI- April 5; 

Olympic, New York, 7-12. 
■Auto Girls" — Century. Kansas City, 81- 

April E; Standard, St. Loula. 7-12. 
"Aviator Girls"— Gayety, Brooklyn, 31- 

Anril 6: WrtghUtown. N. J.. 10-11. 
"Beauty Review"— standard, St. Louis, si- 

Aprll 5; Terre Haute, Ind., 6; Majestic, 
Indianapolis, 7-12. 
"Big Review"— Chester. Pa.. II- April 1: 

Camden. N. J., 3-5: wrlghtstown; N. J.. 
7-S; Trenton, 10-12. 

"Blue Birds" — Wrlghtstown, N. J., April 
S-E; Gayety. Philadelphia. 7-13. 

"Broadway Belles"— Crown. Chicago. 31- 
April 6: Gayety, Milwaukee, 7-13. 

"French Frolics" — Englewood, Chicago, 31- 
April 5; Crown, Chicago, 7-13. 

"Follies of Pleasure" — Majestic, Indianap- 
olis. 31-April S: Gayety. Louisville. 7-12. 

"Frolics of the Nlte" — Star. St. Paul, 81- 
Aprll 5: Sioux City, Iowa. 7-10. 

"Girls from the Follies" — Olympic New 
York, 31-April 6; Plaza, Springfield. 
Mass.. 7-12. 

"Grown Up Babies" — Garden, Buffalo, Sl- 
Aprll 6: Empire, Cleveland, .7-13. - . . . . 

"Girls from Joyland" — Gayety. Louisville. 
31-April 5; Lyceum, Columbus. (X, 7-12. 

"Hello, Paree" — Binghamton, N. X., 31- 
April 1; Schenectady, 3-5; Watertown, 
N. Y-. 7: Oswego. 8: Niagara Falls. 0-12. 

"High Flyers"— Empire. Hoboken, Sl-Aprll 

6; Star, Brooklyn, 7-12. 
"Innocent Mklds" — Gayety, Baltimore, 31- 
. April 5; Lyceum, Washington, 7-12. 
"Jolly. Gbrls" — Wrlghtstown. N. J., 31-April 

. 2; Trenton, 3-5; Empire. Hoboken, 7-13. 
"LldT Lifters"— Camden, N. J., 31-Aprll 3; 
' Chester, Pa., 3-B; Pottstown, 7; Easton, 8; 

WUkesbarre, 9-12. 

"Midnight Maidens" — Howard, Boston, Sl- 
Aprll 8: Gayety. Brooklyn. 7-12. . 

"Mlie-a-Mlnut» Girls"— Troeadero. Phila- 
delphia. Sl-Aprll E: Chester, Pa., 7-s: 
Camden. N. J.. 10-13. _ , 

"Military Maids" — Star, Toronto, Ont., Sl- 
Aprll E; Garden. Buffalo, N. Y.. 7-13. 

"Mischief Maker*"— Victoria, Pittsburgh, 
31-April 5: Perm Circuit, 7-12. #• 

"Monte Carlo Girls"— Wheeling, 31-Aprll 2; 
Newcastle, Pa., 3: Beaver Falls. 4: Can— 
. ton, 0„ ; Victoria, Pittsburgh, 7-12. 

"Orientals" — Grand, Worcester. Mass., 31- 
Aprll 5: Howard, Boston. 7-18. __^ 

"Parisian Flirts"— Penn Circuit, 31-April E; 
Gayety, Baltimore, 7-12. 

"Pennant Winners" — Sioux City, Iowa, 31- 
Aprll 3; Century. Kansas City, .7-13. 

"Peacemakers" — Gayety. Minneapolis, Sl- 
Aprll E: Star. St. Paul. 7-12. __ . 

"Pirates" — Empire. Cleveland, 31-Aprll 6; 

Cadillac Detroit. 7-12. 

Pat White Show— Niagara Falls, 2-E; Star, 
Toronto. Ont.. 7-12. ____„ 

"Paris by Night"— Gayety. Philadelphia. 31- 
April E; Camden, N. J.. 7-9; Chester, Pa., 
10-12. 

"Razzle Dazzle Girls" — Plaza, Springfield, 
Mass., Sl-Aprll 5; Grand, 'Worcester, 
Mass., 7-12. 

"Record Breakers" — Gayety, Milwaukee. 
31-April B: Gayety. Minneapolis. 7-12. 

"Social Follies" — Lyceum. Washington. Sl- 
Aprll B; Troeadero. Philadelphia. 7-12. 

"Speedway Girls" — Pottstown, 81: Easton. 
April 1: WUkesbarre. 2-6: Majestic. 
Scranton. Pa., 7-12. 

"Tempters"— Majestic. Scranton, 81-April 
S; Binghamton, N. Y., 7-8; Schenectady, 
9-12. _ 

"Trail Hitters" — Lyceum. Columbus. O.. 
31-April 6; Wheeling. W. Va.. 7-9: New- 
castle. Pa.. 10; Beaver Fails. 11; Canton, 

O.. 12. 
"World Beaters" — Cadillac. Detroit. Sl- 
Aprll S: Englewood. Chicago. 7-12. 

PENN CIRCUIT 

Monday — McKeesport. Pa. 
Tuesday — Unlontown, Pa. 
Wednesday — Johnstown. Pa. 
Thursday — Altoona, Pa. 
Saturday — York, Pa. 

. U. 5. LIBERTY THEATRES 

Week April 7th 

Dev ens — First half. Vaudeville; last half. 

pictures. 
Upton — First half. Vaudeville; last half. 

"Manhattan Revue." 
Merritt— Billy Allen Musical Co. (All 

Dlx — First half, "Sick a Bed"; last half, 

"Stop, Look and Listen." 
Meade — First half. "Hearts of Humanity"; 

last half. "Parlor. Bedroom and Bath." 
Lee— First half. Vaudeville; last half. "Oh. 

Lady! Lady!!" 
Jackson — First half. Vaudeville; last half, 

"Romance of the Air." 
Cordon — First half. Pictures; last half. 

Vaudeville. 



p showfSSt i&vSlSSg*?'**""* 

Dodge— First half, Pictures; last half. "Mian 

Blue Eyes." 
Grant — First half. "Miss Blue Eyes": last 

half. Pictures. 
Custer— First half. Camp Show; last half. 

"Miss Bine Eyes." 

Sherman Vaudeville. (An week.) 
MUls-£Manbattan Revue." (An week.) 
Humphries — First half. Picture*: last half. 

"Sick a Bed." 
Stewart— First half, "Stop, Look and Lis- 
ten".; last half. "Kiss Burglar." - 

^•fflcf'«^d.S• ,f • ***■»*»: "»«* n«I*Y 

TraWs— Feature Pictures. (AH week.) 
Bowie— Feature Pictures. (All weak.) 
Funston— Schuster-Davis Stock Co. (AD 

week.) 
Taylor— Orpheum Players. (All week.) 



Fields. AL G.— Alton, DL, S-«; Hi 

ssSsfi SS^^'i Keokuk. tT -~ 

BS SS >«»>■??>■. One— Binghamton. N. Y.. 8; 

Albany. 4-5. 
De Rue Bros.— Curwensville. PSu, 8; Phn- 

llpaburg. 3; Huntsdale. 4; BeUelonte, C. 
O'Brien. Nell— Henderson. k£TxT:Sna2^ 

vflle. 4; Paducah, 8: Belleville, fat, r^ 

CIRCUS 2 

Rlngitng Bros, ft Barnum ft Ballsy— Madl«~ 
son Square Garden, indef. 

TABLOIDS 

Z VF?!',' B -J' 3 * Revne"— Coliseum. Nw 

Castle. Pa., 31-Aprll 5. V 

Z^rroWa "American Girls" — Princess. 

Youngstown, o., Sl-Apr. 8. ..; 

ZarrpWa "English Daisies"— Star. Muncle. 

Ind.. 30-Apr. B. 7 

Zarrow's "Zls Zag Town Girls"— Lyceum, 

Cincinnati. O.. 30-Apr. B. ' 

Zarrow's "Yanks"— Ada Mead. Lexington. 

Ky., 31-Apr. E. ^^* * 

t STOCK ■ 

Astor— Guy Players. Jamestown. N. Y.. 
lndef. 

M * ca f*rJ>\Ay6r*—Alaatn r Theatre, Port- 
land. Ore., lndef. 

Bessey Stock Co.— Racine. Wis., lndef. 
H r ey ock <3d - — colonial, Baltimore, In- 

Blaney Stock— York-rtHe. New York City. 

indef. 
BUtney Stock— Lyceum, Troy, N. Y. 
Bunting Emma— 14th Street, New York 

City, indef. 

Briasac Virginia. Stock — Strand, San 
Diego, Cal., lndef. ~ 

Castle Square Stock Co.— Castle Square. 
Boston, lndef. «m—«» 

Comerford Players — Lynn, Mass.. lndef. 
- Cutler Stock Co.— Oswego, N. Y.. Sl-Apr. B. 

Crown Theatre Stock Co.— Ei Bowland— 

Corson Stock CO.— Chester Playhouse Ches- 
ter. Pa., hidef. 

Columbia Stock Co.— Snow Hill, Md.. 8-8. 
qS" ,",,, Payers — Winnipeg, Manitoba".- 

D %"KS ,1 . a ' H**'. Shyers— Orpheum. Phila- 
delphia. Pa., lndef. 

Desmond, Mae— Schenectady, N. Y. 

Ebey Stock Co.— Oakland. Cake lndef. 

Empire Flayers— Salem. Mass.. lndef. 

Enterprises-Stock Co.— Green Bay, Wis., In- 
def. . a> 

Grand Theatre Stock Co.— Tulsa. Okie., in- 
def. 

Gardner Bros. Stock Co.— Palace. Okla- 
homa City. Okla., lndef. • 

Hyperion Players— New Raven. Conn., ln- 
def. 

Hudson Theatre Stock Co.— Union Hill. N. 

J., indef. 
Howard-Lorn Stock— National. Englewood. 

111.. Indef. 
Hawkins- Webb Co.— Majestic. Flint. Mich.. 

Indef. t 

Hathaway Players— Brockton, Mass., lndef. 
Keith Stock— Columbus, O., Indef. 
Llacomb players — Majestic San Francisco. 

Cal.. Indef. 
Liberty Players — Strand. San Diego. CaL 
Maiden Stock Co.— Maiden. Mass., indef. 
Majestic Players — Butler, Pa., lndef. 
Morosco Stock Co. — Los Angeles, lndef. 
. Metropolitan Players— Binghamton, N. Y., 

lndef. 
Martin. Lewis Stock Co. — Fox, Jollet, 111., 

indef. 
Nellie Booth Players— (Nellie Booth, Mgr.) 

— Kenyon. Pittsburgh. Pa., lndef. 
Northampton Players— Northampton. Mass.. 

lndef. 
Oliver Players— Shubert. St. Paul. Minn., 

Indef. 
Oliver Otis Players — Orpheum, Qulncy, I1L, 

lndef. 
Permanent Players— Orpheum. Moose Jaw. 

Saak.. Can., lndef. 
Permanent Players — Lyceum. Paterson, N. 

J., lndef. 
Peck. Geo. — Opera House. Rockford, III.. 

lndef. ■ 
Plnney Theatre Stock Co.— Boise, Ida., ln- 
def. ** ' 
Poll Players — Bridgeport. Conn., indef. 
Poll's Stock— Poll's. Hartford, Conn., lndef. 
Phelan. F. V. — Hallfnv N. S.. indef. 

Polack. Edith. Stock Co.— Diamond. New 

Orleans, lndef. 

Roma Reade. Edward Keane Bayers — 
Jamestown. N. Y., Indef. , 

Royal Stock Co. — Vancouver. B. C. lndef. 

Shlpman Co. — Bert, Hot Springs, Ark., ln- 
def. i 

Savoy Players— Hamilton, Can., lndef. 

Trent Players — Hoboken, N. J., lndef. ' 

Vaughan Glaser Stock Co. — Pittsburgh, in- 
def. i /' ^ . sis 

Wallace, Morgan, Stock— Grand, Sioux City. 
- la.. Indef. 
Williams. Ed., Stock— South Bend, Ind.. In- 

Wilkes Players— Seattle. WasfTT lndef.' 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2. 1919 




For Rent or For Sale 

AMERICAN THEATRE 

Franklin St, and Girard Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Modern, attractive Playhouse. Seating capacity over 1500. 
Apply: H. WENIGER, 437 Arch St., Phila., Pa. 


HU HI 

Booked solid M July 1, 1919 

Direction MAX ROGERS 


IT WJLL PAY YOU TO SEE 

MAHIEU 

THEATRICAL COSTUMER 

Original and Exclusive Design* for the Coming Season 

BERT BERNSTEIN. Gen. RmntuUyt 

243 W. 47th ST., Now York, Phone, Bryant 1462 




yosi s mF° 

DIRECTION — FRED BRANT 


THE PERFECTION OF ARTISTIC STUPIDITY— Eve-Telegram 

PELHAM-LYNTON 

And a Monocle. "Tbs Symbol ei interrogation and iacompreaeniibfliry."— 

SIR GILBERT PARKER 


■"SSLST BUCK HART 

THE ESCAPED ARTIST OF THE PLAINS . Dir. — LEW COLDER 


Read The Clipper Letter List 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 




J MUSICML 



OPENING DATES AHEAD 

"The Good Bad Woman" — H. H. FTaxee — 

Harris. April 7. 
"The J cat 1 ' — Arthur' Hopkins — Plymouth. 

April 7. 
Bronx Exposition — April 26. 
Treasurers' Club Benefit — Hudson, April 27. 
Sooaa Band Tonr — John Philip Sonsa — 

Academy of Music, Brooklyn, June 14. 

OUT OF TOWN 

■The- Wrong- Number" — Schubert's, Stam- 
ford, Conn.. April 4. 

•The New Girl' 1 — C. B. Dillingham— Wash- 
ington. April 7. 

•The Cave Girl" — Cohan A Harris — Atlan- 
tic City, N. J., April 7. 

"A Night Off' — Richard - Lambert — Balti- 
more. Md., April 7. 

-Sunshine" — Johnson-Shaw Co. — Trenton, 
N. J., April ll. . , _ 

New England District Convention, I. A. T. 
8. E.' — Lomn. Mass.. April 13. . _.. 

"The- Dangerous Age 1 '— Ed. Dublnaay^-Chi- 
caEO, April 21. 

'"Passing. Show of 1919" — Palace Music Hall, 

Chicago. May 14. 
"Follies'? — Florens Ziegfeld, Jr. — Atlantic 
City. N. J„ May 21. 

SHOWS CLOSING 

"Eedemptlon" — Plymouth, April S. 

"LETS BEAT IT," 
TYPICAL SOLDIER SHOW, 
WILL WIN FAVOR 



"ran BEAT IT" — A two-set musi- 
cal farce; book by PrlTats Harry 
Qribble aad Lleot. Wm. A. Halloran. 
Jr., aad mnalc by PrlTstes WUIIam J. 
WIttaaa, Barton Hamilton. Eric Krebs 
and Sid Marlon. Produced Monday 
areolae March 34. at the Century 
Theatre, by members of the 27th 
BMbssb. 

,. CAST. 

First Street Cleaner. Corporal Le Boy Beers 
Second Street Cleaner.. Fr. Harold Dunham 

Roscoe Bansome PrlTate Jack Johannes 

Merlock Tomes Cor. Albert Van Zandt 

Granville Greening Private Jack Roche 

Kitty Conifer PrlTate I. A. Crawford 

Johnny Cola PrlTate Oonnj 0"DonneU 

jimmy Woo* Prlrate Harold Dager 

B1U Marlowe Prlrate Erie Krebs 

lira. Marlowe PrlTate Dan Burns 

Waiter Pritata Leon Pearee 

The Hon. Diadwlddle St. B. Dunsmore 

ST Corporal Boy Lloyd 

Billy .Barrow ....TPrirate Howard Plaaamaa 

Marjorle Mack Prirate Walter Roberta 

Jethro Mack Prlrate Harry Cribble 

Lotta Noras ...Prlrate William Bramman 

Charlie Corporal Lester Appletaa 

Abulia Chandra Prlrate Barry Sbarpc 



The history of the writing of "Let's 
BeBt It" is interesting in that it was 
written = in the battle zone in France in 
which the 27th Division saw action. It 
waa written during "rest" periods, the 
greater portion of the second act having 
been turned ont in a billet near the St. 
Quentin. Canal at Bellicourt, a few days 
after the Germans had been driven out of 
the place in some of the hottest fighting 
of the ; war. The composers ground out 
their music on a battered old piano which 
they captured from the Huns. 

Like -its predecessor, "Ton Know Me 
Al," "Let's Beat If is a Simon pure 27th 
Division product from its making to its 
production, and,- like it, seems destined to 
win public approval. 

A number of stars after the names of 
the players showed that they had been 
wounded or gassed. But this in no way 
prevented them from dancing and singing. 

The story of the piece tells of a bunt 
for an emerald which has been stolen by 
Ahnirn . Chandra and hidden by him in a 
bottle of perfumery, which Mar jorie Mack 
purchased to flavor the candy in her new 
store on the boardwalk. Of course, the 
gem is finally discovered and punishment 
is meted ont to the "villain" in true mus- 
ical comedy style. 

E. A. Crawford, as Kitty Coulter, made 
one of the liveliest brick top soubrettes 
ever beheld in a bathing suit at a musical 
comedy seaside scene. 

Walter Roberts was Marjorie, the in- 
genue. Eric Krebs was Rita Marlowe, a 
temperamental young woman, and Dan 
Bruns was Mrs. Marlowe, her mother. 

Howard Plassman played Billy Barrow, 
manager of a jewelry store, and Harry 
Sharpe was the Hindu, Ahnim Chundra. 

There were a number of tuneful songs. 



NEW CROTHERS 

PLAY PROVES A 

GOOD COMEDY 



"39 BAST."— A 


comedy by Rachel 


Crotbers. Presented Monday e renins", 


March, SI, at the 


Broadhnret Theatre, - 


by the Shoberta. 




CAST. 






Timothy O'Brien... 


. . . . .Victor ■ Bother land 


Mlaa McMasters 


Blanche Prlderld 


Mrs. de MaiUy 


Alison Sklpworth 


- Dr. Hobbard ...... 


...Albert Carroll 


Mrs. Smith 


: .Ludt Moore 


8sldee- Clarence 


Edith aresham 


Myrtle Clarence .. 


Mildred Arden 


Napoleon Qlbbs .... 


Henry Hun 


Penelope Pean...... 


- . - . . Constance Blanay 


The Park Policeman 


1.......:-.John Morris 



The. new comedy of boarding house life 
by Rachel Crothers is a refreshingly nat- 
ural performance and the first night audi- 
ence revelled at the amusing situations 
and quaint character types. These char- 
acters serve as the background for the 
romance of two young lovers, who find 
themselves in this uncongenial roost. One 
is the daughter of a poor clergyman who 
came to New York in search of fame and 
found a haven in a chorus. She meets a 
wealthy young man who soon falls in 
love with her. 

After the introduction of the characters 
in the first act, the stage is left clear for 
the second act, in which the two young 
lovers meet for their first talk alone in 
a nook in Central Park. There is a note 
of sorrow when the girl, indignant at the 
suggestion that she cannot .make her way 
alone in New York, runs away from her 
protector. 

The types are well played, with honors 
possibly for Lucia Moore, the giggling 
widow and Blanche Friderici, spinster. 
Victor Sutherland's vulgarity as the 
westerner was laughable. In the two 
young players of the leading roles there 
was uncommon assistance. Constance 
Binney is a young woman of charm. 
Henry Hull, who was in the east of "The 
Man Who Came Back," revealed a keen 
sense of humor and was altogether de- 
lightful in the role. 

Routine life in the boarding house on a 
May day is originally presented and there 
are passages of youthful delight in the 
play which are a rare pleasure. The 
boarders consist of a titled Italian, a friv- 
olous widow from the south, a doctor, un- 
attractive twins and a fresh young man 
from the west. 

This play of character with Its setting 
in Mrs. de Mailly's boarding house has 
given the author a range of action of 
which she takes full advantage. It is 
interesting comedy at all times with the 
youthful actors playing their parts bril- 
liantly. 

JANET BEECHER GETS DIVORCE 

Janet Beecher secured a divorce from 
Harry R. Gugsrenheimer in the Supreme 
Court last week. Justice Tompkins signed 
the decree and It was filed in the West- 
chester County Clerk's office. 

The decree awards her $2,600 per year 
alimony and permits her to resume her 
maiden name. In addition, Quggenheimer 
will not be allowed to marry again in 
this State while she lives. Quggenheimer, 
whose father was the late Randolph Gug- 
genheimer. the first president of the Bor- 
ough of Manhattan, was married to Miss 
Beecher on July 3, 1913. 

SELWYrTS PRODUCE HEW PLAY 

The Selwyns are assembling a cast for 
a new play by Eugene Walters called 
"The Challentre" which will have its pre- 
miere in Washington. Margaret Law- 
rence, Allen Dinehart and John Holllday 
are in the cast. 



BURGOMASTER CAST CHANGES - 

Walter Kingaford baa succeeded Mal- 
colm Moffat in the cast of "A Burgomaster 
of 'Belgium" at the Belmont Theatre. 
Captain Max Montesole, who staged the 
production, sailed for England on Tues- 
day, taking with him several plays for 
production in London. He plans to re- 
turn here In the falL 



"SWEET INNISFAI.I.F.N" 
GIVES BERNARD DALY 
PLENTY OF SCOPE 



"SWEWT HmiSPAIABM"— A roman- 
tic Irish drama in four acta and- Are • 
scenes, presented Monday evening. 
... March 94, at the LaaJagnSJ Theitre. . 
by Bernard Daly. 

CAST. 

Barry McOool Geo. BL Blcbaxdeoa 

Nora Shannon Kirrteen Forrest 

Mrs. O'Malley .Ada' Bherman 

Mr. O'Brien "..Fred A. Qteeeco 












Gwendoline Williams 

Edw. J. Tsrrls 

. . . Josephine Mangold 


Desmond Moore 

Uttle Molly 





MUSICAL COMEDY FOR MOROSCO 

"Smith, Jones and Brown" is the name 
of a new musical comedy which will soon' 
be produced by Oliver Morosco. It will 
appear early next season. 



"Sweet Innisfallen," and its star, Ber- 
nard Daly, an Irish singer, are new to 
New York, although both are well known 
through this country and Canada, where 
Daly has become popular. 

The play belongs to the oM school of 
Irish drama, with the persecuted maiden, 
the "villainous villain" and the "happy- 
go-lucky", hero. It is crudely written in 
a - style now obsolete, with asides and 
soliloquies, but, withal, tells a rather in- 
teresting story and has been splendidly 
mounted, four of its five scenes being, 
elaborate and well calculated to bring, 'ont. 
the Irish atmosphere. 

It deals with the quest of Larry O'Con- 
nell for the man who married and desert- 
ed hie sister. He comes to Innisfallen 
with Little Molly, a child of eight at nine 
years, and his coming is the talk of the 
place because of his vagabond appearance 
and the fact that he will tell no one any- 
thing about himself. 

Larry, with Little Molly as his constant . 
companion, goes about singing in an ap- 
parently light hearted manner, which wins 
the affections of Nora Shannon. 

Before Larry's advent, a certain Lord 
Aahton had been murdered, and a young 
squire of the place is accused of the 
crime. He is in hiding. His sister, Grace 
Moore, is to marry Gerald O'Brien, but 
Squire Carlton, who baa squandered his 
fortune, determines to marry her and 
gain her riches. 

Carlton, who knows of a crime which _ 
Mylea Regan committed years before, ' 
holds it over him and forces him to tell 
Grace that he saw her shoot Lord Aah- 
ton. Then Carlton tries to kill Gerald, 
who is saved by Larry. Carlton also 
throws Regan off of a 50- foot bluff into 
a lake, bnt the ever present Larry again 
comes to the rescue. 

Carlton succeeds in placing Desmond in 
the hands of the law. He is tried and 
convicted and is sentenced to die. The 
day of execution arrives, and with it 
comes Regan who confesses that he killed 
Lord Aahton because Aahton had caused 
the death of Regan's mother. Regan .then 
dies and Carlton la charged with his mur- 
der, but before he is taken away, Larry 
makes known to him that he, Carlton, is 
the father, of Little Molly and was the 
despicable husband of Larry's sister. 

Bernard Daly' won much applause for 
the rendition of his songs and his acting. 
His rendering of a serio-comic number 
with "To die" as the final words, waa his 
best singing effort and drew him several 
encores. He waa not in good voice, but 
put several of his songs over welL 

Kirsteen Forrest waa charming as Nora, 
and Charles Bates did capital character 
work aa Maples Regan. 



•TAKE IT FROM ME" 
EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD 
NEW MUSICAL SHOW 



"TAKJB IT FROM ME."— .V "musical 
comedy in a prologue and two acts, 
with lyrics and book by win Johnstone - 
' and mnalc by Win K. -Anderson. Pre- 
sented at the *sth St. Theatre. Mon- 
day erenlnc. March SI, by Jos. W. 1 
Osltes. 

OAST. : 

.Vernon Van Dyke Vred Hlllebrand 

Barney Charles WMsh Homer 

Dick Roller A. Don*- la a LaaTl 1 1 

Gwendolyn Forsyth* ....... Helen Baftary - 

Tom Eggett ...Jack MeOovan 

Sheriff "Biff" Doyle John C. Lamoat 

Horace Turner '. .Harold Visard"-. 

KUa Abbott ..Alice nun - 

Wllklos Hsrry Eurnham 

Cyras" Crebb ........... ..William. Balfour 

Grace Gordon Georgia Msoatt 

Qneenle LsBelle Vers Mlcbelsna 

Miss Dewltt Butler Dorothy Beta 

Harmon ..Bu Leech 

Other characters by Misses .Leah Orlfflth. - 
Martens* Taylor. Florence .Crow. Teressa 
Warden. Mildred Thompson. Berates 
Frank, Lacracu Craig.-" Bstelle Wbtts. 
Msurile Clifton, Marlon Comfort. Brownie 
Roes. Ruth &awyar. Hetty DeGrasae. Belle. 
Sawyer. Carrie De - NotIII*. CecU. Banana. . 
snd Peggy EUls. " 




"Take It from Me" la a musical comedy 
with a well developed plot which, strange 
to say, unfolds a story that is. not only 
interesting and highly entertaining from 
start to finish, bnt is really logical as well. 
The humor of the piece is Irresistible, the 
situations and incidental bgilnsss being of 
the most natural sort imaginable, and 
loaded to the muxsle with bighf-'class com- 
edy values. -T*t S5V " ■ v 

The character drawing is superb, the 
various types presented bejng^temedlatMy 
recognisable aa real, - live " nwfcan . beings 
that one might expect to meet in every - 
day life, and not mere statin posts and 
caricatures, such as the a*eaSle* musical 
comedy usually puta forward aa charac- 
terisations. 

The hero of "Take It from 
a large department store, 
retain permanently, providing 1 
ceeds in operating the establishment 
profitably for one year. -:"' 

Tbe. amateur merchant calls to h la aid 
rrrri ggafr Srrlends who immediately jump 
in and work like Trojans to help him "put 
the store over." The hero's male Men da, 
incidentally, call In a third assistant "In 
the shape _ of a movie vampire, and It 
might be said right here that the word 
"shape** is used advisedly, this particular 
"vamp," as played by Vera Micbelena, be- 
ing one hundred per cent perfect in the 

matter of lines and curves. 

The quartette of funmakera keep the 
laughs a-coming in one continuous gale, 
the fun arising principally from the se- 
rious manner in which each of the four 
goes about his or her task of keeping the 
department store in the family. 

There is still another wonderfully played 
character that esters importantly into the 
proceedings at all -times. This role is por- 
trayed by Alice fifjle, who makes the 
hero's private secretary a comedy' "charac- 
ter creation worth going miles to sea, Mia. 
Hills' impersonation of the angular spin- 
ster in Take It from Me" will gain her 
much fame and many dollars eventually 
if the opinion of the firatnightera amounts 
to anything. j 

The songs era bright ■ and snappy and 
the music Is exceedingly tuneful, contain- 
ing more than one meloiry that seems des- 
tined 'to be whistled and sung for s long 
time to. come. 



GOES INTO HAJtRli 
"The Good Bad Woman," produced by 
Harry Frazee, will open next Monday at 
the Harris Theatre following "The in- 
visible Foe," which doses Saturday. 
William Anthony McGuire wrote the play, 
the east of which incladea Margaret ni- 
ington, Robert Edeson, Wilton Lackaje, 
Katheririe Kaelred, Richard Tabor. Bawl 
Turney, Amy Onglej and Howard Bool- 
den, .j 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



AND THE GREATEST OF THEM ALL IS 








By S. R. HENRY, D. ONIVAS ud FRANK H. WARREN 
WRITERS OF HITS ONLY— 'INDIANOLA'— <KENTUCKY DREAMS'— TEARS'— 'PAHJAMAH' 

Published By JOS. W. STERN & CO., 102-4 West 38th St., NY. C. 



CHARLES 



ETHEL 



••." ■■• ■: . 



O'DONNELL Se BLAIR 



IN 



i •--- 



THE PIANO TUNER 

SENSATIONAL THROUGHOUT 



A REVELATION IN COMEDY 

THIS WEEK (March 31) BUSHWICK, BROOKLYN 

DIRECnON-^JAS. E PLUNKETT 



NEXT WEEK (April 7) RQYAL 



FULLY PROTECTED 



WARNING TO A MERI CAN PERFOR MERS 

It has come to thejaaqwledge of the VARIETY ARTISTES' FEDERATION that certain English Agents, or their representatives, 
are holding out inducements to American performers to go to England. In most cases contracts for a few trial weeks are offered, and 
a promise given that other engagements will follow. Such statements should be accepted with the greatest reserve. The condition of the 
market in Great Britain at the present time is such that the fulfilment of the. promises given is very unlikely. The places of amusement 
playing variety cannot give employment to more than 2,000 acts per week, and there are already in the country at least 5,000 acts competing 
for the 2,000 places. Men who have been serving with the Forces are now being demobilized, and, consequently, the congestion is increas- 
ing. The prices of commodities are extremely high, and accommodation in the large centres is very, difficult to obtain. American artistes 
are strongly advised not to take the trip unless BEFORE LEAVING THEY HOLD DEFINITE AND BINDING CONTRACTS TO 
COVER THE ENTIRE PERIOD THEY INTEND TO REMAIN IN THE COUNTRY; otherwise they may find themselves unable 
to obtain ■work after the first few 'weeks. 



NATIONAL MUSICAL COMEDY STOCK COMPANY 



Comedians, Soubrette, Singing and Dancing Juvenile 
Man, Prima Donna, all kinds of Musical Comedy People; 
can also use Chorus Girls. Must be young and good 
looking. Send Photos and all Particulars in first letter. 
Photos will be returned. Season opens June 2. One year's steady work if you can make good. 

C. R. HACEDORN, NATIONAL THEATRE, DETROIT. MICH. 



WANTS 



GEO. KAL ALUffl'S HA WAII ANS 



DDL GEO. SOFRANSKI 



BOOKED SOLID LOEW TIME 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



CiJj»j» 




In Kdv to avoid rats tab— and to Insure th» ■— Ml MfcM of th. lnon ^ wWM 
la tfcss Uot. • POSTAL CARD moat bo mo* ici|iteelhi| as to forward yoar lottar. It mot 
bo ilrnod with your hill name and the addroaa to which tho lottor hi to bo coat, and tho 
Una of liuil foBowad by tho bo should bo oionMoood. 

Planee aooBtiaa tho date (or natabof) of tho CUPPER la which tho lotton sea* far 



GENTLEMEN 



, C FrefcrUaa, Geo. 

, A. Famon. Nat 

BM lut M. Gerald. Boost 

DUsen-Drs* Cliarwr. Ju. 

Players doner, wm. 

Casus. Hal Green. Jot. P. 

Cody, day Howard, CMS 

DoiBJfllj, Jack Harris. Lew 



Mar- 



Lrk. Oad 
stefau*. 



Jt o Leon. Geo. 

Louis I^nrvir . Ha but 

Tan tone. Chat T. 

_lrf Lsdd. EMnDtdt 

HUt . Lloyd. Udmtf Oakley, 1 

Chss. B. Io Moo*, Mor- 

atDtOB ton 
Bfflj 



Maw. i 

Paulding. 



Bdd. A. Qortoo 
Hum Geo. 
8eJby. 



Taylor, Jos. M. 
Ward, Mfflkret 
William, Jack 



LADIES 



Carteton. 



curtoo. Kittr 

Oawelaoc. Basal 
Courtney, Bobble 



Demerol, 

BE 

Fas* Jwtililm. 
Pariardcaa. Doll 
Gallatner, DthT 



Oarln, Jennl* 
Catb- 



Moraa. Anot 



Geries, Annette 
to Ooor. Maria 
Lobster, Helen 



Sterna, Hilda 



ana. Mary 

Baodals, Gladys 



MOT J) 
DeUy 



Stuart, Era 



Farm/ 
Wtlsoo, Lola 
Tonne Mi*. 



HAPPY 



EMIL M. 



THOMPSON & KING 



THE TWO MISFITS 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOBBY ADAMS 



Personality — Plus 



SHERMAN & ROSE 



Clever Dancing Act 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



IM 



DRAMATIC STOCK PEOPLE for TOOTLE THEATRE. Must join on wire. Run all cummer. 
Could use scene painter. Must have wardrobe and stock experience. Send programs, photos and 
quote rock-bottom salary. A. R. BRADF1ELD, Manager Tootlo Theatre, St. Joseph, Mo. 



DEATHS OF THE WEEK 



ANN LIVERMORE. once a member of 
the Livennore Minstrels, and tno motner 
of Horace Sheldon, conductor of the Pal- 
ladium, In Lonilon, died in that city on 
March 86. „ 

RICHARD HEMM1NGS, formerly a well- 
known circus man, died last week, while 
attending a meeting In Elk's Hall, Phila- 
delphia. He was elghty-flve years old and 
was born In Birmingham. England. Heart 
disease caused his death. 

Mr. Hemmlng-s entered the circus busi- 
ness in the early '40's and came to America 
in 1855. He then left for Cuba and re- 
turned to this country with Lent and 
Welch's circus. He opened his first show 
with Dan Gardner at Canuck's Wood. 
Philadelphia. In 1860, and later was the 
first circus to play In Atlantic City. He 
formed the Gardner, Hemmlngs and 
Cooper show In 1863, and after many 
changes in it Hemmlngs went out In 1872. 
He then continued on the road with Adam 
Forepaugh until he retired. 

BENJAMIN STERN, who had been put- 
ting up a fig-tit against pneumonia, at 
Stern's private hospital for two weeks. 
finally succumbed to the malady which has 
laid so many low during the past year, last 
Thursday morning, at the age of fifty-eight 
years. 

Stern had been engaged In various fields 
of the show business. He had been the 
representative for Grand Opera, band con- 
certs, foreign and native theatrical lumin- 
aries, Summer parks and productions. He 
directed Lillian Russell and Fannie Daven- 
port among others. He was general book- 
ing manager for the late Henry B. Harris 
when tho latter was at the height of his 
successful career. One of the feats for 
which Stern Is most widely remembered is 
that of hurrying one of Harris' companies 



out ot San Francisco at the time the bis 

earthquake caused so much damage. Ho 
managed the tour of the company so skill- 
fully that it did not miss one engagement- 
Telegraph wires and other means of com- 
munication had been wrecked, and it was 
not until some time bad passed that Harris 
found out that all of the booking dates had 
been filled and that the members of tho 
company had not been killed or injured In 
the big upheaval. 

A widow and two sons survive Stern, 
who was a member of the Pacific lodge 
of Masons, No. 233. The latter organisation 
took charge of his funeral. 

MRS. CLARA HAGUE, of the team of 
Hague and Herbert, died at her home In 
Toledo, Ohio, on Mar. 17. She had been ill 
since the team retired from the stage three 
years ago. Her husband, mother and three 
sisters survive her. 

FRANK, FOSTER, an old actor, died at 
Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia last 
week from an attack of heart disease. He 
was seventy-four years old and had been 
under the care of the Actors' Fund of 
America for a number of years. He was 
buried by the fund In Philadelphia. His 
relatives, if any. are asked to communicate 
with the Actors' Fund in the Longacre 

Building, New York. 

JOHN H. CHRIST, a vaudeville actor 
who lived with bis parents In West Sev- 
entieth Street, was Instantly killed last 
Sunday as the result of a fall from a win- 
dow on the fourth floor of his house, to the 
court in the back of the building. He was 
twenty-six years old. 

MIL.O, the dancer, known in private life 
as May Davis, died at her home in Brook- 
lyn last week. She was twenty-nine years 
of age. - 



GLADYS KLARK COMPANY 

Wanti At OnetB — LEADING MAN 

Not less than FIVE FEET TEN, for such parts as MacMiUan Forrester, in 
"THE BRAT." John Hayward, in "PLAYTHINGS." Dr. Webster, in "THE 
NATURAL LAW." Etc. State all in first; photos. Address J. E. BALFOUR, 
Somersworth, N. H. Rehearsals week April 14th. 



WANTED xS e COLUMBIA STOCK COMPANY 

Tall Mao. far Iht— alfaa. light cnasosaasa, aaoa for awsasnrat basalaoea, woanaaa far la^aosaoa, must" 
do two characters. Bos* Canvas Man. Houses till June, then tent till September, thee back 
in houses. Work the year around. All photos returned. State lowest in first letter. No time 
to dicker. Address WM. KRALCE. Mar, Soow Hill, Md, week of March 31; Mfflahors, DM, 
week of April 7. 

WANTED CLEVER STOCK PEOPLE 

All lines, including Scenic Artist. Send usual credentials, which will be re- 
turned. Please mention salary without inviting offers. Rehearsals April 14. 
Address until April 11, GEORGE F. ORMSBEE, 6 North Jay Street, Schenec- 
tady, New York. After that, Lyric Theatre, Jamestown, New York. 

WANTED— A RELIABLE BILLPOSTER 

Experience absolutely essential. Permanent position. Write quick, giving full 
particulars, salary, etc., to YORK POSTER ADVERTISING COMPANY, 
York. Pa. 

NEW YORK ATTRACTIONS 



CEO. r All AN Theatre. "'way A 4Sd St. Bves. 
M. VVIIAII P JO. Mats. Wed. A Sat. 2.30. 

GEO. M. COHAN'S 

HEW COMEDY 

"A PRINCE THERE WAS" 

GEO. M. COHAN AS THE PRINCE 



B. F. KEITH'S 

PALME 



MARIE DRESSLER, JACK 
HOXWOBTB, 

IISSI, 

ABDEXE A CO., TOBEY 
Broadway A 47tb St. . 

Mat. DaUy at I r. SI. * NOBJstAS. WtaTBTOH'B 
25, 60 and 75c. WATER LIONS, PBJBA 

» soYs ti tl » * «>•. ™ TO » 0EDD "- 



Theatre. W. 42d St. Evca. 8.15. 
Mats. Wed. 4 Sat. 2.15. 



mmsmn 

XLAW * EBLANGEB PRESENT , " 

TIE VELVET LADY 

Hilarious Baw Musical Comedy. 
artraic by victor Herbert. 



I IRFRTY Tboatr *- w - 42nd st - * 



8.30. 



Mats. Wed. * Sat. 2.30. 



Henry Miller, Blanche Bate* 

Holbrook Bllnn, Ettelle Winwoot. 

sad a Di«Unsrui»hed Company la 

MOLIERE 

A PLAT BT roXTF MOEIXEB. 

W. 44th 8t. nr. B'wij. Bres. 
8.30. Mats. Wed. at Sat. 2.S0. 
A bullion-Dollar Saeoaaa." — Globe. 
A. K. WOODS PRESENTS 



Theatre, West 44th St. Errs. 

8.20. Mats. Thar. A Sat. 2.20. 
SAVED BELABCO PRESENTS 

FRANCES STARR 

In "TIGER! TIGER!" 

A sow play by Edward Xnabloch. 

DCDITDI 1st* W. 420 St. Eres. 8.30. Mats 
IVEr UDL1L. Wed. A Sat 2.30. 

ARTHUR HOPKINS PRESENTS 

MARJ0R1E RAMBEAU 

(By arrangement with A. H. WOODS) In 

'THE FORTUNE TELLER" 

CHARLES SXLUBQHAX rBEBEBTfl 

«« EVERYTHING »• 

• at the 

HIPPODROME 

A Maauaatb Xnadoal Spaetaole by B. H. BaraaMa. 
Mats. Dally. Best Seats. *1. 



HUDSON 



LOUIS 



SAM 



ELTINGE 



MANN BERNARD 

fa FRIENDLY ENEMIES 

By. Samuel Saipman and Aaron Hoffman, 

Theatre, West 42nd St. Eves, 
at 8.80. Mats. Wed. A Sat. 2 JO. 
A. H. W00BS BBXSEBTB 
UaP 11M 

MAOEL'S ROOM 

With HAZEL DAWB. JOHN CUMBERLAND aid 
WALTEX JONES. 

B'wsy A 40th St. Ere,. 8.20. 
Mats. Wed. A Sat. at 2.20. 
CrTnBT.BW rXOHXABT PBE8EHTB 

WILLIAM GILLETTE 

DT THE HEW COatEDY 

"DEAR BRUTUS" 

BT I. M , BABBXE. 



I V aft? ITU 45tb st - Demr B'way. Eres. 
Ii I till V SB 8.30. Mata. Thar. A Set. 2.30. 

SAVED BELASOO PBE8EBTS 

DADDIES 



OLYMPIC SEtSi 



Avs. 



TUb Wuk 



GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES 

Nest Woolt— AMERICANS 

BROOKLYN THEATRES 

O *Y* Jk f~% Jay nr. Fulton St. Mat. 
aj J. i>\l% Tel. Main 1898 Dally 

AMERICANS 



Evan- Sim Am 1 Ws .. 
Wnatllatr Every Tuesday 
Next Woo h— HIGH FLYERS 

CASINO THEATRE 

THIS WEEK 

BEAU 1 Y REVUE 

Not Week— BOWERY BURLESQUER5 

G A Y E T Y l^lpo* *v«. 

^*** * *=* * * BROA.DWA.Y 

THIS WEEK 

AVIATORS 

SUNDAY CONCERTS 



- by MORCANSTERN 
Gaiety Tka.tr. Usf, Now York 



EMPIRE THEATRE 

THIS WEEK 

BEHMAN SHOW 

Next Weak — MILLION DOLLAR DOLLS 



30 



THE NtW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



QUERY TEN WITNESSES IN VAUDEVILLE PROBE 

(Continued frvm p<HK< 3 «~* on. 31 and 28.) 



ten. connected with Ma theatres. "What do per cent commission, the witness testified. 
«7 ielJ^ toe public?" IrSulred the Keith Other testimony given by Walton was i that 
lawyer "Accumulated knowledge." answered the average prlc.5 of a email time bill, neeord- 

Ing to a rough estimate, was about $1,200, 
and a big time bill about $2,500. The average 



lawyer. 
Far. 

This line of questioning continued (or tome 



time, Goodman malting minute Inquiries as to 
whether Fly paid actors transportation, 
whether he sold scenery or properties, or II 
hit theatre* conducted any transactions of a 
commercial nature that would came under 
the head of an Interstate transaction. 

Mr Walsh, the Federal Trade Commission's 
attorney, then took the witness IpjMfcMg 
sought to counteract the effect of the Utter' a 
questioning relative to the nature of the 
business Fay's theatres are encased in. 

The deduction of 1200 from the salary of 
an act entitled "A Mutate on My Part," 
which played Fay's Providence, during the with th. 
inflnensa epidemic, was next gone into by neydld 
Goodman. The affair seemed to be veryjiasy That 

in Fay's mind, he ststlng that he didn t 
think the act in question had received much 
more than that amount as full Salary. IB 
relation to the deduction. Goodman asked 



a man named Hughenot had gone 
down to Providence to protest against the 
alleged short payment. Fay, in reply, stated 
that he had never heard of Hughenot. 

A recess was then taken until two o clock, 
at which time Fay aga in resumed the stand 
and Mr Kelly, Mr. Goodman's associate, 
started Fay's continued croea-exanunation 
by asking why he didn't hire some of the 
8,000 actors who were supposed to be con- 
tinually laying oft, according to earlier tes- 
timony by Fat Casey. It should be an easy 
matter to make up a snow with so many 
available actors at hand, Mr. Kelly declared. 

Fay conceded that there were many actors 
laying off at all times, but laying off or not, 
aa the case might be, the actors were not 

particularly keen to work for him, the wit- 
ness said. Asked why this so-called condi- 
tion prevailed, the witness replied it was 
because Fay's theatres were "blacklisted.' 

Several actors had cancelled his boose 
Fay again declared and this time stated that 
among them were Boyle and Brazil, Weston 
and Peggy, Frank Gardner and Allen and 
CopelanaT Letters from the actors in ques- 
tion were introduced to support Fay's con- 
tention. A telegram purporting to be from 
Alexander Canaroua, sent to Henry Chester- 
field by Canaroua, was identified by the wit- 
ness, who stated that he had helped draft 
the message. 

Harry 6. Wallen. secretary and treasurer 
of the Keith Booking Exchange, followed Fay 
on the stand. A financial statement of the 
L*. B. O. for the year starting 1018 and 
ending 1910, was shown to him for identifi- 
cation, by the Federal Trade attorney. The 
statement disclosed the fact that the United 
Booking Offices had received the sum of 1277,- 
882.09 in the form of commissions during the 
year. Booking fees from theatres receiving 
bills from the TJ. B. O. totaled up to $44.- 

944.71. 

Mr. * Walsh then Inquired tbe amount 
charged a theatre by the TJ. B. O. for a 
booking franchise. This varied from 95 to 
1100 weekly, for the service, it was stated. 
Tbe TJ. B. O. books some 130 odd theatres, 
the witness said, but not all are charged a 
booking fee. Mr. Walsh immediately sought 
to find out which houses psld a fee and 
which did not. 

Some of the theatres not required to pay 
a booking fee and then- owners or managers 
according to Wallen, are as follows: Halsey, 
Brooklyn ; Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn ; Bijou. 
Knoxvfile; Arcade. Jacksonville: Grand, 
Montgomery; Academy, Norfolk, Wllmer and 
Vincent; Palace, New Orleans, Orpbeum 
Bealty Company; Century, Petersburg; Roa- 
noke, Roanoke. Mr. Heins. ; Lyric. Richmond, 
Jake Wells; Temple. Rochester. Mr. Moore; 
theatre In Savannah, Jake Wells; Shea's 
Toronto, Shea Amusement Co. ; Garrlck, Wil- 
mington, Mr. Dockstader: Star, Ithaca, Mr. 
Hammer; Colonial. Lancaster, Mr. Howell; 
Middlesex. Mlddletown, owned by j. corpora- 
tion: Lyceum. New London. Walter Murphy; 
Grand Opera House, Philadelphia. Mr. Wege- 
farth: Glrard Ave.. Philadelphia: Sheridan 
Park. Pittsburgh. Harris Amusement Co.: 
Majestic Peterson : Scenic Pawtucket, owned 
by a corporation; Playhouse. Psssalc. Mr. 
Taylor; Crescent, Syracuse. Mr. CahDl; AI- 
hambra, Stamford, Mr. GeroMmo: Hippo- 
drome, .Toronto, Shea Amusement Co.; Lin- 
coln. Union Hill, Mr., Marvin: Majestic, 
Harriaburg, Wllmer ana Vincent: Hippo- 
drome, Reading: BIJoa. Woonsocket. owned by 
a corporation: Majestic, WUItomsport, Mr. 
Gibson; Strand, White Plains, Mr. Marvin, 
and a theatre in Easton. 

Mr. Wallen did not know why some houses 
had to pay a booking fee while others were 
exempted, tbe witness stating that he was un- 
familiar with such matters. The Eighty-First 
Street Theatre. It was brought a few moments 
later, pays 1230.77 weekly to the TJ. B. O. 
as a fee for booking privileges, which amount 
to regularly turned over by the booking offices 



small time salary, he likewise estimated to 
be about $138 and the average big time salary 
about 1*15 weekly. 

The X; B. O. spent for advertising lost year 
the sum of $18,954. About 81,600 or 81,800 
was spent In Variety, the witness estimated, 
stating that he could not remember the exact 
figures. The sum of 132,000 was charged up 
to incidentals. 

Mr. Wallen waa then questioned In regard 
to Ms knowledge of artists' representatives, 
and tnelr goings and comings in the booking 
office. The witness was not very familiar 
with the subject and the Federal Trade attor- 
* * not go deeply into the matter, 
completed Wednsedsy's session. 

Thursday 

Dan Hennessy, head of the Family Depart- 
ment of the TJ. B. O., waa called as the first 
witness the. hearing getting under way at 10 
o'clock sharp. He stated that he had been 
In the show business for 41 years and had 
been connected with the Keith interests for 
13 years. He had held Ms present Job, as 
head of the Family Department bf the 
TJ. B, 0. for 8 or years, he stated. 

In 1000 Hennessy was elected manager of 
the Vaudeville Managers' Association of 
America, when that organization waa formed. 
He continued in office until 1005, which time 
the Vaudeville Managers' Association was dis- 
solved. He went Into the Keith Booking 
Offices, as office manager In 1900, the Keith 
concern taking over the remnants of the 
Vaudeville Managers' Association. 

Before getting Into the vaudeville end of 
the business Hennessy was manager for Tom 
Keene, the tragedian, and did advance work 
for legitimate road attractions. When the 
TJ. B. O., which was formed in 1807, merged 
with the Keith Booking Office in 1910, Hen- 
nessy was Installed in his present position 
and worked and has held it ever since. . 

There was some dissension in the ranks of 
the Vaudeville Managers' Association in 1005, 
some of tbe managers going up to the New 
York Theatre Building and starting another 
organisation, along similar lines, he said. The 
Keith Booking Office, which came Into being In 
1906, was practically the same in its member- 
ship as the Vaudeville Managers' Association. 

There was no small time In 1905, Hennessy 
said, in answer to a question by Walsh, the 
Federal Trade attorney. The eastern big time 
theatres in the 1905-1909 period were about 
as follows, he testified: the Keith and Proc- 
tor houses, Percy Williams houses, Hurtlg 
and Seamon, Tony Pastor's and theatres in 
Cleveland, Wshlngton, Detroit, Rochester, Nor- 
folk and a few other dries. 

Mr. Hennessy sold that be met Mr. Albee 
for the first time about twenty years ago. 
The hitter waa then general manager of B. F. 
Keith's enterprises. During the period in 
which the Vaudeville Managers' Association 



then the Circle Theatre. _ 

Q.— Here In New York City. A.— Yes. and 
from that one he took the Alhambra and the 
Colonial and gave up the Circle. 

Mr. Goodman again interrupted, and ad- 
dressing the witness, said : • 

"When Mr. Williams came into the TJ. B. O. 
will you tell Mr. Walsh, how many theatres . 
Mr. Williams had? . * 

Hennessy — Well, the theatres that I knew 
tie had, that played vaudeville, were the Or- 
pheum the Alhambra and the Colonial. 

Goodman, — Not the Greenpolnt and the 

Hennessy. — No, the Buahwlck was built 
afterwards. It was the Greenpolnt, waa It 
not 7 

Casey. — The Greenpolnt and the Bronx. 

Hennessy. — Oh, yes, the Greenpolnt and the 
Bronx. 

Walsh.— Did he not have the Orpheum In 
Beaton, previously to the time he went into 
the TJ. B. O., or about that time? 

Hennessy. — Previously, yes, 

<J, — Bow long previously? 

A.— Well, I did not pay very much, atten- 
tion to that, but my recollection la that he 
had It, maybe a year before that time. 

Mr. Goodman once again Interrupted and 
tald: 

"If it win save any time, I will concede 
that Mr. Williams had a theatre in Boston 
and also one in Philadelphia, and I wUl fur- 
ther concede that he transferred, his Interest 
In that theatre in Boston to B. F. Keith, ana 
that he also transferred Ms interest to the 
Philadelphia theatre to B. B\ Keith." He 
then added that, on July 1st. Williams sold 
the entire circuit to B. F. Keith for 
Sfi 000 000 

Walsh.— Do you know when Mike Shea, 
of Buffalo, came into do business with the 
United Booking Offices? 

Hennessy. — He did business with the Keith 
Booking Offices, which was succeeded by the 

'o.— Were you ever connected with booking 
of big time In the U. B. O? A.— It was all 
big time until nine years ago. 

Tj — Has the business of booking been 
changed from what It was then? A.— The 
business is Just the same as it ever was. There 
is hardly a piece of paper, that has been 
changed since the office was opened. 

O. That Is, they use the same forms. A. — 

The same forms and systems, exactly. The 
only difference to in the method of filing, 
using filing cases. Instead of letter files. 

Mr. Hennessy, at the request of the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission's attorney, then went 
Into minute details regarding the method of 
booking at the present time, the status of per- 
sonal representatives, and the different cir- 
cuits booked through the Family or Popular- 
Priced Department of the TJ. B. 0. . 

The witness told of how artists' representa- 
tives dig up new material by visiting honky- 
tonks and various places of amusement, add- 
ing that it was a _ question of the artists 



Mr. Walsh then resumed his examination 
again, following Goodman's interrogation of 
the witness. 

Q. — What do you understand aa a cut week? 
A. — A cut week to -the time that an actor, 
for some reason or other, is willing to take 
three days at one-third off. or some portion 
of his salary less that what he has been 
receiving all the time. 

Q. — Is there any preference given to the- 
atres, aa to who gets the cut weeks in the 
U. B.O.? A.— None. 

Mr. Waiah then delved Into the subject of 
tryouts and the "showing" of acts. 

Q. — Are there certain theatres designated 
as showing houses, In wMch new acta are usu- 
ally tried out? A.— There are certain the- 
atres where we give show acta. 

Q.— What are these theatres? A. — Well, 
Proctor's 125th St.. Harlem Opera House, the 
Halsey. Brooklyn ; - Union Hill and white 
Plains. 

Q.— Keith's Jersey City? A.— That might 
be, but I don't remember. 

Q.— The Fifth Avenue? A. — Yes. 

Q. — Twenty-third Street? A— Yes. 

Q.— The Greenpolnt, Brooklyn A. — Yes. 

Q. — Mount Vernon? A. — I do not know, 
positively, about that. 

Q. — Yonkers? A. — Sometimes. 

Goodman. — As a general thing, the houses 
used ss tryout houses, are houses in close 
proximity to New York City, where the man- 
agers can see the acts, are they not? 

Hennessy — Tea, and where the expenses are 
less to produce It. 

Walsh — Those are all Keith houses, are 
they not? 

Hennessy — No. 

Walsh — Which are not, Mr. Hennessy? A. — 
Well, all other houses except the Twenty- 
third Street, Fifth Avenue, Harlem Opera 
House. I do not know what the Keith 
houses are. I am not so very well posted as 
between Keith and Proctor. They were to- 
gether in my time. 

Q- — WMch of these showing houses are 
neither Keith or Proctor houses? A. — The 
Halsey in Brooklyn to not. The Union Hill to 
not. White Plains to not. 

Q. — Who operates or owns these theatres? 
A. — I could not tell you the names. It to all 
Greek to me. . . 

Mr. Goodman then explained that K. T. 
Marvin operated tbe houses at UMon Hill and 
White Plains. In reply to a question as to 
whether or not bills at "showing" houses, 
*£?..■?.. made ?P of tryout acts, Hennessy 
stated that he did not know, as he had not 
been In a theatre twice in three years, he 
having recently recovered from a long Ill- 
ness. Goodman, however, answered the ques- 
tion by saying, that there may be one. two 
or three tryouts in a bill of sS or eight acts 
and Offered to get the actual bill- of any 
house tor as many weeks back aa the Federal 
attorney wanted to go. 

.It developed during Henhessy's examination 
£"i.A e «M*« Theatre, Newark" was 



representative working hard morning, noon booked/ by the Orpbeum office, because Martin 
and night in order to be successful at his Beck and bis associates are the owners of 



business. Incidentally, he paid a tribute to a 40 per cent stock interest ta~ that" house" 



pany. This fee, apparently, la paid by the 
Eighty-first Street for tbe privilege of oper- 
ating a theatre in proximity to tbe Riverside 
and Colonial. 

The Poll Circuit, according to testimony 
given by Wallen retains two-and-a-half per 
cent of the five per eent commission charged 
the actor bv the U. B. O., as a booking fee. 
The Proctor houses retain one-and-a-half per 
cent, of the five per cent U. B. O. commission. 

The only persona who could throw any light 
on the reasons aa to why Pell and Proctor 
were allowed to retain part of the five per 
rent commission, were the Board of Directors 
or the U. B. O.. Wallen stated. In reply to a 
question by Walsh. 

An of the Keith houses sent in the fall five 



V.UB UlgWIUCU, <UJ UWJIO.UB CWJ)l UUC HOC 

members of the association, Hennessy said. 
Proctor withdrew in 1000 when the first 
White Rats strike occ ur red, turning his the- 
atres Into stock houses. Poll Joined the 
U. B. O. In 1908, Hennessy testified, but he 
was not familiar with the circumstances that 
attended bla Joining the organization. 

Mr. Hennessy had nothing to do with tbe 
formation of the U. B. O., he stated, tbe 
question being asked twice by Walsh and 
answered in the negative each time. 

"Do you know how Persy Williams came 
to do business with the United Booking 
Offices?" Walsh Inquired of the witness. 

"Williams was elected a member of the 
Vaudeville Managers' Association In July or 
August. • 1900." he replied, "We were organ- 
ized June 4th, 1900. Mr. Williams and sev- 
eral other members that were not of the origi- 
nal number.. like Jake Weils. Hurtlg and 
Seamon and Shoberts, who all came in at 
one time, was not in the original managers' 
association. At that time Mr. Williams did 
not have a house." 

Mr. Hennessy had evidently misunderstood 
the question and Walsh made it clear that It 
was tbe United ' Booking Offices that he re- 
ferred to, whereupon the witness replied that 

be was not familiar with the circumstances 
under which Percy Williams started to book 
with the U. B. O. 

Previously. Hennessy told of how Williams 
was the manager of the old Brooklyn Music 
Hall, In 1900. The ball waa owned by Huber, 
the witness said, and, at that time, the Or- 
pbeum, Brooklyn, waa In process of erection. 
The Orpbeum, he added, did not open until 
1901. 

The Federal Trade Commission's attorney 
then made several inquiries, as to whether 
Williams had a house in Boston, at the time 
of Ma entry Into the United Booking Offices. 

Q.— Did he (Williams) have a theatre In 
Boston at that time? A. — He had a theatre 
In Boston, but I do not think it waa at that 
time. 

Q. — Do yon know when he had a heatre in 
Boston? A. — Previous to that time. He 
might have had it then. I do not know. 

Mr. Goodman Interposed a question at this 
point In Henneasy's examination. 

Mr. Goodman. — "The question is, did he 
have any theatres?" 

Hennessy. — "No, he had no theatre in Bos- 
ton." 

Mr. Walsh then continued with the Ques- 
tioning relative to the bouses operated by 
Williams at the time he Joined the U. B. O. 

Q. — Generally, where were the Williams' 
houses? A. — His first theatre was the Brook- 
lyn Music Hall, then the Orpheum Theatre, 



and an unusually good Judge of sets. The 
witness explained bow the artists' representa- 
tive submitted his nets to the circuit repre- 
sentatives in the Family Department, defining, 
in reply to a question, what waa meant by 
"pencilling to" and other details relative to 
the booking business. 

Mr. Walsh then took up the matter of the 
salaries paid to acta booked by llennesaya 
deportment, making a searching inquiry as to 
who fixed the amounts to be paid, etc. Some 
of the more important questions and answers 
were as follows : 

Q. — In reference to the salary or compensa- 
tion of the actors, how to it determined by 
your office, whether or not the salary or com- 

en sat Ion is a fair one? A. — There is noth- 
g determined by our office in regard to 
salary. 

Q. — Nothing in reference to salary? A.-» 
No. sir. 

Q. — Who in the V. B. O. fixes the salary. 
A.— The manager. 
Q. — But the manager to not always there? 

A. — He is there at meetings, where they make 
those things. There la a certain act, for. 
Instance, conceded by everybody to be of a 
certain value. It gets so much. It may have 
been with a travelling show and received 
$200 a week, and Is well worth something 
more. That is agreed upon, 

Q. — Mr. Murdock determines the fair value 
of tbe act? A.— That la absolutely untrue ; 
he does not. 

Q. — At what meeting to It that there Is a 
determination of what Is a fair salary? A. — 
Every Wednesday or Thursday — Wednesday's 
principally, they have a meeting of the man- 
agers, regarding certain acts who do not get 
time, or are sticking out for a certain price. 

Goodman. — Who have a meeting? 

Hennessy— The managers of the theatre!. 

Walsh — Is that a committee or a full meet- 



% ? e 



Jlennessy — A full meeting of individuals. 

Walsh — When does Mr. Poll come in? 

Hennessy— Poll does as he wants to. 

Then followed a description of a managers' 
meeting, who takes part in it, etc. 

Goodman — Has the manager of a theatre 
ever entered into collusion with an actor to 
establish a fictitious salary by making a con- 
tract for a greater sum than he actually 

pays the actor, so that the greater sum would 

appear as his salary upon the books of the 
Booking Office? 

Hennessy — Well, we believe that kind of 
thing happens, but I have never had any 
positive proof of It. although I believe, abso- 
lutely, It waa true. 



The other 51 per cent of the Palace stock to 
owned by the B. F. Keith Theatres Company, 
a holding corporation for certain, although 
not all, Keith theatres. Walsh made inquiry 
?" *9_who got the commissions for booking 
the Palace. It was stated In reply that 
there are no commissions charged acts who 
play the Palace. 

Mr. Sonennborn, tbe attorney for the Or- 
pheum Circuit, was then queried by Walsh, 
while Hennessy was on the stand, as to the 
significance of the word "affiliated," which 
appeared on a program of one of the Ornheum 
houses. j 

.. S'^ - ??,? 4 J? tne meaning of the statement 
"affiliated" with the B. F. Keith Circuit of 
Theatres and the 'DuFrece-Butt Circuit of 
Theatres of Great Britain? A, — I think that 
Is an advertising circular. I. do not know that 
they are affiliated In any other way except 
this, tbat the Orpheum Company as such, 
V"'." 42 me stock ln tne B - K Keith New 

\ork Theatres Company. They are affiliated 
In that way. but the statement, generally, la 
a sort of advertisement 

Mr. Goodman then made the following state- 
ment : "The B. F. Keith Theatres Company 
of Connecticut, owns 51 per cent of the Pal- 
ace heatre arid Realty Company, which oper- 
ates the Palace Theatre." 

Walsh. — And Martin Beck and his asso- 
ciates, own 49 per cent? 

Goodman — Yes, sir, and the Orpheum The- 
atre and Realty Company, commonly called 
the Orpheum Circuit, owns about 25 per cent 
of the stock of the B. F. Keith New York 
Theatres Company. 

Sonnenborn — The B. F. Keith Theatres 
Company bought a chain of theatres formerly 
known as the Percy Williams chain of the 
atres. That is the only connection that the 
Orpheum Circuit baa with the B. F. Keith 
Theatres Company. 

Walsh— The B. K Keith Company of Con- 
necticut, owns the stock of the B. F. Keith 
Theatres Company of New York, as I under- 
stand it? 

Goodman — Owns about 25 per cent of the 
B. F. Keith New York Theatres Company. 

Hennessy, during Ms testimony, said that 
when be started in to book the small timers, 
the average price of a bill waa about 8200. 
Now it to about 81,000 to $1,200 a week, be 
said. Years ago. the average salary of a 
■Ingle act was about $40 and a double act 
about $80. At the present time, the average 
salary of a email time single figures about 
$75 and a double about $150. The Family 
Department of the U. B. O. waa not an im- 
mediate success Mr. Hennessy stated, losing at 
the rate, .of About $300 a week at the start. 
The present salary list of the Colonial, Mr. 



April 2, 1919 



T H'E n e w y 6 r k clipper 



31 



Hennessy estimated to be about $4,000 weekly. 
In toe old days, before the Vaudeville Man- 
ager*' Association was formed In 1900, most 
of the booking; was done In a haphazard way. 
largely by correspondence and the button- 
houng of managers by actors on the street, 
Mr. Hennessy said,. Most of the booking men 
at that time, had their offices In their bats. 
Actors, as a cIhbb, Heneniy declared, are not 
good business men, bnt there \ were a few 
exceptions, notably Jim Mclntyre, of Mela* y re j 
and Heath, who was a remarkably capable 
one. 

The agent, or artists' representative, did 
for the actor what the .actor was not qualified 
to do for himself, In most instances, that la 
to say. arrange a satisfactory business desl 
for bfs services, the witness testified.. 

Walsh then asked Hennessy whether he 
booked acta who played for Fay In Providence. 
Hennessy said he did not know, as he had 
not been much in touch with the office for 
a long time, until recently. Bnt, It would 
not make any difference to him If an act 
played for anyone, provided that the act was 
good and he wanted It, he said. In telling 
of the advancement that has been made by 
actor* In the matter of salary In the last 
twenty years, the witness cited Williams and 
Walker as having played for $800, as a team, 
twenty years ago. Bert Williams' recent en- 
gagements on the Keith time were at a aalary 
which he estimated to be from $1,500 to 
$2,000. Mclntyre and Heath got $350 nine- 
teen years ago, and they now receive in the 
neighborhood of $2,000 a week for their ser- 
vices. 

The theatrical people In the conrt room 
smiled a bit reminlscently, when Hennessy, 
In response to a request by Walsh, explained 
the method pursued by a vaudeville actor 
who wished to secure time from the Family 
Department, direct, the witness going into 
the matter at length and detailing how the 
Job seeker entered the office, presented bis 
card to the boy at the wicker, etc He said 
that he had never told any actor to get a 
personal representative and that he bad never 
recommended any personal representative to 
an actor. He bad never recommended even 
his own son in that light, be Bald. 

Harry Weber followed Hennessy on the wit- 
ness stand, and, after stating that he was 
40 years of age, that be lived in New Bo- 
chelle and was a representative of acts, went 
on to relate how he started as a property boy 
at the Empire Theatre, Quincy. Illnols, and 
later became a member of the 1402 company. 
He joined the army at the time of the Spanish 
War, he stated and served in the Phllllpines. 
After the war, he opened an office in Chicago, 
and engaged in the booking and promoting 
of vaudeville and fair attractions. 

Weber testified that he came to New York 
nine years ago and engaged in business with 
Reed Albee and Frank Evans. Weber and 
Evans bought out Reed Albee abont 1012, and 
the firm continued, under the foregoing name. 
Later. Weber and Evans split up. and .the 
arm of Harry Weber, Inc., came into existence. 
Weber stated that he owns fifteen attractions, 
. Including the scenic accessories and general 
paraphernal In. etc, of each. He pays salaries 
to the performers In these fifteen acts, he 
said. 

In reply to a question, as to who is asso- 
ciated with blm In the business of Harry 
Weber, Inc., he said he was the sole owner 
of the corporation. Then followed some tes- 
timony relative to a letter dated March 26th. 
1917, which Weber admitted -as having sent 
ont to several of his acts. The letter requested 
that. the acts It was addressed to take space 
In a Barry Weber number of Variety. Asked 
as to the circumstances under which the letter 
1 came to be sent out, Weber said that he was 
- desirous of getting some publicity, for his acts 
and himself. The price to the actors was to 
be $115 a page, and the gross price per page 
$185. The Weber concern was to make up the 
difference of $20 on each page. Weber wns to 
have his picture on the front cover, of the 
special Issue, which concession was to be com- 
plimentary, tor arranging matters. 

Following the description of the Variety 
deal, Walsh, in querying the witness referred 
to him «b a "Frankenstein." 

Mr. Walsh then aaked Weber how many acts 
he represented. The witness replied that he 
did not know. He had never had any experi- 
ence In "penciling in" acts, Weber said, In 
answer to Walsh's inquiries relative to the 
booking of his offerings. In response to an 
Inquiry as to his method of securing clients, 
Weber told of how he took trips, to Chicago 
and elsewhere, looking for embryo talent, in- 
cidentally. It developed, that one' of the ob- 
jects of Weber's recent trip to the coast, was 
for the. purpose of signing up the Ble Four, 
Fairbanks. Chaplin, Piekford and Griffith, for 
vaudeville. The witness described how he pro- 
moted acts and mentioned that he had dls- 
' covered Frisco, the Jaxz dancer, dancing in a 
Chicago cabaret. Frisco was receiving a quar- 
ter, or as Weber described it "two bits" a 
dance, when Weber first met him. This was 
but two or three years ago, Weber said, in 
substance, and now Frisco, was receiving 
$l.2B0 weekly, as a vaudeville headllner. 

Weber said that .the Vaudeville Collection 
Agency, collected for blm in the East, and 
the Excelsior Collection Agency . collected for 
him in the West, for the services he rendered 
to acts. Weber pays a fee of 20 per cent to 
the Vaudeville Collection Agency, for making 
collections, he stated. 

Asked how he came to make up his mind to 
come to New York from Chicago, Weber said. 
In effect, that be grew to be too big for 
the town. The witness stated- that he re- 
ceived the sum of $100 a week from Era 
Tanguay, $5,200 a year. Tanguay received 
a salary of $2,000 a week, he said. 

Mr. Walsh asked Weber If he bad anything 
to do with the organisation of the n7v. A., 
and If be took part in a conference, regarding 
the selection of the officers of the K V. A. 
around the time is was formed. He answered 



that ho had not. The witness was aaked 
whether he had taken an automobile trip up 
to .Ulster County, to visit Frank Fogarty, 
In company with George McKay. Eddie Leon- 
ard and George O'Brien, around the .time that 
the N. V. A. was being projected. He an- 
swered that he had, 

Weber specifically denied having picketed a 
White Bats meeting held In a church in 
Forty-seventh Street at the time of the White 
Bats strike In 1917. Aaked whether he knew 
Max.. Hayes, Charles Blerbower, Fred De 
Bondy, Charles Wilshln, Lou Leslie and Lee 
Muckenfass, Weber replied in the affirmative. 
He aald that he did not know Sam Baerwlts 
or Nat Sobel. 

The officers of Harrv w«»>-» inc. are Harry 
Webex-Jr., president, and treasurer, and Her- 
man w. Weber, secretary. The directors of 
the corporation are Harry Weber, Jr. ; Her- 
man W. Weber and Mrs. Harry Weber. Jr. 
Going back to the variety special number 
matter, Walsh aaked Weber, if Mr. Albee or 
Mr. Murdock had suggested the idea to him. 
He replied that this was not so. in either in- 
stance. In discussing the Variety special 
number, Weber, incidentally, declared in sub- 
stance that it waa purely a matter of pub- 
licity. Publicity, he added, In effect, was the 
life and breath of an actor's life. Publicity 
Is the only way the actor has of getting his 
wares before tbe manager, Weber said. 

Mr. Goodman then asked Weber If be had 
ever paid Mr. Albee or Mr. Murdock any- 
thing of value, money or otherwise, for the 
privilege of doing business with the United 
Booking Offices as an artists' representative. 
Weber replied that he bad never paid either 
Mr. Albee or Mr. Murdock, In any way, for 
the privilege of doing business with the U. 
B. O. Weber, in answer to further ques- 
tioning with respect to bis business, stated. 
In effect, that Murdock had nothing to do 
with the Weber organisation. He never 
asked for any part of the Weber business, 
Weber stated, in answer to another question. 
Neither Mr. Albee nor Mr. Murdock. now 
hold, or have ever held any interest in the 
business of Harry Weber, Inc.. the witness 
continued. He then went on to tell of how, 
when be first took hold of Harry Fox, the 
latter was receiving about $326 a week, 
wblcb sum Fox had to share in some way 
with the MUlership Bisters, with whom he 
was teamed op at that time. He estimated 
Fox's present day value as a vaudeville act 
at $1,250 a week. 

The Dolly Slaters, Weber said, were get- 
ting around $200 weekly when he started 
to handle their business for tbem. Now 
they are considered to be worth about $1,750. 
Weber said that it would not make any 
difference to blm If a man was a White 
Bat or not, as far as he was concerned. 
Being a White Bat or an N. V. A. la neither 
a bar nor an advantage to the acta he repre- 
sented, when it came to booking, the witness 
declared. Weber was shown a contract by 
Walsh, containing the stamped clause which 
warranted that the person receiving the con- 
tract did not belong to the White Bats. 
Walsh asked the witness whether be bad 
ever had any such contract in his possession. 
Weber replied that, to the best of bis know- 
ledge, he did not know whether he had or 
not. 

Weber said that he had no written agree- 
ment, or anything In the nature of a writ- 
ten instrument, that could be called a fran- 
chise for booking acts with the U. B. O. 
Asked whether he had ever booked any 
acts with the Loew Circuit. Weber said that 
he bad done so, naming Harry Cooper and 
Belle Baker, as acts that bad received 
Loew bookings through his office. That 
ended the Thursday session. 

Friday 

Frank Fogerty was tbe first witness to be 
Interrogated on Friday morning. He gave 
his pedigree at the request of Walsh, stating 
that he was forty-two years old, was now 
Executive Secretary to the Borough President 
of Brooklyn, and had been In the theatrical 
business for years before being appointed to 
his present position. He had played many 
parts In bis time, be said. He was in bur- 
lesque In 1897, 1898 and 1899. Be bad 
given stage characterizations at various times 
of Swedes. Negroes, Hebrews and Irishmen, 
i-.nil, at one time, was the principal comedian 
for Al. G. Fields Minstrels, he stated. The 
* last time that he played tbe Palace, Fogerty 
said. .. he bad received a salary of $500 a 
week. 

The witness, after giving several other 
little details concerning bis career before the 
footlights, then told of an Interview he bad 
had with Mr. Albee, shortly after he had 
been elected President of the White Bats. It 
seems that Fogerty was desirous of having 
Mr. Albee meet a committee of White Bats. 
The following conversation between Fogerty 
and Mr. Albee, testified to as having taken 
place by Fogerty shows that Mr. Albee was 
not at all Inclined to favor the proposed 
conference. 

Mr. Albee — I will meet no committee from 
tbe White Bats as long as they are members 
of that union. 

Fonerty — Mr. Albee, yon said a moment 
ago that yon helped to elect me President of 
the White Bats. Why did you did you do It 
and then immediately tie my bands? If yon 
are not going to help me, we can do no good. 

Mr. Albee — That goes. Ton can talk to 
me at any time yon want to. but I will meet 
no committee from the White Bats. 

Fogerty — Why? Ton employ union stage 
bands and musicians. Why do you do that? 

Mr. Albee — Why? Because 1 have to. They 

have made me more trouble than I have 
fingers and toes, and I will not put up with 
any more of it, and I will not meet any 
committees from the White Bat*, as a union. 
Fogerty then related a conversation which 
he said he bad had with John J. Murdock. 
during the course of wblcb it wss intimated 



that Pocerry could be the President of the 
N. V. A., It he so desired, he said. In refer- 
ence to the presidential proposition, Fogerty 
said that he had told Mr. Murdock. In ef- 
fect, that he would not accept the presidency 
of the N. V. A. unless the booking offices 
would stop commission abuses, issue an 
equitable contract and play acta, regardless 
of the tact that they held membership In 



tbe White Bats or not. 

Later on, Fogerty told of a visit paid 
him In the Catskills by George O'Brien, of 
the Harry Weber office. Fogerty fixed the 
date of the visit as sometime In July, 1916. 
According to Fogerty, O'Brien cams up to 
see him In order to have him Join the Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists, Inc. The follow- 
ing conversation took place between O'Brien 
and himself. Fogerty testified: 

George O'Brien— Frank, why don't you 
Join the N. V. A.? 

'Fogerty — I don't want to. 

O'Brien — Well, what Is the use of getting 
In wrong? 

Fogerty — What have I done that Is wrong? 

O'Brien — I don't know that yon have done 
anything, but they will not play anyone, 
only N. V. A.'s, and why do yon want to 
get yourself in wrong? I would like to have 
you talk this over with Mr. Murdock. 

Fogerty — I would be very glad to have 
Mr. Murdock come up. 

Fogerty said that O'Brien told him that 
he would see wbst he could do and, a few 
weeks later, Fogerty stated be received a 
wire from O'Brien, which read in effect: 
"Will be up to-morrow and wlU bring that 
party with me." 

"On Saturday afternoon, there arrived at 
my home, Fogerty stated, continuing with 
his testimony, "Mr. Weber, his brother Her- 
man, Eddie Leonard, George O'Brien and 
George McKay." 

Fogerty did not become either a member 
or an officer of the N. V. A. From tbe gen- 
eral trend of his testimony. It would seem 
that bis chief objection to the organisation 

was because of an apparent belief on bis 
part that it waa what he termed a "mana- 
gers' organisation." 

While on tbe stand. Fogerty told of some 
difficulty be had experienced In getting work. 
He said that he had changed agents, leaving 
Tom Fltspatrlck and going over to William 
Morris. Morris, however. Informed Fogerty, 
according to the latter, that any booking he 
received from the U. B. O. would have to 
come through Fltspatrlck. He approached 
Mike Sbea. hut the latter told him that he 
couldn't play him. Fogerty said Shea told 
him, he would have to leave it to his own 

Judgment, the reason why he could not play 
ilm. Fogerty said his wife was cancelled 
at one of the New York houses booked by 
the U. B. O., and he took it for granted that 
tbe cancellation was brought about because 
of the fact that he had written tbe songs - 
in his wife's act. 
Fogerty stated that be had known of a 

number of artists who not only paid a com- 
mission, but paid extra money on the side 
as well. 

Maurice Goodman, tbe .Keith attorney, 
then asked Fogerty If be believed thai a 
judgment against the average actor, conld 
be collected. Fogerty said he believed it 
could. Goodman said that the U. B. O. was 
responsible and, if It broke a contract, the 
actor collects very easily. Fogerty was quite 
sure that recovery could be made also from 
the average actor who might be proceeded 
against for breaking a contract. 

Asked whether he didn't consider that 
conditions were better at the present time 
for a vaudeville actor than they Were years 
ago, Fogerty said be did not think that con- 
ditions were as good for' the small act as 
they were years ago. Fogerty also gave 
testimony somewhat along tbe same lines 
as that, given on Wednesday by Dan Hen- 
nessy, with respect to booking conditions In 
the early days of vaudeville. Goodman In 

2ulred how Fogerty transacted his club book- 
iig business several years ago. and asked 
the witness if he did not furnish so many 
actors at a lump snm, and pay salaries to 
the performers giving the show. .Fogerty 
said that was abont the way he had dona 
business, as far as his club booking agency 
was concerned. 

Fogerty was asked whether s "black list" . 
was In existence at the time that be was 
President of the White Bats. He replied that 
a "black list" did exist at that time. Fo- 
gerty mentioned Ed. Keoogb as an actor 
whom be believed to have been on the 
"black Hat" at the time that he was Presi- 
dent of the Rats. 

Mr. Goodman asked Fogerty if he con- 
sidered that a team that put on three 
sketches In fifteen years could be considered 
as keeping abreast of the vaudeville times. 
Fogerty thought that It was. and so stated, 
adding that be understood that Keongh 
couldn't get work even when he bad a new 
sketch. While Fogerty .changed his material 
every year, be expressed the belief that the 
three sketches In fifteen years bad nothing 
to do with Keough not getting work. 

In answer to a question by John M. Kelley. 
Mr. Goodman's associate, concerning Foger- 
ty's estimate of Harry Monntford, Fogerty 
stated that be believed Mountford to be dis- 
honest. He had opposed Monntford's meth- 
ods as regards the policy of the White Rats 
and was not af all in favor of Monntford's 
way of doing things, he said. 

Poverty's chief reason for expressing the 
belief that Mountford was dishonest, it 
seems, was based on the fact that he had 
asked Monntford to render a statement of 
his travelling expenses for a trip taken by 

the latter In his capacity as oragnlxer for 
the Bats. The trip in question embraced a 
visit to Boston. Chicago, and Philadelphia, 
for which Mountford was given $250 for 
travelling expenses. Although he bsd asked 
Monntford to. render an expense account to 
tbe Rats Board of Directors, be had never 
seen tbe accounting called for. 



Mr. Goodman then sprung a surprise by 
producing a copy of tbe minutes of a meet- 
ing of the White Bate In which Mountford 
advised the organisation to get rid of the 
club house. The Introduction of tbe Whits 
Bat minutes caused quite a stir, when Good- 
man stated that they had been given to him 
by "Harry Cooke or Harry De Veaux." The 
first name appears on the record as "Harry" 
Cooke. Will Cooke waa in the conrt room 
at the time that Goodman made the an- 
nouncement as to who gave him the White 
Bat minutes and he evidently seemed to 
think that, the person referred as "Harry" 
Cooke, was himself, lnssmuch as be arose 
at recess and sought to address the examiner. 
Mr. Moore told Cooke that he had any 
statement to make he would have to see 
Mr. Walsh. 

Latter, Mountford and Cooke bad quits a 
wordy altercation In the corridor, daring the 
coarse of which the minutes were referred 
to frequently. No blows were struck, but it 
looked for a moment as If they would surely 
"go to the mat" Each satisfied himself with 
calllnc the other "complimentary" names, 
however, Mountford winding up the debate 
by telling Cooke that he "hoped he would get 
tost franchise from the U. B. O." Just 
what he meant by that remark. Mountford 
refused to explain, bnt said that he knew 
exactly what he meant and that waa enough. 

A form of agreement that Goodman said 
had been sent to the managers for considera- 
tion, by Barry Mountford, In 1016, and 
which stated, in effect, that the White Bats 
proposed to Institute tbe "closed shop" in 
vaudeville, was read by the U. B. O. attorney. 
This agreement, in addition to the "closed 
shop" clause, called for the limiting of the 
membership of the Bats snd the consequent 
limiting of the number of newcomers who 
would be permitted to enter the vaudeville 
profession. 

Fogerty said that it was tbe general opin- 
ion in the Bats that Monntford's methods 
were not what mlgbt be termed diplomatic. 
"Uncalled for" waa the way In which Fogerty 
characterised his attitude toward the mana- 
gers. 

The word of three-quarters of the mana- 
gers wss "no good." according to Fogerty, 
who would not express sn opinion about 
Mr. Albee or Mr. Murdock In this respect. 
Later, he declared that Mr. Albee did not 
keep faith with blm. Aaked whether be 
thought Pat Casey was a suitable man to 
preside over an arbitration board, Fogerty 
replied that be did not think any one man 
was qualified to do so. 

Jack Curtis, of the vaudeville firm of 
Rose and Curtis, was then called. He 
spent a very uncomfortable fifteen min- 
utes on the stand, his memory going back 
on him very badly when interrogated by 
Attorney Walsh. He could not remember 
Just how be came to write Queenle Dune- 
din on November :, 1916, that the V. K. 
P. A. would not employ acts belonging to 
the White Bats. Asked where he got the 
Information from, he could not say. Pressed 
for an answer, he said something about 
White Rats walking out of theatres, and 
being unreliable. 

Walsh Immediately became very serious 
and aaked Curtis whether he realised that 
he was under oath. Curtis replied that 
he did. and was trying* to tell the truth. 
Walsh then called Curtis's attention to a 
telegram sent to Adams and Guhl. advis- 
ing them to Join tbe N. V. A. Curtis was 
Just as much at sea In trying to remember 
how he came to send the telegram as he 
had been on the question of where he got 
his Information about the letter to Queerrle 
Dunedln. 

Tom Qulgley. the Boston booking agent, 
followed Curtis as a witness, and. after 
stating that he had been In tbe booking 
business for fourteen years, told of. a list 
of acts sent to him by Pat Casey. This 
list was referred to by the witness as a 
so-called "blacklist." Qulgley said he 
booked twenty-five houses In and around 
Boston. Mr. Goodman asked Qulgley to 
tell abont bis charges for booking theatres 
and the witness did so. When It came to 
making known his booking fee for his full 
week houses, however, he demurred very 
strongly. Qulgley set up a claim that the 
U. B. O. would become possessed of Infor- 
mation that, he Insinuated, might be used 

to take the St. James, the only full week 
house that he books in Boston, away from 
him. Examiner Moore, however. Instructed 
Qulgley to answer the question, the wit- 
ness stating that he charged aU the way 
from $26.00 to $100.00 for full week book- 
ing service. 



Saturday 

Jack Curtis was recalled to the stand on 
Saturday morning, and his memory was 
In much better working order than on the 
previous day. He said that he had sent 
the telegram to Adams and Guhl, and the 
letter to Queenle Dunedln, on his own re- 
sponsibility. The telegram referred to was 
the one In which Curtis advised a*»— 
and Guhl to Join the N. V. A. and U» 
letter to Queenle Dunedln stated that the 
V. M. P. A. would not play acts belonging 
to the White Beta. 

Eddie Clark was than sworn aa a witness 
and occupied the chair for tbe better part 
or the day. He outlined his theatrical ex- 
periences from the time that he entered 
the show business as a chorus boy. giving 
a detailed account of his activities as a 
public entertainer and author of stage ma- 
terial that covered fourteen or fifteen y ears , 
Clark told how he went to Percy 'Wil- 
liams for work, and of the hitter's rug- 
Sestlon that he see Mr. Murdock- Mr. 
lurdock, according to Clark, said thai ha 
(Clark) would not play for him as long 
as- William Morris was In the show busi- 
ness. 

(.Continued on pave 38.) 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



DON CLARK 

PRODUCER AND LIGHT COMEDIAN— THE AMERICANS— INVITES OFFERS FOR NEXT SEASON 
STAR, BROOKLYN, THIS WEEK OLYMPIC, NEW YORK, NEXT WEEK 



Season's Sensation 
Direction Ike Weber 



GRACE HOWARD 



Soubrette 

CHAS. WALDRON'S 

BOSTONIANS 



STAR S OF BURL E S Q U E 

PAT WHITE SHOW 1^ ^^ \r\r 











rid DOIMN 



RALPH JAZZ WOP 



ELSIE PRIMA DONNA 



/Hello Paree\ 
V Company / 



DONNA 






IVI 





MILLION 
DOLLAR 
DOLLS 



I 



IM 



NOW \KfV 

IRWIN' 



FEATURED 

MIDNIGHT 
MAIDENS 



IMI 



AND 



SIGNED 

FOR NEXT 

SEASON 



EDDIE AKIN 

JUST PUNTING ABOUT MIDNIGHT MAIDENS 

JIMMY DUNN 



ANN. 

With F* WkHa> Gate* Gbta I 
My 



N 



CSaa 



Eiif) 



E L V A G gl^EVES 



u. 



PAT WHITE SHOW 



KITTY GLASCO 



DONNA 



CHARLIE 1VIAC 



MILLION DOLLAR DOLLS 



JO 



ionc writer-produce* 

AKD CCHtEPlAW 



HURTING AND SERMON'S 

MIDNIGHT MAIDENS 



I 



IM 



SOUBRETTE— PARIS BY NIGHT 



VAN AND KELLY 



NOW PLAYING POX TIME 



tWCWO AND DANONC JUVENILE-ROSTONIA1CS 

AMETA 



directiow-ixe 



UTH SEASON WITH BEHMAN SHOW 



IMES 



THELMA SEAVELLE 

w4A "Hip, Hy, Ho^^y CW 



THE HURRICANE SOUBRETTE 



2J 



PRIMA DONNA 



SECOND SEASON 



BROADWAY Mnure 



RETURNS TO BURLESQUE A3 3IMON LECREB-TEMfTERS- 



TOIVI AIKIN 

JACK SINGERS BEHMAN SHOW 



FLO WELLS 

PRIMA DONNA PUNCH FROLICS 



SMILING NELLIE WATSON 

SOUBRETTE DAVE MARION'S "AMERICA'S BEST" 

IM K LAMBERT 

CHARACTER MAN— PARIS BY NIGHT 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from pass U) 



'GIRLS FROM FOLLIES- 
PLEASES BROOKLYN 
AUDIENCES AT STAR 

The "Girls from Follies" at the Star last 
week save a performance that proved sat- 
isfactory. While there are practically the 
same bits that were In the show last sea- 
son, they were offered In such a manner 
that the full value of the comedy was 
easily seen. 

Fred Binder and William Jennings are 
the comedians: of course. Binder Is the 
chief funmaker and he succeeded in getting 
many laughs. He Is one of those acrobatic 
Hebrew comedians, who Is bound to get his 
stuff over. He la fast and a very hard 
worker. He does bumps and his catch 
line "Oh, boy," never falls to get a laugh. 

'While Tom Robinson's name appears on 
the programme, for some reason he did 
not play the part opposite Binder Thurs- 
day night. It Is said be closed Wednesday 
on account of a salary disagreement. Jen- 
nings returned to his old part doing Irish, 
in -which role he worked hard. 

Harry C. Van, doing a juvenile straight, 
sang several numbers in a clear tenor 
voice. He also appeared In several scenes. 
He dressed well. 

Al Casey Fox did straight in the first 
part and characters later on. doing nicely. 

Mae Barlowe, who has a most excellent 
and pleasing personality, is the prima 
donna. She is a brunette and makes a 
fine appearance, and was seen to an ad- 
vantage In her numbers, which she offered 
In a clever manner. She has a sweet 
voice and uses it well. Her wardrobe Is 
attractive. 

Anna Armstrong, who plays a lead, is 8, 
striking and shapely blonde. She reads 
lines well and easily takes care of herself 
in the scenes. She makes a fine appear- 
ance In tights. 

Madge De Voe is the ingenue. This 
young lady makes a pleasing appearance. 
Her wardrobe looks well from the front 

Ernest Stone Is in several scenes and 
he handles himself very well in each. 

Van and Miss Barlowe offered a neat 

duet early In the show most pleasingly 
and it went well. 

The "model" bit. with Binder. Jennings. 
Stone. Fox and Miss Armstrong, pleased. 
The "flower" bit, with all the water effects 
repeated its former success at this house 
the way Binder worked it up. Van and 
the Misses De Voe and Barlowe were also 
in it 

The "court room" scene In ragtime went 
well with Binder as the prisoner, Jennings 
the Judge, Van the cop. Fox the prosecut- 
ing attorney. Misses Barlowe and De Voe 
as witnesses, and several of the chorus in 
the jury. 

The "diamond pin" bit was well worked 
up by Binder, Jennings, Fox and Miss 
Armstrong. There was plenty of rough 
house and tumbling seen here which was 
liked. 

. The Cabaret scene in the burlesque of- 
fered several specialties. Miss Armstrong 
did an impersonation of Adele Richie. Fox 



looked like William Hart, the bad man of 
the pictures. Fox gave a lariat specialty, 
and he sure can handle the rope. He also 
did a wooden shoe dance. 

Mae Barlowe's Impersonation of Melba 
gave this young lady an opportunity to 
show her voice, which she did to an ad- 
vantage. 

Van's minstrel number was well ren- 
dered. One of the girls of the chorus led 
a number and put it over nicely. She 
would have looked better had she forgot- 
ten to put the spot of red grease paint 
on her chin. 

The "periscope" bit had plenty of laughs. 
Binder, Fox. the Misses Barlowe, Arm- 
strong, De Voe and several chorus girls 
worked in it. 

Binder and Miss Armstrong make a big 
hit In the "drinking" scene, in which the 
lady worked up a good "drunk." The way 
she rumbled and bumped .around the stage 
with Binder was remarkable. Her work 
was appreciated here. 

The "cabinet" scene pleased and it was 
nicely worked up by Binder, Van, Jennings. 
Stone and the "Mysterious Marie." 

The girls in the chorus worked and 
looked well. 

A fairly good sized house was on hand 
a nd the audience liked the show. Sis. 

WILL CLOSE WITH KAHN 

Ben Kahn has announced last week that 
Billy Spencer will close with his stock 
company May 24. Brad Sutton closes 
April 2G, and Miss Lorraine May 10. 
Spencer is going to put on stock at the 
Howard, Boston. Sutton will do the same 
at the Star, Toronto, and Miss Lorraine is 
going to take a vacation. Frances Cor- 
nell will open for Kahn May 12. 

JOINS "TRAIL HITTERS" 

Bert Weston leaves New York today 
(Wednesday) to join the "Trail Hitters" 
in Columbus. He replaces Vic Plant and 
opens next Monday. Weston will have 
full charge hack stage. 

ED. CRAWFORD. SICK 

Ed. Crawford, formerly of "Cheer Up, 
America," is confined to his home with 
the influenza. He has been ill for three 
weeks. 



SIGNS FOR THE SUMMER 

Fred Stair has signed Josephine Sabel 
for Summer stock at the Star, Toronto, 
this season. 



ILLNESS FORCES CLOSING 

Flo Owens closed with the "Americans" 
in Hoboken last week on account' of ill- 
ness. Vic Dayton has replaced her. 



$25-Choras Girls Wanted-$25 

Must be Show Girls, Weight 150 up. Must be Al. No half salaries 
Show Opens East, closes East. 

BILLY WATSON 



BIO OIRLIE £ 

Columbia Amusement Co., Houses 
WANT ALL KINDS of Principals — Men and Women. Address, aa per Route. 



\A/ A IM 



FOR NEXT SEASON FOR 



"Bostonian Burlesquers 



ii 



A GOOD TRIO OR QUARTETTE TEAM OF MEN, one capable 
of playing good straight, two principal women, good novelty rnrnrical act. 
Address CHAS. H. WALDRON, Waldron's Casino, Boston, Mass. 



JOE ENNIS 

Re-engaged by Jacobs and Jermon for next season at 
an increase of salary. 



The Moxt Artif tic 

SonffiVallx^ 
in Many/ 
yean* / 



ABijTimeJbirt 



7 Bi$ Tune 
\Acly 



Joj.W.jtern&Co. 

1556 Broadway. NYI. 

Hlt) Ttnnej .- M$r 

119 No-Clark 5t. Chicago 

5i§ A Bosley - M3r 



,> Dream. 

the writers of lWianola W\ 

^SvTeaix Palijaniah/' 



Prof Copy 6 
Orchertration 
in any k* y 
FREE. Jo rctojshtd irh<;tr 
Dance Oichcstration 
ro Leaderr 25* Band 50* 



B. F. KAHN'S UNION SQUARE THEATRE 

STOCK BURLESQUE 

With AU Star Cast 



BILLY (GROGAN) SPENCER 
J AS. X. FRANCIS 
LOUISE PEARSON 
BABE WELLINGTON 

ETHEL DE VEAUX 
AND 



FRANK MACKEY 
BRAD SUTTON 
LORRAINE 
MAE DIX 



BIG BEAUTY CHORUS 

SO row i nii sfra lio ns to B. F. 



Who have had Burlesque experience as Prima Donna, Ingenues, Soubrette, 
Comedians, Character Men and Chorus Girls; also Producers. Write and 
send Photo. FOLLY THEATRE, Pennsylvania Avenue at Ninth Street, 

Washington, D. C. 



JUVENILE MERRY ROUNDERS 



DIRECTION CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



eJIIVI McINERNEY 



AN ACE WITH "AVIATORS" 



THIS WEEK— CAYETY. BROOKLYN 



RUTH DENICE 



PARS BY NIGHT 



SOUBRETTE 



EN ROUTE 



NELLIE CRAWFORD 

S incing and Ducini Soubrette DiractioD Kmbb A Richards Orsantals 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



E. r. ALKZ 



J. 4. BURDOCK 



r. r. proctor 



B. F. Keith 




(Agency) 
(FnUcf TWrnbrn ■■■«■«. Wwr T—fc) 

B.F.KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 

Artfate C-« Book Dinet fcy AddriA« S. K. 




JIMMIE HODGES' 
ATTRACTIONS 

4-SHOWS NOW PLAYING-4 

Jimmio Hodges Musical Comedy Co. 

Pretty Baby Eastern— Pretty Baby Tabloid 

Jimmie Hodges Company with himself 

Can use a few more chorus girls 

Address J. E. EVISTON, General Manager, 

Mozart Theatre, Elmira, N. Y. 



CHIEF BLUE CLOUD & WINONA 

In Indian Novelty: 

Is Twinlh 



ANNA VIVIAN & CO. 



PRESENT 



"WHAT WOMAN CAN DO" 

Thm Season's Latest Fmmmnm Na—lty 



aouD loxw amcuiT 



™ DOBBS & WELCH ™ 



SOMEWHERE IN TOWN 

DIRECTION— KOSE AND CURTIS 



WILLIAMS SISTERS 

IN THEIR DAINTY REVUE 

SURPRISE A LA MINUTE 



C ARUT A and DICK LEWIS 

PRESENT THEIR MUSICAL COMEDIETTA 

w Luason Love" 



TINY 



MADELINE 



BELMONT and MOORE 

Singing and Dancing De Luxe 

DIRECTION— JACK LE1A 



PAUL FETCHING & CO. 



"Ifoaicnl Flomr GartUo" 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

. Executive Offices, 130 West 46tb St, New York 
, JACK W. LOEB 






•:! 



Panoaal 



EDGAR ALLEN 

with artfaU from J 2 to «, or bj 



;•■ 



Attention Vaudeville Acts 

John Quigley Theatrical Agency, Inc. 

Can book acts consecutively for 5 weeks. Extra Sundays, 
Short Jumps. New England's Leading Independent 
Agency. 184 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. All corre- 
spondence answered. 



LEE STAFFORD 



DIRECTION— EVANCELINE WEED 



ARCHIE 



MARGARET 



Oria»nl«f tfc* 



ORIGINALITY 

I Man nimi m tna Wh DIRZCTIOlt-FAUl. DU*AND 



BILLY 



HOWARD & LEWIS 

In "DO YOU LIKE ME?" 

DIRECTION— MAYER JONES 



ARTHUR 



TOM O'CONNELL 

Character Comedian and Dancer 



In VnodWrflU 



BONESETTIS TROUPE 



DIRECTION— O. ELERNDORF 



MINNIE FAUST & BRO, 

Comedy Ladder Act 

PUyin, U. B. O. Thn. 



m,ch^ EMMET & MOORE e,leen 

In "IRELAND TODAY"- 



Hi» Own 



April 2, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



THOUSANDS VIEW NEW N. V. A. CLUB 

(Continued from page 5.) 



Aerial Shaws, Fannie Newman, H. Me- 
Grata. 

Ida May Chadwlck. Lester Latch. Cap- 
tain Powers, AJ Darling. George O'Brien. R. 
3 Miller. Bob Eddy. Lillian Shaw. Francis 
X. Donegan, Jefferson Lloyd, Ltssle Brana, 
Hurl Falls. Fred J. Boetiner, F. R. Wbite- 
house. J. E. Agnew, J. J. Daly, Mr. MoUena, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Leonard, Harry Bart. 

Ben Hastings, Frank Aberwald, Mima 
Pearlman, Tom Cotton, Ben Bard. Mr. and 
lira. Carl Nixon, Dave Kowlln, John Aca- 
than. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Walton. A. J. 
Gantner. Joe Daly. WlUle Ritchie, Al Dow, 
John Lamp*. Lew Murdock, Al Moore, 
Frank Quins. Jack Qulnn. Tom Yost, John 
Eaaper, George Lance. Stuart Barnes. 

Ed Morton, BUI Roehm. BUly F. Adams. 
Charles Hlrsch. Jean SchwarU. Dock 
O'Neill. Arthur Gordon. Charles Peterson. 
Mr Marshall, Mr. and Mrs. Dave Stelnhart, 
Judge Graham, Bernard II. Sandler and 
wile. Lottie Clifton, Lewis Silverman, Wal- 
ter Donovan. Harry Murray. Jo-Jo, Grant 
Hall. Fred Steals. ,^__ -„. 

Billy Swede Hall, Jennie Colburn, Miss 
McKemte, Miss Davis. Clyde SUber and 
wife. Lestro. Jack Hallen, Mary Gobi, Mr. 
and Mrs. 1 Fred C. Curtis, Mr. and Mm. 
Hudson Hilbom, Bob Lansing, George 
Glbbs, L. M. Bell, K. Cowan, John and Ruth 

R( Ed'dle Dowllng, Mr. and Mrs. Wells De 
Veaux. Murray Livingston. James Dyson. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hal Dyson, Zelanka, William 
Stuart. Charles Wllkens. Doris Roth. Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Joyce, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Cook, Fred C. Hackett, Betty Tompkins, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bay Raymond. Charles Wta- 
nlger, Lamont Trio. Lady Alice's Pets, Mr. 
and Mrs. N. L. Graham. ■ 

May Palay. Jas. Norval, Flo Lewis, Irv- 
ing Berlin, Lieut. Gordon MacNlchoL Mary 
Kelley and Thos. Swift, Taj Tunis. Mil- 
dred Evans, Zella Russell, Harry K. Mor- 
ton, Zellnanov, Miss Kola, Miss Black. Jas. 
P O'Loughlin. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ryan, 
Tlnk Humphrey, Jack Mack, Jas. F. Shee- 
han, Bob O'DonneU, Al Worsley, Jack Cur- 
tis, Neal Burns, Gertha Du Four. Louise 
De Lora, Ruby Clark. _ • . 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Golden, Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Laser, Mr. and Mrs. Aleck Ba- 
rarsky, Irwin Irving and wife. Mr. and 
Mrs. Robt. B. Roberts. Harry Warden. 
Jack Barton. EMI Crawford. Marty Ford. 
N. T. Grandlund. Grace Emmett, Fred 
C Hagen. Frances Holmes, Dixie Martin, 
Emma Cams. Frank Sullivan, Grace Van 
Tassell, Edward Marshall, Catherine Mc- 
Gsrvie, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Walters and 

JO Lawrence" Schwab. Glen Anders, Geo. 
White. Franklyn ArdeU, Gaynell & Mack, 
8am Hyams. Claude Bostock, Geo. Bobbe, 
Ed Nelson. W. Spoor. Maurice Bjtter, 
Irene Melva. June Melva. Barney Ward, 
John P. Harris. ES. M. Robinson, ingress- 
man Morln, Ollle Young * April. l«aHa _ 
Bryar, Florence Flynn, Lon Pollock, Reed 
Albee, Jack Marshall. Barney Ferguson. 
Byron Silvers, John West. Edita Geer^A. 
O. Duncan. Claude Austin, Mr and Mrs. 
Hal Jones. Bob Tenney, Morton wroa.. 
Pump Burke. S. K. Fried. S.WLawton. 
Rlchird E. Webster, »?■?,?> Ty? le !ki a £ 
E. Rowan. Otto Clifton, Ell Budd, Charles 
Wheeler, Ed Barto. ««i«w— » tn 

Louis Baum. Nat Burns, DeUbert B. 
Bean. Doc Baum. Wm. J. Hasson, Oeorgto 
aSmettTRlta Gibson. M. I* Vino, Alex 1- 
Vino Vlnclnla Rankin, J. H. Rirton. Al 
Rome. HarrV FoToirnr Owen. Leon Fla- 
towT Marlon Wilson, Jack Lexey. Mr. and 
Mrs! Harry Burton, Baron Lew Peyton. 
M?aid Mrs. Harry. HoodlnL JuUan .Rose. 
Steve Green. Geo. Young. Wilfred. Robert 
and 1 wtfeVJadc OlffordTMlriam Wills and 

W ja^GteaiaSn". Jlmmle Fox :. WUU. Maxr 
weaNst Farnum.' Jimmy Shields. Harry 
Brown. MosSoSSble, Willie Fields, Phil 
Brice, Hippy Weston, Joe Cooper^ Wm. 
Darts, Florence Tlmponl and mother. 
Cba^ Mayer. Eddie Koler and Jean Lamb. 
j7>« La. Bick. J. B- Dillon. Jr.. H. S- 
Stonge.Frank Sartorlus. Lieut. J^J- Gar- 
vie, Lieut. Edwin C. Faxsona, Frankly 

Ston" Chaa. Reffley. Nat and Fay *£*£. 
lln, Andy Lewis. B^, 1 ^^-,*^"^ 8 , 

Burke, w. A. Levean. Ruth Edej, Jeweu 
Webster. Victor KeweU, Frank Davis and 

H G^ n roib.on, Btaneh. Stewart Ben 
Mile.. Al Raymond F. J WuTUBJ, Tea 
Banks. James Rowland, Mr. and Mrs. 
Eddie De Noyer. Jessie Fowere, J 4 ™ 
mteheu. Edwaid Lynch, Miss »sg»dg«r. 
Miss May MaJoney, Mlas Ionise Daven- 
port and Miss Bertha Harris. - -^- 

Tommy Bay, Clande West.- 81m Collins, 
Mr and 7 iST' Joe Bennett. J. -f. Meyer. 
Archie Goulette. J°«|Pb L. GarreUon, 
Horace Pbtter. R. H. Bertram. Mr. Cber- 
rtngton. Ned S. Hastings, E. N. _Ml" en - 
James L. Reed, Mr. and iMra. MaxmUlton. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dick Fltsgerald. gr. and 
Mrs. Jack Ingllas. James Hajleyj_ Ted Bon- 
nell. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Lovett, Emory Man- 
ley. Harry Weston, Bob Fisher. Jos. (Irish 
Yankee) Brennan, Frank Hardy, B. EL 
Coon, WUllam Burt. Tbomas Meegan, 
Helen Scher, Sol Goodman. Boater West 
and Margaret Green. . 

Frank Jones, Colonel Diamond, Jim 

££$»&£ R ag gglB 

Eulot. Bert Angeles, Bernlce Hoffman. 
Vivian Hurilck, Charles lanes, Harvey 

Spalding, Mitchell SeUeslaugh. Artie Nel- 
son, Jack McCloud. James MartaU. CMs- 
hohn * Breen. Bert Fox. Fred Merrtue. 



Luekle A Harris. Harry English. Joe 
Klein. Pat Woods. Mill McCaJTery, May 
Woods, Miss Relsenberger, Ed (Flying) 
Russell and Harriet Worth. 

Harry Koler, Sergeant Max Koler. 
George Falrtnan. La Veen eV Cross. Tom 
Dingle, Patsey, Delaney, Val Trainer, Wal- 
ter Meyers, Jack Dempsey, Grace DeWln- 
ters, Ben Beyer, Evelyn Forbes, Jas. Cas- 
sldy. Pearl Ford. Bessie Luekle, Mildred 
Savldge, Acnes Sllber, Marie De Greaux. 
Walter Kingsley. George Whiting. Sadie 
Burt. Eddie Fltsgerald. Jno. E. Henshaw. 
Henry Kelley, Margie Wilson, Harry How- 
ell, George Pearce. 

Helen Neaxy, Harry Adler, Al Sexton, 
Loney Haskell. Jack Peters, Frank Dob- 
bins, Bobby Nash, Bert Kenney, Dan Hen- 
nessey, Johnny Johnston, Roy Byron, 
Wm. Cunningham. Robt. Rickson and Wm. 
D. Stewart. 

On Thursday night, delegations of 
dramatic editors, newspaper men and man- 
agers from various parts of the country 
were the guest* of the dub, of whom 200 
were afterwards entertained at the Zieg- 
feld "Midnight Frolic," where they wit- 
nessed the second performance, beginning 
at 11:30 p. M. The principal address of 
the evening was made by Edwards Davis, 
Prompter of the Green Boom dub. 

Davis, a former vaudeville performer, 
and at present a member of the cast of 
"Daddies," told of the results of Mr. Al- 
bee' s work in the actors' behalf and 
pleaded for unity, harmony and good fel- 
lowship between performer and manager. 

Nils Granlund, publicity man for the 
Loew Circuit, and Walter J. Kingsley, gen- 
eral publicity representative for the Keith 
interests, together with Henry Chesterfield, 
greeted the out-of-town guests and had 
charge of the entertainment arrangements. 

Two typists from the Keith offices, Miss 
Franceses Cook and Bessie Seigel, assigned 
by Walter Kingsley to the club house for 
the evening, were stationed, with type- 
writers, on the mezzanine floor, where they 
filed the stories of the club's opening sub- 
mitted by the out-of-town newspaper men. 




RAINBOW LILLIE and MOHAWK 

20ttt Century Indians 



BERNARD TRIO 

Those Three Nifty Girls 

P LA YIN G U. ft. O. TIME 



JEAN LEIGHTO 



and HER MINSTREL REVUE 

New Piayiai ft. F. Kafek 



STEWART SMITH 

Dallas, The Harmonica King 

DIRECTION JACK SHEA * 



MARGARET 



SUZANNE 



HAVEN and ERANTZ 

Piano and Harmony 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



RECOLLECTIONS 

Five Operatic Soloists in "From Grand Opera to Rag " 

A SCENIC PRODUCTION 



ETHEL MILTON & CO, 

In "MOVIE MINNIE" 

. By WILLARD MACK 



BERTRAM, MAY & ROSEWOOD 




ATTRACTIVE DISPLAY OF GILBERT * FRIEDLAND SONGS IN WINDOW OF CHICAGO F. W. WOOLWORTH CO. STORE 



36 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 2, 1919 



BACKED BY THE GOVERNMENT 

PUBLIC HEALTH FILMS ANNOUNCES 

THE PRESENTATION OF 

FIT TO Wl 

Produced for the War Department Commission 
on Training Camp Activities daring mobilization 
and now constituting the opening gun of the cam- 
paign launched by the UNITED STATES PUB- 
LIC HEALTH SERVICE to make the world 
safe for posterity. 





WITH 



McKI 



I 



AS 



Personally Directed by LIEUT. E. H. GRIFFITH 







PUBLIC HEALTH FILMS 

1493 Broadway, N. Y. C Suite 211 Phone, Bryant 9496 



JOE 


LILLIAN 


HATCH & HATCH 


Singing, 


Dancing and Comedy 




IN VAUDEVILLE 



m » HIBBITT and MALLE — 

••Two Southern Boys" 

MATERIAL BY ANDY RICE DIRECTION— MAX GORDON 



JACK 



ORBEN & DIXIE 

The Jack of Hearts and the Queen of Spades 



NELLIE 



LOEW CIRCUIT 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Continued from page 23 and on 3S) 



LUCILLE CHALFANT 



DIRECTION— ^CLAUDE BOSTOCJt 



LEON C PAUL Ri 

WHITEHEAD & FITZGERALD 

Over Thai* with « tassg N< Mraiahi. ■C1RAMBB AND EPST1N 



IM 



SAX ERANCIBCO, CAT. 

Pentages— Magazine Qirl— Lew Wilson— McCon 

Dell & Simpson — Van ft Vernon — Joe Dealer ft 

Slater. 

SAN DIEGO, CAI. 
Pantages — Four Mayakos — Senator Francis 
Murphy— Maryland Singers— Bega! a: Moon — 
Murphy * Klein — lore ft Wilbur. 
SPOKANE, WASH. 
Pentages — Four Danobce — Chaa. F. Semon — Col. 
Hals Dancer* — Hanah ft LareUe — Bath Challls — 
Bullet Proof Lady. 

SEATTLE. WASH. 
ftntlfU — Miss 1820 — "Wbo la He?" — MrLcTlan 
ft Carson — Denn Lino — Three Western Slaters. 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Pentages— La Petite Bra— Tallyho Girls— Jack 
Boae — Borke ft Bnrke — Zuhn ft l>rala — La Toy's 
Doga. 

TACOMA, WASH. 
Pantages — Fonr Bards — TroTato — "Fireside Ber- 
erie" — Walter ft Brer— LUllan Wataon— Pedrinl'a 
Monks. 

VANCOUVER. CAN. 
Fantafsi — Three fosses— Mel Elee — Mile. Blanca 
ft Co. — Valentine Vox — Julia Clifford — Tuacano 
Brotbera. 

VICTORIA, OAH, 
Pantages — Million Dollar Dolls— Arthur Barrett 
— Uka Marie Deal— Jack ft Marie Grey— Aator 
Foot — Aeroplane Olrla. 

WINNIPE G, OAH. 
Pantxge* — "Some Baby" — Harris ft Mannlon — 
Bterer ft Lorejoy — Maidle DeLoog — Victor Foot — 
Will Morris. 

ALTON, Hi. 
Hippodrome (First Half)— IBIS Winter Garden 
Berne. (Last Half)— Wood, Tonne ft Phillips— 
Bealsta. 

BILLINOB, MOST. 
Babcook (Apr. 6-7) — Fred ft Peggy Pymm — Me- 
Orslh ft Yeoman— Polly. Oa ft Chick—Wolf ft 
Wlllon. (Apr. 10) — "Aerial Shells" — Cleveland ft 
Trelease — Jolly Wild ft Co. — Harry Brans ft Co. 
— Lockhar t ft L addie. 

BUTTE. MONT. 
People's Hipp, (Apr. S-8) — Darling ft Osman — 

Howard. Moore A Cooper — Princess Minstrel Misses 

— Shriller ft Herman— Four Plerrotts. (Apr. 9-12) 
— Snow, Slgworth ft Sharp — Fred ft Peggy Prmm 
— McCrath ft Yeoman— Polly, Oa ft Chick— Wolf ft 

Wilton. 

CHICAGO, nx. 

Amerlou (First Half)— Goldle ft Ayers— Karl 
ft Jennings— Boaeh ft McCurdy. (Last Halt) — 
Argo ft Virginia Slaters — "Bamnaats" — "MUe-a- 
Mfiiile " 

Empreu (First Half)— McGreery ft Doyle— Joe 
Nathan — Gafney ft Dale — Valayda— Ray ft Burma 
Dran— "Mile a Minute." (Lait Half)— B. I. 
Cycle — Bensee ft Balrd — Moore ft Elliott — Cameron 
ft Gsylord— Skating Bear. 

Lincoln (First Half)— Argo ft Virginia Sisters — 
Tracy. Palmer ft Tracy— Silver ft Dnval — Van 
Bros. — "Cheyenne Days." (Last Half)— Karl ft 
Jennings— "Hello People Hello." 

Kedxle (First Half) — Hip Raymond — WlBlson 
ft Sherwood' — G. 8wsyn~ Gordon — Walmaley ft 
Myers — Crawford's Fashion Berne. (Last Half) 
— Bromo ft Baldy— Ben Deeley ft Co. — Surer ft 
Duval — White Bros. 

Hippodrome (Day Show) — Frank Carmen — Flake 
ft Fallon — Knorr ft Bella — Froslnl — Hong Kong 
Mysteries— The Rials. (Might Show)— Norton ft 
Kimball — Dorsch ft Russell — Darle Jamleoon — 
Amoroa ft Jeannette. . 

CHAMPAZGH. ILL. 

Orphanm (First Half) — Vada Clayton — John T. 
Ray ft Co. — McCormack ft Wallace— Frank Crnmlt. 
(Last Hair) — Mae Marrtn — Deane ft Debrow — 
"Sand Man's Hour." 

cedar RArrrje, ia. 

Majestic (First Half) — Lambert! — Sllber ft North 
— wnitledge ft Beckwith— John R. Gordon ft Co. 
— Jack Ostennan. 

CAMP LEWIS, WASH. 

Green Faxk (First Half) — Mardo ft Hunter — 

Ray LeRoyre— Hamilton Bros— Prelles arena- 
Hall * O'Brien. (Last Hall)— MnusDeia ft 

Blddle-r^uggttng D'lmu -Morse ft Clark — Danc- 
ing Burtons— Portia Sisters. 

DAVENPORT. I A. 

Columbia . (First Half ) —Curtis Canines — Thomas 
ft McDonald — "Somewhere with Pershing" — Bris- 
coe A Raub — La Oradoaa. (Last Half) — Clifford 

A. Ma rah — Van Bros "Number Please" — Jack 

Oetarman — "Follies of Today." 
A DECATUR ILL. 

Empress (First. Half)— Sim ma ft Werfleld— 
Newell ft Most —Colonial Musical Misses — "Sand 
Man's Hoot*' — Lew Bully. (Last Halt) — Vnda 
Clayton — Snlllran ft Myers — McCormack ft Wallace 
— John T. Bar ft Co. 

DE8 MOINES, IA, 

Empress (First Half) — Pearson Trio— BBSs ft 
Dot— Wlllard Hntchlnson ft Co. — Jarrow— Howard 
ft Fields Minstrels. (Last Half)— Geo. ft Mae 
LaFerre — Ruber ft North — "Hoornrliliig"— Jlm- 
mle Brltt— Plpltax ft Panlo. 



. . DUBUaUE, IA. 

Majestic— Geo. ft Mae LaFevre — Mitchell ft 
Mitch — "Berne DeLux"— Grant Gardner — Piplfax 

A Panlo. ' 

DULUTH, MINN. - • 
Hew Grand (First Halt) — Curley ft Hall — Stan 
ft Mae Laurel — Mack ft Velmar — Fred La Heine 
A Co. (Laat Halt) — Madge Maitlaad— Little Mite 

Dixie — Wood ft Lawson. 

EAST 8T. LOOTS, ILL. 
Erber's (First Half) — Schepp's Comedy Circus 
— Barlow A Deerie — Patrick A Otto — Jordon Olrla. 
(Lust Half)— Colonial Musical Misses— Brooks ft 
George — Togan A Genera. 

GRANT! FORKS, N. D. 
Orpheum (First Half)— Lamey ft Pearsoa— "Two 
Week's Notice" — Clarence . Wilbur — Johnson Dean 
Revue. (Last Hair) — Two AsteUas— Kline ft KUf- 
ton — Jimmy Lyons — "Ragtime Court." .". 
GRANITE CTXX, ILL. 
Washington (Apr. 7)— Cook ft Rothert— Togan 
ft Genera. (First Half Monday)— White 
Brothers — Hope Vernon. (Last Half Thursday)— 
Mowatt ft Mullen— Patrick ft Otto. 
GREEN BAT. WIS. 
Orphanm (Laat Half) — Francis ft Nord — Jack 
Goldle — Three Mori B roe. . . 

jM I fj ATT IC F^y vuiq 

Palace (Flrat Halt)— The Skatins Bear— FollI™ 
Sisters A LeRoy— Darld S. Hall ft Co. — Sills 
Nowlan Troupe — Fred Elliott. (Last Half) — Lutes 
Broe. — Barle ft Edwards-— Mattie Choate— Walma- 
ley ft Myers — June Mills ft Co. — Paul LeVan ft 
Bofeba. 

MADISON, WIS. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Bary ft Bary — Sbeldon 
ft Daley — Tennessee Ten — Francis ft Nord — Her- 
bert's Dogs. (Last Half) — Follls Sisters ft LeRoy 
—Darld 8. Hall . ft Co.— Lew Sully— EUla, Now- 
lan Troupe. 

MOLEST, OX. 

Palace (First Half)— Alma Grant ft Co.— 
"Number Please" — James CuUen— -Slg. Frans 
Tronpe. (Last Half) — Mitchell ft Mitch — Salon 
Singers — Roach ft McCurdy. 

HTNNEAPOLIB. SUNN. 

Hew Palaos (First Half)— Taylor ft Arnold— 
Jardln Kerne — Harry Rose. (Last Half) — Danc- 
ing McDonalds— Chase ft La Toar— May-Kllduff ft 
Allerton — Detzel ft CarroU. 

NORTH YAKIMA. WASH. 

Empire (Apr 6-7) — Covan ft Helens— "Hello 
Tokio" — B. Kelly Forrest — Gardner's Maniacs— 
Heyns. (Apr. 11-12)— Wheelock ft Hay— Clay ft 
Robinson — "Cycle of Mirth"— Tourestl— Kurty's 
Troupe. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Hipp. (Apr. SB) — Welling ft Levering — Gibson 
ft Betty — Jam Bone Quartette — Prince Rarml — 
Musical Sullirans. (Apr. 10-12)— Mardo A Hunter 
— Bay L. Boyce — Hamilton Bros— I*reUes CIrcns — 
Hall ft O'Brien. 

ROCKFORD, ILL, 

PaUoo (First Halt) — Clifford ft Marsh — Barle A 
Edwards — Dnnbar's Salon Singers — Jack Goldle— 
Lutes Bros. (Last Half)— PoUey— Pearson Trio- 
Berne DeLuxe — Olive Briscoe ft Al Ranb— La 
Gradosa. 

ST. LOUIB, MO. 

Grand Opera House — Wills ft Harold Browne— 
Ovanda Duo — Dan Abeam— Cook ft Rothert 
Howard 'Mart ell ft Co. — Styne ft Arnold — Angel A 
FnUer — Robbyn's Family — Crewell Fanton ft Co. 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Majestic (First' Half)— Policy— SulUvan ft 
Myers — "Corn Cob Cut Ops" — Use Marvin — Deane 
ft Debrow. (Last Half)— Frank Crum It— Catherine 
Crawford ft Fash ion Girls. 

SOUTH BEND, IND. 

Orpheum (First Half)— "Pretty Baby"— Victoria 
Goodwin. (Last Half)— Blcknell— Hudson Sisters 
— "Childhood Days"— (Jilroy, Haynei ft Mont- 
gomery — Barto A Clark. 

ST. PAUL. MINN 

Hsw Palace (First Half)— Veree ft Verd— Chase 
ft L&Tour— MattiB Cboate ft Co.— Detzel ft Carroll. 
(Lett Half)— J ardln B erne — Hsrry Bose. 
SUPERIOR, WIS. 

New Palace (First Half) — Infield A Noble— Ray 
A Pklener— tittle Miss Dixie — Madge Maltland— 
Zeno, Dunbar ft Jordon. (last Half)— Curley ft 
Hall — Stan A Mae Laurel — Mack A Veluiar — Fred 
La Seine A Co. 

SIOUX OXTT, IOWA. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Dancing McDonalds— 
Keane A Walsh — "Pinched" — John Gelger — Brierre 
ft King— "Rubevllle." (Laat Half)— Mile. D'Anros 
ft Co. — Archie Nicholson Duo— Willsrd Hntchlnson 
ft Co. — Jarrow — Bala ft Van Kaufman — "The Rain- 
bow Revue." 

SPOKANE, WASH. 

Hipp. (Apr. S-8) — Pinto ft MarteUe — Bessie Clif- 
ton — Ander Girls — Frances ft Hume — Artols Bros. 
(Apr. 8-12)— Three Wallflowers — Hsddon ft Nor- 
man—Tom Manoney— Alco Trio— LaLltta Ward 
Ira via. 

SACRAMENTO CAI,. 

a ' 

(Apr. 9-12)— Wells ft Sells— Marlon 01b- 
ney — Eeuner Hollowsy — Otto Bros. — Alf Golem 
Tronpe. 

(Continued on pagt 38.) 



Hipp. (Apr. S-8)— Two Carltorrs— Two miles— 
Charles Millard ft Co. — Al Abbott — Smith's Aal- 



THE WOP AND THE SINGER 



PAYNTON, HOWARD and LISTETTE 



IN A REAL VAUDEVILLE FROLIC 



DIRECTION— CHAS. BORN HAUPT 



CHAS. ROOT & WHITE WALTER 



ECCENTRIC SONGS AND DANCES 



* s . 




April «. 19*9 



THE NEW V TORK CtVpPEk 7 




BRADY LIVENS 

CENSORSHIP 

HEARING 

STIRS CHICAGO COMMITTEE 



Chicago, 111., Match 29. — William A. 
Brady, heading a delegation of eastern 
motion picture producer*, including 
Walter M. Irwin, Paul Oromelin and 
Gabriel ' M. Hess, created considerable ex- 
cUepent at the hearing of the Chicago 
commission on censorship today. The 
committee of producers from the Hast 
wen invited to come to Chicago and **- 
press their views on censorship of «hnn 
daring what was to have heen a meeting 
at which a fair and unprejudiced hearing 
waa to have been given both sides. 

The hearing, soon became more of »■ 
joke than . anything else, however. The 
majority of those present were men and 
women who had little knowledge of the 
■object at hand and had come there with 
the determination to -uphold the proposed 
scheme no matter what .arguments -were 
advanced against it. After the drat few 
minutes, numerous formal and informal 
verbal battles took place and it began to 
look as though 'a physical tussle would ter- 
minate the proceedings. 

While, all present were hurling argu- 
ments at each other, with scarcely any 
semblance of order, William A Brady de- 
Hvered hla talk, bain*, allowed only fifteen 
minutes to air his opinions. He described 
the work of the motion picture industry 
during the war, telling how films had 
helped uphold the morale of the fighters 
and how. the loan drives, Bed Cross and 
other war drives had been given whole- 
hearted support by the industry* He went 
farther to explain that no profit had been, 
made while aasiatance was given to these 
various activities. 

He told them how he bad produced 
Shakespearean drama upon the spoken 
stage, and that yet, if he dared attempt 
to produce one of the plays of the great 
Bngliah poet upon the screen, he would 
Immediately Incur the displeasure of the 
different censorship committees. The school 
children, he said, were, given the dramas 
of Shakespeare to study, still their pre- 
sentation in .motion pictures was .tabooed. 

Father TMneen, a member of the com- 
mittee, replied to the latter argument with 
the statement that the influence of read- 
ing was considerably less than that of « 
picture, that the latter made a much 
greater impression mentally, upon the chil- 
dren. 

Brady came back at the clergyman, giv- 
ing the stage as an example. "They hear 
the dialogue there in addition to swing 
the action," said he. "What about that?" 
Father Dineen sat back in his seat, com- 
pletely quelled. Brady, however, stuck to 
the point. He demanded why magaxines 
bearing . stories . that would tend toward 
producing «n immoral effect were not cen- 
sored, and declared that he could find upon 
Chicago newspaper stands many such. 







SUE FOR PROFITS 

The ' Protective Amusement Company, 
said to be a subsidiary of Klaw & Er- 
Ianger, is suing the Pathe Exchange in the 
United States District Court.. 

The action is for an injunction to re- 
strain the defendants from presenting the 
motion pietur j called "A Japanese Night- 
ingale," produced some time ago. Accord- 
ing to the bijl of complaint filed by David 
Gerber, attorney for the plaintiff, the mo- 
tion picture is an adaptation of the well 
known, book of the same title, written in 
1900 by Onoto Watanfe, who, in private 
life at that time, was Mrs. Winifred Bab- 
cock, hut is now Mrs. Francis Reeve. 

On June 7,1913, it is alleged, the outhor 
sold the motion picture rights of her story 
to Pat Casey, the latter at that time being 
vice-president of the plaintiff company. 
Casey, in turn, assigned the picture rights 
over to liia company on June 14. 

(However, in an amended bill of com- 
plaint drawn on behalf of the plaintiff, 
Casey and Darcy and Wolford, Inc., are 
also made defendants in the action, it 
being alleged that on September S, 1017, 
Casey assigned to Darcy and Wolford, the 
rights to the story which, it is alleged, the 
latter in turn sold to the Pathe company. 

fow the .plaintiff is seeking an injunc- 
tion and also an* accounting and share of 
the profits, which, it is alleged, the Pathe 
company realized from the presentation 
of the picture. 

TRIES TO STOP "LITTLE WOMEN"' 
Buffalo, March 27.— Marion de For- 
rest, of this city, filed an equity action in 
the United States Court, here, last week, 
in which she is trying to stop the showing 
of "Little Women" as a motion picture. 
Miss de Forrest, an author and dramatic 
critic, charges that the defendants, the 
Famous-Players Leaky Corporation, Will- 
iam A. Brady, William A. Brady, Ine* 
Jessie Bonstelle Stuart, and three Buffalo 
theatres — the Blmwood, the Shea and the 
Victoria, are infringing upon her rights 
to the dramatization and production of 
"Little Women." 

She asks that all films and negatives of 
the production be placed with the clerk of 
the United States Court of the Western 
District of New York during the pendency 
of the proceedings or be surrendered to 
the court for destruction. She also de- 
mands that Buffalo theatres be restrained 
from showing the picture and asks for aa 
injunction .to stop all other houses 
throughout the country from exhibiting the 
film. 

The defendants are given twenty days 
to file an answer to the action. 



WANTS NEW KIND OF FILM 

Chicago, ill., .March 29.— Franklin H. 
Wentwortb, secretary of the National Fire 
Protection Association, holds that the 
ordinary, inflammable motion picture film 
should be abolished. He declares departr 
meets of public safety, fire commissioners 
and fire chiefs, -fire underwriters. State 
police, inspectors and firemen are occupied 
and spending public money in safeguard- 
ing a fire and life hasard <that should not 
exist. 

Mr. Wentwrth pointed out that more 
and more of these hasardous films are 
being carried abbot our cities and used 
and stored in places where they endanger 
human life. Not only this, he says, but 
they are being handled. Cared for and dis- 
played by persons who do net understand 
or Appreciate the danger that is present. 



GOES ABROAD TO MARRY 

Chjcaoo, TfL, March ,29.— Anita King, 
motion picture star, departed from this 
dry last week and sailed for Europe, em- 
barking at New Brunswick, for Paris, 
where she wffi be wedded to Major . James 
McKnight, a prominent California. Mis* 
"King has been spending the Winter .In 
Chicago, with her sister, Mrs. Edwin H. 
Humble. 



FIRE CHIEF IS 

INDICTED IN 

FILMjatAFT 

"FAVORS" GIVEN EXHIBITORS 

Many film exhibitors are alleged to be 
implicated in a graft case wherein it is 
claimed they paid in weekly f ees for "pro- 
tection'* from prosecution for violations of 
the fire ordinances. Indictments alleging 
conspiracy and accepting unlawful fees 
have been returned by the Grand Jury 
against Dr. William F. Doyle, chief of the 
Bureau of Fire Prevention of the city fire 
department, and Capt. Frank McGinnis, in 
charge of the Bureau of Public Assemblies 
of the Bureau of Fire Prevention. Others 
indicted were Leon Wallace, a manager of 
Healy's restaurant and Frank McGoey, of 
Far Roclca way . 

The Grand Jury action is the result of 
an investigation demanded by Fire Com- 
missioner Thomas J. Drennan into the al- 
leged doings of the so-called Colonial Film 
Company. The records of this company, 
to which the money is alleged to have been 
paid, showed that approximately 91,600 
had been paid in by movie concerns in 
amounts of $10, $80, $25 and $30. Wallace 
testified that Cant. McGinnis visited 
Healy's and gave him a list of motion pic- 
ture houses and the amounts they would 
be expected to pay, ostensibly for films. 

These "favors," received by the film ex- 
hibitors, according -to the testimony, in- 
cluded permission to allow "standees" in 
their houses; certain operating booth 
privileges, exit construction privileges and 
other things as to which they expected 
those whose duty it was to protect, the 
public would close their official eyes. Ma- 
Oinnis and McGoey were released in $2,500 
bail and Wallace on $1,000 bail. Dr. Doyle 
will appear in court this week. 



GOVT USING HEALTH FILM 
A dramatic film depicting venereal 
disuses, which was originally intended to 

educate the American soldier, Is now be- 
ing used by the Public Health Service of 
the Government to educate all American 
citizens. The original title was "Fit to 
Fight" and showed the pitfalls besetting 
the paths of men entering Uncle Sam's 
service. The title has been changed to 
"Fit to Win." 

The dangers, precaution and cures for 
these diseases are shown through On me- 
dium of a clever .film plot, which will hold 
the interest of any audience through Its 
human interest alone. A similar picture 
for women, "The End of the Road," has 
also been made by the Government The 
films tell the truth, without camouflage or 
technical names. 



BRONX GETS $500,000 HOUSE 
. The Bronx will soon have - a ..new mo- 
tion picture theatre in the Fordham dis- 
trict to be erected at a cost of fSOOtOQO. 
The corporation .which will rap the house 
Is controlled hy Max J. Kramer, who pur- 
chased -.a plot on the northeast corner of 
Fejgham road and Valentine avenue from 
Daniel j. Qrlffen. 

The house will have a seating capacity 
of 2,200 and a roof garden seating 1,200, 
and ..wfll be hunt on the style of the 
Rlvoll on "Broadway. 8 trashcrarger and 
BchalJeck represent the buyers. 



RORKE BOX IN DISFAVOR 

Habbisbdbo, Pa, March- 27.— The 
Rorke bill, providing for an amendm ent ; .to 
the Sunday laws that would permit Sun- 
day concerts and moving pictures, was re- 
ported negatively hy .the House Judiciary 
Special Committee on Tuesday hen. 



[ 



FILM FLASHES 



"Break the News to Mother" wiU be re- 
leased hy Select. 



William Desmond and Mary Mclvor war* 
married recently. 

Joseph DeOrassa has been signed to direct 
Ince productions. -~ 

. " Lor ?, Jlm " u tte Htle of Louis Bennlsoa's 
fourth Goldwyn feature. 

"Marie, Ltd.," with Alice Brady was re- 
leased by Select last week. 

Dorothy Phinipi has signed a new two- 
year contract with Universal. 

The Pioneer Film Company have secured 
the rights to "The Boomerang." 

'The ailvar Girl." with Frank Keenaa. win 
be released hy Pathe on April BtlL^ ~ 



_Bobert_B L Wortham's suit against Edgar A. 



AvucfL a*, nuruiami suit 

Lewis baa been settled and 



Anita Stewart's next production. ' 
" will be released lata in April. 



Women,' 



Ldeut Nelson Brans has w. ... ., 
of the army and has returned to the 

Monroe Salisbury la working on "The Open 
Bead" under the direction .of Rupert JullanT 

Arrow Films will move from the 

Candle 



Building to a suite in the Candler saaasaaul 

Brunt 



HodUnson will release the Zaaa Grey pic- 
tures .now being Olmed at the Bruntoa 



studios. 



John I* McCutcheon succeeds cuchare 
Turner ss manager for the Gray Seal pro- 
ductions. 



Cabana*. --««••# 

Ehwle Montgomery and Jos Bock will be 
eeen In their next CSg T corned 7 called "Olrls 
and Grubbers." 

Joe Brandt has arrived at the Mew York 

tffavtySPHR 1 Mter * *" a ' athm ' ■» 



Metro, has arrived 'at Wu£ood? D £ne^a ^bi 
will stay for a weak. 

"The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Com*" 
bss been purchased by Mrs. Cttsrtotts THce> 
ford for Jack Flckford. 



thrfr 



In Los Angelas last weak. 



Captain Victor Bobank, formerly with 
Kl !*? , 7- 5M been discharged from the army 
and la la New York Mopping at the rrlars. 

Antonio Moreno and Carol HoUowar have 

completed some of the episodes of their .Vtvi- 
graph serial "Perns. of Thunder Mountain.^ 

Andrew Karsss has closed a deal with the 
Daniels Aalmsted Btndlo for a series of 
leaders sad trailers for the Karsss (tissues 



of the 
at the 



_ wag the first to show 
th. psrsoe ,snd had them 
performances of 



an Kritt 



— '^ auuuuwu iTCJiuiujavmrsj v* am anui 

AM Proctor hoQKi and tbo Rial to uH 




38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April -2,: 1919 



i ii-'_ 



FRANCHINI 

EQUILIBRISTS— HAND-TO-HAND BALANCERS— DIRECTION— PALY SANDERS 




VIOLA GILLETTE 



fat An Exdnaivw Act ty 



Ha* 



Bert Low* at th» Pkao 



LEW A. WARD 

REFINED. CLASSY, ORIGINAL— ALWAYS GOING 



A. NEW NAME, BUT A. STANDARD ACT 



(4) 



Paste. Skit, "TW Nrw Cook. " 



WLf.JLU.1U*imJB 



TENNEY 



A Standard Vaudwvill. Writer of 
VraUvOW Acts. 

1493 Bro.dw.y, New York City 



doc STONE & WALL leo 



Uaicyck and Bicycle 



Direction — Phil Bosh 



GENE and ETHEL, BEAUDRY 

THE imU MAN WITH THE BIG VOICE AND THE PESSONALXTY GIRL 

rtorgirrmrf imnm ad richards hit hip hooray girls 

At Uberty Z&-, J. HARRY JENKINS 



Strait ht, CwawawawewM 



TkU 1— ■ Tha 



Show 



BERTHA. COIVf INS 

INGENUE ..*.--•• FRED UtWINS BIG SHOW 

BEATRICE LAMBERT 

THE INTERNATIONAL GIRL IN VAUDEVILLE 

COLLETTE MAISIE "" 

BATISTE & L'ESTR ANGE 

CIASMCAI. AND POPULAR MELODIES 



I 



Versatile Variety Offering 

FLYNN 



ROSE & ARTHUR BOYLAN 



IN SONG AND DANCE INNOVATION 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



adeuha ROATTINA & BARRETTE w» 

IN "MAJUUUCIA GOING UP" Direction, LEE MUCKENFUSS 

OXX KERNER & CO. 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

to CORELLI & GILLETTE vm 

VARIETY ENTERTAINERS 



NELLIE NICE 



HP. I A »■ 



ROSA 



SOURRETTE 



AT LIBERTY 



Read The Clipper Letter List 



TEN XAM I NED IN PROBE 

(Ctmtir, 4 from page* 3, 3D wsafrgL) 



-Clark also related an Incident that he 
said • occ u r r ed in Brooklyn, when bo was 
playing in KeeneyVs Theatre in October. 
1916. It seems that George O'Brien and 
Harry Weber came. over to Keeney"s and 
after -"Wetier -ftad- been introduced — by 
O'Brien, the subject •* Clark's. appearinK 
as a witness -in the CUffoEd ."Elacher suit 
against the TJ. B. O. came, up for discus- 
sion. Clark intimated that he was prom- 
ised a route, but tbe route never mate- 
rialized. There was much, stalling.- accord- 
ing to Clark, a"bout' the route, and, finally, 
he called for a showdown. While Clark 
never got the promised route, he did. how- 
ever, appear as a witness In the Fischer 
suit. 

Clark's real name is Isadora Baity. It 
developed during his examination. While 
on the stand he maintained a cheerful 
demeanor throughout his testimony, and 
raised more than one hearty laugh by his 
entertaining manner of describing Incidents 
and occurrences. His imitation of Harry 
'Weber's breezy manner even got a laugh 
from Maurice Goodman, who voted it an 
excellent impersonation of the vaudeville 
agent. Goodman asked Clark, -who bad 
stated previously that he had at one time 
Intended to become a Jockey, If he wasn't 
a sort of an tn-and -outer as an actor. 
Goodman explained, that he was using tbe 

parlance of the race track, because Clark 
would understand it after his turf expe- 
riences. • 
Clark, incidentally, told of how ho want 

to see Mr. Alhee regarding tbe production 
of an act, entitled "The Auto Bandit." 
According to Clark, Mr. Albee listened to 
his. preposition and said that, while he 
would not produce the act, he would give 
Clark assistance: Clark got a showing 
for the turn, but the trend of his testi- 
mony tended to indicate that he felt he 
had been given much tbe worst of It- . 

Clark testified that Joe Schesck. of the 
Marcus Loew offices, told him that he could 
not play him -by his right name because 
the members of the V. M. P. A. would get 
onto It. Mr. Murdock, Clark stated, in- 
formed Him in 1916. that he could not get 
time as long, as he was active In the 
White Rats. 

Edward Keough was the next witness 
and told of having joined the White Rats 
In- 1901. and. his many' trials and tribula- 
tions with regard to the securing of book- 
ings at various times since becoming a 
member of the organization. 

Harry Bulger was the last witness to be 
called on Saturday. He said that he had 
been in the show ■ business - since 1882 or 
1883 and that he bad.. played every first 
class theatre in the country as a star dur- 
ing his career as an actor. He said he was 
fifty years of age. 

■ Two years ago last February. Bulger said 
he closed with Cohan's Revue In Boston. 
Bill Lykens sent for him and laid before 
him a proposition to enter vaudeville. -Bul- 
ger told Lykens to go ahead and fix things 
up for him. A few days later Lykens 
called him up and asked him to come to 
New Tork. Bulger said. Upon his arrival 
at Lykens's office, Bulger stated that Ly- 
kens Informed him that the vaudeville deal 
was ail off as Bulger was on tbe "black- 
list." 

Bulger identified his name on a list 
handed to him by Mr. Walsh in the court 
room. The so-called blacklist had Bul- 
ger's name on it all right enough, and 
four stars after it for good measure. Bul- 
ger told of going to see Pat Casey, who 
told him that he was on the list for 
"picketing," "making speeches." "sending 
a check to the Rata," etc Bulger says 
he told Casey that he must be a wonder 
if he had a check signed by him. Inasmuch 
as he had no checking account. 

Bulger denied that he had ever taken 
part In any of the White Rat activities 
that he was alleged to have participated 
in. He played for a short time for the 
TJ. B. O., but his bookings had been any- 
thing but plentiful, he said, since the time 
that Lykens had told him of the so-called 
"blacklist" embargo. Bulger said he had 
never given the M. V. A- any authority to 
use his name as a booster for the forth- 
coming benefit in May. Despite this. Bul- 
ger's name appeared on a letter containing 
a list of names of actors on record as 
being behind, the N. V. A. benefit. 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Contimnd from pares a and S) 



gwaTTT.w WASH. 
Palaaa Hipp. (Apr. 8-0) — Eapanoei*— Morrison * 
Carter— Holland A Jesuitic— Billy Doss— La Vint 
THo. (Apr. 10-12)— Emu WiUe 4 Co. — Housed 
A Cathren — Allen LtseSa enr A Co. — Hombarj A- 
Lee— Will * staid Bland, 

TTCBlaT HAUTE, rjro. 

Hippodrome (Tint Half)— Moos. Herbert— Bin 
* Edna Frawley— Harry * Etta Canity — Keno, 
Keyes A Metros*— "Making Merles." (last Half) 
—Julia Bdwards— Boothbr 4 Krerdeen — Daisy 
Dngas * Variety Foot — Ben Benny — Anna Era 
•ay. ... 

TA00MA, WASH. ' 

Hipp. (Apr. 3-8) — Mansfield * BIdrlle— Joggling 
lyslatu Hue A Clark — Dancing B mt u m — Por- 
tia Bisters. (Apr. 10 12)— sstpanosls— Morrison A 
CarHr Tftilliiid A Jeande — Billy Dots— La Vine 
Trio. 

V ASCO WXB, CAB. 

Columbia (rtrwt Halt) — Emll Wffie— Holland * 
Cathreo — Allen Unosay A Co. — Eombnn A Lee- 
Win A Bald Bland. (Last Half)— Conn * 
Helens— ■•Hello Torio"— B. Kelhr rbrrsrt O art- 
ser"s Maniacs — Tbe Herns. • 



-. OAH. 

Strand (First '. Half )— Two Asn 

inlflni Tlmiiiy Lyoas— ■•Bagtlme Cart." 

Half )— Delmore A. Moore ■ Bleber A V« 

* Marks — Wyoming Trie.- 

WALLA WALLA, WASH. 

Liberty (Apr. 0-7)— Wbeelock A Bay— Clay * 

BoMneoo — "Cyek> of Mirth" — Tooreatl — Kurty's 

Troupe. (Apr. 11-12)— Pinto * MarteDe— ■MM 

Clifton— Ander Girls— Frances A Htnae— Arteii 
B^,. ___. 

WESTERN VAUDEVILLE EXCHANGE 

BATTLE ' OXEEK,* aarrrsr 

Bijou (Fbat Half )— Hudson Slaters— "Kero, So 
Yoioe" — Hal ft Frances — Bod 8nyder — Joe Melius 
ft Co. (Last Half)— Ambler Bros.— Jessie ft Dollle 
Millar— Klnalfy Kids— Jay Bajmond— Hlil, TItoU 
Girls A HUL ■ -^"^ 

BAT CITY, MICH. 

Bijou (Firet Half) — "Shepherd of tbe Hlila." 
(Last Half) — Manekln — Melroy Sister* — Canon 
Trio — Martin ft Cou rtney — "Rising Generation. " 
FLINT, MICH. 

Falaca (First Halt) — Wanda— Hal Johnson— Fonr 
Castors. (Last Half) — Marrelous DeOnaoe— Lino— 
Marcel Gentler — Barley ft Barley — "Berne D* 
VOgOA," 

JACKBOH, MICH. 

Orpasam (First Half) — Marrelooa DeOnsos— 
Jessie ft Dollle Miller — OQroy, Harare ft Mont- 
gomery — Boberra. Pearl ft Straw— Ben Fay. (Last 
Half )— Bod Snyder— Skelly ft Belt— Blaneh ft Jim 
mle Creighton — Habn. WeUer ft Ke nya S i s lay. 
LASSEN}, MICH. . 

Bijou (First H«U) — Manklu— Martla . ft Court- 
nay — "Piano MoYera" — Knox Wilson— mn. Broil 
Glrbl ft Wl)l , 



JAMES MADISON 
WRITES FOR 

AL JOLSON 

For <ucl**ive material eott at my 
I doumtovm office, 1493 -Brooekpoy 



SPECULATION vs INVESTMENT 

Piscina; ■ a bet on a horse on a hundred- 
to-one shot it a speculation.' Spending 
a dollar for MADISON'S BUDGEFNo. 17 
is an investment; yes* it must pay you 
a hundredfold or I. return r our money 
MADISON'S BUDGET No. » contain, the 

finest selection of hokum laughs ever 
assembled, including a liberal assortment 
of my latest monologues, acts for two 
males, acts for male and female and for 
three characters, minstrel first-parts, par- 
odies, 200 single gags, a one-act farce for 
9 people, etc Remember, price ONE DOL- 
LAR. Back issues all gone. Send orders 
to JAMES MADISON, 1052 Third Avenue, 
New York. 



Producing Comedian for Summer Stock. Prima 
Donna. Musical Comedy People in all lines. 
Also Lady Orchestra and Chorus Girls. M. J. 
MEANEY, a* Tremor* t Street, Boston. 



ATTENTION, VAUDEVILIMKS, FRO.IUK, ETC. 

La<re irbeanal ban sub piano for rent by day or bra-. 
LA FMTiMaE STUDIOS. 253 Wast 42* St. K. Y. City. 
Dlrertr, epesdt* Banrb Teeth*. 



w 



|GS Toupees Make-Up 

ORTH Send foT *■*» Utt 

u i I it G- SHINDHELM 

tl I LI ist w. «#th St. New Yee* 



ELLIS ANTKES 
Public Stenographer 

PRESS MATTER WRITTEN 
Colombia Theatre Buildmg 
Broadway and 47th St., New York 
M . Tea. Bryant 7*71 



IT^S EASY £ 



To Demand 

!ore> SiJary 
Waea Tea Use Caaseay Material fnss Ike Sew 

BULLETIN " lv « ^** 
PRICE ONE DOLLAR PER COPY 

CSiTAlIS TBE F0LL8WIKS CtlEDT sUTEtlAL 
23 KrsaiJai asMlecm, 15 rearlsi arts Jw res 
■ales. U •riflitl acts fee BBat ssi faasda, 30 
rare-Ire asraslta, 2 rterf-llfUtif trls sata, 2 rstlflst 
nartsns arts, a sew t isst i uatta, a mat tsUtH 
cseMSy saw s si laS l es, as art far res resales, 12 
ewttst ■lutrel tnt fern, a enst sHastn: laaJe, 
BeaHp ef sttssalk sWaweawsWa , 
■eaeBher the srtes of KuNAUXB BOUErm 
He. 4 a g uy one dDDar per copy; or vm wan iss 
BITUBIINB Not. S and 4 for $1.50. sttb saw 



VVaL HeNAIXY, 81 East 125th SL. N. Y. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



INSURE YOUR MATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 

reget eiTyou r act 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be retained to yon as 

an MAnowtodracot, ud for future reference. The contribution should be signed pUlnlr kj the 
Jjna, or firm ■axeatag the uai, and should be endorsed bj the stage manager °[_^ show or 
of the house where the act i» being need or other witnesses. 
■ud* by the neliite and numbers being publiahed. 
Address your contributiona to 



Farther acknowledgment will be 



The Registry Bureau, 

NEW YOUC CUPPER, UM 



, Now York 



Date 

NEW YORK CUPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 
Endoaed pleas* find copy of Bay 



for Registration. 

NAME.. 



ADDRESS 




FOR STOCK REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES. 

LAXGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Booka for borne 
amusement, Negro Plays, Paper. Scenery, Mr*. Jarler** Was 

Work a. Catalogue Free! Free! Free! 

SAMUEL FRENCH. 23 Wcit 38th St.. New York 



C L I F» F» E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

AdTertiaemeata not aaaowawM one 11a* la 
length will be pohliahed, p ro perly clisainwd. ia 
this index, at the rate of $10 for one year (SI 

mud). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be scot free to each adrertiaer while thai 
advertisement ia running. 

LAWYERS. 

Joseph A. O'Brien. 1402 Broadway, New York 

Edward' Doyle, Attorney, 421 Merchants Bank 

B1J» ., Indianapolis, Ind. 
James S. Kleinmsn. Equitable Bid*- US 

B'way. New York City. 
F. L Boyd. 17 No. U Sail* St., Chicago. 

MUSICAL. OLASSaA. 
A. Braunneies, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond Hill. 
N. V 

MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 
Chaa. L. Lewie, 429 Richmond St., fliu-innati. 

Ohio. 

SCENERY 

SCBELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

HMO-W South I 
De Flesh Scenic Stuc 



itl-io- t*S Sowth High SL Osl.t* * **. O. 

: Flesh Scenic Studio, 447 Halsey St., Brook- 
lyn. Phone Bedford &WJ. 



SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 

Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St. Phfladal- 
phis. Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Wm. W. Delaaey. 117 Park Row. New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goat Co., 10 Atwater St., Detroit, Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Bolton Regain Co., 387 Washington St., Boa- 
con, Mill 

THEATRICAL. HARDWARE. 
A W. Gerstner Co.. 634 8th Are. (41st St.), 
N. Y. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson, 271 West 150th St., New York 
City. 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES. 
August Getnunder & Sons, 141 W. 42nd St., 
N. Y. 



BAL'SDREADNAUGHT 

A GOOD TRUNK AT 
A VERY LOW PRICE- 

BAL'S XX 

OUR STANDARD TRUNK 
FULLY GUARANTEED. 

BAL'S STAR 

OUR TRUNK DE LUXE 

TRUNKS 



WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 
145 West 45th St., 

or 

4 West 22nd St. 
NEW YORK CITY 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 



Formerly the No* 
JOS. T. WEISMAN. „,, 

Northwest Comer 14th and Chestnut St*., St. Louis, Mo. 

Theatrical HoataJrjr. Cmfo stnsl Cabaret 
UaJoatHeip (MemW N. V. A. mad. fcrUecjuo Club) Boat Bat on th* Circuit 



Vauderilie Acta, Muiical Shows, 
Pfgglaajaojaja. Ft» 

TAKE NOTICE! 



I am ready to write original 
words and music Also perfect arranging. 
Prompt delivery. HUGH W. SCHUBERT. 
Crescent Theatre or 4at State St, Bldya. 




ALBOLENE 

%e safe <^B> 
make-up 
^Remover 

A QUICK descent of the final car. 
tain— then ALBOLENE— and the 
make-up disappears in no time. Your 
akin is kept in splendid condition by 
this pore, agreeable make-up remover, 
the favorite of the stage for years. 
For the make-up box 1 and 2 ounce 
tabes. Also in % and 1 lb. cans. 

ALBOLENE is sold by any druggists or 
dealers in make-up. Free sample on 
request. 



McKESSONtROBBINS 



DR. FREDERICK SOBEL 

DENTIST 
Office Hours: • A M.-7 P. M. Snadwyai It 
A M.-J P. M. Evenioc-s by Ap p n l ntwi s wil 
Septal rata* tn sw» rrnsfsaelnn IMtSeweawh 
Ave, Bet. lU-lUth Sta, Now York. Tsaa- 
Ca thedral g&g. Member of tho Bor- 



5.000 9x12 heralds. 4 pp., each Bate 6x9 J 12- 65 

10,000 9x13 heralds, 4 pp., each psae 6X9 20.90 

9.000 lOUxlt bersldi. 4 pp.. each pert 7xlutt 13.75 

10.000 10HX14 heralds. 4 pp.. each pare 7x10% 22.00 

S.000 12x18 heralds. 4 pp., etch pate 9x12 16.50 

10,000 12x18 heralds, 4 pp., each safe 9x12 27.50 

S.000 14x21 beralde. 4 pp.. each psje lOWill 19.95 

10.000 14x21 btralib, 4 n>-. each psco lOVixll 33.00 

6,000 6x24 heralds, two stdes 13.20 

10.000 6x24 heralds, two sloes 21.45 

S.000 7x21 heralds, two tides 13.75 

10.000 7x21 heralds, two sides 22.00 

3,000 9x24 heralds, two sides 16.50 

10,000 9x24 berslds. two sides 27.50 

6.000 1014x29 heralds, two sldss 19.25 

10.000 10HX28 heralds, two aides 33.00 

Union label en all prlntlm. Teraa: Cash with order. 
Prim subject to chantr eithoct notka, 

GAZETTE SHOW PRIVIING COMPANY 

V. T. ml A. swatwawax. 111- U. S. A 



TAYLOR TRUNKS 

A. •,•./ ■■'■ I . , 

C. A. Tavlor Trunk Works 



C -4 LACO 




PLAYS 



New Patriotic 
For War Time 
Benefits 

IVaudcviUeSketchcs. Stage Mono- 
logues, New Minstrel Materiel. Iokea, 

' Hand Books, Operettas. Fofk Danes*. 
Musical Piaeaa. Special Fislftsra- 
atwats, RscitatJee*. DUloraas. Speak- 
ers Tableaux. DriUa, Win. Beards. 

Grease Patau and Other Maks-Up Goods. Cata- 

loraw FREE. 

T.S. DENISON •> CO. 



HlQl-t Class 

SECOND HAND GOWNS 

L. GOODMAN 

2315 S. State St., Chicago, 11L 



LIBERTY BONDS 

Instalment Booka. War Savuag* and 

Thrift Stamp* 

BOUGHT FOR CASH 

Mt BROADWAY. NEW YORK 
Room 415 Phan* Franklhm M 



ACTS 



PLAYS, 36CETCHES WRI1 I EN 

Terms (or a Stamp 

E. 1_ GAMBLE. Playwright 

East Lfvtr»s.L OU* 



OEPT. vr . CHICAGO 




Manufacturinc Chemists 

E*L1833 

91 Fulton Street,NewYork 






SCENERY 



Dy*. Marl 
SCHELL SCENIC STUDIO. COLUMBUS, O. 

I-ErXRrV MIND READING 

set In tee Boon. New. orxttasl 
rarantsed. lastrsrttees »L0O ■**. 
fatsxsMa. •. ' • 



TIGHTS 

Silk Open Hose and 
. StfisJdniYS 



Ant Oar 

otJAi-rrv **» best saw 
LOWEST. 



Gold and 
JeweJlT. 



1 and Silwer Brocs 

sit. Spangle i. Etc 
Trimmings. Wlga, 
la Theatrical. Saxapl 



Brocadee, Theatrical 
Gold and Sil 
Bearda and all 
flampkw upon recmest. 




m 



THiuuGtsr THwxriuaui 
touamavRtiamTHfinRto. 



WE m EMM COMPANIES 

Of ANY SIZE 
ALSO INMVIDIJA1 ORDERS 

we mi mar sua biou/bemimt , 



NEW YORK 1554 8R0*d»ay •■ 46 5t 
CHICAGO Stait & Monpoc Srs 




Wardrobe Prop Tnroks, 'S. 00 

Big Bargain. Hare been naed. Also a few 
Second Hand Inno-rstion and Ftbr* Ward- 
robe Trttn ks. U0 and US. A few extra larga 
P i uyct l/ Trnnkt. Alto old Tarior Trnnia 

and Bat Trunks. 

Parle* Floor , at W. Stat St, New York CBtf 



LARGEST THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER IN N. Y. 

Telephone* > g^ \ Chelsea 

Puree- A rrow Trucks 

JOSEPH F. REILLY 

Officav 437 to 443 W. Slat 
NEW YORK 
S. HEFrTRNAN. GsmL Hgr. 



WILLIAM F. (Billy) HARMS 

HOBOEEN. N. 1. 

THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 
(Mieasir of Y. B. CL> 

WILLIAM RUSSELL MEYEBS 

Vaudevll'e Author 
SM Palaea Tkastr. SaUdlaa . Raw Xerk. 
Reference*: Eddie Leonard, Goo, Featm, 
Exlekaoa. Gordon tUdrwJ, us aaaaaw. 



Goods' 

J. J. WYLE <ft BROS., Inc. 

(Successor* to Siegman and Wail) 
U-M E. ink St, New Ysr* 



MONEY WRITING SONGS 



sxalatatag bio la suxs aasaw 

tests: — Csmettec fear rsalta. wntnxf a 

the aaswtlaat Tseng f asy s m Naexea mar aesas kstw* 
the Public lists **» MM kade Dealers— 100 awa* en* 
Tea 



0ah> 11.00 Pnsts tH awaaat has* 

IX nu taj to. Otis* Mole Csasss., 315 East Frffcs St. 
ClatlaeaU. Mis. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS, 
N. Y. PLAY BUKEAU. JEsU 
Decatur Art, New York City 
Stamp for catalog. 



Read The Clipper 
Letter List 



For Nordties 





SHOEjfflOP 

154 W.45l.*xUlLT.sbMs.rw7* 7 0B* k L« M 



A. FURMAN 

Isetlrktl Cssliner fir tie Be»t 




saw. Ifaw York 



WIGS If 



mJSgg 



O. aaJFPEaTT. 



Thi TkCHSicsx. Pans, New Yoex 



hllMUhMH 




#rih 




^ * c - , . . .'■■■■■ ■ ■ . 

.-■,. .a . .-■•.- ■■ i rfl : . ' : 

THE CITY OF 



■ f 



BRUSSELS 



.. . ««..^,,^WJ*,V ...... , } 



( ...... 



PRESENTS 



THE ONLY REAL AND 
AUTHENTIC HISTORY 

OF 

"BELGIUM, THE KINGDOM OF GRIEF" 

Produced, <nr*ctod and < Jt > o oy 

THE CITY OF BRUSSELS 

a* coociuaWo proof for the Peace Table of what the 
Kaiser cSd to Belgium-- 

HER SUFFERINGS— 

HER SORROWS 

AND SACRIFICE— 



DHIBITOES- T tiDI CHICAGO TRTBUNI: 

JWHW: "The atatn of tot 
•Tk, feeuac of the eooadttM. woo n 
~oe]. a* Araerlea. wnen ^l*i>n>. The KU«dom 
Bee5um la meatloaed, U of OrteT wbn it we. 
onTof PUT- iSt thl. «1«a for to. censor bj 
otcttrV Win •bow tow. that It la the moat re- 
ui>u*r Jo. «nd hrla« maisitu> foreum n:s> erer 
oat ■trocxly the boboc broaght to tola c uuatu 
tkat la ana tMa Y«-ti«" and that It wlU brin*- • 
whldi foogbt so Ti rlintly tear to to* ay. of every 
against such great oMa" ooa who la interested In 
stricken little Belgium." 

at O T I ON PICTUBB 

motion nonm 

Tha King- 

la a Brin* "So 

'a 



atatameett: 'A^oac an 6." axhtoltBd "'"wYraont 
Ik* Quia, tk* brarest ere tny fear of tiring «e— 



ptetnr. we betters It 

an E . «■- 




■ • -•- •■> avvs • ■ :-. --" ■ 



.-*.-.> '.v 



NOT A WAR PICTURE 

No version of this kind has been teen 
before 

IT IS HISTORY! 

IT IS..PROOFL 

IT I S FACTS! 

It is the. psychological screen version the poo pi. 
want to soa. It ha* bora shown at the Andstorioaa 
in Chicago, 111., aasl tKo Brooklyn Institute of Art* 
and Sciences to over 45,000 people aft 
prices from $1 ' to $B. 



THH BROOKLYN INSTITUTE OP ARTS AND 

HUInWOES 

Hounded 1824 

Depe.-oaeat of Bdueatlon 

Mroetor: Office: 

CHAXLB3 D. ATKINS Academy of If Dale 

November 5. ltll. 
Claaale Films Dlarrlbotlnjr Co.. 
The Algonquin Hotel, 
New York city. 
Gentlemen: 

The Member* of too Institute appreciated toe op- 
portunity of viewing jour neat film Picture endued 
"Belgium, toe Kingdom of Grief." Kvery elialr la oar 
Hall, Beating about 2,400. was filled and many were 
unable to eeeore admission. 

The picture la an lntereatlng and TlTld portrayal of 
tna History of Belgium and of her period ef devsa- 
tation and snffering. In the course of the honr and 
three-quarters .thai- the Picture waa on tha screen, I 
aaw no one leave tha Hall, a striking trlbnte to toe 
Interest aroused, . 

We are (lad to bo able to announce to oar mem- 
- here that two additional peasentatlona of the picture 
win. be siren. 

Toots Tar/ truly, • 

OKABXSB J>. ATKINS, Director. 




**• 



For State Rights and Direct 




lor 



atres 



JOHN* D. FtJLTON 



COMMUNICATE WITH 

1 29 West 44th 



New York City 









minimi 



milium 




APRIL 9, 1919 



3= 



ill 



PRICE TEN CENTS 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Aprl 9, 1919 










Everyone Wente to Sing Thie Sone! 

The Greatest Moielty-Comedy Seng . 
Ever Produced 




ME-OW 



w "■<*• h? 
HARRY D KERR 




A Cat's Tale 

of fa Wail 

and a 

Whale of a Tale 



To MEL B. KAUFMAN'S 
famous instrumental hit, 

"ME-OW" 

HARRY D. KERR has writ- 
ten one of the most original 
and clever comedy lyrics ever 
conceived. A SCREAM IN 
EVERY LINE. Any kind of 
an act can put this song on 
and create a laughing riot. 
Lots of extra choruses, about 
the "howl" of the Bolshevik; 
the "howl" when the town 
goes dry, etc. 

W Everyone is familiar with the 
jJrurir. played, by all the best 
orchestra* in the country. GET 
THE SONG QUICK so you can be 
among the first to put over a hit 
that will stop any show. Every- 
one in your audience will 
"ME-OW when leaving the the- 



Write, Wire or Call 

for 

Professional Copy 

and Orchestration 



THE- 



5am Tox Pub . Co . arcade C level and , o . us^t 




Cofiyrighted, 1919, and published weekly hy. CU Cupper Corporation, 1604 Broadway; New York. Entered at the Poet-affieeat New York, Jane 34, lt». as SecMeS-class mall matter under Act of March 3. 1879. 



■ . "Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. .1853:: 



iNTEW YORK, AERIL 9, 1919 , 



■ l "■»' 



VOLUME LXVTl-No. 9 
Price* Ten Cenu, H.00 a Year 



* 




"Jl 



er'eafter, no allien, . especially German, 
jicrforiners or persona otherwise connected 
with toe amusement 'business, will he al- 
lowed *tor leiive' the Un'W Sl»te» w Mi out 
allowing, conclusively that their .. .income 
ta.x~ has" been paid. Amendments to' the 
passport regulation* now make it oblig- 
atory on them to en 11 at the Customs 
Hdnse- and 'nuke their rAwition on thin 
important matter clear by .the. production 
fit- receipts ■before they will be allowed to 
uiil away. '3 •'' ! IS J i. 

THe amendment was made because the 
departure of : aliens Won certain ports of 
the -United States became so numerous 
that Uncle 8am "was losing thousands of 
dollars daily. Among the foreigners 
taking passage weekly from the port of 
New York are many alien actors, and these 
are- caught up ' in' : the net 'which the col- 
lectors have provided by hiring -a small 
army of assistants.' Those acts must now 
make' good on arrear taxes before 'being 
awarded an embarkation slip. 

Americana;- too, have to settle for the 
delinquent tax, but thia is more 'a 'matter 
/of vA-opt-mttoii on their -part and neces- 
sary ■ certifications are given ' them with 
very little delay, The regulations will be 
-in effect . only -pending the peace settle- 
ment. 

American ■ acts going abroad can have 



-the; tax matter taken up by one member 
of the company, if he in able to produce 
the- tax receipts.- Ir. case these are 1 not 
available the tax can be paid and embark- 
ation Blips- awarded in a few minutes. 

In the new amendment, reference is 
made to Section 260 of the Revenue Act 
of 19rS, wirfch 9K iB.p»rt^as:foll6W«t 
4 j "If- tflte Commissioner- finds that a tax- 
payer designs 'quickly to depart from the 
.United States or, .to. remove his property 
*rom, ,or to -conceal himself or his 

*' to prejudice or to render wholly or 
partly ineffectual proceedings to collect 

&*&§&& *fammW $m l*«t past 
or the taxable year then current unless 
such proceedings be brought without de- 
lay,-, the- gomwifijlipner -shftll declare the 
taxable' period J fo'r aueK taxpayer' termin- 
ated at 'the end of the calendar . month 
then last fast' and shall cause notice of 
such, finding' and declaration to be given 
the taxpayer, together with a demand for 
immediate payment ' of ' the . tax- for . the 
taxable period s6 declared terminated and 
of the tax for the preceding taxable year 
or so much of BoJd ,tax ", ^s . is unpaid, 
whether ^oV? W H£nV v Me L otherwise al- 
lowed hy law for filing return and paying 
the -tax has expired;' and such 'taxes shall 
thereupon become immediately doe and 
pay*bSfc*/.v -.&r,tthK€> ZJVTrW. -. r: - 
The work is being carried', out at the 
Custom House under the supervision of 
InterUflia&&nkTA^CIfcuxSe&£P tarter, 
who..is,-,ua)ng every means' to cause- aa 
little;, delay; as, possible- to -American acts 
IffilWM'j'in^l r;;;i't;; *£:n'ja ii&fc£ / 



STRIKE STOPS FIELD SHOW. 

•' Topxii, Kan., April 8. — There was 
no ' Al G. Field' miniatrel show at the 
• Jrand last Monday. For the first time 
in thirty -two years Field MP forced to 

•'pack u_p hiH perfqrroaiico outfit and .leave 
a't'tcr aii dx'tenslve advertising campaign. 
... The 'show was not put on due to the 
stage hands', operators'' and" musicians' 
strike against the Crawford houses. Field, 
who has settled fifteen walkouts of this 
character 1 in I bis career, was unsuccessful 
in bringing the opposing forces together 
Sunday, after a twelve-hour conference. 
•He has ri prided tn cam' hin Topeka ex- 
perience to the courts. He feels that he 
"has' been done an injustice here due to 
'the fart that his own union men were not 
'allowed 'to work and the Topeka . unions 

. . will be a party to the suit to be brought 
at Columbia, OLTIii'.a Je.w..daye- 

A road call" la' out against the Grand 
Opera House. > However, there is a clause 
m the by-laws of the union that gives the 
local union discretionary power as to per- 
mitting' the stage hands of traveling 
shows. the privilege of working the show. 
-Field claims he relied upon this rule to 
give 'him an opportunity to play his show, 
a privilege which -has been granted hfan 
all over the country. 

Mr. Field has consulted attorneys who 
have- advised him that the issue of the 
road call or order by the general . officers 
of the stage bands' union in New York 
City is a flagrant violation of the laws 
governing. interstate traffic. 

BUYS "LUCK IN PAWN." 

Mabel Taliaferro is now the owner of 
"I, uck in Pawn," the play in which she 
has been appearing and which closed last 
Saturday night at the 48th Street The- 
atre, where it opened -March 24. 
- The play was produced by Edward 
Robbins, who baa been running a stock 
company in Toronto for the last seven 
Summers, and William Conway. Robbins 
held a 76 per cent, interest and Conway 
the remaining 26 per cent. The produc- 
tion! cost', t uen» :4i2floo: . " ' 
■ After the play opened here it was de- 
cided to revise -it and add another act to 
tiio three it now has. So the: authors, 

.Koluud Yqung ftiul Maivin Taylor,': got 
busy on the, revision, jj, the meantime 

Mabel Taliaferro, havimrdscidedit might 
eventually serve -her aa a motion picture 
medium, made the producers an offer, 
.which .was ■ accented ; last 'Saturday; 
, llfow ;«na 'phias to present the play 
again Iff; New York, possibly at- the Prih 
cess ( orj some, other small hwase, about 
japrU.SL. .■-..' 



SAJiTIXY l£AVING "OH, MY DEAR" 

i . So*= Santiey and Ms wife. Ivy Sawyer, 
will leave the cast of "Oh,'' My- Dear* next 

gturday night,- in- which they have been 
PwttitiB? at VtWr PflaoeW ifeatre since 
\e.Blay opened there last : November 27. 
e/5r places will - be taken by Lawrence 
*«at and Battle Burke. 'San'tley; -and 
Sawyer .are 'scheduled to open a 
vaudevil le engagement shortly. : 



Lois Josephine to marry 

- Sysaccsb, K'Y.; April 4.— Lois Joseph- 
ine,: formarly of the team of 'OrCew' : SJUl 
-Junejmme, and'brter of the- team of ; Brooke 



Joaephiris; is to mafrV . hef ■ dancing 
jrarrner, !Le» >Htmitftrgy aceorAHng 1 to 1 ariJan- 
fcounceme-ht mafle today. She Is appearing 
fcerer-am May Irwin's* ss^'-^' Water's 
«a«" r.i h»T> SitT- ■' bwtiJs^r- 



; ft;.. ; : ;JJav : . -'jflL: 



Ara*J«TM! Crrr. April 7.— Bert KsDj, 
J*|d« ff • a , «J W s.hr r n4,7 whose name , be 
claims to have made '""1"" .to the pnblic 
whfle on^,* .yaudcviUe tour with Frisco, 
14e'vecoeatric .performer, is taking umbrage 
af, the l*ft*r. for advertUsmrnts which he 
ibfima arc poyr appearing in Chicago. In 
.these anuomiceoicpts -Kelly claims that 
.r.'riaco ia advertising bis act as assisted by 
"I*»rt. Kelly and orlsioal Jaxtband." 
J -, ,A- , tmn vu consulted by Kelly ,yes- 

DEMAND HALF PAY FOR LAY-OFFS. wggEj»» B$SK*. '.1 ■l»£i 



CONTRACT 



' Cmkauo, III., April 7. — At a mee^ns; of 
the Actors* Equity Association held here 

last Friday, a new confarac^ was dra^n up 
that calls for the elimjiiaxiop qf all lay- 
offs hereafter, with the exception pf juch 
as might be occasioned by "an act or God." 
The clause in the, old agreement govern- 
ing ■ popular priced attractions which 
stated that lay-offs might be permitted 
"for any other caose, which could not be 
reasonably anticipated or prevented" does 
not appear in the new agreement. A 
Blanket rule -covers- all -fattire Jaj-offs and 

obligates the manager to pay for the same 
-at half salary- The new agreement will 
.be presented to the managers this week, 
but it is extremely doubtful whether all 
of .them, will agree to its terms. The 
stand the A. H. A. will take in the event 
of such .refusals is problematical. 

The! "for any other means" clause, has 
been the cause of considerable friction and 
luwtmderatajuhjiK he t we aa Chicago man- 
agers and actors in the paafc. 'and, accord- 
ing to the A. B. A., ha* frequently been 
coststrued by managera to soean that an 
at4ractlon that suffered loss of time 
through a cancellation need not pay the 
actors. 

Other important -aengfwp in the new 
agreement are those which state that for 
"popular priced attractions" the week. shall 
be divided into sixths (being) the six week 
days) ;' that Sunday performances w hen 
given are given free; that any performance 
over two pes day shall be paid tor at the 
rate of one sixth; that any week day lost, 
W.-iW 4 ^ ; whether. : one fit.,4mo pcrform- 
uuces, were to have been , given, shall be 
deduced; at the. rate of one sixth (that is, 
presuming t ^f^' * nc ' 1 ■t°J r "f was due to 
an act of God-) ; otherwise, if ft were 
msrc'y for railroad traveling or for can- 
cilJLatjon of booking, or tor any other 
cause, one twelfth is to, be deducted. 

Tjrjs tneaos, iu briaf, that a legal week, 
•J e W«<?eF.- jn iCWcaj-o^wJjl wnsist of six 
days as fax as nopnjar attractions are con- 
wrned. i -; ; ' , „j ..., ,' '._-,'■ - •-' 

The new contract will' also call for a full 
salary Christmas and Holy weeks. An ef- 
fort (Will be. .made. k>y„ the-Chiqego branch 



oft 



tors" E<qu'it. 



« a" law. 



in thr grate of l^o«"cbbipV- . 

stWnsJHe managers to pllt up' ! acasn' bond 
-td'- cover one week's salary, and railroad 
•fs/rea'-'for each' actor contracted for here- 
after, 

' 'Ttte' entire- eonipgny playing "Parlor, 
Bed 1 Boom and Birth" at one of the out- 
lyinjf' Chicago theatres" recently, we're asked 
t«' play ten performances by the manager 
of the flttractfun. 'The A. E. A. holds that 
wine 'performances co n s titu te' a ifisd? and, 
instead of the "Parlor, Bed' Rodin and 
Bstn" rjlayers holding ont for what the 
A B. A. deems to have been thelrrighje in 
the^ matter; the trempe waived their rights 
to the management, and pliyed the ten 
"shown.''' As" a result, all of the members 
ef the cOnrpany in question were suspended 
•b9 ! th#A.-Hr Al' ' : ' "■ 



Mm, proprietor ef the Beaux Arts, Cafe, 
where Kelly is playing, contending that 
he it the "only original" owner uf that 

.nam* v ... Action may be started against 
against Frisco on the basis of the state- 



made in the advi 

rUSttfo^Ghlw 
) action recalls ai 



eertisementa of the 

•W-'.-'j ' •■' i,'"--* 
another incident at 



Majestic 
The a 

the shore la* t season, when. Sophie Tucker 
sepsrated-'froltf ^. i^^ncoTaatlon Flvs" 
and re-engaged another group Under -the 
Mine name: Kelly, 'however, clabjas a 
"grekter advantage la his action by resson 
df the Use of his personal name ia the 
Frisco act. 



MORRtSEY SHOW ATTACHED 
' Win Morrisey'l • VrttsMs Rstus" has 

been Attached In Chicago by A-idre-Sharri, 
Inc., through Attorney David D. Denteeh. 
The actlbn- W for rhdebtedness for 'goods 
Sbld and delivered. 

The qrigtoal contract was tor $3,900, 
»500 of which w»a paid at the time the 
contract was' made and, it b .said, the 
'balance was' due 'when the costumes were 
delivered. Action .was started when the 
shdw reached Providence, hut then was 
no money to square it. and, at the re- 
quest or Col. Felix Wendelachsefer, an 
assignment was given of 80 per cent, of 
the profltli for the weeks, in Syracuse and 
Detroit. The show did .not do well in 
these cities and the action was finally 
pressed in Chicago last week. At this 
time about $2,300 was due Andre-Sherri, 
Inc., it Is claimed. 

FRAZEE TAKES BIG SIGN , 

-II.-. IL r-raaea bad an , electric sign ad- 
ve*S^>Tne r OooFftaa Woman" at the 
TfirrhV hung, on the Subway Terminal 
Building' at Broadway' snd Forty-seemid 
Street, last week. It cost $1,600, excraalve 
of the $230 a week" to advertising rental 
which he la being charged to keep the sign 
'fijerfc 

The sign is displayed on both the Broad- 
way and the Forty-second Street aide* of 
th$ .bnilaingv 4pd .besides flashing the title 
of- the play, contains' 'the names of the 
three stars in the cast, Margaret Illlngton, 
Wilton Lackaye and Robert Edson. 

'. REPORT MACK-FREDERICK SPLIT 
: A £os Anofxes, April 8.— Rumors are 
'about that Pauline Frederick and her hus- 
band, Wflliard Mack, are not having the 
most amojoth xd quarried lives. It la said 
that Mack is ilvtns'Jfn V bungalow at Glen- 
dale, which serves to strengthen the Mport 

SHELDON PLAY COMING TO ffWAY 

"It Haapena to Everybody," the Harry 
Sheldon play now in" its eighth week on 
the road, will come into >«w York on 



h, 



BO8T0W, April 7^— "The.' 
is in its last week at the ~ 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



- . ■ 



April 9, 1919 



"LET'S BEAT IT", 27th SHOW 

WILL MAKE TO UR OF STATE 

<y Ryan's Fighters' Show, After Only a Fair Run in New York, 
Will Try to Enhance Treasury Elsewhere; Big Parade 
'.'Snowed" the Performance Under, But That Condi- 
tion Will Not Be Present in Outside Goes. 



After a fair ran in New York, "Let's 
Best It," tile 27 tk Division's musical farce, 
is to be taken to Brooklyn and then tour 
the state during which it is believed the 
much-depleted treasury wfll be enhanced 
Hie show will probably close at the Gen- 
frixry WtBBB w c©Jc« 

Several reasons have been advanced as 
to why' the show has not been as success- 
ful in New York as was expected. "Yip, 
Yap, Yaphank," "Yon Enow Me AV 
" Atta-Boy ," and several other shows of a 
military nature, have been pr es tint e d in 
New York and, to use an army expres- 
sion, playgoers an about "fed up" on 
this line of entertainment. It is also said 
that the advertising end was not properly 
*""""* Plans were originally made to 
have airplanes fly over the city dropping 
pamphlets, bat it is claimed this was t or- 
Uddsn by the local authorities. 

One great amount of interest in the 
parade and the fact that the newspapers 



devoted much of their space to this phase 
caused the play to be overlooked. Before 
the curtain was niaed, it is said {25,000 
had been invested, {9,000 of which was 
for costumes and wigs and $3,000 for 
scenery. Added to this was the salary and 
advertising expenses. The players have 
been put on a straight salary. -y.j ti 

There has .'also -been,' considerable 
trouble between the managpmpnt. and the 
military authorities in arranging for the 
mustering out of the men. This was 
finally arranged for by General CRyen, 
and the players win get their dischargee 
at Hoboken. The tour around the State 
win last about eight weeks. 

Offers have been made to several of the 
players, some for the legitimate and some 
for the movies, bat the cast will remain 
the same. The management put the prop- 
osition of the tonr up to the men, and all 
volunteered. 



PLAYS TWO FAILURES. 
Atlantic CRT, April 3. — Leo Ditrich- 
stein, in filling hie engagement at Nissan's 
Apollo here, is playing two pieces. During 
the first half of the week, Mondsy, Tues- 
day and Wednesday nights, and the Wed- 
nesday matinee, he is presenting "The 
Matinee Hero," and during the latter part 
of the week, Thursday, Friday and Satur- 
day nights and the Saturday matinee, he 
is offering "The Marquis de Priola." He 
has adopted this scheme instead of the 
usual one of playing one show a fun week. 

"The Matinee Hero," written by A. E. 
Thomas and Leo Ditrichstein, was pre- 
sented by the latter, for Cohan and Harris 
at the Vanderbnt, some time ago. It was 
a te saeml bloomer, and Ditrichstein finally 
broke with Cohan and Harris and decided 
to finance it himself. After a reported loss 
of $15,000 on the venture, Ditrichstein 
presented "The Marquis de Priola," with 
Wallace Monroe acting as manager, at 
the Liberty. Again the public fafled to 
respond. Ditrichstein took the play out 
of the Liberty and presented it on the 
subway circuit. He ia now appearing in 
both shows at Atlantic City, playing them 
on a split week plan. 



LAURETTE TAYLOR REJOINS CAST 

PHTUSKLPHIA, Pa* April 4. — Laurette 
Taylor resumed her place in the cast of 
"Happiness" at the Broad Street Thea- 
tre, here, this week. Miss Taylor was 
taken fil in Cleveland, O, three weeks ago, 
and by advice of her physician did not re- 
turn to her stage work until she had tally 
recovered. 



'THE RED DAWN" REHEARSING 
Rehearsals for "The Red Dawn." the 
new Thoa. Dixon play, commenced on 
Monday with a cast m ade up of Austin 
Webb, Ann Warrington, Wilson Reynolds, 
Florence MacDonald, and Marie BiandL 
■William Phinney is the stage director and 
the piece ia to be presented by Oscar Eagle. 



"FROLIC" FIGHT SETTLED. . 

The threatened suite and counter-suits 
growing out of a fracas at. the "Midnight 
Frolic," have been settled, it was learned 
last week,, when general releases' were 
signed and delivered between the parties 
concerned. 

The affair, which ended in a fight back- 
stage, was participated in by Clarence A. 
Murphy, an ensign in the U. 8. Navy, and 
said to be a former well known Yale 
football star, and Victor Kiraly, manager 
of the "Frolic," J. J. Mara, assistant 
manager, and P. G. Thomas,, superintend- 
ent atop the New' Amsterdam. 
According to witnesses; Murphy visited 
the "Frolic" with a party of men friends. 
Immediately after the nine-thirty show, 
it is said, he, without permission, made 
his way back-stage and attempted to talk 
to one, of the girls in the show. Kiraly, 
Mara and Thomas were sent for after 
Murphy refused to - return to his table 
when ordered to do so by a stage em- 
ployee. When the manager and his as- 
sistants attempted to lead Murphy from 
back-stage, the latter is reported to have 
grown abusive and belligerent, with the 
result that at least one of -the trio was 
brought from back-stage with a badly 
lacerated face, said to have been caused 
by Murphy's fist. Thomas was the most 
badly damaged member of the trio.' 

The following day Kiraly, Mara and 
Thomas, besides threatening separate 
suits against Murphy for damages, sent 
a complaint to the naval authorities, who 
immediately began an investigation of 
the affair. However, influential friends 
of Murphy intervened, and later the com- 
plainants wrote and asked permission of 
the naval authorities to withdraw their 
complaint. 



"LADY IN RED" OPENS 28th. 

"The Lady in Red," being produced for 
the second time in three years, this time 
by the recently organized Hercarsi Cor- 
poration, of which John P. Slocum is gen- 
eral manager, is scheduled to open in 
Washington April 28. The following 
principals will comprise the cast: Ad ale 
Rowland, Ruth MacTammany, Tom Rich- 
ards, Franklyn Ardell, Marguerite St. 
Claire, Louis Christy, Richard Turpin, 
Gladys Miller Eunice Sauvain, May 
Bronte, Harry Glover and Neil Moore. 
Frank Smithson is staging the piece and 
Gua Salzer is 'musical' director. 

This play hae had an odd career in this 
country. It is of foreign origin, having 
been brought here by Hans Bartsch, the 
play broker, from whom it was acquired 
a little over three years ago by R. H. 
Herndon. Ann Caldwell and Robert Win- 
terberg adapted and musicslued the for* 
oign version.. Then Herndon, financed to 
a- large extent, it is said, by Louis Drey- 
fuB, the music publisher, organized tie 
Herndon Corporation, which produced the 
. play in Chicago three years ago. Yam 
VaUi was one of the principals. After- 
wards she married Louis Dreyfus. • 

"The Lady in Red" was accepted by the 
press in Chicago and did business there 
that betokened a successful career on the 
road. But, it is said, that Herndon's 
financial entanglements militated «g«*»««* 
the play's financial success, with the re- 
sult that it had to be withdrawn and the 
rights ultimately reverted back to 
Bartsch. 



GETS PLENTY SHAKESPEARE 
BaxxncoBK. April 5. — The city is re- 
ceiving a good deal of Shakespeare. Rob- 
ert ManteD has been here for a week and 
doses at the Auditorium to-night. On 
Tuesday, Walter Hampden will give a 
■pedal matinee of "Hamlet." 



"MUTT * JEFF* CLOSES MAY 17 

Spokane, Wash., April 4.— The "Mutt 
and Jeff in the Woolly West" show, WOl 
doe* <m May 17th. Griff Williams is the 
businesB manager and reports good busi- 
ness. 



WIFE DIVORCES YIDDISH ACTOR 
A decree of absolute divorce has been 
awarded Ethel Youngelson, of 8 East One 
Hundred and Eighth Street, from Nathan 
Youngelson, the Yiddish actor. They have 
one child two years old, which was awarded 
to the wife. Testimony was given in the 
Supreme Court by Bernard Beaukoff, a 
tailor of 1063 Fox Street, and Samuel 
Kessner, cleaner and dyer, who stated that 
they trailed Youngelson and a stunning 
female companion the night of Dee. 15 last. 
They followed the couple, the? stated, after 
they had dined at the Cosmopolitan Cafe, 
which Mrs. Youngehmn's counsel, Ben]. 
A. Hartstein, describee as a "great hang- 
out for Yiddish acton and actresses," to 
the Hebrew Actors' Club at Second Ave- 
nue and Eighth Street, thence to an apart- 
ment at Second Avenue and Twelfth 
Street. 



GLESSNER BAND OPENS 

lieutenant Glesaner's band, playing a 
series of classic and popular melodies, 
pleased a fair-sized crowd at the Manhat- 
tan Opera House hut Sunday night. 
Glessner led expertly and solos by John 
Dolan, who played the cornet, and Made- 
line MacGuigan, upon the violin, were out- 
standing features. The band,, which has 
been selected from the best players among 
the soldiers in Philadelphia and consists 
of forty pieces, is a good one, the musi- 
cians seeming to be equally at home in 
both classic and popular music. 

Three pieces of march music were ren- 
dered, one at the beginning of the pro- 
gram, one just before intermission, and 
Souaa's "Stars and Stripes" at the end. 
The Ballet Egyptienne was excellently 
rendered and the solos done in a manner 
that warranted applause. 

Herschel L. Crawford - is directing the 
business of the band, which will play one- 
night stands in Pennsylvania this week 
and then make a tour of the country, go- 
ing through Ohio, Tennessee and other 
States to the coast. A six weeks' en- 
gagement wfll be played at Riverview 
Park, Chicago. 

"ALEXANDER'' BEING BUILT UP 
'■Hello Alexander," the Mclntyre and 
Heath production now playing Philadel- 
phia, is being built up by the Shuberts to 
open at the Casino Theatre for a summer 
run in New York. Allan K. Foster has 
been sent to Philadelphia to stage a num- 
ber of new dances for the piece. Sidney 
Phillips, a singing monologist who has been 
attracting considerable attention on the 
metropolitan vaudeville circuits, has been 
signed and' will be added to the show. 
Phillips wRl do his specialty and play a 
part with the "Alexander" troupe until the 
Shuberts put on the 1919 edition of the 
"Passing Show" at the Winter Garden 
about June 15th, when he will be shifted to 
the Summer revue. 



COUTTS AND TENNIS BUY SHOW 

Courts and Tennis last week purchased 
outright from Philip Bartholomae the 
rights to "When Dreams Come True," the 
musical show written by Bartholomae and 
Sylvio Hein. The price was $5,000. 

"When Dreams Come True" was pro- 
duced here six years ago by Bartholomae, 
with Joseph Santley featured in the cast, 
the latter also having an- interest in the 
show. However, the show proved a fail- 
ure, Bartholomae buying out Santley's in- 
terest in it before the piece was with- 
drawn. 

The show has proved '■ to be the most 
successful road show presented by Ooutts 
and Tennis, and during the six years they 
have been presenting the show there have 
been seasons when two companies have 
been out simultaneously playing in the 
P i ece. 

Up to last Saturday the show had been 
playing a total of 248 weeks at .am average 
> of $4,000 st week, the : total receipt* being 
5380,000. -fin e an thoct hare received a 
total of $58,800 in royalties from Courts 
and Tennis during the but six years, an 
average of almost $10,000 a year. 

On the day they purchased "When 
Dreams Come True"' outright from Bar- 
tholomae, Coutts and Tennis also received 
the completed book, lyrics and score of a 
new musical play by Bartholomae and 
Hein caned "Come Seven," which will be 
placed in rehearsal by them next July, 
the play being scheduled to open in a 
Broadway house early next August. 

WAYBURjrS SAILING DELAYED 

London, April 3. — Ned Way burn sailed 
for home to-day on the T«eplsnd which will 
probably arrive in New York on April 
14th. 

The Lapland was scheduled to sail Search 
24, and Wayburn came here from Paris to 
sail on her. This would have brought him 
home by April 5th. But : a coal strike 
prevented the Lapland from — h'"g on the 
scheduled date, the vessel being forced to 
remain here until to-day because she could 
not be coaled. . 



CLARK RE- VAMPS "STATEROOM B" 
Eddie Clark has been commissioned by 
Lee-Shubert to rewrite "The Girl in State- 
room B," which Sam Blair had out early 
this season for a brief road tonr. The 
piece, in its new form, will be a two-act 
musical comedy and win be retitled "An 
Ocean Honeymoon." 

The play was originally a vaudeville 
sketch called "Billy's Tombstone," and, as 
such, was utilised by Sidney Drew for 
many years for bis frequent appearances 
in the two-a-day. Later, it was elaborated 
into a three-act comedy, and called "Good 
Bye Boys." When Blair took it over, he 
re-christened it The Girl in Stats 
Room B." 



Florenz Ziegfeld and his wife, BUlie 
Burke, arrived here from Palm Beach but 
Monday. Ziegfeld had. expected to meet 
Wayburn in New York immediately after 
he got back to town. Now, however, an- 
other week wfll be wasted before definite 
plans for the 1919 "Follies" can be formu- 
lated, for Wayburn has signed contracts 
with several performers in Tendon and 
Paris for appearance in the "Follies" snd 
"Frolic" and these contracts require Zieg- 
feld's signature. 

Immediately after the newest edition of 
the "Follies" is presented, the latter part 
of next month, it was learned last week, 
a new edition of the Midnight "Frolic" 
win be placed in rehearsal. This Utter 
wfll probably open atop the New Amster- 
dam on July L 



STONE CLOSING IN BOSTON 

Phujluelhia, April 7. — Fred Stone, in 
"Jack O'Lantern," is announced for the 
Forrest Theatre here on April 28th. The 
show is the production which Charles Dil- 
lingham originally gave its premiere at the 
Forrest 

"Jack OTan tern" is now - playing at 
the Colonial Theatre, Boston. 

CIRCUS MAN CLEARED OF THEFT 
Venice, Calif, April 4. — The complaint 
against Harry Clarice, a circus concession 
manager, was dismissed in court last week 
after a hearing by Deputy District Attor- 
ney Glover. Clarke was 'charged with 
stealing a watch from J. McMarm in a 
saloon in this city.. 

KOLB AND D ILL O PEN 

San Fkas cisoo, April 7. — KoB> and 
Dfll in "As Yon Were" moved into the 
Corran Theatre here but night following 
"The Man Who Came Back," which dosed 
on Saturday. 



JOLSON GOING TO BOSTON 

Boston, April 7. — The Boston public 
will be able to nee Al Jeuon to "Sfnbad," 
which -opens at the Boston Opera* House 
on Easter Monday, April 2L 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



DISCHARGED SOLDIERS USING 

UNIF ORM TO G RAFT SEATS 

Many Men, Back in Civilian Life, Keep the Khaki Pressed Up 

So They Can Get in Ticket Line at Numerous 

War- Work Organizations 



The abuse of the pass privilege by men 
in uniform has, of late, been mumming 
formidable proportions. Men who have 
been discharged and continue to wear their 
uniforms for days and even weeks after 
final papers have .been issued them, and 
discharged soldiers who have donned 
civilian clothes bat who wear the uniform 
on "special" occasions, are regularly tak- 
ings their place in the tree ticket lines. 
Mas£:-who are J back in*«'«vil life slip' on 

the-'imilorm when they- -want to take in 
a show free of cost, and have no more 
trouble in getting the free slips at the 
numerous war societies than does a sol- 
dier who Is still in the service. 

A soldier recently discharged made the 
statement that more than ten per cent 
of the men in the free ticket lines were 
not entitled to tickets and were there 
because they wanted to take advantage 



of the war^coined phrase "your uniform 
is your pass." 

Once the red stripe, which signifies that 
a man has been discharged, has been re- 
moved from the sleeve, there is no other 
insignia that. differentiates a man really 
in the army aitd one who la faking it. 
At the' demobilization • camps, the men are 
told to wear the red stripe after being 
discharged and that, if they do nor, it may 
result in serious trouble to them. But as 
there seems to be practically none of the 
military police requesting soldiers for 
passes around the streets, a man may 
slip on his army clothes at any time. 

Tickets are sent to the different war 
organizations, with the object of aiding 
the soldier to enjoy himself, and the seats 
are usually choice ones and cost the man 
in uniform nothing but the regular tax 
rate. 



SET PROGRAM FOR FIELD DAY 

The program for the Actors Fund 
Benefit to be held at the Polo Grounds 
next Sunday, at which actors and song 
writers will play a game of ball, will also 
be enlivened by Bird MnJmaw, in a wire 
-act, Pearl White, who will do stunts: in an 
aeroplane, the War. Camp Community 
Chorus of 5,000 -voices, Six Brown Broth- 
ers, Jess Ldbonati, Sophie Tucker, Harry 
Carroll, and six brass bands, including 
Keith's Boys Band of 100 pieces, TJ. 8. 
Naval Recruit Band and the Hebrew Or- 
phan Band. 

A message is expected from President 
Wilson, which will be read by Gov. James 
N. Cox of Ohio. ^ 

Dick Jess, director general of the Field 
Day, has designed the suits for the play- 
ers in the theatrical championship game, 
actors versus songwriters. The completed 
songwriters lineup will be as follows: 
Teddy Eastwood, 3rd base ; Jesse ldbonati, 
2nd base; Harry Carroll or Murray Bit- 
ter, short stop; Tom Pay ton or Moe 
Schenck, 1st base; Joe Phelan, catcher; 
Arthur Piantodosi, center field; Bemie 
Grossman, left field; Sammy Smith, 
pitcher; Billy Stone, right field, and Joe 
Gold, utility. No announcement was made 
of the actors' lineup, but the team will 
be obtained by -Mike Donlin, who will 
bring a delegation from Philadelphia. 

Johnny Brers will' umpire, with Willie 
Ritchie and Benny Leonard on the side- 
lines, i 

The Woman's Motor Corps of America 
win furnish 60 machines to bring wounded 
soldiers to the grounds. Tickets can be 
purchased for these men through George 
W. ««irnn>«, Fulton Theatre Building. 
Checks should be made payable to Daniel 
Frohman. Sections will also be reserved 
for clnbs. 

In case of unfavorable weather the Field 
Day- events will be held on the following 
Sunday, Tickets are on sale at theatre 
box offices and ticket agencies. 



TROUBLE OVER SONG. 

Sioux Crrr, la.,- April 5. — Stella Hay- 
hew and Arthur Deagon, both playing on 
the Orpheum Bill here, had an argument 
this week, which was provoked by Deagon 
when he announced to the audience that 
Miss Mayhew was using material' to which 
she was not entitled. 

The material referred to was a tipsy 
song used by Miss Mayhew in her act and 
wr i tten by John W. Bratton and Paul 
West. Deagon claimed that it had been 
used by him since 1907 -and Miss Mayhew 
that she had used it since 1004, it being 
known as a "champagne" song in a pro- 
duction in which she appeared. 



John W. Bratton stated in New York 
Monday that he had written the cham- 
pagne song used by Miss Mayhew, with 
Paul West, in 1904, for "The Man from 
China," it being part of a number called 
"There's Fifty-seven Ways to ' Catch a 
Man." Miss Mayhew was then making 
her first appearance on Broadway and 
made a hit with the song. This would 
give Miss Mayhew the priority claim. 



HAGGTN NAMED BANKRUPT. 
Ben All Haggin, the well known 
theatrical artist, was petitioned into the 
bankruptcy court last .Monday. The. peti- 
tion was signed by George F. Orr with 
tiie following creditors named : Tappe, Inc. , 
$2,987, on a judgment claim; Charles V. 
Miller, 9546, and the Motion Picture Ap- 
paratus Co., Inc., 1193. Haggin's assets 
are. placed at $2,500 and his liabilities at 
several thousand dollars more than this 
amount, ' 



LEDERER HAS NEW PIECE. 
George Lederer has a new play called 
"The- Violet Girl" with a book by Harry 
B. Smith and music by Victor Herbert, 
which he will shortly put into rehearsal 
and open at the Colonial Theatre, Chicago, 
for a Summer-ran. 



TO RE-ORGANIZE FINANCES. 

The Brooklyn Academy of Music will 
reorganize its finances at a meeting of its 
Board of Directors scheduled for April 
14. At the present time the corpo- 
ration is faced by a deficit amounting to 
$19,769.88. It is planned to wipe this oat 
by borrowing $300,000 for five years at 
six per cent, giving a first mortgage on 
the property and the franchises as se- 
curity. 

The Academy waa built at a cost ex- 
ceeding $1,300,000, and since it was opened 
in November, 1908, never has been able 
to show a profit on- the- investment. The 
shows, concerts and operas which are pre- 
sented there do so on a rental basis. The 
price for the house is $300 a performance. 

The Metropolitan Opera Company has 
given from tan to twenty performances 
at the Academy of Music each season 
since the house waa bnilt. At the prices 
charged, from $1 to $6, the Metropolitan 
can play to a Tnn-rimnrn gross of $8,000 
a performance. 

"KISS BURGLAR" DID $9,300. 

The "Kiss Burglar" played to a total 
of $9,300 for each of its weeks at the 
Broadhnrst and Nora Bayea Theatre*. 
It waa brought in only to fill gaps in the 
bookings of each house. 

The Shuberts have also withdrawn 
"Yesterday" from the road, bringing- it 
in from . Washington. This newest musi- 
cal play by Reginald de Koven waa wen 
received on the road. But the producers 
were dissatisfied with the east. Lee Shu- 
bert stated last week that the play would 
be presented again next August, wits a 
new east. 



SOPHIE TUCKER HAS NEW SHOW. 

Sophie Tucker will not appear in "A 
Fat Chance," the comedy with music 
written for her by Jack Lait, and in 
which she was scheduled to begin re- 
hearsing by the middle of this month. 
She stated last week that the play's sim- 
ilarity to "The Melting of Molly" has 
caused Lait to abandon his intention of 

flwialling it. 

Instead, however, Miss Tucker will ap- 
pear in a new two-act comedy with inter- 
polated musical numbers written by . Ed- 
ward J. Locke, author of "The 'Climax," 
for which no title has as yet been chosen, 
but which is scheduled for presentation 
by William Morris, the producer, on 
June 1. Frank Weatphal will play op- 
posite Miss Tucker, and beyond these bo 
other players have as yet been chosen. 

Her appearance in a play will natu- 
rally . mean Miss Tucker's withdrawal 
from Reisenweber'a restaurant, where the 
is now appearing ; in . one of the. dining 
.rooms with her -Six . Kingi of Syncopa- 
tion; and this, too, despite the fact that 
her arrangement with Reiseuweber's is 
netting her $1,500 a week. -,' 

. STAGE UNIONS HIT BY WAR 

Many local unions of the International 
Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees 
and Moving Picture Machine Operators 
of the United- States, and Canada, will be 
unable to send representatives this year 
to the convention, djte_to_the_._faetJ.that 
more than 26 per. cent, of the membership 
were in the service. The attendance at 
the meeting, which will be held* at the 
Chateau Laurier, Ottawa; Canada, May 
26, will be less than in other years. Wage 
schedules and working conditions will be 
to the fore st the convention. 




MISS TESSA KOSTA 

Miss Tessa Kosta is the little prima 
donna of "The Royal Vagabond," and the 
only member of the cast of George M. Co- 
han's novel opera comique who Is serious 
all. through the play. All the other actors 
at some time or other through the per- 
formance poke fun at themselves — which 
is a feature of Cohanized operetta. Miss 
Kosta, however, keeps her dignity Intact 
— she is the sad, sweet heroine for whom 
the Crown Prince of Bargravia renounces 
his throne. 

The new prima donna is one of the 
happiest discoveries of the Cohanized east 
of "The Royal Vagabond.'' She is • Chi- 
cago girl and went on the stage in a road 
company of "Madame Sherry.'' Broad, 
way first saw her as ingenue with Ray- 
mond Hitchcock in The Beauty Shop," 
and last season .she attracted attention 
aa the singing slave girl of Chu Chin 
Chow. Miss Kosta is a lyric soprano of 
much promise — she' -was- studyin g- for 
grand- opera when she -was -tempted by 
the novelty of opera a la George M. 
Cohan. 



WILL ENTERTAIN NEWSPAPER MEN 

"Although no definite program has yet 
been arranged, a large number of per- 
formers are to aid in entertaining the re- 
turning war correspondents when they are 
. banqueted by New York newspaper men 
at midnight on . April 26th at the Hotel 
Commodore. The names of the following' 
are but tentative at this time: Gordon r 
BUI and Johhuv licoley (and Ray if' she 
is in town-), Bludi Landolf, Ed Wynn, 
Harry Tierney and his own special caba- 
ret, probably a girl act from "The Royal- 
Vagabond," acts from the "Frolic" and 
"Midnight Whirl," and, if they are in- 
town, Nora Bayea and Marie Dressier. 

More than .600 newspaper men will at- 
tend the dinner, which will be the first 
time that such a large number will have 
assembled at one banquet board. To makr 
thia possible, the morning dailies of thsr 
city will go to press earlier than usuaL 

The dinner will be held, in the grand 
ballroom., of . the Hotel... Commodore, aw 
.$3.50 a plate, A cocktail, beer and plenty 
of cigars and cigarettes will be included In 
the menu, and Deputy Police Commission- 
er Harris . having asured the Commodore 
of an all-night license, liquor will be la 
evidence throughout the banquet. James 
Montgomery Flagg has drawn tile cover 
design for the menu. 

The committee having the dinner to 
charge and representing all the dairy pa- 
pers in the city is. as follows: Frank T. 
Pope, Journal of Commerce, Chairman; 
Peter L. Campbell, American, Secretary; 
John J.CCouneU, Times, Treasuer; Jos. 
J. O'Neill, World; Chas. B. Beelig. Trib- 
une; Thomas Dibble. Evening Journal ; Lee 
Marsh, Morning Telegraph; Bide Dudely, 
Evening World; & Jay K«i«m^.. Globe; 
William J.- Murray, Herald; Don Marquis, 
Evening Sun; Charles Sawyer, Evening 
Post; George . D. . Morris, Evening Tale* 
gram; T. E. Oliphant, Evening Mail; Hugh 
Farrell, Commercial; John J. Grotty, 
Brooklyn Eagle; John F. Galas, Brooklyn 
Times, Arthur Dora, Brooklyn Citiaen, Jo- 
seph J. Early, Standard-Unfon; J. a Dal- 
ton, Associated Press; Miles Bath, City 
News Association. The committee, though 
the kindness . of Deputy Police Commfi- 
sioner John A Harries, has obtained the 
use of the room on the 16th floor of 611 
Fifth Avenue, telephone Murray Hill 461$. 

Each newspaper man may invite aa his 
guest some man who saw service eithir 
in camps or overseas. Jacob Ruppert has 
provided beer that the management of the 
Hotel Commodore was unable to buy. 

WEINGARTEN SUES LEW ROSE 

Iasy Weingarten last week started aa 
action in the Municipal Court against Lew 
Rose, erstwhile burlesque producer and 
more recently connected with a stock com- 
pany in New Orleans. 

In his complaint. Sled by Paul Abra- 
hams, his, attorney, Weingarten alleges 
that he lent Rose costumes which the fat- 
ter used in one of his productions, and 
that Rose has never returned them. These, 
Weingarten avers, are worth $400, which 
sum he is seeking to collect. 

The complaint further recites that Rose 
converted the costumes, so that if Wein- 
garten recovers a judgment against Rose 
and the latter fails to pay the amount of 
the Judgment, Weingarten may, accord- 
ing to tie law of this state, begin pro- 
ceedings to lodge tta judgment debtor is 
the Ludlow Street jail, where he would 
have to spend six months for failure to 
pay the judgment. 

ATTEMPT HOLD-UP Of HALL 

Two thieves attempted to hold up Bar- 
nard J. Me tiger, manager of Unity Re- 
hearsal Hall, next to the west 47th Street 
police station, last Thursday. They en- 
tered the building and asked to have the 
hall reserved for the evening. Mil is si 
named the fee and the men told hira that 
they could not pay it at once, hut would 
give him a deposit of $S. Flashing a $20 
bill, they 'asked Urn to change it for 

Metzger put his hand in to his pocket 
and, aa he did so, the Beam of thVtwa 
leaped upon him and aimed a blow at hfc 
ehrk. Metsger ducked, hut received a 
powerful jolt on Ids eye. Meteor " 
seised a stick which lay under B 
and beat off his assailants. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



, April, 9, J919 



THEATRICAL FORCES UNITE 

FOR NEW LOAN DRIVE 

E. F. Albee Again leading Workers; Last Week of Campaign 

Alloted to l^girhnnte and Motion Picture Houses; 2,000,000 

Feet of War Scenes Will Be Used by Government 



Theatrical and motion picture leaders 
are already marshaling their forces in an 
effort to surpass under the leadership of 
E. F. Albee, former records for bond sales, 
in, the coming Victory Loan campaign. It 
has been left for the theatres throughout 
the country to throw in their tremendous 
force during the last week of the drive. 

In New York, prominent theatre folk 
wiQ give abort talks during the perform- 
ances while solicitors are taking subscrip- 
tions. ' There will also be some new' fea- 
ture* eat the general' program, one of 
which will be the use of 2,000,000 feet of 
film in explaining the necessity for buy- 
ing bonds. Among the productions wHI 
be a 5,000-foot film entitled, "The Price 
of Peace/' » photographic record of how 
the country's millions were sp ent. 

Another new subject will be "With Per 
ailing in France." Projections of these 
pictures will begat April 6, a week before 
the opening of the Victory Loan drive. 

Thai trim! w o r k e r s in New York are 



banding under the direction of Mr. Albee 
and it is expected that the three weeks' 
effort of the Fourth Loan, when a total 
of $42,000,000 was subscribed, will be bet- 
tered. ;'•.."'. 

The procedure wiQ be along similar lines 
of otlwr loan campaigns, fit' the Second 
Loan the B. F. Keith Theatres in New 
York raised $12,000,000. In the Third Loan 
the committee was formed to canvass more 
thoroughly the motion picture houses as 
well as theatres' and secured subscriptions 
of $33,000,000. This year, because of the 
cut in time allotted, an extra number of 
canvassers will be employed. 

Films made by twenty-seven film actors 
for the Fourth Loan, which could not be 
used in many cities because of the influ- 
enza epidemic, have been altered audi re- 
titled to suit the present loan. Some gov- 
ernment film will be exhibited in public 
halls with admission fee, and, to assure 
wide distribution, 150 copies have been 



HIPPODROME APPEALS CASE 
The New York Hippodrome Corporation 
is appealing from the judgment for $1,500 
i t tt/jrWed against it by Frank J. Carew, 
a former stage hand. 

'Oarew, who worked at the Hippodrome 
in January; 1017, while the Annette Kel- 
lermann act was appearing there, was in- 
- juried in the basement under the stage 
when a board; which had been stretched 
across a puddle of water formed from a 
tank used in the KeUennann act, became 
loose as he stepped on it and struck him. 
As' a result, he sustained a fractured leg 
and "other injuries which, be testified, 
kept Ufa in the hospital two months and 
at home 'for six months thereafter. lb 
sued fqr $10,000, but a jury in the Su- 
' se Court awarded him a verdict of 



Henry Brill, George Lambert and Max 
Franklin are Care w'a attorneys. Bertrand 
L. Pel l igi ew i is the attorney for the Hip- 
podrome.'' 

SUES OVER PHOTOGRAPH 
Gladys Loftus, of the Ziegfeld "Fol- 
lies ,** is' 'suing the Duplex Film Company, 
Pioneer" Fflm Company, and the Green- 
wich lithographing Company, as well as 
James V. Ritchey, president of the utter 
company. 

In "her complaint, nled by Nathan Bur- 
kan, her attorney. Miss Loftus alleges 
that the 'defendants, without her written 
permission 'or consent used a photograph 
of herself for advertising purposes. The 
photograph, it is alleged,' was reproduced 
on billboards and show cards to adver- 
tise a photoplay entitled "Shame," which 
was being exploited by. the defendants. 

In consequence, Miss. Loftus is stung 
under the, civil rights law and asks for 
an accounting and an assessment of dam- 
ages, the. amount to be determined by the 
court! The case will probably be reached 
or trial next week. 



. SPIEGEL- HAS NEW- PIECE 

"Something Doing"' is, [the title, chosen 
for a new musical play recently, acquired 
by Max Spiegel from, Sanger and Jor- 
dan. The play' is by Edward. A Paul- 
ton and' Frank Mandel, with , music by 
Harry Carroll, and was originally called 
"The Delightful Bigamist." It ia sched- 
uled for presentation, by Spiegel the last 
week in . July, opening.' in Long. Branch 
or soma other seashore town in Jersey. 

HOLDING GRACE GEORGE PLAY 

"She Would and She Did," which Grace 
George tried .out lor two weeks, is now 
slated to come, into ths Playhouse, about 
the second week in Angus t. It was. at 
first Intended to bring it in at once. - 



ENTERTAIN AMERICAN WOUNDED 

Performances were given at ten hos- 
pitals where wounded soldiers and sail- 
ors are taken care of; last week, under 
the auspices of the War Hospital Enter- 
tainment Association. The hospitals at 
which the shows were given were the 
United States Marine Hospital at Staten 
Island, Camp Baritan Hospital at Me- 
tuehagb. N. J.; United States Army Em- 
barkasjon Hospital No. 1, Hoboken, N. J.; 
Naval Reserve Training Station Hospital, 
Pelham Bay Park; United States Army 
Embarkation* Hospital No. 4, Polyclinic 
Building, 34* W. 60th Street, New York; 
Depot Hqstt&ai, Air Service Department, 
Garden OE Long Inland; United States 
General Hospital No. 3, Rah way, N. J.; 
United States Army General Hospital 
No. 1, Gun Hill Road and Bainbridge Ave- 
nue, New York City; Ward 56, United 
States General Hospital No. 1, Annex at 
Tremont and University . Avenues, Bronx; 
and the United States General Hospital 
No. 9, Lakewood, N. J. 

The performers, who gave their services 
gratis, were Lambert and Currier, Robilio 
and- Rothman, Olga, Betty Donn, Mans- 
field and Detar, Harri Downing, Fogarty 
and Foster, Claudia Tracy, Dunham and 
O'Malley, Frank Eeeton, Gladys Lock- 
wood, Milton Berlin, Benedict DeGaetain, 
Eugenia Jones, Little Seymour Rosen, 
Astor Four, Hasting and Mearns, Gilbert 
and CNeil, Joseph,?. Giorgio, Haar and 
Eonlosy, Sammy Wilson, ssnMjMI and Au- 
brey, Burger, Aubrey and Rhodes, Winnie 
Wall, Wells, Hilfanv. and CRourke, in 
"Picking the Winner," Delanoy and Le- 
Roy, Smith and Rogge, Jack Denton, 
Adams and Thomas, Vincent Sully, Wan- 
da and Rosemary, Elbert and Huntington, 
Joseph P. ' Georgio, Katherine Bradley, 
MuiTay and Irwin, Pearl Haight, _ Dou- 
glas, Hughes and Faber, Ward and Perry, 
Crescent Trio, Henry Frey, Frank Mark- 
ley, Billy Crips, Billy Walsh, Frank Gil- 
len, Jane Kelly, Sherlock Sisters and 
Clinton, Elmer Jerome, John P. Reed, Con 
Conrad, Day and Neville, Conboy and 
Livingston, MacDonough and Gavone, 
Elinore and Williams, Lucille Campbell 
and Matty Le vine. 

GILLETTE BURNS HIS EYE 
Just before a performance of "Dear 
Brutus" hut week, William Gillette was 
badly injured by dropping raw spirits of 
ammonia into his eye instead of some 
medicine he intended, to use. A doctor 
was called and alleviated the pain to Borne 
extent and the injured man went on for 
a matinee performance and played ' the 
entire show. Hit oculist attended him 
after the matinee and found that: a huge 
part of the outer coating of his eye was 
burned: away.'. ?: " '..' v:-;i 'o:: 



QUARTETTE LOSES CLOTHES 

The Temple Quartette is mourning the 
loss of four evening suits which were 
stolen from them last week while they, 
were playing at the Fifty-eighth Street 
Theatre. -A young, man entered the store 
. of a. tailor nearby and asked if he was 
the one who generally pressed the clothes 
of the artists at the Fifty-eighth Street 
house. The tailor admitted he was and 
the young man asked him to immediately 
press the four suits, saying that he was a, 
member of the quartette and needed. them 
for the evening, performance. After re- 
ceiving the clothes, neatly pressed, he 
told the tailor to bring his bill to the 
theatre at the end of the week and that 
he would be paid then. 

The Quartette are still waiting for their 
clothes and the tailor for his money. 

SOLAR WANTS CREDIT. 

Willie Solar informed the N. V. A. this 
week that Wright and Walker are doing 
a part of his specialty without his per- 
mission, which he describes as the "Aba- 
Daba" number. Solar says he met Wright 
and Walker three years ago while he was 
playing on the Ackerman and Harris. Cir- 
cuit and the team asked him if they could 
do the number in question, with the dance 
included, and announce the same as an 
''imitation of Willie Solar." Solar says 
that he acquiesced and thought the team 
would continue to carry out their part of 
the agreement. Last week, Solar states, 
he caught the- act' at the City and the 
"Aba -Dabs" number- was still in the act, 
but no mention was *made of -himself as 
the originator. The N. V. A. is looking 
into the matter. 



SAYS GRUBER LIFTED ACT. 

Charlie Wilson, in a letter to the 
N. V. A, this week, charges Chester Gruber 
with ' grabbing the greater part of his 
(Wilson's) act.. To make it more aggra- 
vating, according to Wilson, Gruber is 
now on the W. V. M A. time, and is do- 
ing the very stuff that Wilson proposes 
to use in his act when he plays that cir- 
cuit later in the season. Wilson specifi- 
cally mentions '"the description of a 
dress suit," "the description of a woman's 
dress," a burlesque ventriloquial stunt, a 
travestied dramatic bit and the placing of 
blank cards on an easel, as the pieces of 
business he claims Gruber has lifted from 
him. The N. V. A. is conducting an in- 
vestigation. 

BUCKNER IS IN TOMBS. 

Arthur Buckner, the cabaret revue pro- 
ducer who went into bankruptcy last 
week, was later arrested at the instance 
of_the U.-S. officials and held in $10,000 
bail by Commissioner Hitchcock on a 
charge of using the mails ' to defraud. 
Through the efforts of S. Edward Gins- 
bnrg, his attorney, of 220 West Forty- 
second street, the amount is expected to 
be reduced to $5,000. 

A collection was taken up in a number 
of restaurants early this week and a con- . 
siderable amount raised with which to aid 
him in making a defence. Meanwhile, 
Buckner is in the Tombs prison. 

SIGN TO SKATE ABROAD 

_ A number of well-known roller skaters 
signed last week to appear abroad, among 
whom are the El Rey Sisters who have 
contracted with* Alfred Butt to appear In 
London- after the close of their engage- 
ment at the New York . Hippodrome. 
Maude Mallia goes to the London Coli- 
seum and Steele and Winslow, the com- 
edy skaters, are booked to go to Paris, 
France. 



SAVAGE HAS NEW PLAY . 

"The Love Boat" is. the title of a new 
musical comedy accepted for production 
by Henry W. Savage. It was written by 
Earl Derr Biggers, author of <*A Cure for 
Curables," 'Inside the Lines" and "Seven 
Keys to Baldpate." 

ACTRESS MARRIES ATTORNEY 
Edith. Conrad, for several years leading 
lady, with May Bobs on, was : married to 
DavM''p:, Rogers in Jacksonville, Fla., on 
Saturday. Mr. Rogers is the District At- 
torney of Jacksonville. ""■' . 



DATES AHEAD .... 
"The Jest" — Arthur Hopkins— -Plymouth, 
' ■ April 9. 'li-ts. ? '"' "''' •' . - 
"Papa" — F. ' C Whitney— Little Theatre, 

April 10. 
"A Night of Love" (Yiddish)— Peoples The- 
atre. April lL . 
Neighborhood Theatre — Grand Street — Four 

new plays, April 12. 
Actors* Fund Benefit — Polo Grounds, April 

"The Bonds of Interest" — Theatre Guild— 

Garrlck Theatre. April 14. 
Souaa Band Tour— John Philip Sousa — 

Academy of Music, Brooklyn, April 14. 
"Manila" (Spanish)— Park Theatre, April 

1». 
Commonwealth Opera Co. — Academy of 

Music, Brooklyn, April- 21. 
"Dark Rosaleen" — David Belasco — Belasco 

Theatre, April 22. 
Bronx Exposition opening — April £6. 
Treasurers' Club Benefit — Hudson Theatre, 



April 27. 

N. V. 



A. Benellt— Hippodrome, May 4. 

OUT OF TOWN 

"Sunshine" — Johnson-Shaw Co. — Trenton. 

N. J.. April 1L 
New England District Convention, I. A. T. 

S. B., Lynn, Mass., April IS. 
"Oh, Uncle"-^Shubert'a — Sbubert-1 

Washington, April 14. ■-"■ 

"Mary Be Careful" (new edition)— Weber 

and- Anderson. Wllkes-Barre. Pa., April 

18. i r. ' : ■ ' . .■ - 

"Let's Go Again" (new edition) — Fanchon 

and Marco, San Francisco, Cal., April K). 
"The DangerouS- Age"— Ed. Dnblnsky— 
' Chicago.' April M.- . . 
"It's .Dp to You"-rE. A. Rice — Providence, 
' April 2L' .'.."' . 

"Oh, Peggy, Behave"— Illinois Theatre, 

Chicago. April 2T. 
."The Opels"— Holland. Ohio, April 28. » 
"The Lady In Bed"— John P. Slocum — 

Washington, April 28. 
"ThrouKh the Ases" — Comstock and Gest — 

Buffalo. May 5. ' "' 

American Federation of Musicians, Annual 

Convention. Dayton, Ohio,. May 1Z. 
"Passing Show of 1919" — Shubcrt's — Palace 

Music Ball. Chicago, May 14. . 
"Follies" (new edition) — Florens Ziegfeld. 

Jr.^ Atlantic City. N. J.. May 21. • 

I. A. T. S. E. Convention — Ottawa,! Can., 

May 26. ■ 

. SHOWS CLOSING . I 

Society of American Slngers-rPark Theatre. 

A pril' 12. 
"The Tailor-Made. Man" — Broadway. Brook- 
.' lyil, April 12. -.- , in: 

."Veronica's Veil" - (Passion; play)— West 

Hoboken. April 151 
"Tiger! Tiger!"— Belasco, April If. 



K A E HAVE NEW SHOWS 

London, Bug., April T. — Ivan Caryll 
will make bis stay on this side of the 
water brief as he has contracted' to write 
the music for several American shows, the 
first of which is for Klaw and Erlanger. 
This is' to be called "Chouquette." The 
book i« by Hennequin and"- Marcel Guille- 
mand. For another, "A Husband in Spite 
of Himself," Caryll will have as collabor- 
ators,! Jean Martian and B. H. 'Burnside. 
A third piece, which is for F. Ray Corn- 
stock, will have' a book by Guy Bolton. 
Caryll intends writing these works in his 
American home on Long Island. 



McDiTOSH WANTS TOLLIES."' 

Melbourne, Aug., April 5. — Hugh Mc- 
intosh i& trying. ,to_ arrange with Florens 
Ziegfeld, Jr., to bring over several editions 
of the Ziegfeld "Follies,'* .'which "wfll be 
presented here exactly as they were given 
at the .New Amsterdam Theatre, in New 
York. He' has engaged W- G. Fields, a 
feature of the Tollies". in New York for 
the " last five years, and, to insure the 
lighting, effects being the same as in the 
original productions, has brought.. over, an 
expert electrician. ' .'• 



aUSS CORD ONE OBJECTS. 
Robbie Gordone has filed a complaint 
with the N. V. A. against someone who 
is personally unknown to her, but who, 
she claims,', is playing; western .circuits 
under the name of Bobbie Gordone. Miss 
Gordone sets up a. claim that the close- 
ness of the name of Bobbie Gordone to 
her own professional! monaker constitutes 
an infringement on her professional rights 
and has asked the .N. V- A. to. request 
Miss Gordone to adopt another name. 



ATLANTIC CITY STARTS APR. 14. 

Keith's Atlantic City opens for the sea- 
son on April 14 with Marie Dressier head- 
lining the. following bill: Emmett Welch 
Minstrels, Lively Trio, ! Royal Yn'enna 
Japs, Claire. Vincent and company, Kin- 
ting's Animals and Leo Donnelly. 



-.. -. 



Tr* 



■ ^.JsfC5s*O i ii£Si >■: 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



-\ 



ft. 



HAYMAN ESTATE MUST PAY , 
INHERIT ANCE TA X OF $64,571 

Grow. Estate Wa. $1,852,479 and Net $1,692,515, Which b 
^: r . Mostly Left to Widow and 

Near Relatives 



i 



- 

• 'The estate of the late AM Hayman, the 

executors of wnich are Minnie Hayman, 

-Ms' widow, William H. Rose, of 128 

Broadway, and Edward A. Kerbe, of 527 

"-■-' intOi Avenue, will be taxed $64,571.27, 

» this being the inheritance tax. 

Hayman left a gross estate amounting to 

■ $1,852,470, of which $1,091,993 was in 

real estate, $3,692 in banks, $324,118 in 

securities and $413,675 in notes and per- 

<■- soMl/nropertj*? 1 - The i$L eBt * te amounts 

'■•'■ to J $l,692,515. " ■ rj .,{< ■•'-' :\ !"; . ■'■' 

.-vThere were a number of assets which 

, ; 'included 218 shares, preferred, of Charles 
Frohman, Inc., valued at $21,800; 1,677 
•shares of New- York Theatre Company, 
owner of the New York Theatre, on Broad- 
way, between Forty-fourth and Forty-fifth 
Streets, and capitalized at $1,125,200; 760 
shares of the Klaw and Erlanger New Or- 
leans Theatre Company, valued at $70,- 
567.50,' one-quarter interest in some lots at 
Ninety-fifth Street and Fifth Avenue, $61,- 
-326; one-quarter interest in lots at 94-95 
'Fifth Avenue ; one-half interest in premises 

• at 256-268 West 125th Street, where stands 
■the Pabst restaurant, $55,743.75; at 1432 
•Broadway, $320,000, and 1428 and 1430 
Broadway, where stands the Empire 
Theatre," $610,000; money due from Eman- 
uel Blumenstiel, $46,608.59, and interest, 
$0,646.02; participation in loan made by 
'Scholle -Brothers, of New York, to Charles 
Frohman, Inc., $60,000; money due from 
Charles Frohman, Inc., $83.20 and a 
certificate of. indebtedness of 19 West 
Forty-fourth Street Company, $115,76724, 
with 'accrued interest, $6,380.96. 



Charged up against this sum, $1,852,- 
47927, however, are expenses of $159,- 
663.53; creditors; $98,260.21, which in- 
cludes $90,469.17 due to his brother, Alf 
Hayman, and $4,671.94, due to Scholle 
Brothers, and executors' commissions, $23,- 
384.55. 

Hayman in his will, executed on Nov. 9, 
1912, directed that the following was the 
way in. which his estate waa to be divided : 
• ML Sinai .Cemetery, at; Bridesbarg, Pa., 
for care oi.his plot, $2,000; Alf Hayman, 
his brother, $120,000, absolutely ; Grace 
Seymour, niece, of 543 West 113th Street, 
$10,000; Emma Lehman and Claude Leh- 
man, whose addresses are not given, 
cousins, each $5,000. 

• The rest of the estate, as a life estate 
for his widow, Mia. Hayman, her trust 
fond being $1,560,815.74, after which the 
principal is to be distributed as follows: 

Alf Hayman, a life interest in $250,000, 
with the power to will the principal; the 
Mt. Sinai Hospital, the United- Hebrew 
Charities and the Montefiore Home for 
Chronic Invalids, each $25,000. 

The rest of the estate equally between 
fifteen nephews and nieces, being the chil- 
dren of Rose Hochstader, Blanche Meyer 
and Ella Bernheimer, his sisters. The 
nephews and nieces are: Corinne Bauman, 
Sanford Bernheimer, Lucille Lowenstein, 
Samuel Bernheimer, Blanche Klein, Emma 
Lehman, Edward Hochstader, Cora Lowen- 
tbal, Blanche Boas, May Strauss, Alice 
Kerbs, Irma Rosen berger, Lester, Alvin 
and Arthur Meyer, residing here, in St. 
.Louis, Mo., and in Kansas City, Mo. 



"CAVE GBU." STARTS WELL 

Atlantic Ctty. N. J.. April 7. — In his 
new play, "The Cave Girl/' produced by 
Cohen and Harris. George Middleton starts 
out to prove that under our crust of 
civilization and training Inrks the spark 
of the primitive. But — shades of Adam — 
he finally convinces us that we are hope- 
lessly mired and spattered with tango 
teas, Wall Street, and luxurious food un- 
washably spattered with the lot. 

Two characters who do find the tiniest 
spark of nature cannot oyeroome the con- 
vention of marriage and succeed in 
shocking even the amiable inventor of the 
theory of atavism. Hence, we are not 
Nature's creatures, as we love to imagine 
ourselves, in the midst of the comfort of 
our. libraries. From this angle Mr. SOd- 
dleton's play is satire against the beloved 
scientist. In fact, he laughs twice in dif- 
ferent directions — once at science and once 
at us. 

. However, he laughs neatly, very wm- 
ningly, and, to judge from tonight's 
-audience, very, successfully. 

In the cast are Lola Fischer, Sue Yan- 
duzer, . Katherine Grey, Mary Newcomb, 
Robert McWadc, John Bedouin, Frank M. 
Thomas, Russ Whytal, Howard Gibson 
and Elmer Grandin. 



LORAINE TO PRODUCE 

Loudon, Eng., April 5. — The success of 
Gilbert Miller as a producing manager here 
has prompted several younger leaders in 
the theatrical profession to enter the pro- 
ducing end of the business. Chief among 
these are Robert Loraine and Henry Ain- 
ley, both of whom were recently discharged 
from military service. Their respective 
plans are not definite aa yet, but it is 
almost certain that they will begin work 
on new productions before May 1. 

Margaret Mayo, the American farce 
writer who sailed for borne March 16, took 
with her the script of the French farce 
*Le Conche de la Meriee," which she has 
been commissioned to adapt for British 
presentation by Gilbert Miller who recently 
acquired the British rights to the piece. 



SET "THROUGH AGES" OPENING 

"Through the Ages," the three-act 
drama, with special music placed in re- 
hearsal last Monday by Comstoek and 
Geet, the producers, is scheduled to open 
in Buffalo May 5. The play was written 
by Guy Bolton and George Middleton, 
and was originally called "The Cross." 
The special music has been composed by 
William Frederic Petere, and Robert Mil- 
ton is staging the play. 

There win be sixty people in the cast, of 
whom twenty are principals. Those 
chosen thus far include the following: 
Pedro de Cordoba, Ralph Kellard, Jane 
Cooper, Clara Joel, Henry Stevenson, 
Helen Chandler, Charles Crumpton, Carl 
Anthony, Herbert Druce, Jules Bpailry and 
Leslie Palmer. • 



DEVUELLE IS NOT GUILTY 

Lof dox, Eng., April 4. — Reginald De- 
vuelle, formerly a New York fashion de- 
signer, has been acquitted of the charge of 
manslaughter in connection with the death 
of Billie Carleton, who recently died of 
drug poisoning. The trial was held in the 
Old Bailey Court. Devuelle was accused 
of supplying the American actress -with 
cocaine. Next week, Devuelle will be tried 
for violating the Defense of the Realm 
Act, it being alleged that he supplied the 
deceased performer with cocaine. 



H1NSHA W TO PRODUCE NEW OPERA 

"Men of Harlech," an opera by John 
McGhie, will be produced next season 'jy 
William Wade Hinshaw, president of the 
Society of American Singers. McGhie is 
the mnsic leader of the society. 

TO USE REVOLVING STAGE 

A revolving stage will be constructed 
for the presentation of "Susan Lenox," 
in which there are three acts and eleven 
scenes. The play is now in Providence. 

DC COURVILLE GETS ST. MARTINS 

' London. Eng., April 7. — Charles B. 
Cochran, has leased the St. Martina for 
twelve months to Albert de Conrvflle. 



"DARK ROSALEEN" OPENS APRIL IS 

David Belasco .will nxaa—a, "Dark Rosa- 
lean," air Irish pla/?at the Belasco The- 
atre on April 22, -"Tiger, Tiger" with 
Frances °' — ,~f'l a] — t rniTri-J**" 1 * 

"Dark Rosaleea" wis* ■trHtJofty Whit- 
ford Kane and-.W-'D'-.Hepenstall. The 
cast will be headed by Eileen Huban, last 
seen here in "Crops and Croppers" and 
"On With the Dance." In support of her 
will be Dodson Mitchell, John Daly Mur- 
phy, Thomas Mitchell, Robert Camming*, 
Walter Edwin, John Cannody, George 
Fitzgerald, Charles McCarthy, Dan Moylea, 
P. J. Kelly, Henry Duffey, Tom McGulre, 
Mathews Ard, Charles Bickiord, Beryl 
Mercer, Jane Ross, Eileen Curran, Rose 
Morison, Mollie Carroll and Anne Sheri- 
dan. 



CORT STARTS NEW PIECE 

Josephine Victor started rehearsals Mon- 
day of a new production in which she will 
.be. starred by John Cort. Tile play, as 
yet unnamed, waa written by Edith Ellis, 
and is being produced by B. Iden Payne. 
It will be given. a preliminary spring try- 
out the first week in May. The caat in- 
cludes the following, besides Miss Victor: 
Byron Beasley,- Enid Morel, Mrs. Jacques 
Martin, Richard Henry Lace, William B 
Pennington, Jeffreys Lewis, Wallis Clark, 
Fleming Ward, Clarence Derwent and Isa- 
dora Marcil. 



MRS. DREWS ESTATE APPRAISED 

Anthony P. Luden, one of the State 
Transfer Tax appraisers, has been ap- 
pointed by Surrogate Cohalan to appraise 
the estate left by Mrs. Josephine Baker 
Drew, late wife of John Drew. 

Mrs. Drew died intestate on Dee. 4 last, 
and left an estate of "about $13,000." Be- 
cause of her failure to leave a will. Drew 
will receive one-third of the estate and 
their daughter, Louise Drew Devereaux, 
married to a captain now in France with 
the A. E. F., will receive two- thirds. 

ALHAMBRA HAS BIG YEAR 
London, Eng., April 7. — The annual 
meeting of the directors of the Alhambra 
Company, Ltd., at the Alhambra, brought 
out the fact that the profits 'for the year 
ending December 31st, 1918, amounted to 
$167,685, which, added to the -balance of 
$3,865 from last year, makes .a 'total of 
$171,550. A dividend of 10 per cent was 
declared. $75,000 was set aside for the 
productions account, and $56,800 will be 
carried" forward for 1919. 



REHEARSE 'TROPINQUTrY " 

"Rropinquity," the comedy by George D. 
Parker being produced by the Sclbuia 
Theatrical Enterprises, went into rehear- 
sal at the Punch and Judy Theatre on 
Monday. The cast includes Ida Water- 
man, Kathleen Alexander, Jessie Glenden- 
ning, Beatrice Chardward, Lionel Adams 
and Harold West. The play will be tried 
out and then sent to Chicago. 

BUYS PLAY FOR TOM WISE . 

The dramatic rights to Joseph C. Lin- 
coln's novel, "Cap'n Warren's Ward," 
have been purchased by Oliver Morosco. 
He. intends to produce it this summer in 
Los Angeles. The dramatization win be 
done by Frederic and Fanny Hatton, and 
is intended for Tom Wise. 



SIDNEY DREW SERIOUSLY ILL 

Sidney Drew is seriously 01 at hia home, 
No. 878 Park Ave., after having suffered 
a complete physical collapse in Detroit 
last Friday, where he and Mrs. Drew were 
playing in "Keep Her Smiling." Aa there 
was no understudy, the comedy was 
closed. 



LANGTON'S MEMORY HONORED 

London. Eng., April 7. — In memory of 
the late J. D. Langton, the theatrical law- 
yer, a bed is to be endowed in the Free- 
masons War Hospital. 



"NIGHT OFF" IS WELL ! 

BarxiiioasY Md., April 8.— At Ford's, 
this week, Richard Lambert la presenting 
"A Night Off," a musical version of Austin 
Daly's comedy. 

The action of the play takes place in the 
Babbett Home, on Staten Island, and is 
supposed to cover a period, of one week. 
It U full of catchy songs and. graceful 
dances and has a remarkably good looking 
chorus. The costumes are most attractive 
and there are no dull momenta. 

Percy Pollock, as Justin Babbett, an 
old "horse doctor" front Oklahoma, whose 
great ambition is to be a playwright, ia 
excellent. His habit of smacking hia lips 
and breathing audibly through hia nose 
whenever . excited causes many a good 
laugh, while his attempts to have hia play, 
written in early youth, revised during the 
absence of bis wife at Sulphur Springs, 
put on the stage, form the plot of the 
comedy. 

-., ..Elizabeth Murray as, Zand ppe Babbett, 
Justin's wife, , who believes that her -hus- 
band is leading a "couple of double Uvea," 
is also excellent Her character soars add 
a great deal. to the performance and bar 
lone hand at poker ia one of the hits of the 
comedy. Carolina White aa Angelica Dam- 
ask brings with her a breath of grand 
opera. Her. voice Is splendid. 

Harry Bulger, as Marcus Brntua Snap, 
a wonderful actor and head of a t till more 
wonderful company of actors, who under- 
takes to make a success of Babbett's play, 
1b as funny as he can be and his songs 
jnade a big hit last night 

Margaret Candler, aa Susan, the Bab- 
bett's maid, does, a unique piece of meting 
as a loose-jointed sort of automaton, -and 
she, with the assistance of Tom Dingle, 
gives several interpretative dances that are 
most unusual and entertaining. George 
W. Howard aa Harry Damask, the- hus- 
band, of Angelica; Arthur Hartley, u 
Jack Mulberry, and Marion Weeks, aa 
Nesbe Babbett also add their bit. to the 
success of the performance. 

The audience, last night Judging frAm 
the applause and laughs, was most favor- 
ably impressed, and the play, no doubt 
will be even better later in the week, aa 
some of the players seemed a little uncer- 
tain of their lines and there were several 
slight hitches. 



GEORGE WHITE TO PRODUCE 

George White, now appearing in vaude- 
ville, is to become a producer. He wffl 
start with "Scandal of 1919," an annual 
review, to be offered this summer. 



FRIED LANDER TO BRANCH OUT 

William B. Friedlander is to become a 
play producer, in addition to his produc- 
tion of vaudeville acta. His first venture 
will be a light opera in which Nan Hal- 
perin will be starred. This work is based 
on a successful farce of three seasons ago, 
the music and lyrics for which will be 
written by Friedlander. The next will be 
a new play, also from the pen of Fried- 
lander, in which Robert Edeson will be 
starred. M. S. Bentham will be associated 
with this production. Friedlander will 
open his New York offices about May 1st 
and associated with Urn will be Hugh 
Herbert Will H. Hough, Harlan Thomp- 
son and Sidney Phillips. 



O ' RY AN WANTS THEATRES 
At a dinner given to Mrs. Fiake by the 
Society of Arte and Sciences at the Hotel 
Biltmore last week, Major-Gen. John F. 
CRyan made an address in which ha stated 
that he waa in favor of having memorial 
theatres built to our soldiers, aa they 
would serve to hold memories in a living 
way, rather than something that waa 
stony and dead. 

CORT PICKING NEW CAST 

John Cort has picked Louise Groodv, 
the Morin Sisters, and Banders and MJlL 
for "Just A Minute," the new production 
by George E Stoddard and Harold Orteb, 
authors of "Listen, Lester." Rehearsals 
will start on the finish of the run of "Fid- 
dlers Three" and "Flo Flo," in which Miss 
Groody, Handera and Mills and others are 
now on tour. 



HAST TO REVIVE LATT SHOW 

Walter Hast and Nat Phillips are to 

produce Jack Lait and Joe Swirling's "One 

of Us" late this month in Chicago. Lait to 

now in New York selecting a cast and 

clewing arrangements With Oliver Morosco. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 9, 1919 




RED BANK HOUSE 

MGRS. GONE, 

IS REPORT 

ACTS SEEK THEIR SALARIES 



The end of the Lyric Theatre, Bed Bank, 
New Jersey, as a vaudeville noose, came 
about on il.-rch 28th, after a week of ex- 
citing Tins and downs, the least of which 
are tte • reported- departure of its two 
backers, Richard Thompson and Joe Reiser. 
The actors who appeared at the house the 
first three days of the week of March 
24th, fared a bit better, incidentally, than 
those who furnished the entertainment for 
last half, the first half contingent receiv- 
ing one day's pay, while the last half 
troupers worked two days of the allotted 
three, and are reported to have collected 
nothing for their work. 

According to Frank Folsom, in the Put- 
nam Building, a man describing hi mself as 
Joe Reiser, dropped in to see him one day 
recently and casually mentioned that be 
would like to "get in" on some kind of a 
theatrical venture. Folsom, it seems, put 
Reiser in touch with Richard Thompson, 
said to have been the manager of the 
Lyric. 

After some negotiations with Thompson, 
a deal was arranged, according to a con- 
tract which Folsom holds, whereby Thomp- 
son and Reiser were to operate the Lyric 
jointly and Folsom was to furnish the 
vaudeville acta. . The contract in question 
was signed for both Thompson and Reiser 
by Folsom, who asserts that both parties 
to the deal granted him authority to affix 
their signatures to the document. The 
contract held a stipulation that Reiser and 
Thompson were to divide fifty-fifty after 
the actors* salaries were paid, and seem- 
ingly, both of the principals were to be 
equally responsible for all salary obliga- 
tions incurred. 

All went well enough up to Wednesday, 
March 26th, but when it came to collecting 
their money for the three days, the first 
half bill, consisting of five acts, found to 
their dismay. Folsom says, that Reiser 
could not be found. The first half receipts 
at the Lyric are variously estimated to 
have been from $168.00 to $187.00. 

Thompson. Folsom says, called him op 
on the long distance 'phone on Thursday, 
Mar. 27th, and advised him of Reiser's 
hasty exit meanwhile stating that he would 
continue to ran the house alone. Reiser, 
also called up a little later on Thursday, 
according to Folsom. and upon being asked 
what he was going to do about paying bis 
share of the delinquent first half salaries, 
declared that be would give' the matter his 
attention. 

On Friday, or thereabouts. Reiser sent 
$30 to Thompson, who proceeded to pay 
the artists tor one day out of the remit- 
tance. One act is said to nave received 
a trifle more than the single day's- pay. 

The second half bill upon hearing of 
the financial trouble that had occurred 
previously during the week, decided, on 
Friday night, that it was time to make a 
"touch.*'. Upon -looking for Thompson, 
however, the last half bunch discovered, 
it is reported, that be had duplicated 
Reiser's disappearing feat.' The Lyric is 
now closed. ■ 



DOLLY GRAY HAS NEW ACT 

A comedy sketch by . Frank Fol- 
som called "Papa's Baby, has been ac- 
cepted by Dolly Gray and will open in 
two weeks. In the cast besides Miss .Gray, 
are Whitlock Davis, juvenile; John Saun- 
ders, character man, and Agnes Earl, char- 
actr- woman. Each person will do aa in- 
dividual specialty and tie turn will close 
with a medley of specially -written songs. 



LA MONT'S STENOG ELOPES 
Bert La Mont has lost the best stenog. 
be ever had, and all because of his fond- 
ness . for poetry. Bert, who is a nut on 
lyric varse, recently, asked his former 
stenog to copy a quotation which started 
off somewhat as follows: "Only one thing 
really counts— and that is love." La Mont, 
upon receiving the typed copy, thought no 
more of the incident, until last Monday, 
when he received a note, the first para- 
graph of which informed him that "his 
stenographer had eloped." The missive then 
went on to state that the former Miss 
Graf was now Mrs. Grossman and that 
the quotation mentioned above, was the 
original caose of making her the happiest 
girl .in the world. La Mont is going to 
copy his own quotations, hereafter. 

BRUCE IS HELD 
•Harry Bruce, the vaudeville performer, 
was held in $2,500 bail for the Grand Jury 
by Magistrate Ten Eyek in the West Side 
Court, before whom he waa arraigned last 
week charged with assault and carrying a 
concealed weapon. Bruce was arrested 
two weeks ago in a flat on West Sixtieth 
Street, which the police raided and which 
they claimed was being used to run crap 
games. Ray Bradford, a former waiter 
in Mark Axon's Palace Cafe, and his wife 
were also arrested. Bradford was charged 
with being a common gambler, but was 
discharged by the magistrate. She was 
charged with selling liquor without a li- 
cense. Harry Saks Hechheimer is their 
attorney. 



MARINE! .1,1 SUES SKATERS 

H. B. Marinelli, the booking agent, has 
started a suit, for $2,000 which, he claims, 
is his; .10 per cent, share of $20,000 earned 
by., Charlotte, the skater. An agreement 
reached in 1015 between MarineOi . and 
Wilhelm Oelschlaegel, her father, stipu- 
.lated, the plaintiff states, that Marin elli 
was to manage the act and was to. get 10 
per cent, of its total earnings. From 
September of that year, to date, says 
Marin elli, Charlotte has received $20,000. 

MAC CREGOR TO STAGE ACT 

"Cupid" is the name of a new musical 
act which Edgar MacGregor, of the Klaw 
& Erlanger office, is about to produce. It 
will have four people, three men and a 
woman, none of whom has. as .yet, been 
chosen. The act was written by. Philan- 
der Johnson and Charles Previn, and Mac- 
Gregor plana [ to pick his cast and begin 
rehearsals this week so that the act may 
open the beginning of next week. 



GROSSMAN HAS NEW TURN , 

Al Grossman, the vaudevillian who has 
but one arm and one finger and a thumb 
on that limb, is to appear in a new act 
this week written for him. by George 
Barry. He will change from white to 
blackface on stage. Despite his handicap, 
.he win. also make rapid changes of ties. 
Grossman formerly appeared in "Presi- 
dent's Friend," written by Addison Burk- 
hart. 



BRANDELL ACT OPENING 
"A miniature, musical comedy, "Billy 
Boy." will open Thursday. In the cast 
are- Elaine Gray, Josephine Berg, Earle B. 
Mountain and Harry Bulger, Jr., and a 
chorus of six girls. 



MORRIS A KLEIN GET AMPHION 
Joe Morris, of Morris & Shaw, and Jo- 
seph Klein, have taken over the manage- 
ment of the Amphion Theatre, Brooklyn, 
and will continue the present policy of 
the house., vaudeville and pictures. 



BLONDELL. BOOKING SHAMOKIN 

The Shamokin, Pa., house, formerly 
booked by Billy Delaney through the 
Keith Exchange's Family Department on 
the fifth floor, will hereafter be handled 
by Arthur BlondeH.- '"--'. • 



ORPHEUMBEGINS 

BOOKING FOR 

1919-1920 

SEVERAL ACTS GET ROUTES 



Bookings for next season over the Or- 
pheum time are now well under way,' some 
fifteen or twenty acta already having been 
handed routes' that' will keep them, busy 
until well into the Winter of 1820. , c ", ; 

Among -the acts scheduled for midsum- 
mer openings on the circuit, with the rest 
of the western time to follow are "The 
Tip Tip Yaphankers," starting at the 
Palace, Chicago, on Aug. 1st; Eddie Janis 
and Ruth Cbaplow, Orpheum, San Fran- 
Cisco, July 6th; Kane, Morey and Moore, 
Orpheum, St. Paul, August 17th; Harmon 
and O'Connor, Orpheum, Salt Lake, Au- 
gust 10th; Sheila Terry, . Orpheum, 'Salt 
Lake, August 1st; The Sirens, Orpheum, 
Salt Lake, August 10th; Sidney Townley, 
Orpheum, Salt Lake, August 10th; Clif- 
ford and Wills, Orpheum, San Francisco, 
July 20th; The Pickfords, Majestic Mil- 
waukee, August 31st, and Ly dell and Macy, 
opening in Chicago in July. 

Other acts now on the Orpheum time, 
.opening within, the last three or four 
weeks, whose bookings will carry them into 
next season, are Henchel Hendler, Wil- 
liams and Mitchell and Florence Roberts. 



HAS "EIGHT WILD WOMEN" ACT 

Bert La Mont is rehearsing a new 
vaudeville production calling for the ser- 
vices of eight girls and a couple of come- 
dians. -The turn will be entitled "Eight 
Wild Women" and will .carry a scenic 
complement of three sets, showing inti- 
mate views of the South Sea Isles, which, 
La Mont insists, is the original habitat of 
wild women. Among those engaged for 
the act, are Jennie Delmar, Dolly Belle 
and Elizabeth Reese. 



DELANEY BACK AT WORK 

Billy Delaney, who books a string of 
New York ' State and middle west houses 
on the fifth floor of the Keith Exchange, 
returned: to his desk on Monday, after- a 
four weeks' battle with the "flu>. . 



LT. PARSONS VAUDE POSSIBILITY. 
Lieut. "Ted" Parsons, of the Lafayette 
and Stork Bscadrilles, who arrived in 
New York recently after seeing three and 
a half years' active service in France as 
an airman, and who, incidentally, received 
the Military Medal of France, the Belgian 
Croix de Guerre, the French Croix de 
Guerre with eight citations ftttd numerous 
other medals attesting" his bravery in 
action during the course of the war, went 
on for an experimental showing at Proc- 
tor's, Newark,, hut Friday night, and, ac- 
cording to reports sent into New York, 
cleaned up a sizeable bit. Lieut. Parsons 
holds the honor of being the second Amer- 
ican Ace and the first American-French 
Ace,- and has-been recommended for< the 
American Distinguished Service "Cross. 
Providing that he can postpone a sched- 
uled trip to Poland on April 15, Lieut. 
Parsons will play a limited engagement 
for the Keith Exchange. Ralph Faraum, 
of the Smith and Hughes office, will handle 
the booking details if the trip to Poland 
can be postponed. ■ . 



"RAG" PINAFORE GETS STARTED 

A ragtime version of Gilbert and Sulli- 
van's comic opera favorite, "Pinafore," 
produced originally at a recent Friar's 
Frolic, and later taken over for vaudeville 
by Henry Bellit, will be given a prelimi- 
nary showing in one of the uptown pop 
houses this week, preparatory to coming 
into the Colonial. The production carries 
sixteen people. 

VICTOR MOORE OPENS MONDAY 

Victor Moore will return to. vaudeville ■ 
on April 14th, a. break-in week in one of 
the suburban houses having been arranged 
by the Harry Weber office. Moore will 
present one of his former vaudeville slots, 
and will be assisted by a male "feeder.*' 

DISAGREE OVER EEER KEG 
Wilbur Held has filed a complaint with 
the N. V. A. against James C. Morton, 
the bone of contention being the priority 
of certain business in- which a beer keg 
plays a prominent part. The N. V. A. 
will endeavor to solve the puzzle. 

ORPHEUM CLOSINGS UNDECIDED 
" No closing dates have been set as yet 
for ' -the . Orpheum houses that remain 
closed during the heated period. The' mat. 
ter is now under consideration by the Or- 
pheum Circuit heads, and the houses that 
are to close, and the dates, will be decided 
on later. 



N. V. A. SUSTAINS PRIMROSE 

The N.V.A. has dismissed the complaint 
filed by Norine Carman against George 
-Primrose in which Miss Carman alleged 
that the Primrose- Minstrels were infring- 
ing on an idea originated by her, in using 
a female interlocutor -with an' all-male 
minstrel circle. In making an investiga- 
tion of the complaint the N. V. A. dis- 
covered that -.' Cleveland's Minstrels and 
several other black-face organizations had 
utilized the female interlocutor idea some 
ten or fifteen years ago. . 

RAPF FULLY RECOVERED 
Harry Rapf was scheduled to return to 
his office in the Palace Building this week 
after a long period of convalescence fol- 
lowing a siege of illness that embraced 
everything from influenza to appendicitis. 
Rapf, who was laid up for two months, is 
now in the . best shape again physically 
and win shortly resume work on several 
picture and vaudeville propositions, that 
he was forced to lay aside when taken ill. 

COLLAPSED AFTER ACT 

The finish of her acrobatic and twirling 
act proved a bit too strenuous tor Paula 
last Thursday night at the Victoria 
Theatre, and, as, a result, she collapsed just 
as she reached the little" entrance on the 
left of the footlights. She was carried off 
by friends and assistants. .On the night in 
question the theatre was packed and the 
warm air may have contributed to her diz- 
ziness. ■ 



RETURNING TO VAUDEVILLE 

Irene Franklin and Bert Green, now on 
tour with the Shuberts' "Passing Show," 
will close with the latter organization 
around the first of June, it is reported. 
The team will-play a few" weeks in vaude- 
ville this summer, negotiations now be* 
'ing under way calling for a series of en- 
gagements' in the Keith houses, starting 
with the Palace, about the middle of June. 

CHOOS HAS NEW MUSICAL ACT 

■George Ghoos is producing and . staging 
a' new musical operetta called "Oh Ted- 
dy." ." The principals an Betty Brans, 
Tommy Toner, Hudson Freeborn and Na- 
talie Dugan. The music is by Walter L. 
Rosemont and book by Darl MacBoyle. 
'The turn, which carries a special setting, 
will play Camden and Chester 'this week. 
There are ten girls in the chorus. 

DAVIS BOOKING ATTLEBORO 

Jeff Davis will start booking vaudeville 
into the. Bates Opera House, Attleboro, 
Mass, on April 21st. The theatre has, 
heretofore; been playing straight pictures. 
Davis, who books a large string of houses 
in New -England through .the Family De- 
partment of the Keith Exchange, will send 
a weekly split of three acts to Attleboro. 



April 9, 1919 . 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 

Palace Theatre patrons will soon get fa- 
miliar with the stories of grand opera if 
singing acts continue to explain the plots 
prior to the introduction of their arias. 

Chief. Caupolican, who sang the Torea- 
dor's song from "Carmen," revealed the 
story of- Bizet's masterpiece and a little 
later Marguerite Sylva, the prima donna, 
took the audience into her confidence to 
the extent of unfolding the tragic tale of 
Carmen and Don Jose. 

The "Bricklayers," a well put on trained 
dog act, opened tbe show and did excel- 
lently. The act will be further reviewed 
in the. New Acts Department. 

Chieftain Caupolican followed with a 
song- repertoire in which ... '.'/The Bedouin A 
Love -Bong" and the big (.baritone aria 
from .Carmen, held prominent places. Vo- 
cal quantity, rather than quality, is the 
Chieftain's style and, as a result, his 
tinging is not as pleasing as if he were 
to employ the mezza voce more. Tbe 
biggest voice becomes weakened when 
continually used at full force and a de- 
viation from the true pitch is the inevita- 
ble result. 

A mixup in the lights spoiled the open- 
ing of the Bennett and Richards act. Sup- 
posed to open with a dark stage for tne 
dramatic portion of the act, some < mis- 
take in lighting flashed a bright spot on 
full and- Richards, in order to conceal the 
fact that he was in black face, hid his 
head under a table and spoke the opening 
lines. . . 

Alice Bis, with James Templeton as 
her dancing partner, presented a new act 
which scored excellently. The offering is 
finely staged, excellently costumed and 
the dances remarkably well executed. It 
will be further reviewed under New Acts. 
. Felix Adler, who has been studying for 
grand opera, let the andience into the se- 
cret, by displaying his knowledge of Ital- 
ian in one or two operatic bits. The Met- 
ropolitan, however, is not for Felix, if he 
continues to nse his vocal chords in tne 
present manner. Nature will surely rebel 
if he continues his present singing style, 
which begins at full voice and continues 
with a constantly increasing crescendo. 
Felix has enough good nut material in 
the act, and is " such a clever performer, 
that he can easily dispense with at least 
half of the singing. 

Marguerita Sylva closed the first half 
to big applause. The prima donna, bar- 
ring the Carmen selection, rendered a 
popular repertoire with excellent effect. 
TMs soprano is bound to become a big 
favorite with the songwriters, for, before 
each number, she announces the title and 
the name of the composer. Leo Edwards 
and Lee Roberts were the favored writers. 
. Maud Lambert and Ernest S. Ball re- 
ceived a reception on their appearance af- 
ter intermission- and the applause in- 
creased in volume after each number until 
the act's end, when the big hit of the 
performance was registered. "You're Mak- 
ing a Miser of Me," Ball's new song, 
started tile act off with a bang and other 
songs rendered by Ball and Miss Lambert 
followed in rapid order. "Open Up the 
Gates of Gladness" scored strongly and a 
medley of Ball's old song hits landed in 
just the right spot. Ball is fast develop- 
ing light comedy ability which keeps the 
act bright and clever. Miss Lambert was 
' in excellent voice and wore some charm- 
ing gowns. 

Ed. Gallagher's military travesty took 
on added value by the introduction of a 
new partner in the person of Joe. Rolley, 
the comedian. Rolley is one of the best 
black face comedians vaudeville, has seen 
in many months and got laughs innumer- 
able. 

Bernard Granville scored one. of the big 
bits of the bill with some new songs and 
stories., A new song called "Friends" 
scored ' strongly and his dance finish 
brought him back for many bows. 

"Art," the war tableau seen at this 
house a few months ago, closed. W. V. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Continued ea paee II) 



ORPHEUM 

Camilla's Birds opened the bill with an 
offering that pleased. The birds, all of 
which are cockatoos, went through a series 
of the regular bird stunts with chariots, 
horizontal bars and a ball. The fire scene 
at the close of the act, sent it off to a 
good hand. 

Count-Perrone and Trix Oliver found the 
second spot very easy with their «'"g*"g 
offerings.. They started- with a selection 
from "Trovatore," with Miss Oliver at the ' 
piano, the two singing. An aria from ' 
Lucia Was rendered in fine style and was 
followed by the old ballad "Maggie." A 
French laughing song - netted them an 
encore. The team has a pretty setting, 
both are the possessors of good voices and 
together they make a dandy act. 

The Seven Honey Boys' started at a 
fast pace and held it to their last number. 
They opened with some good harmony, 
which was followed by. a dance by one 
of the company. Manuel Romaine then 
rendered a "Sunday School" song in a 
fine manner, with tne company joining in 
the chorus. One of the seven is possessed 
of- an exceptionally good falsetto, and did 
some fine yodelling. He also took a big 
hand with an imitation of a cornet solo 
on the phonograph. A few other members 
and some gags filling in between them 
made up a pleasing minstrel offering. The 
dancer of the- company showed some 
ability and his numbers could be worked 
up to better advantage. 

Fred Allen scored the laughing hit of 
the first half, or of the entire bill, for 
that matter, with one of the most original 
monologues seen in vaudeville. He proved 
himself to be a thorough showman all 
through his offering. He utilizes anything 
that happens in the audience for comedy 
purposes. He has a good make-up, that 
is good for a laugh on his entrance. His 
monologue contains a few old gags, but his 
delivery of them is enongh to make any 
one grin. He also showed some good 
juggling ability, on which he also gave a 
burlesque. A farce on a ventriloquistic 
act created roars of laughter. At the. close 
of his offering, pictures of Washington, 
Wilson and the Flag were flashed on the 
curtain while he was off-stage. At the 
end of the applause which they brought, 
he had a "Much Obliged" sign thrown 
on, and made his bows amid a riot of 
laughter. 

Alan Brooks, with Vivienne Osborn, 
Jack Marvin and Fransy S. Shiota, dosed 
the first half with their "Dollars and 
Sense" playlet, which went over very welL 
It is well presented and acted and the 
plot of the sketch is well worked out. 

Josie Heather, assisted by William Casey 
at the piano, and Bobbie Heather, who 
makes a charming Scotch laddie in the 
one number the does, found tbe first posi- 
tion of the second half easy going. Miss 
Heather has the typical Irish intonation 
in her voice and a very pleasing per- 
sonality. 

William Murphy and Blanche Nichols 
and company presented their comedy skit, 
"A School for Acting." The thing Is 
billed as a travesty, but is disjointed and 
without continuity. If handled properly, 
it would make a much better farce than 
it does. • 

Van and Scheneek are favorites in 
Brooklyn, and were greeted with an ova- 
tion. The "pennant-winning battery of 
Songland" have a lot of new material and 
stopped the show with a half dozen clever 
songs all finely rendered. 

Reynolds and Donegan closed the show 
with one of the best skating acts to be 
seen. The costumes are very good and the 
skating is the kind that holds interest. 
Due to the lateness of the hour, a lot of 
the patrons did not stay. . But thoee who 
did, were given a treat. G. J. H. 



ROYAL 

Catherine Powell opened the bill Mon- 
day afternoon with her dances and start- 
ed the show off at a pace that was well 
sustained to the finish of the last act. 
Miss Powell's first number was Spanish. 
A French "Pom Pom," "The Death of the 
Swan," and an American toe dance fol- 
lowed in the order named and each won 
hearty applause. Miss Powell it a dancer 
of great ability. She is graceful and agile 
and is one of our best' exponents of toe 
work.' She wears a special dress far each 
dance, making her changes in full view 
of the audience,. and so quickly that one 
scarcely notices the waits. 

Francis Renault, who calls himself "The 
Parisian Fashion Plate," found much fa- 
vor in number two position. He wore 
three different dress creations, sang a 
song with each dress and kept the major 
portion of the audience "guessing," un- 
til, for bis fourth song, he removed his 
wig. 

Charles ODonnell and Ethel Blair, in 
their skit, "The Piano Tuner," scored the 
laughing hit of the bill. O'Donnell car- 
ries the burden of the act and, with his 
comedy falls and tumbles, kept the an- 
dience in almost constant laughter. He 
made two remarkable falls from a "prop" 
piano and several others from a step lad- 
der. His finish brought the house "down." 
For this he placed the step ladder on the 
piano, sat on the top of it and did a 
teeter and fall to the stage. ODonnell 
is a quick worker and keeps the audience 
wondering what "fool' trick'' be is going 
to do next. 

Truly Shattuck and Emma CNeil, with 
their talk and songs, were hit getters of 
the first class. They have a good line 
of patter which they put over with tell- 
ing effect, and occasionally indulged in 
ad lib retorts which got laughs » and- ap- 

Slause. Miss Shattuck sang two songs, 
er partner one and, together, they ren- 
dered two more. 

Robert T. Haines, assisted by Violette 
Kimball Dunn and J. Malcolm Dunn, pre- 
sented "The One Way Out," an after the 
war playlet away from the ordinary. The 
skit tells the story of Olivia Hastings, 
whose husband Winthrop is with the Roy- 
al Flying Corps in France. Harry Bel- 
ding, a former friend of Winthrop, has 
won tbfi love of Olivia and they are about 
to cast their lot together in a trip to 
Monte Carlo when what is believed to 
be Hastings suddenly appears before them. 
When the wife and her lover learn that 
the husband has been in the room all the 
while they have been tasking each ex- 
pects him to shoot. Bnt he explains that, 
compared with the big tragedy of "No 
Man's Land," domestic tragedies are tri- 
fles and that the one way out is for him 
to return to Flanders. He then cautions 
Belding to do the right thing by Olivia 
and to take her to Monte Carlo as his 
wife. Hastings then sits in a chair (with 
its back to the audience). A telegram is 
brought in which announces the death of 
Hastings. Olivia and Belding look at the 
chair and, seeing it empty, realize that 
they have only seen his spirit. 

The sketch is well written and very 
convincingly played. 

The lively Trio, Slim, Klaiss and Saxe, 
in a musical act, were one of the big hits 
of the bill and stopped the show. .One of 
the men is an expert pianist. ' The other 
man plays well on the saxophone and 
violin and the woman sings. The act is 
well put together and capitally presented. 

Billie Burke's "Motor Boating" scored 
its usual success. 

Bert Williams was a big hit with his 
talk and songs and was obliged to take 
an encore, and the Mirano Brothers, with 
a flying torpedo act, closed the bill and 
held the andience. E. W. 



COLONIAL 

The audience did not enthuse aa thay 
generally do at the Monday aftaraooa 
performance, due to the fact that thai 
balmy weather gave them little pep. How- 
ever, the last half of the show went over 
in great style. Business was capacity. 

The pictures opened and were followed 
by Erford's Whirlwind Sensation, consist- 
ing of two ladies and a man. The male 
member sits in the center of an appara- 
tus and pedals the two ladies, ■jpssjjan' 
by their teeth, around In whirlwind fash- 
ion. Quite a few difficult feats were per- 
formed and they finiah, with bells at- 
tached to their feet and hands, through 
which they play a tune while , being 
whirled around, at great speed, .The act 
proved to be a good opener. 

Phina and her company of colored art- 
ists whooped things up, especially in the 
second half of the act, where well-execut- 
ed grotesque dancing by the youngsters 
brought forth real applause. The ballad 
in the early portion, and the comedy num- 
ber by Bill Bailey, brought a big hand. 
Phina is a marvel, considering the many 
years she has been doing this line of 
work, and seems to enjoy every moment 
she is on the stage. 

Wilfred Clark,. assisted by Grace Men- 
ken and two others, presented a domestis 
comedy playlet entitled "Reel Troubles" 
in which Clarke assumed the character of 
the husband who gets into trouble but 
finally, through some brilliant lines, dis- 
entangles himself. The skit is *a trifle 
too ta Iky and on more than one sssssstssh 
drags. The finish finds a happy ending. 

Ben Bernie did not get into stride un- 
til be played the violin, due to the time- 
worn material delivered. Some of the 
gags refer to the war and the andience 
seemed to want to forget all about the 
conflict. Bernie is a clever performer who 
knows the art of delivery, out is severely 
handicapped by his present routine. Ha 
- should have an author write bits for him 
that contain merit and when this is done 
he will score on any bill. 

Sheila Terry, assisted by Ben Bard and 
Gattison Jones, in "Three's a Crowd," by 
William B. Friedlander, is one of the 
classiest musical romances of the season. 
The theme is entirely new, with a musi- 
cal score that is perfect. Miss Terry is 
a splendid dancer, sings well, and pos- 
sesses much personality. Bard was in 
good voice and scored individually, while 
Jones uncovered a few steps that put him 
in the good graces of the audience. 

Gilbert and Friedland opened after in- 
termission with a wonderful budget of 
songs and surely banged out a hit, Tbe 
medley of old-time numbers were often 
interrupted by heavy applause. Fritrl 
Leighton assisted in two numbers and 
won appreciation. This team of song- 
writers are welcome in vaudeville at any 
time or place. 

Miss Juliet presented her "One Girl Re- 
vue," in which she impersonates stage 
celebrities, and most of the imitations 
brought forth sincere applause. The 
Grace La Rue and Harry Lauder bits were 
faithfully presented and little Miss Juliet 
only made her exit after giving three en- 
cores. 

Toney and Norman easily carried away 
the big hit of the show. ' It ssiims as tf 
the Colonial clientele was made to order 
for this team, as everything attempted 
met with hilarious laughter or thunderous 
applause. Taney's knot-kneed dance was 
a riot and a ballad by Miss Norman was 
excellently rendered. They were on view 
for more than thirty minutes and were 
permitted to depart only after delivering 
a speech of thanks. 

Mile. Daxie and Company, the latter in- 
cluding M Constantin Kobeleff, Ed. Janls 
and four pretty girls, followed. She is a 
wonderful dancer and has carefully se- 
lected her company, who dance to the de- 
light of all. The set is exquisite and the 
solo and ensemble numbers are well out 
on and expertly delivered. - J. D. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April?, .1919 




RIVERSIDE 

Howard's Spectacle, a trained dog and 
pony act, opened tbe show and, with some 
well- axe cnte<J tricks, started the bill off 
in exeellen t shape. 

James .and. Betty Morgan, in songs and 
instrumental selections, failed to score in 
a manner, commensurate with .their abil- 
ity, doe. to the poor arrangement of their 
material. . Que or two of the songs, ren- 
dered by. Miss. Morgan, are good and her 
partner, is * clever pianist, but the neces- 
sary: vim and snap so essential for an act 
of this description is absent. . Some new 
songs and a complete rearrangement of 
the material, seem necessary before the 
offering: will be in. good running order. 

The MaOetto. Sisters, in a variety of 
songs and dancas, did well in an early po- 
sition. The girls are attractive, dance 
excellently and sing well. Special scenery 
and attractive costumes help to make, of 
the act a' fina hit of entertainment. Lew 
Pollack played a number of popular selec- 
tions, one or two of which are of hia own 
composition, during the- costume changes, 
and contributed in no small degree to the 
act's snecesa 

Led Donnelly, who, according to his pro- 
gramme Balling, was the first professional 
entertainer to arrive in France for the 
A. E. F., told a number of war stories, 
recited a poem or two and devoted the 
rest of the time he was on to the prohi- 
bition question. Bis performance will be 
farther reviewed under New Acts. 

Amelia Stone and Annan Kalis, back in 
vaudeville for the first time after a two 
years*- absence v are showing a new act by 
Edgar Allan Wolf and Kaliz, entitled "A 
Song Romance-" It will be reviewed un- 
der New Acts. . 

George Whiting and Sadie Burt opened 
after taternrission and scored one of the 
big hits of the bill. It is always a pleas- 
ure to listen to songs rendered in the ar- 
tistic manner of this couple and, as their 
present! repertoire is one of the best they 
have offered hi several seasons, their act 
was particularly enjoyable. Published 
and special numbers have been selected 
with exeelleirt judgment and the songs, 
lyrically and musically, are gems. 

Frio kirn ArdeU, after a season with 
""the Crowded Hour,** is back in vaude- 
ville with hfs old sketch, "The Wife Say- 
ar," and the act, during its period of re- 
tirement, has lost none of its power to 
amuse. It* clever lines, many of which 
were impromptu, hit the mark with un- 
failing regularity and, judging' by its re- 
ception, ArdeU will have no need to look 
for a new vehicle for months to come. A 
look at the Ardell piece will convince the 
most skeptical critic that there still re- 
mains a big field in vaudeville for the well 
written, well played comedy sketch. 

lack Norworth, on next to closing, did 
excellently with one of the best song 
repertoires he has ever used. Most of his 
songs are of the published variety, but he 
has used such care in their selection and 
renders them so artistically that each one 
stands out like a little classic. The sing- 
ing waiter number, one of the few special 
eongs in his act, is a clever lyric describ- 
ing 4 waiter who combines his orders with 
the lyrics of the popular numbers he sings 
for his guests' entertainment. The "Pick- 
mninny/e Paradine" number is one of bis 
best songs, and rendered at the act's fin- 
ish brought him back for a half-dozen 
bows. One thing in the Nbrworth act, 
however, could, with advantage, be elimi- 
nated and that is the saxophone. It lies 
on the grand piano and after each song 
he picks it np as though he intended play- 
ing upon it. Each time he lays it back on 
the piano and goes into the next number. 
It means nothing in the act and Norworth 
does not need it to sustain interest. 

John Regay and the Lorraine sisters, 
in a fine repertoire of dances, closed the 
show. The act is well pat on and in spite 
of the lateness of the hour held the audi- 
ence in weQ until the final numbers. 

W. V- 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Continued from par* ») 



ALHAMBRA 

The bill for the current week waa voted 
excellent by the Monday night audience 
and- laughter and applause were the order 
of the evening. 

. : The Four Ishikawa Brothers presented 
thein hand equilibristic act and proved 
thmnaehrBa to he without superiors in their 
line. They perform a number of hand 
stand ti«i»Tii'ing feats which are remark- 
able. One of the beat of their stunts is 
performed, by one man -who, balancing 
himself on one hand at the top of 4 
flight of twelve steps, hops down on his 
one hand, to the stage. 

Harry Laughlin and Clara West offered 
their singing and dancing skit, "The Cafe 
Lonesome," and were decided favorites. 
They opened with a little talk, which they 
followed with a song and dance. An- 
other song by both gave way to a dance 
by Miss West, and then a dance by Laugh- 
lin. They closed with a song and dance. 
They are excellent dancers, T*ng.Vm 
being particularly adept in soft-shoe work. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mel-Burhe called their offer- 
ing "On the Fourth Floor," and in it 
prove to be real entertainers. The scene 
of the' sketch is enacted on the roof of 
the porch of the cottage of a' Mr. and 
Mrs. Younghuaband. They have fixed the 
roof np for sleeping in the open air and 
the scene shows a furnished room interior 
back of the porch. As the curtain rises 
the young wife is seen asleep in bed while 
the husband enters from the room. He 
has been to the dub, and what he did 
not drink there he brings home in bottles. 
In the course of his natter it is disclosed 
that he believes his wife is spending the 
week-end at her mother's, and he is cele- 
brating. When he discovers her, he en- 
- deavora to "square" himself, bat makes 
little headway. The entreats him to turn 
over a new leaf, and then threatens to 
divorce him. But both her pleadings and 
threats fall on deaf ears", and the skit 
ends with comedy, as it should. 

The sketch is well written and acted. 
Mel-Burne is capital as the tipsy husband. 
He does not carry it too far, and always 
keeps the characters well within the 
bounds of comedy. Mrs. Mel-Burne makes 
a pretty picture in pajamas, which show 
under a thin gown effect. She, too, acts 
well and does her full share in putting the 
skit over. 

Ward and King are capital dancers and 
fairly good- comedians. With one aa an 
English chappie and the other his Amer- 
ican friend, they start with talk which 
they follow with a song and a dance. 
They then do a couple more songs and 
dances, and one of the boys whistles a 
number excellently. They dance for the 
finish. Their act is well put together, 
most of their material is good and their 
work won them most hearty applause. 

Herman Timberg, assisted by Billy 
Abbott and five JeTming violin girls, 
scored heavily. Timberg and the girls are 
excellent dancers and their violin playing 
while they dance wins them much ap- 
proval. 

Marie Cob ill delighted 1 the audience 
with her work. She started with bits 
from some of her song hits of the past, 
and then gave a present-day song. This 
she followed with a telephone conversa- 
tion, and concluded her act with' songs. 
Miss Cabal's pleasing personality, as well 
as her artistry, brought her a well de- 
served and moat pronounced success. 

Willie Solar replaced BQry Rhodes, and 
pulled down such a hit that he waa called 
upon to take an encore. He sang four 
songs and gave a dance. 

Harry Green and company, in Green's 

new' act, "George Washington Cohen,'* 

found decided favor. (8ee "New Acts.") 

Samaroff and Soma closed the bill, and 

pleased. E. "W. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

Mabel Burke opened the show. A song 
booster in a box came in tor the chorus 
and Was compelled to take an encore. 

Jack- Morrissey and .Company are not . 
tbe kted of an act generally Been in first 
position; as the stage must be swept after 
they get through. Morrissey, assisted by 
another young man, found his spot easy to 
hold, however, and took a. big -hand. - He 
sjastan- with. gome whip-snapping and then 
went through a- series of ro pe -stunts, ■ with 
winch, he lassoed the. young man from va- 
rious difficult positions. He followed that 
up with an exhibition of' sharp-shooting 
and proved that he can' rank 'with the best 
of his kind. The', thrilling part of his 
»J»Mrag consisted of same hair-raising 
feats with the Australian stock-whip', with 
which he cut .a cigarette from his assist- 
ant's month, blew a scrap of paper from 
the young man's, hair and put out burning 
matches held in hia own hand. He kept 
up a .clever .line of patter during hia act 
and scored big. 

Lang and' Shaw found the going easy 
with their song cycle. They started at a 
fast pace with a jaas number and kept it 
all through their offering. Both boys an 
nifty jam manipulators and handle their 
numbers welL A ballad by the tenor was 
delivered in fine style and scored' big and 
was followed by a comedy Hebrew number 
by the other that went over very well, but 
would score much better if the one who 
rendered' it would announce that it wag 
an impersonation of Belle Baker, as it is 
one of her old number*. 

Leonard and WiUard are using the same 
skit they have used for the last few years. 
Leonard rendered bis song, well and -Miss 
Willard proved herself a capable comedi- 
enne. Together, they size up as a dandy 
team, with a good knowledge of showman- 
ship. w ■■■■-. 
"Cameron ' demons and Company also 
presented their sketch "Don't Lose Your 
Nerve*' with which they have been playing 
for sometime. The plot has not had any 
changes made in it, or, for that matter, 
shy' of tbe lines. The three take off their 
parts well and put over the offering for a 
generous band. 

Andrew Mack started his offering with 
a surprise piece of comedy and a telegram 
that did not get over very well. He then 
offered a song for the employment of re- 
turning soldiers and went into the rest 
of his cycle. Mack is assisted at the 
piano' by a young man who does his work 
fairly well. Most of his numbers consist 
of Irish songs and stories, all of which got 
a big hand; He rendered a song he wrote ^ 
for the Lamb's Gambol and did a dance 
which showed surprising agility for a man 
of his size and portliness. 
' Heider and Packer still retain the Book- 
Store act and, "as it' stands, one can't 
blame them. The patter around the book- 
stand ia unusually clever. In fact, it is a 
bit too devar for the average vaudeville 
audience. Header's eccentric dancing will 
some day land him among the foremost of 
his kind.' Miss Packer rendered her num- 
bers very well and makes a dandy straight. 
The "ghost" number showed that Heider 
is also a bit of a tumbler. 

Lou Holts started slowly and only dur- 
ing the latter part of his offering found 
. the going easy. He then worked- up one 
of tbe- biggest hands of the bill. His patter 
at the beginnine of his act' is poor in spots 
and needs a lot of improvement. The 
"blues** number and the parody on it is 
good and a number like it in the beginning 
of his offering would help some. Some 
comedy verselets at the end of the skit, de- 
livered with a unapiftated tin imitation of 
a guitar, registered a hit I or huh. . 

Davis and PeUe closed tbe show with 
their strong-man act The feats are thril- 
lers and done with style. . G. J. H. 



MAJESTIC 

(Chicago) 
. Nadje' opened the . p r ogra m hare . with 
some' livery iron jaw stunts and hand 
walking; • She possesses a form divine and 
displays an abundance of personality. She 
substituted for Jack and Kitty De Maco. 

Stromberg and Lerner, both recently 
discharged from the army, offered comedy 
songs that caught the house instantly. 

Violet Besson appeared in a gripping 
little story entitled "Maid of France," in 
which are introduced characters of the 
various Allies, which was enacted with 
perfection. ■'• . . 

Ames - and Winthrop and their various 
burlesque characters, won mnch laughter 
and, incidentally, cornered plenty -'rif ap- 
plause.' ■-' uevti n't ■;"-' .bsii. 

'Stanley and- Birnes -entertained 'with 
dances,' in which they appeared to be well 
versed. They are agile and dance in 
unison. 

Bessie Clayton, assisted by the Cansinoa, 
presented a series of dances of the recog- 
nized type. The revue is splendidly staged 
and the"' dancers proved themselves masters 
of their art. It is lively and not a dull 
moment is encountered. 

Henry Lewis was the undisputed hit of 
the bill. He is one of the most' enjoyable 
of comics ; hia gags are refreshing and his 
songs contain lines that are truly funny. 

The Barr Twins dosed with a refresh- 
ing interlude that contained songs and 
dances. H. F. R 



McVICKERS 

(Chicago) 

Frawley and West. started the proceed- 
ings with some excellent aerial -work that 
earned them a hearty round of applause. 

Fred Carberry and hia community sing- 
ing was greeted enthusiastically, the audi- 
ence chiming right . in. Everybody sang. 

Gosler and Lusby offered piano playing, 
singing and dancing. Theirs is an artistic 
act that will bear watching. 

Marie Fitigibbons was badly placed and 
should -have fared far better than she did. 
However, her monologue brims over with 
good, wholesome comedy matter and car- 
ries laughing tonic throughout. 

Bevan and Flint took, the hit bunting 
without much opposition. The man is ex- 
tremely funny and the lady proved to be an 
excellent foil. They offered talking and 
singing, intermingled with nutty antics. 

Beatrice McKenzie and Company did not 
fare as well as expected. Their singing 
and whistling proved a little too slow for 
the audience. 

Hudson and Jones brought to view a 
snappy offering that introduced a beauti- 
ful woman and a fast-working man. They 
sing and talk, handling both splendidly. 

Harry Mason and Company offered a 
comedy sketch that held the greater portion 
of the audience. The many funny lines 
and situations are handled ' in tip-top 
fashion. H. F. B. 



WELLER A CURRAN TEAM UP 
Charley Weller, who has been exploit- 
ing songs -for music publishers for the 
last fourteen years, has decided to for- 
sake the music game for. the time being, 
and baa formed a partnership with Mickey 
Curran. Harry 'Weber will handle the 
act, which will consist of singin g and 
talking, and which Weller and Curran 
will show for the first time at one of the 
local Proctor houses this week. 



DUNBAR STAGES TWO NEW ACTS 
Ralph Dunbar started two new produc- 
tions off last week. The first, "The Eight 
Rainbow Girls," opened in Chicago on 
Monday and will play around the western 
houses for a while before coming into New 
York. The second, "Dunbar's Ten Miss- 
issippi Misses,** will .open next week in 
the middle west. Both acts are elaborate 
affairs, each carrying several sets of scen- 

*!7v . : '_ .--.-• ' ■ : - V : .- -' 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



It 




STONE AND KALIZ 



Theatre — Riverside. 
Style — Singing playlet. 
Time — Twenty minute*. 
Setting — Special. 

Amelia Stone and Armand Kalis have 
selected for their vaudeville re-appear- 
ance a novel little playlet of aongs by 
Edgar Allen Woolf and Mr. Kalis called 
"A Song Romance." 

The song is "When I Found Ton," 
and with it the act begins and ends and 
around it is woven the story of romance 
of the yonng couple. 

The act opened disclosing a dimly 
lighted, artistically arranged stage set- 
ting, with KsJiz seated reading a book 
on romance. From' its printed pages he 
read alond and asked "What is Ro- 
mance?" 

The rear drop parted and through it 
Miss Stone appeared and sang for her 
first number the tuneful song telling of 
the romance of the toys. A costume 
change transformed her to a pretty 
country maid and with Mr. Kails ren- 
dered a melodious duet. This was fol- 
lowed by a marriage number called "A 
Band of Gold," ending with a well acted 
bit which told of romance's end after 
marriage. 

Next Mr. Kalis sang a medley of the 
American song hits in French, aa they 
were song In France after the arrival 
of the American troops. 

A duet arrangement of "When I 
Found You" closed the act to great ap- 
plause. 

Paul Parnell, an accomplished pianist, 
-furnished the accompaniments- for the 
songs, all of which were rendered in fine 
vocal style and in a manner so quaint 
and artistic as to make them a delight. 
Finely mounted, filled with melodious 
numbers, rendered tat . a way which left 
nothing to be desired, the new Stone and 
Kaliz act is one of vaudeville's most ar- 
tistic offerings. W. V. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



(riiiillniswl go page U> 



LEXEY AND ROME 

Theatre— Eighty-First St. 
Style— Dancing. 
Time— Eight Minute*. 
Setting— One. 

These two neat appearing boys open 
with a song and then swing into the 
main part of their tarn, soft shoe danc- 
ing. 

The smaller of the two handles the 
comedy end and gets laughs through 
some peculiar antics resembling the 
German "goose" step. After singles by 
each of the men, the two reappear for a 
rapid fire finish and the taller one rides 
off stage on the back of the smaller. 
Despite the early position at this thea- 
tre the pair made a hit and had to take 
several bows. 

It is a very difficult thing to put an 
act of this kind over on the merit of 
the- dancing alone and the two boys 
' could work out the comedy part - to a 
Httle better advantage. The ram Is 
billed as "Silence and Fun." J. L. 



LEO DONNELLY 

Theatre — Riverside. 

Style — Stories: 

Time — Fifteen minute*. 

Setting — 1st one. •*' 

Leo Donnelly, just returned from 
France, where for nearly a year he en- 
tertained the American soldiers, baa a 
new act, the greater .part of which, he 
stated, was collected from the stories 
and sayings of soldiers. 

If the statement 'referred to the last 
h«if of the act; there Is a wonderful 
amount of good material to be found 
with the boys tn Fiance for one or two 
of the stories and recitations are gems. 
The first portion of his act, however, 
dealing with prohibition, the spirit of 
'76, the statue of Liberty, Bryan and 
other bits of lifce nature, may have 
amused the doughboys, but it seems 
doubtful. In any event, it won't do for 
Americas vaudeville and the sooner the 
entire first half Qf the offering is elimi- 
nated the quicker Donnelly will get his 
act into working order. 

The first half of the act slowed down 
to almost nothing, but picked up quickly 
. as soon as Donnelly got into the war 
portion. The stones of the 77 th Divi- 
sion were keenly enjoyed and the recita- 
tion of "I*sy Cohen of Hester Street" 
brought the act to a successful con- 
clusion. W. V. 

ALICE E1S 

Theatre — Palace. .. 

Style — Dancing. 
BaM Fift een minute*, ' ' 
Setting— Special. 

Alice Bis, seen in a half dozen or more 
dancing acta, has a new one to which she . 
is assisted by James Templeton. The 
offering, which is far and away the best 
in which Miss Eis has appeared, is a 
remarkably well put on/ effort and inter- 
esting from start to finish. . . 

It opens with the appearance of Tem- 
ple ton. who, before an artistic drop, 
sans; "tBmm U. S. A." Be is joined in 
the chorus by Miss Bis and a neatly 
done dance finished the number. 

A change to full stage folloajted where 
with an artistic Chinese setting, an ex- 
cellently executed dance in beautiful 
Chinese costumes was given. At its con- 
clusion, Templeton again appeared be- 
fore the drop in one and did his mechan- 
ical toy dance, one of the features of the 
performance. 

Another change to fall stage was then 
mad,e, where a crystal dance. was given 
by 'Miss Eis. The final portion of this 
number was done in a violet spot light 
and, in the shadow, Templeton, in dark 
costume, followed her steps in spectre- 
like manner. This number was partic- 
ularly effective and brought a dancing 
act of much value to a fitting ending. 

W. V. 



EDDIE HEALEY 

Theatre— Proctor** 58th St. 

Style — Songs, stories and piano playing. 

Time — -Sixteen minute*. 

Setting— Tico. 

Eddie Healey has a sweet singing 
voice which he uses to excellent advan- 
tage in five or six vocal numbers. He 
opens with a song at the piano. 

His first song, a prohibition ditty 
with very funny lyrics, gives him a fly- 
i ing start. The next number, an Irish 
song, is followed by several stories, re- 
flated In a' pleasing conversational man- 
- ner. ' 

Healey baa an attractive personality 
large city. The turn was a laughing 
dot at the Greenpoint- It is ready for 
the big time, right now. H. E. 



BRICKLAYERS 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Trained dog*. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting — Special. 

Leon Gautier has put together a real 
novelty in the trained animal style of 
act. The opening scene is that of an 
uncompleted building and a half dozen 
dogs, 'in the guise of laborers, perform 
a number of excellent bits of work. 
Ladders are mounted, building material 
hoisted to the upper floors and other in- 
teresting bits performed.' 

An inebriate dog furnished the comedy 
and got a number of laughs by his really 
clever performance. An effective finish 
to the act was introduced in the shape 
of two swinging platforms, with the 
dogs leaping from one to the other. 

W. V. 



CAMERON CLEMENS & CO. 

Theatre— Eighty-First St. 
Styto — Comedy Playlet. 
Time — Twelve Minutes. 
Setting— Boa, *» Two. - - 

.The act. opens in the office of a big 
business man who is about to swing an 
advertising campaign for a chain of 
united grocery stores, involving $2,000,- 
000. After dictating letters to bis 
stenographer, the business man goes into 
another office and Billy Goodwin comes 
in to visit' the stenographer, and, inci- 
dentally, to get a j<jb with the concern. 
Because Goodwin is inclined to. stutter 
-and be shy, the stenographer tells him 
not .to lose his nerve when he faces the 
boss. 

When the business man comes, in 
again Goodwin tries to- ask for a poai- 
- tion, but "beats around the bush" co 
much that he is finally ordered from the. 
place. ' The stenographer then h ands 
him back his engagement ring. AfBp 
talking the matter over, Goodwin ■*% 
cides to "beat up" the dealer tat g»o- 
caries and he thus get* the business 
man's attention, when he threatens to 
sign with a rival organisation, also 
about to swing an advertising deal in 
groceries. Goodwin is then hired at a 
salary several times larger than he ex- 
pected. 

The part of the hnsineaa man Is 
played by Harry' Hubbard and the 
•teaxawaaher by Ivy Benton. J. L. 

KEEGAN AND O'ROURKE 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Style— Talking, Singing. Dancing. 
Time— Twelve Minutes. 
Setting— One. _. 

■ill torn, of the flirting variety, 
starts slowly, the man appearing in 
dress suit, soused, and saying a few lines 
about the new prohibition law. The 
woman meets him on - the street and 
they drift into a song after a little 
cross-fire conversation. This is followed 
with songs by each of the pair and some 
stepping by "the man, the latter of a 
mediocre quality. The team doea well 
with the songs and the pleasing person- 
ality of the girl and the unsuggertive 
manner in which she does a shlmme 
dance with her partner, easily carries 
. the act over. 

The reception given this act by the 
Greenpointers last Wednesday after- 
noon was a little chilly until toward the 
last of the turn. A re-arrangement of 
the material and the introduction of 
some sure-fire gags is needed. J. L. 

THREE KASHNER SISTERS 

Theatre — if t. Vernon. 
Style— Singing and Dancing. 
Time — Twelve Minutes. 
Setting — In one. ' 

These three girla all bear enough re- 
semblance' to one another to call them- 
selves sisters, even if they are not, and 
start with short white "kid" dresses 
and thin wreaths binding their hair. 
They opened with a "Remember" num- 
ber, in which the three took part. " A 
dance by two of the girls followed, but 
showed' only mediocre ability. 

The act -followed the routine of a 
song by one and a dance by the two 
others and went on for four numbers 
in that manner. The girls should try 
to sing together as much as possible, 
rather than do solos, as the one who 
delivers the solo is not the possessor 
of even a fair voice. The dancing was 
good in spots, but they'll have to crowd 
in more spots, as there were very few 
of them. G. J. H. 



SHERMAN'S JAZZ BEAUS 



Theatre — Greenpoint. 

Style — Donoer and Joss Band. 

Time — Twenty-two min utes. . - 

Setting — Full stage. " ' . 

.. The, act opens wifb. a i jass overture by 
the. band! which consists of fly* lively 
young fellows who play . raggy melodies 
in up-to-date fashion and whose gjre- 
. tions ' while performing are quite aa 
wildly eccentric as the peculiar rhythms 
of tap music they specialise in. 

The boys wear plum colored suits 
-.topped, off with brown derbies. The 
costuming la attractive and- possesses the 
flash that is quite in keeping with the 
cabaret stuff offered. The Instruments 
used in the opening overture are violin, 
cornet, . banjo-mandolin, piano and 
drama. The cornet player toots with 
his hat over the opening of his horn, 
producing. a subdued jnssy effect that Is 
odd and highly enjoyable., . « .. 

The hand is found in various uncon- V 
ventional positions at the start, the ; 
cornettst reposing on the floor, etc They ■' 
can make all of the noises that any of . 
their contemporaries can produce and a 
'few' that sound new in addition. ' Attar 
'the overture,' Shirley Sherman .offers a 
dance number. This is a waits and la 
well done. The band plays the Inci- 
dental music for the waits, and does it . 
excellently. Then the band plays an- 
other jass selection, the const player, 
banjoist and violinist exchanging their 
instrument* for saxophones for this 
number. 

For an encore, the "saxophone trio 
' plays a pretty' ballad, In' the rendition of 
which some effective close harmony 
figures prominently. The band, with the 
cbrnetish playing a saxophone and the 
other four playing violin, piano, drams . 
. . and banjo respectively, then nft up an 
old time song and dance tune. 
'Two of the boys then get busy and 
Illustrate the song and dance selection 
with a few lively steps. Shirley Sher- 
man then comes on the scene once more 
and puts on an Egyptian dance, which ' 
later turns Into a Spanish dance. This 
went over for a deserved hit. . Miss , 
Sherman slips in a few wriggles here 'and 
there, but there is nothing in the dance 

that can be considered in the slightest 
way offensive. The costuming ' of the 
Egyptian-Spanish number is particularly 
effective. A selection by the band, 
bringing into play harp-guitars . and 
guitar-mandolins, was well liked.' The 
bunch put over a Hawaiian number 
while playing the odd-strioged instru- 
ments that was all to the good. The 
finish,' with the band suspended on wires 
a la Collins & Hardt, is a novelty. The 
turn is up to date in every particular 
and can string along with the best of 
their competitors. It is a big time offer- 
ing in every sense of the word. H. EL 



LANDER BROS. 

Theatre- — C/reenpoint. 

Style — Comedy Talking Act. 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting— One. 

Lander Brothers, a two-man combina- 
tion of straight and tramp, offer a talk- 
ing act that is sure-fire. The tramp is 
a wonder, handling comedy lines and 
business in a manner that compares 
more than favorably with any of the 
tramp comlques of the past and puts 
the majority of the present day hobo 
characterizations in the also-ran class. 

There are one or two veterans is the 
routine, bat, as handled by Lander 
Bothers, they are made to seem new. 
The tramp's make-up is particularly 
good, and the type that he presents is 
easily recognisable as a real life pro- 
duct of the lodging bouse section of any 
and should work bis way up the ladder 
very quickly. He has the goods. 

H. E. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 9, 1919 



VMC/ 




WILLIAM GREW AND CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd St. 

Style— Comedy Playlet. 
Tim.* — Fourteen Minutes. 
Setting— Full Stage. 

In this comedy sketch William Grew, 
in the role of the cynical head of a " 
pork and bean concern, does eome g< 
work. The rest of the cast la not quite 
up to standard, although they do fairly 
good work in apoto. The playlet de- 
viates very little from the usual run of 
such sketches. The part just before 
the climax was not forcefully rendered 
and the finish was a rather common- 
place one. The'. offering is a good one 
for the small time. Grew should sur- 
round himself with a good cast and get 
a better vehicle. He could, reach the 
better house* then. 

At the start, Connors, general assist- 
ant in the office of the big pork and 
bean plant, and the girl who runs the 
office, are seen. The owner, a Mr. 
Harding, then appears. He flatly re- 
fuses to give his son, who comes on, 
any more money and offers him a posi- 
tion at The Bottom" at $15 per week. 
The youth is indignant and tries to in- 
terest his father in a "sure thing" he 
has in a venture In Wall Street. His 
father is obdurate and refuses to listen 
to the story. The young man goes out 
and . secures 450,000 on his father's 
name. Instead of cleaning up a few 
million, as the audience expected, how- 
ever, the total sum is lost. 

The girl who runs the office and is in 
love with her employer/a mo, offers to 
give him her savings to make up the 
deficit and have the youth pardoned. 
Connors also comes to the rescue, but 
the offers are refused. The son returns 
and is given a long lecture, after which 
Harding walks out. One of the young 
man's lady friends then appears and in- 
sists that he marry her, as he promised 
to do at one time. He alleges he was 
intoxicated at the time. She steals a 
pork and bean formula worth $50,000. 

Harding then enters, and accuses his 
son. The real thief comes back and it 
develops that the formula was not 
genuine, but just used to test the hon- 
esty of the office force. The older 
Harding then buys the girl, who inaista 
on marrying his son, off. The young 
man then eagerly accepts a position in 
his father's establishment at the orig- 
inal 915 per week. Before the curtain 
falls, Harding remarks, "The girl hasn't 
such a bad shape after all." It is good 
for a laugh at the finish. 

The story, aa a whole, is incongruous 
and ridiculous. It serves fairly well as 
a comedy vehicle because of some well 
written tinea in it. The plot, however, 
is very poor. L S. 

DIXIE NORTON 

Theatre — Keith'e Jersey Oityi 

Style — Singing and talking. 

Time — Twelve minute*. 

Setting— Special. 

Dixie Norton is presenting a single 
singing and talking act and scoring a 
success with it. 

She ia a capable performer, presents 
a neat appearance and sings and talks 
cleverly.' With more work she should 
be ready to step in on a big true bill 
and hold her own. She uses a special 
setting that lends class to her offering 
and her material is in keeping with her 
ability. At this house she found the 
going much to her liking. Miss Norton 
aa a single performs just as well as she 
did in her previous acts. 

She started with some singing, de- 
livering a number of popular tunes of 
which a wedding song stood out. Then 
came the talking, in which she delivered 
a sort of monologue. A number of songs 
concluded and all were given a good ren- 
dition. I. S. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



(Contmasd from Page 11) 



HARRY GREEN AND CO. 

Theatre — Ut. Vernon. 
Style— Comedy Playlet. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — Three (special). 

Harry Green recently promised his 
audience a new offering that would ' be 
better than the "Cherry Tree," but, 
while th is playlet, written by Aaron 
Hoffman, contains a laugh in every line, 
it is not quite' as good as the George 
Washington Cohen Skit. 

The scene is laid at the gates of 
Heaven, where St. Peter is sitting at 
a desk talking to a young lady in an' 
evening gown. He tells her that her 
record ia too bad to allow of her ad- 
mission to Heaven and gives her a red 
Blip to admit her to the devil's abode. 
She takes an elevator down to the lower 
regions and Peter telephones the devil 
to make room for her. 

The elevator then rises and George 
Washington Cohen, his derby and um- 
brella still with him, arrive. He ap- 
proaches Peter and aaks for! bis pass. 
Peter aaks him bow be died and Cohen 
tells him he was murdered by a fifty- 
cent dinner. Peter starts to look . up 
Cohen's record when Cohen exclaims, 
"You're only an office boy here; let me 
see the boss." 

. Peter then asks him to tell of what 
he . did while on earth and to tell the 
truth, absolutely. He tells Cohen that, 

if he lies, the big star on the gates of 
Heaven will have a red light and if he 
ia telling the truth, it will flash white. 
Cohen begins to talk and the light con- 
tinually Hashes red. 

The comedy in the part, with Green's 
acting, is a riot of laughs. Peter asks 
him if he was a good American and to 
repeat the words of the "Star Spangled 
Banner" as a test. Cohen does not 
know them. 

Finally, Peter gives Cohen a red tic- 
ket to admit him to the devil's ball. 
Cohen pleads with him and tells Peter 
that be is too bard, that he does not 
know what temptation la, meanwhile de- 
scribing the corner of 42nd Street and 
Broadway on a windy day. After his 
pleading, Peter relents and gives him a 
white ticket to admit him to Heaven. 
Peter describes the interior of Heaven 
and Cohen's enthusiasm begins to weak- 
en. Just as he is about to go in, the 
woman arrives back in the elevtor, and 
tells Peter that the devil wouldn't have 
her, as ahe was too bad. She then 
tells Cohen what a good woman she was 
and the light begins to flash red. She 
goes on lying however, unconscious of 
the fact that Cohen ia looking at the 
light while he says "Believe me, I be- 
lieve yon." 

Finally, Peter goes away for a minute 
and Cohen takes her red pass and gives 
her his white one, for which he geta a 
kiss. She then goes into ■ Heaven and 
Peter returns, thinking that the woman 
has returned to hell. He asks Cohen 
why he has not gone to Heaven and 
tells him his wife is waiting anxiously 
for him. Cohen then asks a few ques- 
tions about his wife and decides to go 
to helL 

The playlet is a scream from the start, 
especially the parts with the red and 
white lights. The finiahing lines, bow- 
ever, are weak, in fact the entire closing 
needs strengthening. With that reme- 
died. Green will find bis new vehicle 
as easy going as the "Cherry Tree." 

G. J. H. 



BARBOUR AND LYNN 

Theatre— Proctor", 125th St. 
Style — Songs, talk and dancing. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

Barbour and Lynn, a man and 
woman, the former impersonating a rube 
and the latter doing a kid part, have 
sufficient ability to warrant their being 
. placed upon one of the small time cir- 
cuits. The girl ia somewhat tall- for her 
part and the man could improve his part 
somewhat, but the big fault lies in the 
material. They should know that no 
performer nowadays can get away with 
the timeworn "I shall undress' yon this 
evening, ladies and gentlemen," and sim- 
ilar veterans of vaudeville. The talking 
includes a great deal of old material, 
while some of it has been rehashed and 
- is fed out - as new. The dancing was 
well done and the singing showed talent. 
. They started with a rube song, after 
which the lady member of the dno sang 
a kid song. The monologue by the man 
followed and the crowd fell for some of 
it. He followed with a solo on a string 
instrument consisting of a box, finger- 
board and the strings. He used a violin 
bow and produced some fairly pleasant 
sounds upon the contraption. Another 
kid song by the woman was followed by 
a clog dance by the man. There was a 
bit of dialogue, after which came a clog 
dance together that was well done. 

I. S. 



REEDER AND ARMSTRONG 

Theatre — Proctor 1 * 58<k Hi. 

Style — Double piano act. ■•••/.. ,"i 

Time — Bimteen minutes. 

Setting — Two. 

Beeder and Armstrong, two men clad 
in evening dress, start their act off with 
a piano duet played on a pair of baby 
grands. The two pianos on the stage 
give the act a touch of novrlty. The 
idea may have been suggested by "The 
Pianopbienda," an act which played the 
big houses with conspicuous success sev- 
eral years ago. 

The piano playing in the Keeder and 
Armstrong act is the sort of stuff that 
will go over on either the big or small 
time. The boys work with plenty of 
speed, a feature of their offering that 
helps them immeasurably. Following 
the duet, the boys render several comic' 
songs, playing their own accompani- 
ments. The finish, consisting of a raggy 
medley, preceded by a solo that intro- 
duces a pretty chime effect, sends them 
off to a real applause hit. The act is 
novel and should find plenty of work, 
as it has practically no competitors in 
its line. Excellent number for an early 
spot on big time. H. B. 



GRACE GEORGE TO SAIL 

Grace George will sail for London on 
May 1st, from where she intends to go 
to Peris. 



WHITE AND BRADFORD 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th Street. 

Style — Black-face. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

■ This team, a colored man and woman, 
use the 'extra blacking. The woman of 
the duo is a marvel and baa more than 
one of the audience still wondering about 
her sex. 

They offered a number of songs and 
comedy. The woman costumed in comi- 
cal dresses and acted exactly like a man 
doing a "nance" act. She had the writer 
fooled. The team should get some better 
comedy material to fit their capabilities. 
Their voices are the typical negro tenor 
type and the songs were delivered 
nicely. The encore they rendered should 
be put in earlier in the act. ' G. J. H. 



ARTHUR STRANGE AND CO. 

Theatre— Harlem Opera Bote, 
Stylo— Sketch. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — Full stage. 

This offering ia one that contains a 
punch and the jab ia not concealed 
either. 

The curtain rises on Senator Winter*, 
seated at a desk in his study. The time 
is near midnight. The Senator is await- 
ing the arrival of a burglar, whom his 
valet has overheard plan to rob the 
house. While he is sitting then, the 
phone rings and he answers it. "X Wwb- 
. paper reporter by the r name of Mazley 
is on the other end and tells the Senator 
that a report had been phoned to the 
paper that the Senator's house has been 
robbed and the Senator killed. The 
Senator aaks the reporter to come up to 
the boose, which Marley does. 

The Senator then tells him what his 
valet haa overheard. Midnig ht arrives 
and Winters says, "Well, I guess he 
won't come." 

The reporter then pulls out a gun and 
says he is the burglar. He forces Win- 
ters to go to a safe, but just aa be is 
about to open it, the valet enters with 
a gun and holds Marley up. 

The Senator shouts, "Well done!" 
and strikes Marley across. the face. Aa 
he does so, Marley'a coat flies open and 
two medals bx« seen pinned on his vest. 
Winters examines them and finds one is 
a Croix de Guerre and the other a Dis- 
tinguished Service Cross. 

He asks Marley how he got them and 
the latter tells him at Ohatean-Thierry 
and the Argonne. The Senator then In- 
quires, as to how he, a decorated soldier, 
became a thief, and Marley replies he is 
not a thief, but that he ia starving. Be 
tells of his condition and of what he 
claims ia the condition of other returned 
soldiers. He maintained that Congress 
has 'passed a bill to pay for all war 
supplies, i and that; -while the profiteers 
are getting theirs, the real war supplies, 
soldiers and sailors, were left to what- 
ever might happen to them. He said 
that he came up, not with the purpose, 
of stealing, but to ask the Senator to 
introduce a bill In Congress that would 
provide for .soldiers and others dis- 
charged from service, before the profit- 
eers received a cent. 

"What good are the wonderful wel- 
comes, we get," he cried. "The people's 
hearts are full and our stomachs 
empty." 

The valet was in teara by now and 
dropped the gun. Marley stopped his 
narrative, grabbed the revolver, and 
made them both put up their hands. 
Here the whole playlet weakened. He 
told them that he really was Marley 
the reporter and never had been a sol- 
dier. He said that he meant, every 
word he told them about the condition 
of the soldiers, and the only way he 
could meet the Senator and bring out 
hia point was to follow the method he 
did. The steiAtar then said that he had 
learned his lesson and would introduce 
the' bill the next day. 

The end should be strengthened to 
conform with the rest of the sketch and 
make a better finish. G. J. H. 



GENE IRWIN 

Theatre— Proctor** 126th Street. 
Style — Singing. 
Time — Eleven minute*. 
Setting — In one. . 

Gene Irwin ia a blonde who presents 
a fairly pleasing appearance but should 
find a better manner of delivering her 
numbers. Her act consists of a number 
of ordinary songs heard in the popular 
houses and needs more life. With a 
little more pep, the offering may get on 
the small time. G. J. H. 



April 9, 1919 



TH^fl^6lt y cl^^^ 



13 




In US by Frank Queasa 

Published ty the 
CUPPER CORPORATION 



Frederick C Mailer.... 

Oriaad W. Vanglian... .President end 3 e t,r e t s r/ 

1604 Broadway. New York 
Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN. EDITOR 
Faol C Sweinhart, Managing Editor 



NEW YORK, APRIL 9, 1919 



Entered June 24. 1879. at the Poet Office et 
New York. N. Y-, aa wcond claw matter, un- 
der the ict of March 3, 1179. 

THE CUPPER is issued every WEDNESDAY. 
'^ymi Close on -Monday at IP, K, 

«jsa ? ' surs^3upth»S.,'v v ;. 

One year, in advance, $4 ; six months. $2; 
three months. $1. Canada and foreign postafe 
extra. Single copies will be seat, " postpaid, on 

receipt off 10 cents. 

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 

Chicago Office — Room 314, 35 S. Dearborn St. 

Hasst F. Rosa, Majuqsb. 

.Address All Communicationa to 
... THE NEW YORK CUPPER 
MM Broadway. New York 

Ktgiuercd CmbU Addmt. "AuTitonrr." 

Trb Curat*, can as ostaihkd wbolhals ajts 
■stah, at our agents, Doringe American Newt 
Agency, 17 Green Street. Charing Crass Road, 



ondon, W. C, England; Brcntano's News De- 
POpe 

! I 

Australia. 



Sot, 37 Avenue de rOpera, Paris, Franca: Gor- 
on & Gotch, 123 -l'itt Street, Sydney, N. & W.. 
Australia. ' 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. MAN- 
AGEMENT. CIRCULATION. ETC.. RE- 

8UIRED BY THE ACT OF CONGRESS 
P AUGUST 24. 1912. 
01 New Yqaa Cbirraa, pnbliahed weekly at New 
York, N. Y., for April 1, 1919. 
State of New York 1 „, 
County of New York J 

Before n\e. a Notary Public, id and for the 
State and county aforesaid, personally appeared 
Orland W. Vingban, who, having been duly 
swora according to law, deposes and says that 
he is the Editor of the New Yoax Curraa. and 
that the following is, to the best of his knowledge 
sod belief, a true statement of the ownership, 
management (and if a daily paper, the circula- 
tion), etc, of the aforesaid publication for the 
date shown in the sbovs caption, required by 
the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in section 
443, Postal 1-awa and Regulations, printed on 
the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the pub- 
lisher, editor, managing editor, and business 
managers are: 

Publisher. Clipper Corporation. 1604 Broadway, 
New York City. 

Editor: Orland W. Vsugbsn. 1604 Broadway. 
New York City. _ „. ■ , .^ 

Managing Editor! Paul. C Sweinhart. 1604 
. Broadway. New York City. ■"'••• 

Business Managers: None. ■ 

2. That the owners are: (Give name .and ad- 
dresses of individual owners, or, if a' corporation 
give its name and the names and addresses of 
stockholders owning or holding 1 .per cent or 
more of the total amount of stock): 

Clipper Corporation, 1604 Broadway, New 

Orland W. Vaughan. 1604 Broadway, New 

Frederick C. Muller. 1604 Broadway. New 
York City. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, 
snd other security holders owning or holding 1 
per cent or more of total amount of bonds, 
mortgages, or other securities, are: (If. there are 
none, so state): None. ■• ■ 

4. That the two' paragraphs not above, giving 
the names of the owners, stockholders, and se- 
curity holders, if any, contain not only the list 
of stockholders snd security holders aa they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company, but also, tn 
cases where the stockholder or security balder 
appears upon the hooka of the company aa trus- 
tee or in any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such trus- 
tee is acting, is given; also thst the said, two 
paragrapha contain statements embracing affiant s 
foil knowledge and belief aa to the circumstances 
snd condition, under which stockholders and se- 
curity holder* who do not appear neon the books 
of the company aa trustees, hold stock snd se- 
curities in • capacity other than thst of s bons 
fide owner; and this tfiint hae no reason to 
believe that any other person, aesodation or 
corporation has sny Interest direct or indirect in 
the said stock, bonds, or other securities than aa 
so listed by him. . 

5. That the average number of copies of each 
issue of this publication sold or d istribute d, 
through the mails or otherwise, to paid sunserfb- 
era during the six montha preceding the date 

shown above is (This Information » 

required from dally publications only.) 

OauuiD W. Vauojiasj. 

Editor. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 1st 
day of April, 1919. . 
- i sialI J. BaaaTAaa Ehcxish. 

i"«a.j Notary Public- N. Y. Co. JO}. 

(My commission expires March 31,' 1921.) 



AN ACHIEVEMENT 

The fact that the Society of American 
Singers, Inc., which will close it* twenty- 
nine week season of opera at the Park 
Theatre, April 14, made money, is truly 
remarkable. For, in* recent years, no ma- 
jor operatic organization in New York 
has finished giving opera here with a 
profit. 

And, though the organization about to 
close at the Park presented opera comlque 
for the most part, it can truly be called 
a major organization, its roster of prin- 
cipals including many whose names are 
identified with the Chicago and Metro- 
politan organizations. 

How they managed to make money is 
no mystery.' 'But it ia significant. To 
begin with, the stars who appeared in 
the various operas did so on a co-oper- 
ative basis. They received a certain 
amount of money for their expenses, but 
took chances with the management on 
earning something above their expenses 
in proportion to the amount of patron- 
age their appearance brought. The 'plan 
was conceived and fostered by William 
Wade Hln&haw, president of the organi- 
zation, and the fact that the engage- 
ment will show a profit is a tribute to 
his management. 

In the light' of his success, it would not 
be at- all surprising to find Oscar Ham- 
merstetn, now reported to be getting 
ready to resume his erstwhile operatic ac- 
tivities, following the same plan and, at 
last,' making- some money for his pains in 
the field of grand opera. 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Edward F. Albee sailed for Europe. 

The People's Theatre, Minneapolis, was 
opened. 

James Owen O'Connor died in the Mor- 
ris Plains Asylum. 

Harry Fiddler played Toni with Gris- 
wold'a D. T. C. Co. 

Maze Edwards was manager of Frank 
Hall's Casino, Chicago. 

James B. Mnckin was 'starring in 
"Grimes' Cellar Door." 

Lillian, Russell appeared in "OironVGiro- 
fla" at the Casino, New York. ' 

George H. Nicolai was the manager of 
Exposition Music Hall, Milwaukee. 

Eddie Shayne was with the "Skipped 
by the Light of the Moon" Company. 

"Sucking Cider Thro' a Straw*' was is- 
sued by the White Smith Music Company. 

The Central Opera House, Music Ball, 
New York, was opened with Leopold 
Fuenkenateen, as manager. 



Answers to Queries 



J. M.— Edward Locke wrote "The Cass 
of Becky." 

K. It. — Charles Frohmavn produced 
"Please Help Emily." 

M. D. — Nat Morton, was with the Army 
and Navy Girls in 1017. 

M. Z. — B. F. Kahn operates the stock 
company at the Union Square Theatre. 

J. M. B. — Ed. Gringas does a cannon 
ball juggling and heavy weight lifting act. 

G. N. — Richard Sterling was a member 
of the cast of "Fair and Warmer" In 
1916. 



H. A. C. — Ada Meade made her debut 
in stock in June, 1917, in "The Prince of 
Pflsen." 



P. T.— The act called "The Australian 
Woodchoppers," opened with the Ringling 
Brothers' Circus on April 1, 1917. 

G. E. M.— "In the Shade of the Old Ap- 
ple Tree" is published by Jerome H. Rem- 
ick ft Co. It was first issued in 1905. 



K. H. — James and Bonnie did not play 
at the theatre you mention that week. 
Tbey were out of the bill because of Al- 
ness. 



B. L— Edouard De Bsssks, the Polish 
bass singer, made his New York debut 
on Dec 14, 1891, in "Romeo and Juliette." 

X Y. Z.— You must sign your name to 
all communications, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good 
faith. 




L. L. — Denman Maley and Olive Reeve- 
smith, members of the "Very Good Ed- 
die" Company, were married on Oct. 10, 
1918, in Boston. , 



B. D.— Mrs. Sarah Ann Stetson was 
known, professionally, on the coast, as 
Fannie Ward. She died in November, 
1917, at Seattle. 



Old. Timer.— "The Tragic Mask" was 
produced in Boston in September, 1891. 
Harry Brunelle managed the Gaiety, Que- 
bec, at that time. 

H. J.— Mary Lee Wertheimsr wrote the 
J a p anese comic opera, . "The Romance of 
Etk." The title of the piece was later 
changed to "Note" 

N. S. — Eddie Leonard's real name is 
Lemuel Toney. He is no relative of Ben- 
ny Leonard, the pugilist, whose real name 
is Benjamin Leiner. 



J. N. — Fritxi Scheff, now appearing faj 
"islorianna," which is now on the road. 
Ycu can. find out where the show is play- 
ing by consulting the Routs List. 

J. A. T. — There are a number of Gar- 
rick Theatres in the United States. State 
specifically to which house you refer, and. 
we wiQ try to give you the information- 

D. P. — William Fox produced "Love and 
Hate." It was a five-reel picture and fea- 
tured Bertha Kalich. May Murrillo wrote 
the scenario and James Vincent directed 
it. It was a problem play. Stuart Holme* 
was also featured. 

M. P.— The Cook and Wilson Circus, 
scheduled to play in Albany in August, 
1918, was forced to cancel by the. authori- 
ties, who took the step, as a precautionary 
measure agalnat infantile paralysis, which 
was raging at the time. ' 

O. M.— W., A, Brady produced' the film 
called ."The Heart of a Hero" in 1916. 
It was released on November, 5th of that 
year by the World. ' Frances Marion wrote 
the scenario. It was a .melodrama writ- 
ten around the life of Nathan Hale. 



THEATRICAL MYSTERY NO. 37 

. Waterbury vaudeville audience*— and 

what makes 'em that way. 

VAUDEVILLE PROVERBS HO. 7 

The early bird, in addition to his worm 
eating accomplishments, also goto first 
crack at the orchestra on rehearsal days. 

MORE TRUTH THAN POETRY 
Jack and Jill went to Union *"», 
Booked by Keith for a "show," 
But the act fell down, 
Now they're back in town, 
Trying to land with Loew. 

QUITE A DIFFERENCE 

A Western movie .-man is out with an 
announcement that he has invented a 
picture that can do everything, ♦■Hndhtf 
talk. Must be considerably different from 
the . old time talking pictures, which, if 
we remember rightly, could do every- 
thing bnt talk 

ALMOST BUT HOT QUITE 

The. Greenwich. Village Players are set- 
ting ready to stage a new play, called 
"Shakantula," written 1,600 years ago. 
That's going back some for new material 
all right— almost as far back, in fast, aa 
some of our best little vaudeville come- 
dians go when they dig up new stuff for 
their act. 



M M., Brooklyn.— Al Darling is now the 
manager of the Royal. Chris Egan, who 
formerly managed the Royal, exchanged 
places with him and is now at the Colo- 
nial. 'Any communication will reach either 
one of them at their respective theatres. 

A. Q— "The Grass Widow" opened at 
the Liberty on December 3, 1917. Louis 
A. Hirach wrote the music for it. Chan- 
ting Pollock and Rennold Wolf wrote the 
book and lyrics. It was adapted from 
Blisson and St. Albin'a "Le Peril Jeunne." 



BETTER SETTLE IT QUICKLY 

A couple of vaudeville actor* are en- 
gaged in a lively controversy aa to who 
is entitled to utilize a beer keg for com- 
edy purposes. That's one dispute that 
better be settled pretty quickly, as it 
wont be very long before there wont be 
any comedy or anything else, for that 
matter, left in any beer keg. 

SILVER LINING ROTE 

The landlords of most of the theatrical 
buildings in and' around' Longacre Square - 
.haw -notified their tenants that they is- ' 
tend to raise their rents on the first of ' 
May. This will be welcome news to sev- 
eral theatrical promoters and vaudeville 
agents, who have been on the verge of ■ 
giving up the job of raising the rent as 
a bad proposition. 

THINGS WORTH HAVING 

A room in the new N. V. A. club house. 

An agent wbo keep* you working all 
the time. , 1 . • 

An. act written by Jim Madison. 

Lewis Selznick'a knack o,' putting it 
over.' '.■•—. . . 1 

A sure fire finish. 

Sam Hodgdon's speech making ability. 

A formula for making your own, after 
July 1. . t .'■;.. -. ■ 



F. B. — "Keep the Home Fires Burning" 
is an English song published by Chappell 
& Co. The words were written by Lena 
Guilburt Ford and the music by Ivor No- 
vello. Mrs. Ford was about fifty year* 
of age, of American birth, and lost her 
life during one of the German air raids. 

B. A. R. — Max Marcin is the author of 
"Cheating Cheaters." It opened in New 
York at the Eltinge Theatre, Aug. 9, 
1918. A. H. Woods was the producer. 
Marjorie Rambeau, William Morris, Cyril 
Keightly, Anne Sutherland and Robert 
McWade were in the cast. It was a four- 
act play. 

J. N. S.— Ruth Chatterton was featured 
in "Come Out of the Kitchen," a three-act 
comedy by A. E. Thomas, who adapted it 
from the novel of the same name by Alice 
Duer Miller. It had ite premiere on Oct. 
23, 1916, at the George M. Cohan Thea- 
tre. Bruce McRae was in the cast. Henry 
Miller produced the play, which had a 
fair run on Broadway. 



VAUDEVILLE VETERA" S - 

Who are you, anyway f I'm the an- 
swer to a maiden'a prayer. 

Can- a woman keep a aecrett Sura 
thing. Just ask any woman her age, if 
yon don't believe me. 

Have you laid anything aside for a 
rainy day 7 Sure— an umbrella. 

Are we all fools T No, some men are 
single. 

Were you singing a moment ago when 
I made my entrance t I certainly was. 
Oh, that explains it— I thought someone 
was putting in a ton of coal. 

My boy, allow me to tell you that I 
used to ride in my own carriage, years 
ago. When was that! When I was a 
baby, of course. 



TYSON TAKES $500,000 LEASE 
The Tyson Theatre Ticket Company 
leased an office in the Longacre Building 
last week from Charles F. Noyes, who 
represented William H. Barnum and Wil- 
liam EverdeU, Jr. The lease, which cov- 
ers a period of twenty years, was secured. 
at a total rental of $600,000. The Tysons 
will not move into the new quarters for 
three years. The new office is at jjisssul 
occupied by Red path's Cafe. 



14 



X i*fe<t*fiW:> VMS jCltfMP Rj h t 



Agfl9,l fflftr 




LEXINGTON, N. Y. AGAIN 

TO HAVE STOCK COMPANY 

Frances Fern Will Head Organization to Be Known as the 

Broadway Players — Will Open on Easter Monday with 

"Under Cover" 



.;: .-■=.! -^ aAi. - 



The Lexington Theatre is once more to 
be toe home of stockand will open Easter 
Monday, April 21, with the Broadway 
Players, headed by Frances Fern. 

Miss Fern, who is well known for her 
work hi Broadway a productions, has b^en 
in England for three years doing canteen 
work. She will' be supported by a com- 
pany of recognized players* and war ap- 
pear in plays that have found favor on 
Broadway. 

Jack Horn, who inaugurated stock at 



the Fifth Avenue Theatre, Brooklyn, and 
more recently started the Liberty Players 
at Stapleton, Staten Island, will manage 
the company. Harry McRae Webster will 
be the stage director. 

The company will be completed this 
week' and rehearsals will start next Mon- 
day. "Under Cover* will be the opening 
bin, with "Naughty Wives'" to follow. 

The scale of prices will be from $1.50 
down, with two matinees a week, 
Wednesday and Saturday. 



MALDEN STOCK BREAKS RECORD 

MaxOSH, Mass., April 5.— "The Byes of 
j"outh," put on by the Temple Stock, 
at the Auditorium, la breaking records for 
a stock run here. The bill drew such big 
business this week that the management 
decided to hold it over for next week 
Director Arthur Ritchie has made an en- 
viable reputation here but in the staging 
of The Eyes of Youth" he has fairly out- 
done himself. The consensus of opinion 
is that it is the best performance ever 
given by the local company. 

BLANEYS GET TTH AVENUE 

Charles £'. and Harry Clay: Blaney last 
week concluded negotiations whereby they 
acquired control of Locw'e Seventh Ave- 
nue Theatre. The siyrnisitinn of the 
house gives the Blaneya three New York 
theatres, the other two being the York- 
ville and Miner's Bronx. They will open 
the Seventh Avenue early in May with a 
stock company composed of capable play- 
era. : Their Bronx house will follow a few 
weeks later. The Yorkville is now play- 
ing to capacity business. 

MARY DANIELS GETS A CHANCE 

Mary Daniels, general understudy of 
the Blaney Players at the Yorkville The- 
atre, played the leading role in "The 
House of Glass" for one performance last 
week and acquitted herself so well that 
she has been signed by the Blaneys for 
two years to play leads. Miss Daniels' 
opportunity came through the indisposi- 
tion of Frances McGratli. 



HAL OLIVER MUSTERED OUT 
Hal Oliver was mustered out of the 
army and arrived in New York last a t i u s * 
after nineteen and a half months in ser- 
vice. He was stationed at Newport News, 
Va., and was director of the Soldiers and 
Sailors Theatre Company, staging their 
shows. He was also with the Soldier and 
Sailor show that made a six weeks' tour 
of Pennsylvania and Maryland. 



SALT LAKES SIGNS RAMBEAU. 
Marjorie Rambeau has been booked to 
play stock star engagements in Salt Lake 
City, Denver and San Francisco, opening 
in the first named city on June 1. Miss 
Rambeau will remain three weeks in each 
city, appearing in "The Eves of Youth," 
"Where Poppies Bloom,? and "Cheating 
Cheaters." 



ALICE EARLE IN TOWN 

Alice Earle, who, with her husband, 
Burton C. Fair, has closed a twenty-two 
weeks' engagement with the Warren 
0*Hara Stock Company at New Bedford, 
Mass., arrived in New York last week. 



WILLIAM FLORENCE SERIOUSLY- ILL 

Wis, J. Florence, a stock actor, is seri- 
ously HI with pneumonia in the -Western 
Pennsylvania Hospital. Pittsburgh.. ■ .-, -, 



COLUMBUS STOCK COMPLETED 

Columbus, O., April 7.— Manager W. 
W. Prosser. of Keith's Theatre, this city, 
returned from New York last week with 
a- complete list of players of the Keith 
Stock Company. The opening is set for 
Monday, April 21. This date will mark 
the beginning of the second season of stock 
at this house. The experiment last year 
proved successful beyond the fondest ex- 
pectations of the management, which put 
in a dramatic stock in face of the predic- 
tion that .nothing bnt a musical stock 
would succeed. The company, engaged 
through the Packard Theatrical Exchange, 
is headed by Maude Gilbert and Ben Tag- 
gart. Tie others are Edith Speare, in- 
genue: Russell Fillmore, juvenile; Maude 
All a n , second woman; Raymond Bramley, 
second man : Bessie Warren, character 
woman ; Thomas Gerald, character man ; 
Mayo Thach, general business; Tom Wil- 
liams, comedian, and Basse! Parker, 
stage - manager. Roland G. Edwards is 
director and Russell Senior scenic artist. 
The company last season presented Broad- 
way successes never before seen in Calnm- 
bns and Manager Prosser hopes to secure 
a number of equally new bills this season. 



GRACE GEORGE TO HAVE CO. 

When Grace George returns to the New 
Xork stage next season, she intends to es- 
tablish a permanent stock company. She 
has already secured a number of plays for 
her repertoire, some of which she hss tried 
our. Among them are "She Would and 
She Did" by Mark Reed, and "The Ruined 
Lady" by Francis Nordstrom. 



BALFOUR COMPLETES COMPANY 

So mers worth. N. EL. April 7. — Mana- 
ger J. E. Balfour has completed the roster 
of the Gladys Klark Company and will 
start rehearsals next , week Royalty 
plays will be presented, the list of which 
includes "Playthings," "The Brat" and 
'The Natural Law." 



FASSETT SIGNING PLAYERS 

At.bant, N. Y., April 7. — Ann Mason 
and J. Irving White have sighed with 
Malcolm Fassett for his Spring and Sum- 
mer stock opening. Easter Monday, at Har- 
manus Bleecker HalL 



FRANKLIN JOINS PAYTON 

Newark. N. J., April 7. — Maurice 
Franklin has joined the Corse Payton 
Stock Company to play second business 
and opened tonight in "Within the Law.'' 



FAHR JOBBING IN PATERSON 
patekson. N. J„ April 7. — Burton C. 
Fahr is jobbing this week with the Rich- 
ard Buhler Company at the Lyceum. 



, STOCK SIGNS JAMES BOSHELL 

Dayton*, O.. April 7. — James Boshell 
has ; signed with the Bronell -Stork Com- 
pany which opens here May 20. 



CHICAGO NEWS 



WORTH $30,000; DIES IN FILTH 

Living in filth in a cellar at 2628 Went- 
worth Avenue, Marie Rose, noted in the 
glaring spotlight of showdom, was over- 
taken by death on Thursday. She was 
noted in the days when Lily Langtry and 
Fanny Davenport were in their prime. 

People living in the neighborhood tell 
of the old miser, who beggea pennies and 
lived years and years in a dark cellar in 
their vicinity. She was known as Marie 
Leavitt and had very little to say to any- 
one, 'Her. .tune. was spent in going about 
with a basket begging or picking things 
out of garbage cans. 

Last week she was the victim , of a 
reckless driver of an. automobile. Those 
that witnessed the .accident stated . that 
the woman staggered across the street as 
if she were starving 'and .was .not, quick 
enough to get out of the way of the 
speeding car. An investigation disclosed 
that the former actress died leaving a 
fiat building valued at $30,000 and a 
daughter that had just recently been dis- 
charged from an asylum. The property 
is being handled by E. M. Greenbaum, of 
the hanking firm of E. M. Greenbaum and 
Sons. He stated that the woman was 
worth from $25,000 to $30,000. Mr. Green- 
baum also said that he had been looking 
out for her financial interests for the last 
thirty years. 

An effort is now being made to locate 
the daughter of the deceased, who, at 
death, had reached the age of 83. 

SHOW GIRL ENDS LIFE 

Miss Ruth Massey, a show girl with 
"Going Up," now playing an engagement 
at the Cohan Grand Opera House, ended 
her life by inhaling gas in her kitchenette 
apartment at 3901 Grand Boulevard on 
Friday afternoon. She was twenty-one 
years of age and had been in the profes- 
sion four years. 

Dressed in a new black silk gown and 
wearing her diamonds, she arranged things 
neatly in her apartment and then 
stretched herself out on two pillows in 
the kitchen, turned on the gas and await- 
ed death, after writing two notes, one to 
her. sister Olive and the other to her 
mother, Mrs. Mary Massey, of Superior. 
Wis. She died In the Fort Dearborn 
Hospital shortly after being admitted. 

No reason for the suicide is forthcom- 
ing from family or friends. It is said, 
however, that love for a New York man 
caused her to end her lif£ Her sweet- 
heart had wired her daily for months and - 
only lately the wires ceased to arrive. 

Chester Massey, a brother, is the head 
of the Massey Steam. Ship Company, of 
Superior, Wis. Mrs.' Mary Massey, her 
mother, could give no reason for her 
daughter's deed. The letter to her sister 
Olive was sealed and was not opened by 
the police. " 



ALL SHOWS HOLD OVER 
No new attractions are sched u led for 
Chicago this week. All are being held 
over. 

"Business Before Pleasure" is in Its six- 
teenth week at the Woods. "Going Up" 
enters upon its sixteenth week. Guy 
Bates. Post is enjoying his eleventh week 
at the Studebaker. "The Overseas Re- 
vue" enters 'its tenth week at the Play- 
house. "Oh, Lady, Lady" races' along in 
its seventh week at the La Salle. "Til- 
lie" is in its seventh at the Black stone. 
"The Better 'Ole" enters its seventh week 
at the Illinois. "Scandal," "Thirty Days" 
and "Gloriana" are. other productions hold- 
ing over. "Moonlight and Honeysuckle" 
starts on its second week. . . 



.,..' GET OFFICES APRIL 20th 9nl 

Theatrical occupants of the State. Lake 
Building will be able to take possession 
of their offices around April 20tn, accord- 
ing to information supplied by the Hool 
office, agents for the building. 

It has been arranged that the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association, The 
United Booking Offices, Interstate and 
Orpheum Circuits will be located in the 
new building. All circuits affiliate with 
the larger ones will also be accommodated. 
The independent agents have arranged 
for offices in the loop end building, direct- 
ly opposite. Two trade papers have been 
given offices in the new building. 

AU GOES INTO BUSINESS 
Abner AIL former head of the White 
Rats Actors' Union and Associated Ac- 
tresses of America in this city, has re- 
tired from the profession- and entered 
commercial lines. He is now manager of 
the Meechum Mercantile Agency, a Chi- 
cago collection company/ 



THESPIAN PATIENTS RECOVERING 

This week's bulletin, .issued by the 
American Hospital, announces most of the 
theatrical patients are doing well. Amnng 
them are B. McDaniel, Fay Warren, Frank 
A. Gladden, Ethel Townsend, F. K. Mullin 
and Alberta Fritche. 



SAIL OVERSEAS APRIL 21 

Arthur and Leah Bell, popular in west- 
ern vaudeville, will sail April 21 aa part 
of an overseas unit. They plan to remain 
in France for two months, returning here 
to take up interrupted bookings. 

SINGER * HUMPHREY BACK 

Mort H. Singer and C. S. Humphrey 
have returned from New York City where 
they assisted in dedicating the new Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists Club house. 



THEN THE RING DISAPPEARED 

Scene: The cafe at the back of the Log 
Cabin, 331 S. Clark Street, where thes- 
pians gather nightly. H. J. Fadner, ac- 
tor, speaks: 

"I was sitting at the table kind of 
fuddled. Up comes Josie, the piano play- 
er, and says: "Where's you're ring?' *Here 
it is,' I says, and shows my $300 sparkler. 
Pretty soon Archie, the waiter, comes 
over. 

" Tf our taxi's outside, sir,' he says. 

"I couldn't remember ordering any taxi, 
but I wasn't very clear, so I went out to 
see about it. Two men pushed me -inside 
and drove me down in Federal Street. 
One of them gave me a bust in the jaw 
and : the other, grabbed the ring. Then 
they pushed me out on the bricks and 
drove away." 

Therefore, the police went to the Log 
Cabin immediately and placed Archie 
Schaefer, a former actor and, at present, 
a waiter, and Mrs. Josephine Goodwin, 
also a thespian but now a pianist, under 
arrest, and' booked both aa accessories to 
the robbery. Detectives are now looking 
for the taxicab in which the robbery is 
alleged to have occurred. 



"ATTA BOY- CLOSES 

"Atta Boy" closed its engagement at 
' the Olympic Theatre on Sunday »»< g^*. 
taking to the road after a successful three 
weeks' engagement. 

TOM KANE OUT OF ARMY 

Tom Kane has been discharged from 
the Camp Grant cantonment and plans 
an early return to vaudeville with a new 
single . act. 

ELTTNCE OPENING APRIL 13 

Julian Eltinge's Revue is scheduled to 
come into the Olympic Theatre on- April 
13th, and remaining for a fortnight. 

OPENS AT ILLINOIS 

" ob ' Fe 883 r > Behave," an Owen Davis 
play, will be a bite Spring and Summer 
attraction at the Illinois Theatre. 

IZETTA GOING INTO TAB 

Izetta has accepted a contract to star 
with a tabloid production that will travel 
out of Chicago next season. 

BENSON BEATS OFF "FLU" 
Edgar A. Benson, local agent, is: able to 
be about again, after a severe attack of 
infloenat.- " '.".:-."' ? -, 



AprH 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




SUPPLEMENTARY 

TIME GIVEN 

TO 24 SHOWS 

I SOME GET SEVERAL WEEKS 



- The Columbia wheel shows that will 
get supplementary time after the Tegular 
season doses next Saturday are as fol- 
low: ii; r-n; 

The'-Girle de Looks" win play the Gay- 
' ety, Boston, the week of Hay 19th. The 
"Star and Garter" show has two extra 
weeks. It will open at the Empire, Al- 
bany, .the week of May 19th, and the Ca- 
sino, Boston, the week of the 26th. 

The -Lev Kelly Shew will be at the 
Qayety, Rochester, the week of May 19th, 
Empire, Albany, the week of May 26th, 
Casino, Boston, week June 2nd, and Em- 
pire, Newark, week. of 'June 9th. 

"Step Lively Girls" plays the Gayety, 
Buffalo, week of May- 19th "Gayety, Bos- 
ton, week of May 26th, and the Casino, 
Brooklyn, week of June 2nd. 

"Oh Girl" is at Fort Huron Sunday, 
May 18th, Gayety, Toronto, week of May 
19th, and the Gayety, -Buffalo, week of 
May 26th. 

"iBip, Hip Hooray Girls," Gayety, De- 
troit, week of May 18th, Port Huron, Sun- 
day, May 25th, ;Gayety, Toronto, week of 
May 28th, and the Qayety, Buffalo, week 
of Jane 2nd. . 

The "Bostoniane" will play the Star and 
Garter,' Chicago, week of May 18th, Gay- 
ety, Detroit, week of May 25th, Empire, 
Albany, week of June 2nd, and the Ca- 
sino Boston, week of June 9th. 

The "Best Show in Town" have the 
Columbia, Chicago, week of May 25th, the 
Gayety, Detroit, week of June 1st and 
the Gayety, Buffalo, week of June 9th. 

The "Twentieth Century Maids" go to 
the Gayety, Kansas City, week of May 
18th, lay off the week of "the 25th Col- 
umbia, Chicago, -week of June 1st, Gay- 
ety; Detroit, week of June 8th and the 
Gayety, Buffalo, week of June 15th. 

Ben Welsh goes to the Gayety, Pitts- 
burgh, week of May 19th, lays, off week 
of the 28th and then to Hurtig and Sea- 
mon'g, New York,- for a ran. 

The "Sight Seers" have the Columbia, 
Chicago, week of May 18th, and the Star 
and Garter, Chicago, the following week. 

"Hello America" plays the Empire, To- 
ledo, week of May 18th. 

The "Beauty Trust* plays the Star, 
Cleveland, week of May 19th, Empire, 
Toledo, week of May 25th, and the Star 
and Garter, Chicago, week of June 1st. 

The "Million Dollar Dolls" have the 
week of May I8th at the Gayety, Wash- 
ington. The "Boseland Girls" win go to 
the Palace, Baltimore, week of May 19th, 
and the Gayety, Washington, week of 
May 26th. The "Majesties" have the Peo- 
ples, Philadelphia, week of May 19th. Pal- 
ace, Baltimore, . week of May 20th . and 
the Gayety, Washington, week of June 
2nd. 

The- "Merry Bounders" play the Or- 
pheum, Peterson, week of May 19th, and 
the Majestic, Jersey City, week of May 

26th. 

"Maids of America" have the Empire, 
Brooklyn, week of May 19th, and New- 
burgh and Poughkeepsie the week of May 

""Cheer Up America" goes to Hurtig and 

Seamon'e, New York, week of May l»th, 
and the Casino, Brooklyn, week of May 
2«th. : ? / ■ 

The "Burlesque Wonder Show*' has the 
. Majestic Jersey City, week of May 19th, 
Empire. Brooklyn, week of May 26th, Ca- 
sino, Philadelphia, week of June 2nd, Pal- 
nee Baltimore, week of June 9th and the 
G4yety, Washington, week of Jane leth. 
The "Burlesque Review" wffl play^New- 



burg and Poughkeepeie the week of Xfay 
19th. 

The "Bowerys" go to the Casino, Bos- 
ton, week of May 19th, are open the week 
of May 26th, then are at the Palace, Bal- 
timore, week of June 2nd and the Gayety, 
Washington, week of June 8th. 

Mollie Williams Big Show will play the 
Casino, Philadelphia, week of May 19th, 
Miners' Bronx, the week of May 28th, the 
Majestic, Jersey City, the week of June 
2nd, and the Empie, Brooklyn, the week 
of June 9th. 

Harry Hastings Big Show has the Em- 
pire, Newark, the week of May 19th,' Ca- 
sino, Philadelphia, week of May 26th and 
the Empire, Brooklyn, week of June 2nd. 

Dave Marion will play the Casino, 
Brooklyn, the week of May 19th and' the 
Empire, Newark, the week of May 26th. 

The shows that do not play any extra 
thae after the regular season are Al 
Beeves, Behman Show, Bon Tons, Follies 
of the Day, Golden Crooks, Irwin's Big 
Show, Liberty Girls, Puss Puss, Rone Sy- 
dell, Sam Howe Stone and Pillard, Sport- 
ing Widows, and Watson's Beef Trust. 

Jean Bedini's new show will have the 
Summer run at the Columbia, New York, 
opening May 1Mb. - - - 

WATSON TO ENLARGE HOUSE 

Paterson. N. J., April 5. — Billy Witt- 
son, owner of the Orpheum Theatre, this 
city, * now playing Columbia Amusement 
'Company shows, has just ordered 196 ad- 
ditional opera seats and 192 mesxanine 
box seats from the Andrews Opera Chair 
Company! Commencing June 1, the entire 
theatre will be reconstructed, redecorated, 
and, with the additional seats, win have a 
seating capacity of 1854. 

The decorations win be in terra cotte 
and gold. The new mezzanine boxes will 
be carpeted and finished off with brass 
rails, the chairs being white. 



MINSKY HAS NEW PEOPLE 

The Minaky Brothers have engaged the 
following for their National Winter Gar- 
den. George Walsh and Dolly Sweet, to 
open next Monday. Carrie Finnell, Caro- 
line Warner and Kitty Madison opened 
this week. The • latter were booked 
through Roehm and Richards office. 

Mark Thompson will close next week 
and Helen Russell closed last Saturday. 

Jack Perry has been engaged as pro- 
ducer and manager. 



MANAGER AND PRIMA DONNA WED 

Minneapolis, Minn,, Apr. 3.— Florence 
Tanner, well known in burlesque as a 
prima donna, and Bob Schoemecker, man- 
ager of the "Pace makers" playing the 
Gayety Theatre, this city, were married to- 
day at the National Hotel here. 



FRANK1E NIB LO OUT OF SHOW 

Philadelphia. Pa., April 4— Franhie 
Nfblo was taken ffl during the matinee of 
"Cheer Up America" at the Casino, yes* 
terday. She win be out of the cast about 
two weeks, it is claimed. 



RUBIN REPLACES LAMBERT 

Pinr.AniB.PHIA, Pa., April 5. — Ben Ru- 
bin, a Hebrew comedian, joined the "Cheer 
Up America" Company at the Casino, here, 
Monday, replacing Eddie Lambert. 



EDE MAE LOSES FATHER. 

Portland, Ore., Apr. 3. — John Smith, 
father of Ede Mae, prima donna of the 
"MBUon Doner Dolls," died at his home 
here to-day of pneumonia at the age of 
seventy-four years. 



ROSE AND HILL CLOSE. 

Chicago, HI, Mar. 30. — Rose and Hill 
closed with Pete Clark's "Oh Girl" com- 
pany here to-day., Vivian Lawrence joined 
the show as sowb'rette. 

- ; — -- •„ ^.., ,,, ; ... x .. ! 



AMERICAN TO 

DROP SOME 

SPLITWEEKS 

SCHENECTADY IS INCLUDED 

When the American wheel starts re- 
volving again -next season, a number of 
changes in both houses and route will be 
found. • 

The Hudson, Schenectady, wil close as 
an American Circuit "house with the 
"Tempters," Saturday night. It is stated 
that arrangements are under way to fill 
these four days in Ebnira, Ithaca, Auburn 
and one other city near by. 

Chester, which now splits with Camden, 
wUl doee Saturday night with "Paris by 
Night." These three days have not been 
filled in as yet. 

Pottatown was discontinued last Mon- 
day night, the 'lid Lifters" being the 
last ehow to play there. The shows have 
been playing Pottstownon Monday after 
the Camden and Chester week, with Eas- 
tern foUowing on Tuesday, Wilksbane be- 
ing played the last four days of the week. 
Monday has not been filled in, aa yet, 
and may not be for the balance -of the 
season. 



"AMERICANS," WITH 
NEW CAST, SCORE 

HEAVILY AT STAR 



TEAR DOWN "HIGH FLYERS" PAPER 

Chief of Police Hayes, of Hoboken, or- 
dered, last week, that postern advertising 
the "High Flyers" show be torn down 
from fences -where the paper had been 
pasted by O Meelia, the bill poster. 

There is a law in New Jersey which 
makes it mandatory for each show to pre- 
sent its paper for inspection by the police 
before it is pasted on fences or exhibited" 
elsewhere. ■ In the ease of the "High Fly- 
era" show, owned by Charles Baker, which 
played, last week, at the Empire, Hobo- 
ken, the police claim the paper waa not 
shown to them in advance. 

Activities in New Jersey against bill 
posting, were started three weeks ago in 
Jersey City, where "Salome," the picture 
featuring Theda Ban, was being present- 
ed at the MontieeUo Theatre. Several 
church organizations took umbrage at the 
biU posting and window display cards be- 
ing exhibited in connection with the pic- 
ture, and the police were asked to act in 
the matter. The "Salome" display mat- 
ter was withdrawn. 

In the same, city two weeks ago, the 
Bar. Thomaa B. Larldn, of St. Bridget's 
Roman Catholic Church, called the atten- 
tion of Mayor Hague to what he termed 
to be "sugges ti v e , indecent, immoral "and 
impure billboard advertising. 



ABBOTT B CLEARED 

The Grand Jury, In Brooklyn, baring 
refused 'to indict Frank Abbott, manager 
of the Crescent Theatre, the charge against 
him of running' a lottery in connection with 
a "Country Store" night was dismissed, 
last Thursday. 

Abbott was held for the Grand Jury 
following his arraignment in the Msf 
Street Magistrate's Court, four weeks ago. 
Hia defease waa that he Charged nothing 
extra from 'patrons for the privilege j of 
drawing' prizes 'given away from the stage, 
a custom in vogue in 'neighborhood theatres 
throughout the country. 

Had Abbott . been indicted and later 
found guilty, his case would have estab- 
lished a precedent which would have elimi- 
nated the "Country Store" nights in thea- 
tres throughout the State of New York. 



f 



RE-SIGNED AS SOUBRETTE 
Ethel Shutta has been rnehjiisil lor 
next season by Frank Laldr aa sobbiette. 

■'*' •'-•■ -''■•■■■ 



Hughey Bernard's "Am origan*," with al- 
most an entire new cast. WsjBe Its appear- 
ance at the Star last week. The show 
has been all changed around since it 
opened in tbe Bast early In the season. 
One great addition to the cast is Den 
Clark, who is considered by many to be 

one of the best light comedian* In bur- 
lesque. Clark was seen early In the season 
at the Columbia with the "Star and Car- 
ter Show," which he dosed with a few 
weeks later. He joined the "Americana" 
shortly after this and reproduced the show, 
in which the cast had been an changed 
around. . 

Clark works hard In this snow, in fast 
he Is working from the' time the curtain 
arises until It falls at the end of the per- 
formance. He never gives the comedians 
an opportunity to rest, keeping after them 
all the time, and he keen* the show coma* 
a long with plenty of speed. Clark la a 
One talker and knows how to humor situa- 
tions, so that they get the proper result. 
He can wear clothes and la a classy dresser. 

Bernard does a touch bit which he han- 
dles well. Hie ballad to the second act 
was nicely rendered and he was compelled 
to sing several encores. 

Mickey McCabe. doing an old "tad." 
which role he Is wen known In. never put 
this . part over better. He worked hard* 
Thursday night and handled himself like 
a young fellow. 

Billy Helntyre is doing an eccentric com- 
edy part In which be did well. He make* 
a mistake, however. In getting away from 
hie blackface. While not taking anything* 
away from him In what he is doing now. 
he. would stand out more, to our way of 
thinking, by using the cork. 

Dick Hahn to the juvenile. While not 
bavins a great deal to do. he works while 
he la on the stage. 

Gussle White, a fast soubratte with lota 
of "pep," had no trouble In getting her 
numbers over,. She works hard, Injectlng 
several styles of dancing In her various 
numbers. She wears pretty dresses and 
looks well. 

Easter Hlcbee to handling the prima 
donna role. She offered four numbers. 

Vic Dayton, shapely In form, pretty in 
face., who just Joined the show the week 
before, reptoclna; Flo Owens, who was oom- 
peUed to close on account of illness, is seen 
to a. better advantage In this show than 
we have ever seen her In the past. She 
works .as though she takes Interest in What 
she Is doing, now that she has shaken oft 
that listless way she had of working In the 
past. Her numbers went over well and 
she did nicely in scenes. 

The chorus worked hard In tbe numbers 
and looked wen from the front. 

The "Introduction" bit went over nicely 
as done by Clark, McCabe and Hiss Hlg- 
bee, as did the "I. O. TJ." bit as ottered by 
Clark, McCabe and Melntyre. 

The "Scotch" bit pleased the way Clark. 
McCabe. Melntyre and Hiss Dayton did it. 

The "garter" bit was well done by Me- 
lntyre. McCabe and Miss Dayton. The 
"tough" bit pleased aa offered by Bernard. 
McCabe and Melntyre. 

Anna Mack, one of the girls of the chorus, 
led a number with the girls and cot it 
over wen. » 

Tbe "deaf, dumb and blind" bit was done 
by McCabe, Melntyre, Clark and the Masses 
White and Hlarbee. 

Clark and Melntyre put over a good 
comedy talking specialty which finished 
with a song.' It went own nicely. 

The "suicide" bit waa done by Melntyre. 
Hahn and McCabe, and tbe "funny face" 
bit offered by Clark. Melntyre. McCabe and 
the orchestra leader. 

McCabe. assisted by the chorus, offered 
his number called "Old Songs," and It 
went over big, as did MUs Dayton's num- 
ber, "Sho Me a Little Bit." In which she 
appeared In a one-piece bathing suit. Her 
shapely figure waa seen to a line advantage 
In this number. Bio. 



WEWGAKTEN RENEWS LEASE 

Issy Weingarten has renewed the le 

of his franchise on the Columbia Circuit 
for five more years, commencing next sea- 
son. 

This franchise belongs to the Hyde Es- 
tate, and is now playing under the title 
of the "Star and Garter Show." Wein- 
gartan signed the eontreet with the Hyde 
people last week when he was in «ew 
York. 



liis. 



on Page. 



3 



FRED CLARK RE-ENGAGED. 

Fred Clark, thi. season manager of the 
"Burlesque Review," has been re-engaged 
by Jacobs and Jermon to manage one of 
their shows next season, and to produce 
in addition. He has also contract* to 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 9,1919 



HIT BULLETIN 

A liit of twelve of die biggest current tong kite presented in a handy form for die benefit of artists who want to 

keep potted on "what's what" in die popular songs of die season. . . "." 


1 


A Rip Snorting, Snre-Fire Song Hit 

JA-DA JA-DA 

... Special Stage Versions for Any Kind of Act 


' Ey 

BOB CARL ETON 


2 


Eddie Cantor's Big Hit with the "Ponies'' 

JOHNNY'S IN TOWN 

He Says: "If s the Biggest Hit I Ever Sang" 


JACK YBLLEN 

GEO. W. MEYER 

and *&> 
***. ."ABE OLMAN « 1 


3 


Cleaning Up and No Wonder 

SALVATION LASSIE OF MINE 

"She Brought Doughnuts to the Doughboys" 


JACK CADDIGAN 
CHICK STORY 


4 


The Host Magnificent Song of the Period 

THE ROSE OF NO MAN'S LAND 

A Tribute to the Girls Who Took Care of Our Boya 


JACK CADDIGAN 

■ and 
JAMES A BRBNNAN 


5 


A "Kiss" Song That's Different 

THE KISS THAT MADE ME CRY 

A Snre-Fire Ballad Hit 


JOB BURNS, 

ARTHUR FIELDS 

and 

ARCHIE GOTTLER 


6 


A New and Novel Rag Song 

ANYTHING IS NICE IF IT COMES FRON DIXIELAND 

Jnrt the Kind You've Been Asking for 


GRANT CLARKE 
GEO. W. MEYER 

and 
MILTON AGER 


7' 


Everybody Loves to Sing This Wonderful Song 

YOU'LL FIND OLD DIXIELAND IN FRANCE 

A Southern Ditty a la Francaise 


By 
GRANT CLARKE 

and 

GEO. W. MEYER 


8 


Well, Yon Know Now, Where to Get It! 

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY LOVING SOMEBODY ELSE? 

If s a Hit— Therefore, Consequently, We Publish It 


By 
SIDNEY MITCHELL 

' and 
ARCHIE GOTTLER 


9 


A Toast Song to Our Sea Heroes 

THE NAVY TOOK THEM OVER AND THE NAVY WILL BRING 

THEM BACK 

Even the Soldier Boys Love to" Sins; It 


HOWARD JOHNSON 
U. S. N. 
and - • 
IRA SCHUSTER 


10 


If s a Scream— Takes the Sting Out of Mental Hurts 

HOW ARE YOU GOING TO WET YOUR WHISTLE 

(WHEN THE WHOLE DARN WORLD GOES DRY) 


FRANClI BYRNE 
FRANK McINTYRE 
% •■- and • 
PERCY WENRICH 


11 


Plenty of Screams, Without Vulgarity r 

EV'RY DAY'LL BE SUNDAY WHEN THE TOWN GOES DRY 

Self Adjusting— Will Fit Any Spot 


'. .-By .'.' 
WILLIAM JEROME 

and 

JACK MAHONSY 


12 


That Peach of a Novelty Rag Jazz Hit 

EVERYTHING IS PEACHES DOWN IN GEORGIA 

It Has the Kick That Does the Trick 


. MILTONAGER 

and 
1 GEO. W. MEYER 


The** songs are listed in typographical order, for the sake of appearance. Because a sons; is listed last does not Indicate 
that it is any the less a hit than the one higher op. In ordering, prof ewionaU will help our department by mentioning sib— Sser 
as wall as -a title. If orchestration is wanted ple*»o mention key desired. 


CHICAGO 

Grand flfessa Hoom MHsaj 

BOSTON 

181 Has— S 3tr-t 

PHILADELPHIA 

NEW ORLEANS . 

115 Uoinniy PU« 


LEO. FEIST, Inc. 

135 West 44th Street, New York 

CLEVELAND. 308 Bangor BM*. DETROIT, 213 Woodward Ave. 
BUFFALO, 4SS Main St. KANSAS CITY, Gayaty Thank** BUg. 

PITTSBURGH, 311 Schmidt BMg I TT5 ArtT.Fl EB, fflW Ban PaaassaS Wi% 


ST. LOUIS 

Holland BiBsnnj 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Paatagaa Tho.tr. Bonding 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Lyric Theatre Bnidiag 

SEATTLE 
■ 301 Chkkaring HaD . 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



Adfj& 





RICORDI CO. LOSES 

PHONOGRAPH SUIT 



Court Dec id** It Can Not CUim Mo- 

cUnWil InatntHMBt Protection B*> 
cuw Composer U a 0—4*1 

According to a decision handed down 
last week by Justice Mayer, in the United 
States District Court, a Canadian com- 
poser can not claim the protection offered 
by the. mechanical instrument clause of 
the copyright act and a phonograph or 
other reproducing company can make and 
sell records of his compositions without 
obtaining the customary license or the 
payment of any royalties from the' sales 
of the records. 

If it be a song;- the fact that the words 
of the number are the work of an Ameri- 
can citizen avails nothing and the whole 
composition can be reproduced without 
payment of any kind. 

This, in effect, is the decision in the 
case of G. Ricordi A Co., Inc., against the 
Columbia Graphophone Company for an 
injunction and damages for the manufac- 
turing and selling of records of the song 
"Dear Old Pal of Mine" by Lieut. Gitz- 
Rice and Harold Robe and which was de- 
cided in favor or the defendants, the 
Columbia Company. 

The case arose out of the fact, that the 
Columbia Company manufactured and ' 
sold records of the song, which was duly 
.. copyrighted;, without license .or permis- 
sion from Ricordi & Co., and without the 
payment of royalty as provided for in the 
copyright act. 

The Columbia Company contended that 
_ it had -a right to mechanically— reproduce - 
the song in question without permission* 
or royalty payment because Rice,* the 
composer of the music, is and was a Can- 
adian to whose compositions the provi- 
sions of the Copyright Act, in so far as 
'the mechanical reproduction rights- are 
' concerned, do not apply, since Canada does 
not grant similar rights to citizens of the 
,' United' States. 

It further contended that the words of 

the composition, although by an Ameri- 

'2, 'can citizen, could not be classified as a 

■ : music al - work and cannot be protected by 

the mechanical clause of the copyright 

act. 

In his decision dismissing, the applies - 
; tion of Ricordi A Co. for an injunction, 
District Judge Meyer, in his opinion -said 
in part: "That defendant is right as to 
its first contention is too clear to require 
discussion. Until the Dominion of Can- 
"" ada, grants similar rights to our citizens, 
.the protective features of the statute in 
this respect cannot, under the statute, be 
extended to her citizens. Finally, 'musi- 
cal copyright,' 'musical composition" and 
' mu sical work* obviously refer to a com- 
position which may be music alone or 
words and music. Here the music was 
plainly the compos it ion of Rice. 

"As the musical composition of Rice 
(without the words) could not have been 
copyrighted.. for the 'reasons stated supra, 
- it adds" nothing to the rights of the par- 
ties' that the words were ' written by a 
citizen of the United States; for it is the 
music which counts in invoking the rights 
accorded by the statute. 

"A different question might have been 
presented and a different disposition might 
have followed, if the music had been com- 
posed by the *Tn»rii»aTi citizen and the 
' words had been written by the Canadian 
citizen or if, for instance, an American 
citizen had set to music some poem, verse 
or other literary composition which 
in the public domain." 



"NEVER AGAIN" SAYS SEAMON 

Carl Seamon, the pianist, volunteered 
to furnish the accompaniments for May 
Melville, who appeared at a fashionable 
charity affair held at the Hotel Plaza one 
day last week. Seamon, attired in his 
best clothes, carelessly draped his over- 
coat over the back of a chair near the 
piano and went through his portion of 
the entertainment. Arising at the con- 
clusion he turned for his overcoat and 
found to his dismay that it had disap- 
peared and a search failed to locate it. 
"Never again," said Seamon, in relating 
the incident. "In future I'll sit on the 
coat, just as I used to do when I played 
in a small time picture house." 

. E ' £g ~ i -JS 

CLARK BALL NETS $ 1 000 . 

The entertainment and ball tendered to. 
David J. Clark, at the New Amsterdam 
Hall on Thursday night netted over $1,000 
which has been turned over to the ex- 
songwriter. 

The affair was a big success and sev- 
eral hundred people prominent in the the- 
atrical and musical world attended. The 
list of entertainers included Irving Berlin, 
Sophie Tucker, Whiting and Burt, Jack 
Kraft, Jim Moore and Miss Lee, Lou 
Holts, Artie Mehlinger, Maurice Diamond 
and others. 



FRED BELCHER BACK 

FROM PACIFIC COAST 



-HARRIS HAS COMEDY SONG HIT 
Ghas. K. Harris has a comedy song hit 
in the new novelty number "Ze Yankee 
Boys Have Made a Wild French Baby 
Out of Me," by Eugene West- and Joe 
Gold. Sophie Tucker at Reisenweber's is 
singing it nightly and it is one of the big 
..hits _of her. act-... 



"THREE SONGS IN BIG ACT 

Harry Von TUzer has three songs in 
the Van and Schenck act which is playing 
this week at the Orpheum. "Can You 
Tame Wild Women T" "Somebody's Wait- 
ing for Someone," and "Pickaninny's Par- 
adise" are all being featured by the clever 
singers. 



Moaic Bweinses Bowmftn in All Week, 

Says Mnaic Man, Back Aftax 

Sac Waaka* Tow 

Fred Belcher, secretary of Jerome fl. 
Remick A Co., returned last week from 
a six weeks' tour of the West on which 
he visited all the principal cities oh the 
western coast. "The music business la 
booming," said Mr. Belcher, "in all the 
cities along the coast from Los Angeles 
to Seattle. There axe many flue moale - 
stores in the large' towns and cities and 
music is even. more of a feature ha the 
theatres, restaurants i and; cafes than in 
the East. " ' «* ' 

"There are scores of fine orchestras in 
the cafes and theatres and popular songs 
and instrumental pieces are exploited in 
a remarkably effective manner. The big 
interest in music along the coast is re- 
sponsible for some fine musical organiza- 
tions and a crop of excellent composers 
and writers have coma to the front aa 
well. 

"While on the coast I secured the pub- 
lication rights for a number of new com- 
positions, several of which are big suc- 
ceses out there and will reach the East 
shortly. Among them are Tell Me Why,' 
by Coburn and Rose; 'The Rive tier's 
Rag,' by the same writers; and "What la 
the Harm in a Bit of a Walk V by Elmer 
Clayton and Norman McNeil. This num- 
ber will be featured in the new Dorothy 
Gish picture, "Boots.' 

"Another new composition which is 
.popular on the coast and for which we 
have the publication rights, is "My Dan- 
' nie,' by Chris Scheraberg. 

"The Remick Company is- excellently 
represented on the western coast and we 
have large retail establishments in Los 
Angeles, San Francisco, Portland and 
Seattle." 



SAM COSLOW WITH MILLS 
Sam Coslow, formerly with the F. B. 
Haviland Pub. Co., is now professional 
manager for Kerry Alilla. He is also 
writing songs for the firm, his first num- 
ber being a syncopated ballad entitled 
"After All That You've Done to Me." 



JACK MILLS IN CHICAGO 

Jack Mills, professional manager of the 
McCarthy A Fisher Co., is spending a few 
weeks in Chicago assisting the profes- 
sional staff in that city in popularising 
the two new song successes recently re- 
leased by his firm. 

They are, "Eyes That Say I Love You" 
and "Everybody Wants a Key to My 
Cellar." 



PAT ROONEY SINGS "FRIENDS" 

Pat Rooney is singing the new Feist 
"gong "Friends" and although the dancing 
comedian never attempted a song of that 
nature before, he is scoring one of the 
hits of his act with it. 



GEO. GRAFF WITH WORLD CO. 

George Graff, the songwriter, is now 
-with the World Music Corporation, a re- 
cently organized publishing company, with 
offices on West 46th St. 



. ALL WANT TO PLAY 

According to Dick Jess, who is staging 
the big base ball game between the actors 
and songwriters at the Polo Grounds next 
Sunday, everybody wants to play. "Every- 
body connected with a publishing bouse," 
said Jess, "wants to get into the game, and 
if we accepted an the offers, there would 
be more men on the field than in the grand 
stand." 



COHEN'S WEDDING ANNOUNCED 

The wedding of Ixmia Cohen, profes- 
sional manager for Chas. K. Harris, has 
been announced for April 26th. Mr. Cohen 
is to marry Miss Mina Steil, formerly sec- 
retary to Mr. Harris. 



AUSTRALIAN MUSIC MAN COMING 

Frank Albert, a member of the Aus- 
tralian music publishing firm of J. Albert 
ft Son, sailed from Australia last week. 
He is accompanied by his wife and daugh- 
ter. 



HAROLD WEEKS ON WAY EAST 

Harold Weeks, writer of "Hindostan," 
"Chong," and other popular numbers, 'eft 
Seattle on Saturday for New York. He 
will spend several weeks in this city. 



NO VELLO IN PICTURES 
Ivor Novello, the young composer, writer 
of "Keep the Home Fires Burning," is 
appearing in pictures this week in the big 
time houses. The films show him at the 
piano at work on a new composition. 



FOX HAS COMEDY SONG HIT. 
The Sam Fox Publishing Oo-'s novelty 
instrumental hit, "Me-Ow, ,s by Mel Kauf- 
man, has in response to many requests 
been issued in song form, and this week 
has been released to the singing profes- 
sion. Harry D. Kerr has supplied the 
lyric which is a gem. " " ""' - 



WEST SUED FOR DIVORCE 

Eugene 'West, the songwriter, is being 
sued for a divorce by Mrs. West, who 1» 
-known on the screen as Catharine Henry. 

WILLIE WESTON B ILL ' 
Willie Weston, the songwriter and 
vaudeville actor, is confined to his home 
with. a. severe. nervoi» ailment. He. has 
been unable to work for several weeks. 



TOMBES HAS A NEW SHOW 

Andrew Tombes will be seen next sea- 
son in a new show by Frank Stammers. 
C. B. Haddock ia to produce the piece 
and the song interpolations axe being 
written by Henry Marshall 

BUD DE SYLVA RE-SK2QXJ 
Bud De Sytrsv the composer, has re- 
signed with Jerome H. Remick ft Co. 



F. W. WOOLWORTH DEAD. 

Frank Winfield Woolworth, head of the 
the great Woolworth syndicate of stores 
which revolutionized the music publishing 
business, died on Tuesday at his home in 
Glen Cove, L. I. 

Mr. Woolworth, who opened the first 
S and 10-cent store, was born at Rodman, 
N. Y., the son of John H. and Fannie 
MoBrier Woolworth. He started as an 
office boy without salary when ha was 
past twenty-one, yet amassed a fortune 
that bad made him one of the leading 
business men of the world. 

The Woolworth Company, at the time 
of the founder's death, operated more than 
860 stores throughout the United States 
and Canada and several in England. It 
was capitalized at $85,000,000. Paying 
cash for his goods was the slogan by 
which Mr. Woolworth built up his enor- 
mous business. 

The MMti stores were the first to 
retail iriusie at ten cents, and soon built 
up an enormous business in this line. 

Over 800 of these stores handle music 
today. 

GREENE ON ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 
Gene Greene and Beth Mayo are meet- 
ing with much success on the Orpheum 
circuit where Greene is featuring a reper- 
toire of new and up-to-the-minute song*. 
Among the leaders In his programme axe 
"Salvation Lassie of Mine," "Johnny's in 
Town," and "Chong." Greene was the 
first singer v to sing the -Salvation Lassie 
song on the Orpheum time, where it is a 
decided hit. "Chong" is also a big suc- 
cess with him and Miss Mayo, in costume, 
assists him in ,tT, ff i "g the number. All 
these songs are from the Feist catalogue. 

SHERWOOD HAS NEW WALTZ SONG 

"Shadows" is the title of a new waits 
song by Ray Sherwood and Howard Sut- 
ter. The number baa been accepted as 
the official number lor "Shadows," the 
Qoldwyn feature film in which Geraldina 
Famr is to be featured. 

The song is published by the Vender - 
•loot Music Company, which ia planning 
a big advertising campaign in connection 
with it. 



HARMS CO. GETS NEW PLAYS 

The T. B. Harms Co. has arranged to 
publish the music of "If s Up to Yon," a 
new musical comedy book and lyrics by 
A. G. Delamater and music by William 
Frederick Peters. The piece will open out 
of town on Easter Monday and after a pre- 
liminary tour will be seen at a prominent 
Broadway house. 



PETERS WRITES NEW PIECE 

William Frederick Peters, the composer 
of "If s Up to Yon," has composed the 
musical setting of "Through the Age*,'* a 
new spectacular play by Guy Bolton and 
George Middleton. The pieee will be pre- 
sented by Comstock ft Ges*.. 



CLAIRE WITH MUSIC HOUSE 

Sidney Claire, formerly of the vaude- 
ville act of Morton and Claire, is now 
connected with the professional depart- 
ment of Gilbert ft Friedlahd, Inc. 

PARIS CAN NOW HAVE MUSIC 
PasiB, April 2. — Under a new regulation 
cafes and restaurants will be permitted to 
remain open until 10.30 p. at. beginning 
this week and will be allowed to employ 
orchestras and other forms of music 



RTTTER TO MAW AGE BALL TEAM 

Maurice RItter win manage the Music 
Publishers' team, which will play the 
Actors* organization at the Polo Grounds 
next Sunday. / 



RICHMOND HAS NEW JOB 

Sid. Richmond, for several years with 
the J. H. Remiek 4 .Co. house, Is now with 
the Gilbert ft Frisdland Co. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 9, 1919 



BIO Ml 



Comedy Riotf 



m 



CAN YOU 

TAME WILD 

WIMMIN? 

A Sensational 
Hit! 



The Best Comedy French Song 
HH On the Market! 

PUT HIM 




THE 
MARSEILLAISE 

AND WAKE HIM UP 
WITH AN OO LA LA 



A 

Sensational 
Hit! 



JIM-JIM 

i 

ALWAYS KNEW 

THAT YOU'D 

WIN 



STARTING WITH THE GREATEST 



SOMEBODY'S WAIi 



n ef* 



Somebody's Waiting- For Someone 



Words by . 
ANDREW B. STKRMNfl 



Music by 
HARHY XQN TILZER 



. > - 




- V r r 


:'ZTi—i ' 


pOr : 


"pjj/T 


r^- 


• • tast • 




-==i. 




I 


















Piano< 






, I .-,.." 




"P. '. i' 


w. 


j: B _ 


i j 




( 
























' l Si 


+•-£: ' 






-V J 










\m 



She sits by the win-aow in ' sun-shine or "rain,-. Her dear face pressed 
The sound of each foot -step that comes from the street, Brings hope to her 

at 



mim 



^m 



3 



iHI 



* *- t 



£=£ 



HM 




close to the cold win • dow pane, Her poor heart is yearn- tag, ah 

eyes and her poor heart will beat, My , boy is re -turn . tag, she'll 




wait- ing each day. For someone's re - turn- tag, some -one far, far a - way 

ten - der- ly sigh, But al - -*-ays, yes al - ways, all the foot-steps i(b by. 

, . , ■ i.l ■ /7\ 




Copyright MCHXIX by Harry Won Tllzcr Music Pub.Co..2« W. 4«tJ» St. .NY 



/», HIT 



BEN BOPNSVEIN, 



the: 



F?^VC5» BAU 



X H| piCKANIIVII 
HARRY VON TlLZER N 

n Street. EDUIE LIAIS, Manauer. BOSTON: ?2G Tremont Stre 



CHICAGO: 143 ,\l. Dearborn Street. EDUIE LEWIS, Manager. 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Tl 



kD WRITTEN IN TWENTY YEARS 



NIG FOR SOMEONE 



p-O - ! OF* 



Chorus 




■»-ny : Some- bod -yV wait-injj, watch - ing and wait.- ing day 




i 



':. : ..; I 



by day _____ At night there's a light in the win - dow for 




rf'J. J J 1 1 J 1 1 ' I i f II' I j 1 1. I |TT I 



some- one a - cross the- foam . 



And some- hod -y's wait - ing for some 




ON 



BIG HI 



SIC PUBLISHING CO. 

'New York City 

' HARRISON. Manaoer, PHILADELPHIA: Keith's The 



A.HIT! 



MURRAY BLOOM 
Prof- W.sr. 



Comedy Riot! 

CAN YOU 

TAME WILD 

WIMMIN? 

A Sensational 
Hit! 

The Best Comedy French Sona 
HH On the Market! . 

PUT HIM 
TO SLEEP WITH 

THE 
MARSEILLAISE 

AND WAKE HIM UP 
WITH AN OO LA LA 



Better 
Than Ever! 



I 

WAN 



■ It 



LL 



PHILADELPHIA: Keith's Theatre Bldg. HARRY LINK, Manager. 



2f 



THE NEWTORK CLIPPER 



April 9, 1919 




■-■■.'- - 



An Interview With the McCarthy & Fisher 

In making my rounds of the different publishers, looking for scandal, I drifted into McCarthy and Fisher's, 
and the- first man I met was Fred Fisher. 



FRED FISHER •- 

I asked.. Fred Fisher what 
he thought. was the best song 
in his catalog andr Fred said 
^'There is nb ; suchHmng. We 
have so , many .wonderful 
songs. and each. one is so dif- 
ferent, from jtbe: : other ,that it 
is almost impossible to pick 
which is going to be. the big- 
gest hit Right now I think 
that 'EVERYBODY 
WANTS -A, KEY TO MY 
CELLAR* by Ed.._Rose, Billy 
Baskette and Levr Pollock, is 
a safe bet for the biggest 
comedy song hit of. the year ; 
but you cannot: overlook* the* 
other comedy songs^we have, 
such as 'RIP VAN WINKLE 
SLEPT WITH, ONE EYE 
OPEN,' 'OH SUSIE BE- 
HAVE* and 'BALLYHOO 
BAY.' Can you imagine such 
a thing as having four great 
comedy songs at one time? I 
suppose if I- mention some 
more songs you would say I 
am raving, but on the level, 
did you ever think -Ve could 
pick up a song like "KISSES' 
and make it one of the biggest 
hits in the country? I-ynn 
Cowan and Alex Sullivan who 
wrote 'KISSES' certainly 
deserve a lot of credit, and 
they have given Us a waltz 
song entitled T CAN'T -SEE 
THE GOOD IN GOOD 
BYE,' which looks like an- 
other one of . those things. 
Well, I have got to go along 
now and rehearse that act in 
the front room on Jimmie 
Monaco's new 'daddy* song, 
and say, it is some song. The 
title of it is ' T HE R E '.S 
ONLY " ONE THAT I 
WOULD EVER LOSE MY 
SLEEP FOR AND THAT'S 
FOR DADDY' It is one of 
those clever little- rag songs 
that only one 'Jimmie' can 
write.* So long. Why don't 
yon go upstairs and see Jack 
Mills for a minute if he isn't 
too busy." 



JACK MILLS 

I found Jack Mills on the 
third floor demonstrating for 
several acts and had to wait 
nearly half ?an>.n our bef ore I 
could even get him to give me 
a tumble. I finally got him 
in a corner and told him what 
Fred Fisher said about songs 
and then Jack . started his 
spiel, which was something 
like this: "What Fisher told 
you was the truth. We have 
such a big catalog of regular 
songs - that • ; I am -nearly 
swamped. Fisher was too 
modest to talk about bis own 
songs, but I want to tell you 
that his new song, 'EYES 
THAT SAY I LOVE YOU,' 
is. the surest-fire hit the house 
ever had. It is a real Fisher 
melody and the song lends it- 
self to so many angles that 
anybody 'can sing it. J*ll bet 
weittave twenty-five different 
choruses- on 'EYES' and ten 
different double versions. 
Just keep your eyes on this 
baby. It is going over as 
sure as the Lord made little 
apples. Another great_song 
is. Grant Clarke and Jimmie 
Monaco's first song with the 
house called "WHEN YOU 

H E A R ADR E ArM Y 
WALTZ MELODY.' Now, 
after all has been said and 
done about waltz songs, you 
can. take it from me this song 
is going to walk away with 
the bacon. Just wait until 
you catch it once from the 
front of the house, you will 
rave about it as much as I 
do. Nothing can stop it. 

Just then Jack Glogau 
walked into the room and 
Mills left me with him. 



JACK GLOGAU 
After congratulating Glogau 
for his good judgment in 
connecting himself . with . a 
live wire-house!, ~I asked .him 
for! a little scandal, but ill he 
would talk about was songs 
the house is publishing. - He 
elaborated on What Fisher 
and Mills had already told 
me, but he gave me a little 
more song talk. "Say, did you 
hear Sam Lander's and Phil 
Baker's novelty song, 'LOV- 
ERS' LANE IS CROWDED 
AGAIN?* Some title, Eh? 
Well- it is some song, right 
up to the minute ami a laugh 
in every line. We have an- 
other - great novelty - song . by 
Shelton Brooks,^ 'TELL ME 
WHY YOU WANT TO GO 
TO PAREEWHEN YOU 
CAN GET THE. 'SAME 
SWEET LOVING HERE 
AT HOME.' You know 
Shelton never wrote . a bad 
one and you ran bank all 
you've got that this one is a 
pip. This number is going 
to put all the 'parlez vous' 
songs in the shade." 

Just then someone called 
for Glogau and he left me 
flat, so I took a chance and 
knocked on the door that 
leads to. "Smiling". Leo. Ed- 
wards' office. 

." LEO EDWARDS 

Leo was- there and asked 
me rib" sit" down while he 
played his new one-step, 
'fCASTLES IN . SPAIN,*' 
which is " a. "corking number. 
Then I asked him about 
songs. Leo -said: "We have 
one ballad in the house that 
is going to make us a fortune 
just as sure as you live and 
that is 'MY LADDIE,* by 
Howard E. Rogers and Harry 
Akst" I heard the song and 
agreed with Leo. I thought 
I had heard enough songs for 
one day and started down- 
stairs, -where I ran into Jack 
McCoy oh the second floor. 



JACK McCOY 

"-Well -Jack," I said, "I 
thought I. would drop, in for 
a minute, but I have been 
here for two hours- You cer- 
Sairily- have, a wonderful -.-cata- 
log.-' "Did you hear the 
songs?" asked Jack. I told 
him I did. "I'll -bet you didn't 
hear my favorite ditty," and . 
I asked him what that might be. 
He grabbed me by the arm and 
dragged me into a rehearsal room 
and. played me an Irish song by 
Billy Tracy, Kate Elinore and 
Sam Williams, entitled "IF I. 
KNEW THAT IRELAND WAS 
FREE." That capped the climax. 

I. hear d . every . conceivable, kind of 
song under one roof that any per- 
former might want to. use. I even 
heard -someone rehearsing "SADIE - 
HARROVITCH, -TELL ME 
WHICH' IS WHICH," a ' great 
clean comedy Jew song. I started 
for the front door and bumped into 
general manager, George Friedman, 
whom the boys refer to as" "Boss." 



GEORGE A. FRIEDMAN 

He asked me into his beau- 
tifully upholstered, red and 
white, mahogany furnitured 
office -and offered me a Fa- 
tima. "Well, George," I said, 
after I sat myself down in 
the $500.00 guest chair, "this 
is a great institution you have 
and a great buncn of boys, 
and the greatest . bunch of 
songs I ever heard." "Do 
you think so?" said George, 
"well you haven't heard any- 
thing. In about four weeks 
we; are going to hand you the 
greatest' surprise of your life. 
We are going to make every band 
and orchestra leader in the country 
our friends, by. giving them the 
most wonderful catalog of- instru- 
mental numbers they ever heard." 
He showed me a stack of manu- 
scripts and out- of~.it, be--selected 
what he termed the "cream." They 
were "DARDANELLA," "Oriental 
Fox Trot by Felix Bernard; 
"LOVE STARS," Waltz, by Leo 
Edwards; "HIAWATHA 

WALTZES." by Jimmie McHugh; 
"SONG OF OMAR," Oriental Fox 
Trot, by Leo Edwards ; "STAR OF 
LIGHT," Oriental Fox Trot, by 
Jacques Adrian; "CASTLES IN 
SPATN," One Step, by Leo Ed- 
wards ; "BUDDHA," Oriental Fox 
Trot, by Lew Pollock. Then he 
sent for Arthur Lange,. who de- 
lightfully played them all over for 
me, and if what I heard was in 
those manuscripts, McCarthy and 
Fisher, Inc, have nothing to worry 
about 



April 9, : 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



I^EOUGH and Edel are doing .*. naw act. 

Ruth Findlay has been engaged for 
"First Is LasC? - " ; — "' S\ ' 




Major Reginald Barlow returned from 
France last week. 



Thompson and King are. playing a new 
act over the Mom time.- ' 



Will B. Johnstone is to write a new 

comedy for the Shuberte. 

Wm_ Lucifer sailed April 5 with the 
T. M. C. A. Overseas Unit. 



Jessie Bualey has been engaged M lead- 
ing lady of "Nightie, Nightie/' 



Aaron. Boss - has .joined- Allen 
Greeny producing department. 

■J 



and 




it has' been engaged for the 
Ie_ in_«Nlghtie,.^lghtie.V .... ... _ 

Hugh Ward has purchased the Austral- 
ian rights to "Please Get Married." ... -,-. .. 

Barry Miller and Lew King will soon 
play vaudeville in a new act. 

Philip Moeller has sold his four-story 
house on West Seventy-fifth Street. 

Donald; McDonald has been ei _ 
John P. S locum for "The Lady in 

John Cort was in Terre Haute last 
week with his "Fiddlers Three" compaay. 

Ramon Blanchard has been engaged for; 
"Msruxa" at the Park Theatre oh April 

10-, ..--,-•-- . - T- • — .£•-.. 



Maude Hansford has been engaged by 
Arthur Hopkins for the leading vomtni 
part in "The Jest." 

Al Haalon has moved his office from 
the Strand building to the fifth floor of 
the Putnam Building. 

- I B 

Paul Dasher, formerly well . known, in 
stock, is now booking with Lillian Ward 
in the Putnam Building. 

•Edward Forbes and Harry Lyons will 
.soon be seen in "Buddy's Pal,"- a new 
sketch by Alice E. Ives. 

■ - Perry Norman has been engaged for 
the. special matinees of. "Sakuntala" at 
the Greenwich Theatre; -'■' r. . 

- Henry L. Moss, the "Oklahoma Kid," wUl 
, sail with the ..Overseas Theatre , League. 
for France on April 12. 

Barbara Gordon has been engaged as 
leading woman for Otis Oliver's "The 
Naughty Bride?. Company. 

Pan! Swan will appear in a hew' series 
of dances tomorrow (Thursday) after- 
noon at the Selwyn Theatre. 

Mrs. Mary Worsvick is doing the press 
work for the Spanish organization soon 
to open at the Park Theatre. 

Wallace Carnell, an actor, had Daniel 
Hutchinson arrested last week on the 
charge of. having stabbed him. .. ,. ... 



Lester Lonargan has secured the Amer- 
ican rights to "The Mob," by John Gals- 
worthy, and will present it in New "York 
next Fall. 

Pauline Harris, formerly co-star with 
Tom Aikin in "Harvest Days" is playing 
the ingenue lead in "Milady's Gown" in 
vaudeville. 



. Mabel Withee, who recently left the 
"Sinbad" show, has joined "Little- Sim- 
plicity" taking the place of Carolyn 
Thompson.' The latter is now appearing 
again in "Maytime." 

K. M. Harvey may change the name of 
his show from Harvey's Greater Minstrels 
to the Honeymoon Minstrels, as .there are 
four bridal couples in his troupe already 
and indications of more. 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Gregory are 
haying -a new est written by A. BV Ten- ' 
ney. It is a song and talk act, with ape- ' 
cial .settings. 

Fay Baintor was out of the cast of 
"East Is West" last week due to a slight 
attack of influenra, and Helena Sinnott 
tools her part. , . . .; ( . , . .., ,. 

" Joseph' G. Ferari, the" carnival man, had 
•his- finger cut off by a motor on a new 
amusement, device he was trying to per; 
feet, last Week. 



Charles S. Beid is rehearsing a piano 
act which he will present in vaudeville 
shortly. ._.' .;-:•'.. ".'< - 

Dan Dawson, of the Drury Xane . The- 
atre, London, has been engaged for "Come 
Along." 

Marie Carroll is taking a two weeks' 
vacation after closing with "The Kiss, 
Burglar." : I vT"; t?*!*XS $v* / 

Roland Young has been engaged' by 
William Harris, Jr., to appear in "First 
Is Last." 



Robert Whrttier will shortly open "An- 
Enemy of the People," which he has ia 
rehearsal. 



returned to- the cast of 
"Penny Wise" at the Punch and 'Judy,' 
:' last week. 



Richard Pyle will open Thursday as the 
leading, juvenile in "Leave It to Jane" in 
Worcester. 



Mildred Stuart, with the act called 
"The Studio Party " is laid up with 

laryngitis. ;':• > . - ..";: ^ 

Max Montesole,. producer of "A Burgo- 
master' of Belgium," sailed for England 
last. week. ■ - f'li ... i ■.,■•". 



" J. P. WhfteaeHftas secured a lease on 
the Bockville, HI, Opera House. He will 
open it with motion pictures. ^. ,. - ff ! 

Grant ley and Dean will shortly be seen 
in a new act being written by A. S. Ten- 
ney, called "The Tin Wedding." 

Jack Haskell, former producer for J. 0. 
Williams, of Australia, arrived in London 

last week to do some, producing. j 

-John Campbell is "making the designs 
for 'the scenery and costumes of "Dark 
Rosaleen," the new Belasco piece. 

Ida; Waterman has signed with the 
Scibilia Company to appear in "Propin- 
quity," George D. Parker's comedy. 

Louise Emery las returned to the cast 
.oi_!§Penny Wise" at the. Puneh .and Judy; 

She has the part of Amelia Dobbin. 

Marie Chambers, Bnrf ord Hampton and 
Snzanne Morgan have been engaged by 
Adolph Kl&uber for "Nightie, Nightie." 

Olive. White, actress and wife of Will- 
iam Farnum, is mourning the loss of her 
mother, Mrs. Sarah White, who died last 

week. y -."'■■ *''.'; 



Vera Finley , Edward Elli a, Mitchell Har- 
ris and; Grace Henderson have been en- 
gaged for "O Peggy, Behave," Owen Da- 
vis's new play. 

Frank Huyler will tour vaudeville after 
he closes with. Chauncey Oleott in' The 

Voice 'of McConnell,"' in an act used by 
Wajter . Morrison. . 

Burt and Hate Bolton, known in vaude- 
ville and other -branches of the show world 
as. mu sici a n s, have lost' their mother, who 

died in Blissfleld, Mich. 

; -.The Prince lima Quartette was the fea- 
ture of the program of the Concert Din- 
ner' Dance' given last Sunday evening at 

' Murray's Roman Gardens. 

Mabel Burke, who sings regularly at 
' the Fifth Avenue, went down to Proctor's 
Twenty-third Street last week, where she 
offered a. few animated songs. 

Lieut. Walter Wanger has formed a 
partnership with Gilbert Miller and. will 
go to London, Eng., to join him. in his 
producing operations in that city. 

1 -*«t- w -.. - • 

The Berrick Brothers are one of a num- 
ber of act b brought from the coast by 
Paid Allen, of Allen. . and Green.' They 
have booked it over the Fox time. 



Anna Hinkle has joined the "Flo Flo" 
Company at the Forrest Theatre, Phila- 
delphia, Pa, _. .. . .__ 

Helen Greenleaf Patterson baa been 
added to the dancers of "Lampland" in 
"Everything." 

Lieut. Walter F. Wanger has returned 
to New York after eighteen months' serv- 
ice' in France." 



Molly Mcln tyre will appear in. musical 
coinedy next Fall under the direction of 
William Wade Hinshaw, of; the Opera 
Comique. f 

Bias Ryan is.- to. make .a - long - tour in 
"Tea for- Three," starting in. Halifax in 
the near future and extending to the 
Pacific. . ... . 1 



Oscar Eagle, .who staged "Susan Len- 
nox" for the Shuberts, has returned from 
Washington,; where -that show opened, to 
rehearse another play for the Shuberts. 

Jack Boas, who played the leading sole 
in the circus scene in "Everything" at 
the Hippodrome, has been mustered out 
of the service. He was at Pelham Bay. 

Ethel Towneeud, who closed with "My 
Irish Cinderella" Company three weeks 
ago, has gone to Atlantic City; N. J., and 
will probably remain there for the Sum- 
mer. 



Max Rogers will open new. offices at 
1644 Broadway, April 30. He will make 

a specialty of producing musical shows 
and revues. 



Ethel Du Fre Houston "has been ' en- 
gaged for. "Come Along" at the Nora 
Bayes' Theatre. 



Gabriella BesanxonL a contralto from 
Italy, who recently arrived in New York, 
has signed with the Metropolitan-Opera 
Company to sing principal roles next 



McKay Morris. -and Leslie Austin have 
been engaged for "Dark Horses," put into 
rehearsal by. William Harris, Jr. Samuel 
Shipman and Percival Wilde wrote the 
play- 
Annie Warden has had a sketch called 
"Patsy with a Past," written for her by 
Aaron Boss. The playlet has been taken 
from Ross's three-act play of the, same 
name.. 



Harold Fuller MeSish will join the east 
of "39 East" as soon as he la mustered 
out of the army. 



Eahn and Bouwman have opened an of- 
fice for their Brooklyn studio in .Boom 

, TT 7 — t ■■-. .^i .'• MWt Potman Buflding.. , Among. the recent. 

Chambers, Bnrf ord Hampton and work for artists is a new setting for Miss 
Susanne 'Morgan have been" engaged for "Herlo, swimming act, and decorations for 
"Mghtkv Nightie.*- • " W3«*3VJ ^-t^. Soto Bra,*,. 



Mr. and Mrs. George A. Barrett have 
rejoined the "Girls de Looks" burlesque 
company at St. Louis, Mo., after a two 
weeks' absence due to an attack of the 
"fin." 



George Vivian, who recently returned 

- from London, is now stage , maanger . for 

"Good Morning Judge" at the Shnbert. 

He succeeds Cecil CloveHy, who has ' 

engaged for "The Jest." 



Adeline Vehi, who played the prima 
donna role in "Msruxa," Amadeo Viva's 
opera, in its initial performance in Spain, 
will have that role when it has its Amer- 
ican premiere at the Park here.-- : ^: r 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Belmont and their 
seventeen birds have been engaged to of- 
fer "A Canary Symphony" in the Ziegfeld 
"Nine O'clock Review" and the "Midnight 
Frolic?? on, the "N«w Amsterdam roof. 

Maryland Tyson, formerly of the Tyson 
Sisters in vaudeville .and sister olj Anna 
Sawyer and Mrs. John G. Jerraon, , was 
married at Co 11 in ga wood, N. J, Feb. 14th, 
to W. W. Steele, a business man of Phil- 
adelphia. .-.;"■:* 

Audrey Boat Wilson, daughter of 
Frank H. Wilson, of the team known as 
the Wilson Brothers, is 01 at the Hen- 
rotin Hospital, Chicago, where she la re- 
cuperating from an operation. She is 
doing nicely. ' 

Billy Hagadale and LOa Sims, the for- 
mer recently released from the Navy, are 
featured in a new girl act with nine peo- 
ple, of whom six are in the chorus. A. S. 
Tenney wrote the act, for which a final 
title has not as yet been chosen. . 

Robert Y. Newman, brother 'of Alfred 
Newman, "The Boy Pianist," musical di- 
rector of the May Irwin show, has been 
appointed assistant chairman of publicity 
for the Field Day of the Actors' Fund of 
America. 



William Morgan, who has managed the 
Wilier Theatre, Zanesville. O., since hut 
Fall, has gone to Salisbury, 6. CLatO re- 
sume his position as secretary-treasurer 
of the Sparks Shows, with which he has 
been associated for several seasons. 



"IV IE. Hbyt, of the Columbia Theatre 
Building, has a musical act in rehearsal. 
There are two men and two women in 
the .act, the former playing the*' cornet 
and one doubling on the piano, while the 
: men play the trombone, one also perform- 
ing on the violin. _ . . 

Walker and Cosy close with the "Ship 
Ahoy Girls" .at Spartanburg, 8. C, on 
April 19. On April 28 they will be., seen 
with the Rfpgimg Brothers iuwlBarnum 
and Bailey Circus, doing their ait in the 
aide show. Walker was with the Ring- 
lings in 1910, '11, »12 and lis, 

Marjorle Rambean and Hugh Dfflham 
celebrated the" completion of the first 
month of their marriage . Sasfc -Friday 
night by giving a dinner party at Mur- 
ray's Roman Gardens.; Theatrical] people 
-present included Norman Hackett and 
Phoebe Hunt • 

- I 

Milt Mooney, whose! horse act was at 
: the'- Hippodrome several years ago. states 
that the horses sold ! at Dorian djfi. las t 
' week to satisfy a feed '. bin and which 
were represented as having belonged to 
him, were not his property at all, having 
been turned over to-Durland's over a year 
ago- 




S«x*,or toTrir SUNSHKE Of TOJR SMLT 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 9, 1919 





« 



■•'. • 
■ % ■-. 



With JOS. M. GAITES' 

IT FROM ME" 



Rep., LEWIS & GORDON 

Pake* Theatre Bld». 



44th STREET THEATRE; NEW YORK, NOW 






■I 



"ff t/f.n.f.ii, .-i 



The Quaint 

Comedienne 



UNA CLAYTON 

Assisted by HERBERT L. GRIFFIN In "KEEP SMILIN' " 

Palace Theatre, New York City, Week of April Fourteenth 
TWELVE YEARS OF KEITH VAUDEVILLE MANAGEMENT FRANK EVANS 



E.F.. 



A J. MUKOOCX 



r. r. 



B. f. Keith 

deville Exchange 



(Agency) 



Hew 

B.F.KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 

Arts** Cm IM* Direct by AMmmSh S» K. kmigimm 




JIMMIE HODGES' 

At TRACTIONS 

4-SHOWS NOW PLAYING-4 

Jimmle Hodges Musical Comedy Co. 

Pntty Baby Eastern— Pretty Baby Tabloid 

Jimmle Hodges Company with himself 

Can use a few more chorus girls 

Address J. E. EVISTON, General Manager, 

M or art Theatre, Elrnira, N. Y. 



ED. 



CORELLI & GILLETTE chas. 



VARIETY EHTERTAiNERS 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Executive Office., 130 Wert 46th St., New York 
JACKW. LOEB 

EDGAR ALLEN 

with artiste ires* 12 to B. or by 






John Quigley Theatrical Agency, Inc. 

Can book acts consecutively for 5 weeks. Extra Sundays, 
Short Jumps. New England's Leading Independent 
Agency. 184 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. All corre- 
spondence answered. 



Still doing good of Moulin Rouge . 
Will begin rehearsals with Cohan and Harris' New Production 

latter part of May. 
THANKS TO MAX ROGERS 



GEO. KALALUHTS HA WAIIANS 

DHL GEO. SOFRANSftl 



BOOKED SOLID LOEW 






April 9. 1919rii£L > Sses 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



B. K. KETTFTS VAUDE. EXCHANGE 

NEW YORK CITY. 

Riverside — Helen Were — Libonsti — CUadla Cole- 
man — Lady Alice's Pets— Stuart Barnes — Marie 
dhill— Geo. White— Ben Bern!*— O'Donnell & 
Blair. • 

Colonial — Sailor Rellly — Jimmy Hussey Oo. — 
Alan Brooke. Oo. — Mtio — Poor Morton* — Owea l£e- 
Qlveoey — Bradley A Ardlne— Dehnar A Hackett 
—"Too Much Harried." 

Royal— •'Not Yet Marie"— Mack A Vincent— 
Wo. Cutty— Brewer & Gardner— Fred Allen — 
Hoes & Frye. 

Auambra— Howard's Ponies— Lillian Shaw— 
Croaby'a Cornera — Watts A Hswley — Whitlnx A 
Bert — Rrford's Senaation — Chaa. Reianer. 

tt Street (April 7-8)— I)e Boors; Slat era — Sogers 
& Barrett — Powers A Wallace — The Turn of the — 
Card— Dooley A Dooley. (April 10-12)— Lillian 
McNeil— Alice Nelson A Co.— Al Raymond — Al- 
rerua A Laert — Bernard A Duffy — Boyarr Troupe. 

Fifth Aranue (April 7-9)— Andrew Mack— Jack 
Kcrriasey- (April 10-12)— Owen McQlTenej— 
Lelpslg— Conway A Fields— Wood A Wade — Cbas. 
Kenna — Bell A Caron. 

185th St. (April 7-9)— -yip, Yip Yaphankera" 
—Dean Moore A Co. — Frank ' A Milt Britton. 
(April 10-12) — Harry Breen — Tracey A McBrlde 
—Three Liakos Girls — Jack Morrtssey. 

Mth Street (April 7 0) KerllUl -Variety FOOT 

— MoLaln. Gates A Co.— Rosamond A Dorothy— 
Sahlna La Pearl A Co. — Sandy Shaw — Oelmar A 
Hackett. s se t pril lO-lSf^-TomsU ="»do^-8*rg«ifiit-'- - 
Jimmy Dixon — Henn A Barlow— Tad ■ A Cortnna 
Pn-tton — Qnlxey Foor— Joy, w. A Lewis— Gypsy 
Trio. 

BROOKLYN. 
Orpheam. — Oeorgte Price Co. — Iran Baakoff Oo. 
—Frances Reynold* — Franklin Ardelle Co. — Jaa 
Watts Co.— Van A Bchenck— Bert WiUlama. 

Bu.hwick — Chris Blchard* — "Art*' — Belle Baker. 

ALBANY, N. T. 
Prootsrs (April 10-12)— Leona La Mar— Patrleola 
—Eddie Oarr A Co. — Stone A Hayes — Gliding 
O'Meers. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
■Keith* Meredith A B n ooecr Wtltbt A Dietrich 
—Edmund Hayes A Co.— Marla-Lo— Lander Bros. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 
Maryland— 81. One* * Ritchie — Patrleola — 
Juliette— Hyams A Melntyre — Sharrocka, The — 
Mehllnger A Myers — Color Genu. 
BtriTAIO. N. T. 
gh**'*— Hickman Bros.— Harry Hlne* Ba i l i e 
ruber Co.— Edna Loby — lahlkawa Jans— Moran A 
Wiser- Darren A Edwards— Ford Sisters A Co. 

COLOMBUB, OHIO. 

Keith's— The Dnttona— GUdlns O'Maaras— Clark 
Sifters— Bruce Duffel Co.— Marx Broa.— Frank 
Qaby — Fred Berrena. 

OLKVZLAND, OHIO. 

•Karl*'*— Btbel - MeDonoagb— CUWon OrwwroroV— 
Arnold A AUman— Willie Dale A Bro.— Le Halts 
A nayea — Creasy A Dayne — Dorse's Celebrities. 

cmOTNNATI, OHIO. 
Keith's— Florrnse 000— "What Girls Can Do"— 
Eddie Foyer— Morton A Glass — Halteo A Fuller. 
DETROIT, MICH. 
Temple — lana Stephens— Grenadier Girls — 
Uerie BrooaoQ— Henry Lewis— Symmoo* * 
Btantly— Stanley A Blrns— Jsnls A Ohaplow — Or- 
TlUe Stamm. 

— DATTON, OHIO. 
Xalth'a — Gardner Hartman — Bobbin* A Oo. — 
Oonlon A Rica — Mrs. Gene Hughes — Poor Haley 
Slater* — Naator A Vlucsnt. . . . • - 

ELTZABITH. N, J, 
Procter's (April T-0)— Jimmy Hussey — Mkrle 
But;* 00.— Ida May Chadwlck— Mallta Bonconl 
—Jordan A Wilde — Sergeant Jack Hanlay — (April 
10-12)— Jimmy Huaaey— Swift A Kelly— Dotaon— 
Frank Wilbur. 

EBIE, PA. 
Oolonlal— Robbie Gordone— Frances Kennedy — 

Kotne A OOX — Hugh Herbert A Co. — Aerial 

Mitchell*. 

GRAND RAPIDS. 1A. 
Empreaa— Prosper A Moret — Scotch Lsda A Las- 
sies—Bob Albright— "8w*etle*"— BUly Rogers. 
HAMILTON. CAN. 
Orpheum— Dickinson A Deagoo— Tarxan— Guerro 
Carmen— The Brands — Conroy A Murphy. 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Keith's— Frank Crnmlt— Jean Adair Co.— Area 
Comedy « — Adroit Bros. — Sylvester A Vance. 

LOWELL, MASS. 
Xeith'a— Mlllette Slaters Co.— H. A A. Seymour 
—Jack lngllsh— Blkins. Pay A Blkins— Mr. A Mia. 
J. Barry — Lawton — Challen Keke. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Keith's — Mme. Chllson Obrmsn— Msrconl A Ftta- 
glbbon — Schwarta Bros. — Area Sisters — 'Some- 
where in Franca" — Moran A Hack. 
MT. VERNON. N. ». 
Proctor's (April 7-0)— Boyarr. Trio— Ward A 
Tan— Conroy A Field*— Crosby's Corners— Llapalg 
— Lamret Trio, (April 10-12)— Nellie V. Nlchola 
— Burt A Harry Gordon — Frank A Milt Britton. 

■OSTIEAl, CAS. 

Orpheum — Booney A Bent — Parsons A Irwin — 
It. A J. Connolly— Geo. N. Brown A Co.— Blank' A 

White— Mayo A Lynn— Rostock's Riding Brtool. 
PORTLAND. ME. 
Keith's— Fink's Mules-Juliette Dika— Jam** 
Sato Co.— Norton A Noble— WU1 J. Ward A Girls 
— Petty Beat A Bro. 



1?oses Mean Love 

iV - AND 

Love Means You 

Ballad 

Successor »"THE SUNSHWE OT YOUR SMF 






PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Keith's— Dorothy Toye A sister— Herbert Clif- 
ton — Emma Cams. 

PrTTTiSPFT-PTfTfli PA* 
Keith's— MlpiOD— Roe* A Mood— To to — Olga 
FetroTa — Reynolds 4r Donegon — Toney A Norman — 
Harry Bereaford Co. — Kartelll — Doc O'NelL 
PBOVTDKNOE, B. L 
Keith's— "Memory Book"— Apollo Trio"— Lougfc- 
llu A West— "In the Dark"— Derla A DarraU— 
Ward A Van. ' 

ROCHESTER, N. T. 
Temple — Florence Tempest Oo. — Bert Bwor — Al 
Bbsyne— Connell A Gibson — Degnon A Clifton — 
Half A Lockett* — Millar Bradford — Oorxelu'e 

Three, • 

-BOHESXCTADY, H. T. 
Proctor's (April 10-12)— Seven Bracks— Mary 
Melville — Bond WUsoo A Oo.- : -Hogh OUrka— On- 
cart Banks. 

TBOT, H . T. 
Prootor'a (April 10-12) — "Forest Fire" — Taraan 
—Brans A'^Wilson— Xbuder "Broa.— HBDatmotT A 

Hagney — ciande Boode A FraarJa. 

TORONTO. CAN. 
Shea's— Nash A O'DouneU— Docney * Sale*— 
Green A De Ller— Wellington Cross— Buth Boys. 

TOLEDO. OHIO. 
Keith'*— American Ace— Chill A Bo tn a lne 
Gertrude Hoffman Martin A Bay**— Hall A 
Brews — Bdward Marshall. 

WASHXKSXOH, D. O. 
Keith's Bahlns La Pearl— TJ. B. Navy Ja«a 
Bend— Lbjhtners A Alexander— Wm. Gaxton Co. 
— Adele Bowland — Gmber'a Animals— Boa* A 



WXLHXNOTON, PUT. 
Derrick— BUly ssllott— OaUl Troupe— Vsnsattas 
—The Vlrlsns— Jo A Agnes Beilly — Mshoney A 

Bogers. 

YOUBG6TOWN, OHIO. 
Hlppedreaie— Helen* Dsrls — Krans A La Ball* 
— Bit* Maria Orchestra— Cycling Brunettes— Clif- 
ton Walker — Edna Goodrich. 

YONKEBB. H. T. 
Prater's (April 7-W— Norman Thsima— Bhaw A 
Campbell— Swift A Kelly — Qnlxey Poor— Tomakl 
Duo. (April 10-12)— Kartelll— Boaamond A Doro- 
thy— -Oood Night Teacher Alexander A Field*— 
The Saobacka. 

OHPHELIM CIRCUIT 

OmOAOO, XXL, 
Palace — Frisco — WlUlams A Wolrae — Officer 
Yoke* A Don— Bowers, Walters A Crocker — I. A 
B. Smith — Koban Japa— Kltner A Beeney — Bol- 



linger A Reynold*. 

Majaati 



tie— Sheila Terry— Leo Beers— Cbas. Grape- 
win — Marshall Montgomery — Kathryn Murray — 
Susan Tompkins — Ferry — Brlanta, 

CAIOARI, OAK. 

Orphswn— Lucille Csranagh — Basal* Browning 
—Mason A Heeler— Clark A Verdi S as becks — L* 

Bo* A Dnpree. 

DENVER. COLO. 
Orphaum — Florenoe Robari* — Sas Smith — 
Brenck's Models — Wsusor A Palmer — Si-erest* 
Circus — JPrlmroaa Poor — Jan Ruhlnl. 
DULUTH, Km. 
Orpheam— "RubeTlila"— WhlUedge A Berkwlth 
Jennlngi A Mack—Jos. Bernard A Co.— Dunham 
A Bdwards— Sylria Loyal A Co.— Patrleola Myers. 

SB norm, IA. 

Orphaaja— Blossom Seeley A Co.— Harmony 
Kiel* — Kennedy A Booney — Hector — Soot Gibson 
— Turner A Grace. 

KABSAS CITY. HO. 
Orphean — Bae Samuels — Whit* Coupon*— Rob- 
inson's Elephants — Westony A Lorrane — Ohaa. A 
Madeline Dnnbar— Bamsdella A Deyo— Lea Kohl- 
mar A Co. 

LOS ANOKLZS. OAL. 
Orpheam — Four Hosbands— Rockwell A Fox — 
Flanagan A Edwards— Lewis A White— Nolan A 
Nolan— Demarest A Collette— Bert Wheeler A Co. 
— Valeaka Snratt A Co. 

lnrOOLH, NEB. 
Orpheam — Jos. Howard's Berne— Claodio* A 
Scarlet — Walter Fenser A Co. — Valladtaa Leop- 
ards—Hampton A BUke— Bennett Slste i s , OU sel 

Urchin. " 

KEHPKIB, TEHN. 
Orpheum — Alia Moakowa A Co.— Yates A Bead 
— Ryan A Ryan. 

WTLWATTKEK, WIS. 

KsJsatLe— Mabel McCane A Oo. — Lemalre A 
Crouch— Smith Austin — Cbas. Aheam Troupe — 
Garclnettl Bros, — Lnnettc Sisters. 

MINNEAP0L1B, HXaTH. 
Orpheum — "An American Ace" — Ball A West 
— Mule King A Co. — C. A B. Barry — Cameron 
DeVltt— Aerial Sbawe — Leo Beers. 

MEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Orpheum — Sea Wolf — "Thrn Thick A Thin" — 
Lydell A Macey— Bison City Poor — H. A G. Ella- 
worth. 

OMAHA, VEB. 
Orpheum — Heart of Annie Wood — Bert Baker A 
CO. — Burn* A Frablto — Bailey A Cowan — Wm. 
Smyth e A Co. — Jos. Jefferson Co.— Shrapnel 
Dodgers. 

OAKLAND, OAL. 
Orpheum — Eddie Foy A Co. — Girls of Altitude — 
Ilobson A Bentty — Chaa. Wilson — Klrksmith Sla- 
ters — Melntyre*. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 
Orpheum— Miracle— Da Tl« 4 Rich— lilchey Bros. 

— Ruth St. Denis — Harriet Rempel — Genaro A 

Gr.ld— -Paul la Verr* A Bro. 

'ST. LOUIS, HO. 

Orpheum — Bessie Clayton A Co. — Nltta Jo.— a 
Whltflcld A. Ireland— Ban Twins— J. A M. Hat- 
klna — J. A K. Demaco. 



SALT LAKE CITY, TJTAH. 
Orphaum — Joe Jackson — Breudel A Bert — Jaa. C- 
Morton A Co. — Briscoe A Bann— Creole Fashion 

put*. 

BT. Pi-ITL. atTJIH. 
Orphsaxa— 'Morgan Dancers — Santos A Hay**— 
Herschcl Henlene A Co.— Brterre A King— But- 
son* A Delilah — Caroline Kohl A Co. 
8ACRAHEKT0, STOCKTON AND TBXBB0. CAL. 
Orpheum — Theo. Koalofl' A Oo. — Adams A Grif- 
fith — Jean Barrios — Ooakley A DnnleTy^Flemlng* 
—Martha. Hamilton A Co.— Ethel- Natalie A Oo. 
BAH FRANCISCO, OAL. 
Orpheum— 8am Mann A Co. — Jouanl A Berry — 
Chaa. Irwin — Polly Moran — Helen Beholder — 
Fantlno Troup*— Hoeconl Broa.— Paul Dickey A 
Co. 

■ALT LAKE OTTT, TJTAH. 
Orpheum — John B. Hymar A Co.— McKay A 
Ardlne— Henry B. Toomer— LeToio*T-61d T O P * **) 
— Bedriquas Br**.— Walter A Vralfara. 

' _ . spsaeerw JKssssl , - *»■ «i 

- Orphsum— Becklrsa Ere— Crawford A Broderle 
-NK* Johnson— Bessie Bern pel A C*.— Msrritt A 
Bridewell— ^The Sterlings. 

vAjroo v Tn, oam. 
Orphsum — Annette KaBarmann A Oo. — Great 
Lester— Gene Greene— Margaret Young— BL A B. 
Adair— Alee A Dot Lamb. 

WIBBlPaW , CAN. 
Omhenm— Trlxta Friganaa — Hand amrl* A Co. 
— aidnay A Townlsy— M»s B~ 
Wortb A Co.— WlUoa Aubrey Trio, 

loew cotcuir 



■llSl ' SStT. , CAN. 

Loswa,— Walsh ' A Ed ward— UcOnrmsck A Irr- 
lng— Carlisle A Boemer— Jack A Tommy Weir— 
Whirlwind Gypsies. 

NEW KOCKELLK, N. T. 

- Loswa (first Half)— WlUlam Dkk- Nayon's 

Bird* (Lest Hal f)— Fern * A Howell. 

PROVTOKKpX, B. L 

Kmssy (First Half)— Precanlo Bros.— Goeta A 

Duffy^flaael Hsrrlngton A Oo,— Jullsav Hall — 

Chaifcsste Ststers. (Last Hslf)— Bolxar Bro*. — 

I-ane^A Harper— "A Regular Business Man"— 
HsXUer Stain V Phillip*— Margot A Francois. 
aVeUaTBlTBXB. MASS. 
Brsodwaj (First Half)— Bolgat Bros.— Lan* A 
Harper — "A Regnlsr Boslnss* Man"— Hudler, 
Stein A Phllllo*— Margot A Francois. (Last Half) 
— Precardo Broa. — Goeta A DutTy— Haaei Harring- 
ton A Co.— Julian HaU— Ohalfonta Slaters. 
SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA. 
Orasd Opera Hon** (First Half) — Fags A Whit* 
— Gorman Bros.— Lillian A Bnulllo Broa. (Last 
Half) — Herbert Brooks— Nettle Carroll Troup*. 
TORONTO. OAK. 
. Years St* »* A N it* CalTsrt A Shayi 
Stewart A CaeyiBswl A Msck— Dtxon 
JoUe Flynn'a Mtn.treU. 

rou cmcurr 



Smarinan (First Bain— trank Shield* -WH- 
sou A Whlbnnn— Wutar A larks Ohsihwt* Law- 
lie— Ash A Hyams— Hason A Cole— "Han from 
Denrar" — Lyon* A Yeaco-^EquiBo Broa. cLeai 
Half)— Sherman A Boa* Ryan A Moore— Bdward* 
Bro*.— Jim BeynoM* — Hal Stephens A Co.— 
Beolah Pearl— Chlabolm A Breen— Lyons A Yosce 



-Pall -.IFiist ^HaUJ-flr-lnkal Jm _ 
Clark A Co.— Howard A Sadler — Amoro* A Ooay. 
(Last Half)— Isabel D'artssaTrA <X\-StlN A 
L^lgbtoo — Kesting A Walton. 

Plasa (First Half)— Mshoney A Aunorn-Cor- 
cnraB A Hack— Adelaide Bell A Cler Club Jaa* 
Bto*. (Laat Halt)— Cecil A Bernlrs Bmlly 
Smlly A Co. — Oopeland A' McClond)— Dan Jns*. 

HAXTTOU), OOJTjr. 

Pell (Tint Halt)— Naka* Jatsr^-Engsn* Bm- 
mett — H. Langford A A. Fredrlcka— Liberty 
—Winston's Water Liens. (Last Half)- 
Mannlng— Falli Herman I .lag A T 
A Sadler— Winston's water Llona. 

NEW HAVEN, OOHH. 

False* (gVrat Half)— Isabel D'Armand It Co.— 
asstso A Lelghton-Keating A Walton— BIgototto 
Bra. (Laat Halt)— Murphy A White— Amorea A 
Obey — Diamond A Brennan. 

Bijo* (Pint Half)— Cecil A Bernlce— Larry 
Ballsy A Co. Bon Smith. (Last Half)— HahasaaF 
A Auburn— Corcoran A Mack— Adelaide Bell A 
Clef Club Jaax Band. 



Lincoln Square (First Half)— Sherman A Boa* 
—Mkbel Best— Ohlaholm * Bia iu FiWnd A 
Downing Koko CarnlaaL (Laat Half )— G angler* 
Dogs— Henderson A HoUJoay— "Pretty Soft" — 
I'anl Bolln— 7-legler Twins A Oo. 

Dslancsy Street (First Half)— OUlla Trio— 
Jewett A Elgin — Francis A Connolly — "Pretty 
Seft" JradlsoT TsMislas flafl P"***l A 00* LLast 
Half)— O. K. Legal— Dorothy Doyle— Nixon A 
Sands— Dorothy Hayes A Co.— Walah A McAroy— 
Sterling A Marguerite. 

VUrUria (First Half)— Oanglara Dogs— MM 
A Dixie— "Old Faahloned Girl" — Chang Wah Fonr 
— Zlegler Twins A Co. (Last Half)— Jack A Jam* 
laniflln Msl Eastman — "iMan from Danrar" — 
Murphy A White— «tehard. the oreat. 

Greeley aViuara (First Half) -Frank Hartley— 

Byan A ' Moore— Henderson ' A HalWdsy fSISS 
Moratl A Co.— Pan! Bolln— SbsrBog A Marguerite. 
(Laat Half)— The Lslands— Mabel Best— Ash A 

Hyams— Cooper A Rlcsrdo— Amoros A Obey. 

National (First Hslf)— O. K. Bc**l— NUon A 

Band*— Herbert Brooks A Co.— Sol Barns— Barg- 
ban A Oroha. (Lest n*lf) — Net Burna — Barry 
MrOormack A On.— Morley A KcCarthy flasUfO— 
Koko Carnlral. 

Orhpaum (First Half)— Tyler A CroUus— Lelanda 
— (Mel Eastman — Dorothy Hayes A' Co. — Cooper A 
Rlcardo— Dsraa Bro*. (Laat Half)— Gillie Trio- 
Dudley Douglas— "Old Fsshls— d Olrl"— fki i rsg 
Wah Four— Wlrbur A Lyke. 

Arenuo B (First Hslf)— CamBI* Peraonl A Co, 
— Duquesne Comedy Foor. (Laat Half) — Wm. 
Dick— Friend A Downing— Naynon't Birda. 
BROOKLYN. V. T. 

Metropolitan (First Hslf)— Dawson Lanlgan A 
Corert— Beaale LeOonnt — Montana Fire — Welsh A 
McAroy— Kremka Broa. (Last Half)— Bqalllo 
Bros.— Doylo A Btatoe— Bply Swwde, Han A Oo. — 
Carole Trio— Cart Bostnl A Oo. 

SeXalb (sirat_HaU>^E4wards Bros.— Harria A 
Lyman — Breseott — Jim Bayaslds — LaPetlte Jennie. 
(Lest Half)— Darns Bros.— Knight A BawtoUo— 
Freecott— Joe Darcy — Baraoan A Oroha. 

Palaoe (First Half)— Carols Trio— Lola SalMnl 
A Co. (Last Half)— LaPetlte Jennie A Oo- -Do 
qnesne Comedy Four. 

Warwick (First Hslf) -Arthur Pickens A Co. — 

Ferns A' HowsU. (Last Half )— OsmiUe Peraonl A 
Co.— Lola Selblnl A Oo. 

Fulton (First HaU)— Jack A June LanghUA— 
Knights A Sawtelle— Jo* Darcy — •"Submarine F-7." 
(Last Half)— Wilson A Whitman— Charlotte Lew- 
lie— Harris A Lyman— Sol Bems— "Bnb m axta* 

BALTIMORE. HD. 
Hippodrome — Swain* Oat* A Rata — Mayo A 
V.Tina— GUI A Veak— Brady A Mshoney— 'Days 
of Long Ago." 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Orphaum (Flrtt Hall)— Cornells A Adrle— De- 
: Witt A Guntber — Gray A Graham— Bertram Sax- 
ton A Co.— John Clark A CO. (Last Half) — 
Wastlka A Understudy — Lillian Calrert — Ward A 
CuUen— Walter Baldwin. Jr. A Co.— George A. 
Mack— Three Lordens. 

* FAIX BTVEB, MASS. 
BUou (First Half) — Waatlka A Understudy— 
Ward A CuUen — Walter Baldwin, Jr. A Oo. — 
Oeorxe A. Mack— Three Lordens. (Last Half) — 
Cornelia A Adele-»DeWltt A Gtmther — Gray A 
Graham— Bertram A Barton— John Clark A CO. ' 

HAMILTON. CAN. 
. Loews— Johnson, Baker A Johnson-Jessie Bead 
• — Van A Carrie Arery — Ward A Thornton — Per- 
i nlkofl A Bee* RaHett. 

'' ' aOBOXEN. H. ■>.■ 
Lyrio (First' ! Half) — Christopher A . Walton — 
Galrin A Cal»ln— Nettle Carroll Troup*. (Last 
Half)— Fagg A Whit* — Arthur Pickens A Co. — 
Gorman Bros.— The Brlghtona. 



Pslaea (First Hslf)— Win too Bros.— Msonlng A 
Lee— Bill Praitt— Candy Shop — Barrey, Haver A 
Grayce — Mar*. HlU'a Comedy Clrcna. (Last Half) 
— Lorner Girl*— Ben Smith— Wilfred Clark A On. 
— Humford A Stanley— Rlgoletto Br**. 
ICBANTON. PA. 

Pell (First Half)— J. K. Brennan A Bert Bah* 
— Among Those P res en t — Oscar Lorn I lis Oln 
graaa. (Last Half)— Carroll Beating A Fsy— WU- 

son Bros Three Daring Stater*. 

WATEBBURY. OONN. 

Pall (First Half)— "That'* My Wife." (task 
Half)— "Pretty Beta." 

WORCESTKB. HAM. 

Plan* (First Hslf)— AUos M lug Bully 

Bmlly A Co.— Mumford At suniay— Daa Jan*. 
(Last Half)— BUI Prultt— TO* Candy She**, 

Pell (First Hslf) — Lorner Oht M S f i iif B j A 
White — Ling A Long— Diamond A Biaasss 
Pallx Horman. CLast HalO— Wtntaa Bros.— 
Manning A La* — B. Langford A A. Frederick* — 
Barrey. Hsney A Grayce— Marg. HUla ~ 
dree*. 

PAMTAGES CnCUTT 

BUTTE, KQATT. 
raatages (Four Day*)— Dorothy Boy* 
Hldelll — John G. Spark* A Co. — Denn Linn — Klana 
A Termini— Hoosler atria. 

CALOABT. CAN. 
P anbag sg Caltes Broa, A Co.— Race A BAre— 
Butn St Denis— A lice Tod dy— Joe «***. 
DENVER. COLO. 
Psatagss— Le Boy. Talma A B i mn t stldo TsB 
Dyke A Bro.— Will Stanton A Co.— Ssntneet— 

Franda A Wilson. •- ■ - 

KDHOBTOB, CAB. "afl| 
Tsillsgss rainy Pti Jaas Band Tu s* Belly — 
Mortha KoeseU A Co.— Bockar A Winifred -Lucy 
Valmoot A Co. 

OREAT rAIXB, BSBX 
Paxtags* (First Half)— Gay WsaUUck'a BUMpgfH 
Bide**— Eddie Boss — Raines A Goodrich — D*nl- 
abawn Dancara— Gordon A Day. 
- MB ANOBUB. "at 

Pantaaee -World Wide Reroe— Ned Norworth A 
Co.— Prorol — Old Time Darkle* — Dsltojlr^Marawn* 
A Deltoo. '!we>e»_- v -. . 

OAKLAaTD. OAL. , ... 

Pantagws— Magaain* Olrl— Law Wilson— MeCoo 
nsll A a)Sieri*«» — Van A Vernon— Joe Dealer A 

Sister. 

OwPKH, VTAH. 
Tsntss-a* la Petite Bee— Tallyhe Girls — Jack 
Boa*— BOrke A Burke — Znhn A Dreia— La Toy'a 

Dogs. ■ 

PORTLAND, OBB. 
passage* — Poor Bard* — Tromio— aB B —I d * JB se- 
erlc — Walser A Dyer— UUlan Wstaon— P adrlaf s 
Wonka ' 

MB oai. 

Pantagw* — "Some Baby"— Harri* A Minnln* . 
Sterer A Lorejoy— MaidVa DsXoasJ— Victoria Ftmr 
— WIU Morris. 

(Conlinurd on Page 28) 







- •'■- -is 



24 



THE J 



9?5& MSSt' 



r 



April 9, 1919 



BERT BERTRAND 



<t 



FEATURED WITH CHARLES BAKER'S 

High Fliers" 



.. ■-:■■■■ - \ " ■'.'; 



STAR, BROOKLYN, THIS WEEK 



OLYMPIC, NEW YORK, NEXT WEEK 



W^'jifcfi! 



iM H p fef Will tpring a big surprise next season— Watch me 

BK • ft i*?: 2k ■ : - JsU-''- *.-■■' \ i *.-.:' _.'--- ... .' • "J.. 



' :*>■ 



.;:?;. i- • -.' • -id* 



Season's Sensation 
Direction Ike Weber 



GRACE HOWARD 



Soubretie 
CHAS. WALDRON'S 

BOSTONIANS 



STARS O F B U R L E S Q UE 



wyy/y>yA///^////////////////^^^ 




PAT WHITE SHOW 




EW 








R 



ROGERS and DONNE 



RALPH JAZZ WOP 



ELSIE PRIMA DONNA 



/Hello PapeeV 
V Company ) 



DONNA 



E D E MAE 



MILUON 

DOLLAR 

DOLLS 



RA Gl 



ON 



IRWIN' 



FEATURED 

MIDNIGHT 
MAIDENS 



IMI 



AND 



SIGNED 

FOR NEXT 

SEASON 



EDDIE AKIN 

JUST PUNTING ABOUT MIDNIGHT MAIDENS 



JIMMY D U IM N 


ANNA GRANT 

WMfc Pa* WUt^t bktr QM« * «*»• wuwr _4 — Qty tilMt a* tfca H ir. (S» 
Uy Haw Aflft-lilait aad Batt.*) 


ELVA GRIEVES 

-k— ai— t a. ■ • Wan*ate af iv rrta« Dm 8MB at *• Mr. BimMi* Tat. 

- --Oixwr. Jaa. U. rAT WHITE SHOW 


KITTY G LAS CO 


CHARLIE MAC 

aUIXIOM DOLLAK DOLLS 


BONO w*JTE*-nw«*>CM. BUKTIMO AND SSAHOrTS 
AMD COOSUN MIDNIGHT MAIDENS 



I 



N 



BT NIGHT 



V A IV amd KELLY 



NOW PLAYING FOX TIME 



GEORGE S. KI1SUMEAR 

JUVENILE MERRY ROUNDERS DIRECTION CHAMBER LAIN BROWN 

AMETA -PYISIES 

•_ umSBUOM WITH BEHMAN SHOW 



PRIMA DONNA 



SECOND SEASON 



BROADWAY BELLES 



KETUKN3 TO BUKLESQUE AS SIMON LEGKEE-TEMPTEm- 



NELLIE NICE 



THUD SEASON 
HELLO PAEEE 



BESSE ROSA 

SOUBRETIE AT LIBERTY 



SMILING NELLIE WATSON 

SOUBRETTE DAVE MARION'S "AMERICA'S BEST* 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

( Continued from pa** If mad on a mad Jt ) 



KAHN SHOW LAST 
WEEK ONE OF BEST 

OF THE SEASON 

The show offered by Ben Kahn at his Union 
Square' Theatre last week was the heat seen 
at that house In many weeks. The Ant Part 
was caHed *THe Saltan's Harem," and was 
followed by "Frolics at the Seashore," both 

aSeWea of the "Harem" waa carried out 
excellently from a production standpoint. The 
last scene, a market place In which slaves 
were auctioned off, was carefully and artis- 
tically staged by ftoducer Dolly Fields. The 
rest of the performance waa put on In the 
same careful manner. 

The comedy, as usual, was In the hands of 
Billy Spencer and Frank Mackay, who did 
last enough to keep the audience good na- 
tared. James X. Francis did exceptionally 
well aa the Sultan In the first act. and then 
went to Ms straight role In the burlesque 
Brad Sutton, as AJ11, gave a touch of humor 
to the character which made It pleasing. He 
also handled Mitiwlf well throughout the 
balance of the show. • - - 

Miss Lorraine had some good numbers, but 
was eeen to the beat advantage In her scenes, 

Her work In auctioning off the slaves de- 
served mention, aa also did her several other . 
scenes. Her wardrobe looked well from the 
front. • 

Louise Pearson offered some pretty gowns 
and did nicely in her scenes and number. In 
the comedy specialty with Spencer and 
Mackay, in one, she was seen to good advan- 

Babe Wellington, whose voice' la getting 
better, had no trouble In patting her numbers 
over and getting lota of encores.- .She looked 
pretty and shapely and wore dresses that 
were becoming.". , . • 

So far aa personality goes'; Mae Dlx wins, 
as without a doubt she has a most pleasing 
and attractive way of smiling and getting 
her numbers over. She reads lines nicely 
and did exceptionally well in scenes. Her 
selection or dresses matched' well with -her 
auburn hair. Sbe Is working easier than 
when we caught her several weeks ago. 

Ethel De Veanx, a clean cot sonbrette who 
Joined the show last week. Is a far more 
clever girl than abe was last Winter when 
we caught her at this boose. She can now 
put a number over and dance and sbe wears 
some attractive wardrobe. Kahn has three 
corking good soubrette's in the Misses Wel- 
lington, nii and DeVeaox. 

The "whiskey In the Ice cooler" bit was 
worked up nicely by Spencer, Mackey, Fran- 



cis, Sutton, and the Hisses Wellington, Pear- 
son and De Veaux. 

A good comedy boxing scene waa acted by 
Mackey. Spencer and Sutton. i 

Miss Lorraine's "Singapore" number waa 
very prettily staged, with the chorus using 
panels and arranging them in different for-: 
mationn durina* the number. ' 

The "presentation speech" bit waa well 
done by Spencer and the Misses Dlx and Lor- 
raine. 

The ■Turkish football" bit waa fanny as 
done by Mackey. Spencer and Sutton. 

The "Market Place" waa an excellent finale 
to the first part. 

The "French" bit pleased the way Spencer, 1 
Mackay and Miss Lorraine offered it. i 

The "rubberband" bit went well. It waa 

£ resented by Mackey, Spencer, Button and 
[las Dix. 

The "grip" bit proved its worth when 
Spencer, Mackay and Francis did It. j 

A dandy duet was offered by Mackey and 
Miss Pearson, which more than pleased. 

The "Lily of the Valley" bit was well 
worked np and not overdone. It wag offered 

by Sutton, Spencer, Francis, Mackey and 
Miss De Veaux. Babe Qulnn also worked In 
this bit ont in the audience and did verjl 
well. This scene waa amusing and went oven 

The girls In the chorus worked hard In the| 
numbers. The costumes looked well from the 
front. Sid. 

CLARK RE-NAMES SHOW 

Peter S. Clark will use his former title. 
"The Runaway Girls," for hie Columbia] 
Wheel Show next season. He baa signed 
Danny Murphy, Ted Burns and wife, Eu-I 
gene (Rags) Morgan, Carlos De Angelia, 
now with the Bird of Paradise Company;, 
Harry H.* Young;, straight; Josephine) 
Yonge, ingenue prima donna';' and Kath- 
ryn Adelphi, prima donna. •-..■' "-. 



WE HOLD THREE ACES! 



The Ace of Spades— On Account of the Color 
of the Ladv in the Sonjr— is 

"HINDU ROSE" 



A Novel Comedy Number by Neil Moret and Louis Vi'esly'ri' 
.\ Genuinely Jumoriius Lyric and an. Cnfonjetiable; Melody. 



The Ace of Diamonds ,i> 



SOME DAY IN ARABY" 

The Vocal Version of Vincent Rose's Wonderful Instrumental -Hit, 
•<)KIENTAL;\'.a Diamond of the 1'irst Water that will Sparkle 

•-■ ,":''". ;■ Forever. ,\ niL tlie Ace of Jlearts is . 

ROSE OF ROMANY 




A UeautifuL Love Sonj; with a Gypsy Atmosphere 
M\ Mo 
As mi Instrumental Number It Is a Fascinating Fox-Trot.- 

. : Wrtle '»r Call for -Cuuirx; ot Orchr- 1 r.itlon-. 

DANIELS & WILSON, Inc. 



tsWssT X$ 

Successor toTHE SUNSHINE OF YOUR SHUT 



233 Vont Str.-fl 
K«rl ruhrmtnn. Profusions' Msr 



NEW YORK 

Its WeliV 13th Strc-t 

.'«.»lTn. rrofrsctsnsl Mfi 




WARD 



Sincerest thanks to Mr. James E. Cooper and to the Columbia Amusement 
Company for many kind courtesies extended to me during six con- .. 
secutive years — Terminating the end of this season — of the 
most pleasant engagement of my entire stage career. 

FEATURED COMEDIAN WITH ROSELAND GIRLS AT HURTIG A SEAMON'S THEATRE, 
WEST 125TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY, THIS WEEK; CASINO THEATRE, BROOKLYN, 

NEXT WEEK 

• ' - * . 

Address All Communications to 

SOLLY WARD, 819 East 163rd Street, N. Y. City 




OLYMPIC THEATRE, NEW YORK, WEEK APRIL 7 



WITH "AMERICANS'* 
SPEED, MERIT, TALENT INVITES OFFERS 



«JIlVf McINERNEY 



AN ACE WITH "AVIATORS" 



THIS WEEK — WRJCHTSTOWN, N. JL' 



lester FAD and FANCY <="«* 



Straia>kt and Dome Smgms Specialty 



Chaj. Baksr-s Hith Fliara 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April ?, 1919 



"SPORTING WIDOWS," 
WITH HARRY COOPER 
FILLED WITH LAUGHS 

The "Sporting Widows" and Harry Coo- 
er are at the Columbia this week In one 
of the best shows we have ever seen this 
"All in Fun," and that Is just what It Is. 
It ha_a no plot but Is just one frood comedy 
bit after another. It is In two acta with 
eight scenes. 

Jacobs and Jermon have extended them- 
selves In equipping the show with elab- 
orate scenery, artistically painted, and 
wardrobe that la above the average. 

Harry Cooper, whose Impersonation of a 
"drunk" is well known in. burlesque, as he 
has been doing; It for years, repeated his 
success of previous seasons. In this role 
Cooper has no superiors, as he has the Idea 
down to a One point. He is now working 
with practically no make-up. He has even 
done away with the red nose, bnt gets his 
material over just as well. He is a fast 
and hard worker and his style of comedy 
was liked Monday afternoon. 

Joe Brown is doing an eccentric com- 
edy, opposite Cooper, which is of a differ- 
ent type than others. He is a good tum- 
bler and his laugh soon won him favor. 

Prank Ward, a classy looking juvenile 
straight, pleased with his work. He makes 
a fine appearance, looks well and can 
dance. * 

George D. Wlest, the Juvenile, gave a 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

' (Contfraed from pa sl s l IS and 25) 



good account of himself In his scenes and 
put several numbers over weJL - ,-■ 

Harry Meyers, as a Russian general, 
played the part as It was Intended to be 
played. 

June lie Veay. a rather attractive bru- 
nette, is the prima donna. -She has a voice 
that shows much volume in the numbers 
she assumed in one of the scenes pleased. 

Alice Laxar. pretty of face and figure, 
design and material. The French accent 
she offered. Her costumes were. pretty in 
had a prominent part and easily .carried 
It over. She can read lines also and works 
with comedians in a way to help put 
scenes over. She did well with her num- 
bers, too. Her gowns are very pretty and 
show the good care she has taken' with 
them this season, 

Louise Wright, brunette in type -and vi- 
vacious in her work, pleased the audience 
by the way she handled her numbers. She 
is a pleasing looking little person, with 
lots of personality and a good voice. She 
displays a wardrobe worth while. 

The "French" bit went over for good re- 
sults the way Cooper, Brown, Miss Le Veay 
and several chorus girls did It. 

The "husband" bit was fast and went 
over nicely. Cooper. Brown, Ward and 
Miss Lazar were in It. The "pnnch" Of 



this bit was the punishment Cooper took 
'when "Ward and Miss Tjirar struck him 
across the face and a number of times. 

Another good scene, offered in one. was 
the "flirting" bit In which Cooper. Ward 
and Miss Wright and two chorus girls 
appeared. 

Brown worked up some good laughs when 
he acted as guard to the palace. The pass- 
word, '1 can't remember," was well put 

over. Cooper, 'Ward, 'Wlest and the Misses 
Lazar and I*e Veay were also seen in this 
portion. 

The "cabaret" scene, which closed the 
first part, offered a number of specialties 
that more than pleased. Miss La Veay 
opened with a number that went over very 
well. Cooper and Miss Lazar followed with 
a comedy singing and talking act that gave 

£ roper results. There were plenty of 
Lughs In It and the audience was kept In 
good humor during Its action. 

Wright, Wlest and Meyers were a big 
hit in the singing and piano act. They 
opened with Meyers and Miss Wright in a 
gong and Wlest at the piano. Meyers and 
Wlest then gave an Impersonation of Van 
and Schenck singing one of their Irish 
numbers. They finish by all ringing a 
number. They went so well that they 
were compelled to sing another number for 



an encore. This Is a clever, trio and could 
easily clean. up on any bill. 

, Cooper's. Impersonation of a drunk in 
the first scene of the second act was well 
done. He did not overdo it at an y ti me 
and was extremely funny. Brown. Wlest, 

, and Miss Lazar, assisted in putting . the 
scene over. 

In Miss Norton's number. Brown did a 
lot of acrobatic stuff in working- it up. 
His drop into the orchestra pit and jump 
back onto the stage.. again, without any 
apparent effort on his part, made a big 

hit with the' audience. 

The "insult" bit was well worked up by 
Cooper, Brown, Meyers, Wlest and the 
Misses Lazar and La Veay. 

Ward did his finger dancing specialty In 
one and was a decided success. 

The "Sporting Widows" is a good show 
and has a fine cast, catchy music and lots 

of good' comedy. B n>..' 




S"«e»or feTHE SUNSHNE CT YOUR SHUT 



__. . __-^-_._ 1 



MANAGERS— ATTENTION ! 



THE SEASON'S FIND! i 



BEN RUBIN 



SINGING AND DANCING 

JEW COMEDIAN 






Putting The CHEER in MAX SPIEGEL'S CHEER UP AMERICA 

Come One — Come All — See Him for Next Season. 
This Week— MINER'S BRONX, at 149th St. 



SEE 



Exclusive Management 
ROEHM A RICHARDS CO. 
Strand Theatre BIdg. , New York 



'ys///ss/s///y/?//y/<''///s////s///sy//ss/^^ 



f S/SS„'.''SS///////////S///S/S//S///////////////////////.'///SS//////S//S//S/SA 



B. F. KAHN'S UNION SQUARE THEATRE 

STOCK BURLESQUE 

With All Star Cast 



BILLY (GROGAN) SPENCER 
J AS. X. FRANCIS 
LOUISE PEARSON 
BABE WELLINGTON 

ETHEL DE VEAUX 
AND 



FRANK MACKEY 
BRAD SUTTON 
LORRAINE 

MAE DIX 



BIG BEAUTY CHORUS 

to B. F. Kahn 



\A/A IN 




FOR NEXT SEASON FOR 



"Boston. an Burlesquers 

A GOOD TRIO OK QUARTETTE TEAM OF MEN, one capable 
of playing good straight, two principal women, good novelty musical act. 
Address CHAS. H. WALDRON, Waldron's Casino, Boston, Man. 



Who have had Burlesque experience as Prima Donna, Ingenues, Sonbrette, 
Comedians, Character Men and Chorus Girls; also Producers. Write and 
send Photo. FOLLY THEATRE, Pennsylvania Avenue at Ninth Street, 
Washington, D. C. 



IMK L-A 

CHARACTER MAN PARIS BY NIGHT 



Philadelphia's Famous Burlesk Theatre 

WANTS 

CHORUS GIRLS AND PRINCIPALS 

SUIX/IIVIER? STOCK 

REHEARSALS BEGIN APRIL 21 OPEN WEEK OF MAY 5 
Write JOE M. HOWARD 



CHORUS GIRLS WANTED 

Fifty-two weeks' work. Liberal salary for stock in New York City. 
MINSKY BROS.— National Winter Garden, Houston Street and Second 
Ave. See Ray Perez. 

GEIME and ETHEL BEAUDRY 



THE LITTLE MAN WITH TUB 

DIRECTION- ROEHM SB* RICHARDS 



voice Arn> the nxsoNALrrr cm. 

HIP HIP HOORAY GIRLS 



At Liberty ^ f £*. n J. HARRY JENHNS 

Comoalan, Straight, Characters ThU 1— Tho Bahsuns Show 



BERTHA. COM INS 

INGENUE FRED IRWTNS BIG SHOW 

RUTH DENICE 



PARIS BY NIGHT 



SOUBRETTE 



EN ROUTE 



NELLIE CRAWFORD 

Singing and Dancing Soubrette 



Direction — Roehm dt Richards 



Orientals 



I am under an exchuire contract to CHAMBERLAIN BROWN and have not signed 
anv burlesque contracts. .- - 

JOHN O. OF 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



DRAMATIC AMD .MUSICAL 

iMo.tR M ckTU,OCc«N«t 
Tluartnhr 

Arliss. George — Hollla. Boston, Mass., 7-19 
"Atta Boy" — Olympic, Chicago, 7-12. 
"Adam and Ere" — Park Sq.. Boston, Mass., 

lndef. 
Tlsjeliiiisii Before Pleasure" — Woods, Chl- 
, cago>. lndef.. . 
"Better -Ole" — (Mr. and Mrs. Coburn) — 

Cort, N. Y. City, lnder. 

"Prtler 'Ole' - (B) — Seattle, 'Wash..- g-1*. 
"Battir 'Ole" (D>— Nixon. Pittsburgh, Pa.. 
.. ^^M. 
"Batter 'Ole" <B) — BUnoIs, Chicago, B1., 

lndef. 
Boyes; Korm — Lyric, Philadelhpia, lndef. 
"Big Chance. The" — Majestic. Boston, 7-11. 
"Burgomaster of. Belgium" — Belmont, New 

Tor* -GUj. lndef. 
"Blank: America" — Auditorium, K«n»»n 

City, Mo.. 8-20. 
Barrymore, Ethel — Park, Toungstown. O., 

11-12. 

"Bird of ParadlBe" — Shubert-Belasco, 

Washington. D. C, 7-12. -, 
"Blind Youth" — Opera House, Providence. 

R. L. 7-12. 
"Cappy Ricks"— Morosco, New York City, 

lndef. "> -. Cv. 

Chicago Grand Opera Co.— A. of M. , Phlla- 

delphiaVFm^ lndef. t- PS \ -, - 

CarmeloY Ted. Musical Comedy Co. — 

Sherman, Regina, Sask.. Canada, lndef. 
"Crowded Hour" (Jane Cowl) — Manhattan 

O. H., N. T. City, indef. 
"Dear Brutus" — Empire, New Tork City, 

lndef. 
D«npaey, Jack, Show— Watertown, N. Y„ 
9: Ogdensburg, 10; Montreal, Can., 11; 
Toronto, 12. 
Drew, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney— Pittsburgh, 

Pa., 7-ia. 
"Darktown Frolics" — Coliseum. St. Louis, 

Mo., 6-20. 
"Dark Rosaleen" — Shubert-Belasco. Wash- 
ington, D. C, 14-19. 
Dltrichsteln. Leo — Academy, Baltimore, 

Md., 7-12. 
♦•Everything" — Hippodrome, ' New Tork 

City, indef. 
"East Is West"— Astor. New Tork City, 

indef. 
"Eyes of Youth" — Walnut, Philadelphia. 

lndef. 
Elttngc. Julian — Olympic, Chicago, 13. 
"Friendly Enemies" — Hudson, New Tork 

City, lndef.. 
"Forever After"— Playhouse, New Tork 

City, lndef. 
"Fiddlers 3" — Olympic, Chicago, lndef. 
"Fortune Teller" — Republic. New Tork 

City, indef. 
"Flo Flo"— Forest, Philadelphia, lndef. 
"Furs and Frills" (Richard Carle)— O. H.. 
Lob Angeles, Cal., 7-12; San Diego, 13; 
Pasadena. 14; Redlands, IE: Riverside, 
IS: San Bernadrlno. 17. 
Gilbert & Sullivan Operas — Park. New York 

City (Last two weeks). 
"Good Morning Judge" — Shubert. New 

York, lndef. 
"Going Up"— Cohan's O. H., Chicago, BL 
"Glorlanna" — Colonial. Chicago, indef. 
"Good. Bad Woman"— Harris, New Tork. 

Indef. 
"Hello, Alexander" — Majestic, Providence. 

R. I. 
Hall, Billy— WatervUle, Me., 7-12. 
"Happiness" — Broad . Street. Philadelphia, 

Pa.. 7-12; Washington, D. C, 14-19. 
"Invisible Foe. The" — Standard, N. Y. 

City, 7-12, , 

"Jack O'Lantern" — Colonial. Boston, indef. 
"Keep It to Yourself" — 39th Street. New 

York City, indef. 
"Llghtnin' " — Gayety, New York City, in- 
def. - 
"Listen Lester" — Knickerbocker, New York 



r ROUTE LIST 



City, indef. 

"Little 



;le Journey, The" — Vanderbilt, New 
York City, lndef. . 
"Little Simplicity"— Shubert, Philadelphia. 
lndef. 

"Let's Beat It"— Century Theatre. New 

Tork City, indef. 
"Melting of Molly"— Chestnut St., Philadel- 
phia. Pa., indef. 
"Midnight Whirl" — New Century, New 

York City, lndef. _. 

"Masquerader, The". — Studebaker. Chicago. 

lndef. 
"Miss Nelly of New Orleans"— Henry Mil- : 

ler. New York City, indef. 
"Monte Cristo. Jr."— Wintergarden, New- 

York City, indef. __ 

Mantell. Robert — Washington. D. C. 7-12. 
"Mollere"— Liberty. New, York City, lndef. 
"Mutt & Jeff Co." — Butte, 16-17; Boseman, 

18; Big Timber. 19; Glendlne. 20. 
"Moonlight & Honeysuckle" — (Ruth Chat- 

terton). Powers' Chicago, lndef. 
Maude, Cyril — American. St. Louis, Mo.. 

7-12. 
"Maytime" — Shubert-Rlviera, New York 

City, 7-12. 
"Night Off. A"— Lord's, BalUmore, Md. 
"New Girl. The" — National, Washington, 

D. G, 7-1*. • 
Opera Comlque— Park. New York City 

(Last two weeks). 
"Oh. My Dear"— Princess, New York City, 

indef. 



s Mean Love 




BaffJaa 

SucceuwtoThTSUrerWEOrTOJR SHUT 



"Oh. Look" — Shubert. Boston, indef. 
"Ob, Lady! Lady !"— La Salle. Chicago, 

lndef; 
"Odds and Ends" — Cedar Rapids, la., 10- 
_ 12; Marshalltown. IS; Grlnnell, 14; Cen- 

tervUle. 15; Creston, 16; Clartnda, 17; 

St. Joseph, Mo,, 18-19. 
"Oh. Uncle"— Poll's, Washington. D. O. 

14-17. 
"Please Get Married" — Fulton, New York 

City, indef. . 

".Prince There 'Was"— .Cohan, New York 

City, lndef. 
"Penny Wise"— Punch & Judy, New York 

City, lndaf. . 
"Parlor, Bedroom .and Bath" — Adelphl, 

Philadelphia, indef. 
"Papa" — Little, New Tork City, 10-lndef. 
"Royal Vagabond, The" — Cohan & Harris, 

New Tork City, indef. 
"Rainbow Girl" — Tremont, Boston, 7-19. 
"Riddle Woman" — Loew's Seventh Avenue, 

New York City. 7-12. 
"Sinbad" — Poll's, Washington, D. C, 7-12. 
"Sometime" — Casino, New York City, in- 
def. 
"Sleepless Night"— Bijou, New York City. 

lndef. 
Skinner. Otis — Globe. New York City, lndef. 
"Scandal" — Garrick. Chicago, indef. 
"She Walked In Her Sleep" — Plymouth, 

Boston. Mass., indef. 
Susan Lenox— Majestic, Providence, R, I., 

7-12. 

"September Morn" — Toronto, Can., 7-12. 

"Seven Days Leave" — Majestic, Boston. 
Mass.. 14-19. 

"Tea for Three" — Maxlne Elliott. New York 
City, lndef. 

"Three Faces East" — Lo nga cre, New York 
City, lndef. 

'"Three Wise Fools"— Criterion, New Tork 
City, lndef. 

"Tiger! Tiger!!" — (With Frances Starr) — 
Belasco. New York City, lndef. 

"Toby's Bow"— Comedy, New York City, 
indef. 

Thurston — Lyric, Cincinnati, 6-12. - 

"Tlllle" — Blackstone. Chicago, indef. - 

"Thirty Days" — Cort. Chicago, indef. 

"Tumble Inn" — Selwyn, New York City, 
indef. 

Taylor, Laurette — Broad Street, Philadel- 
phia. Pa., indef. 

TeUegen. Lou— Providence. R. L. 7-12. 

"Turn to the Right"— Garrick. Philadel- 
phia, lndef. 

"Thirty-nine East"— Broadhurat. New York . 
City, lndef. 

"Thirteenth Chair" — Shubert-Garrlck, 
Washington, D. C, 14-19. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin Co. — Stamford. Conn.. 
10: Norwich. 11: Willtmantlc 12: go. 
Manchester, 14; Ware, Mass., IE; Worces- 
ter. 16. 

"Unknown Purple, The" — Lyric, New York 
City, lndef. _ 

"Velvet Lady" — New Amsterdam. New 
York City, lndef. 

"Ziegfeld Midnight Frolic"— New Amster- 
dam Roof, New Tork City, lndef. . 

COLUMBIA CIRCUIT 

Al Reeves Big Show — Majestic, Jersey City. 

7-12: Peoples. Philadelphia. 14-19. 
"Best Show in Town —Lyric, Dayton. 

7-12; Olympic Cincinnati, 14-19. , 

"Beauty Trust" — Orpheum, Peterson. 7-12; 
Majestic, Jersey City. 14-19. 

"Behman Show' 1 — Newburg. N. Y.; 7-9: 
Foughkeepsle, 10-12; Orpheum. Pateraon, 
14-19. 

"Bon Tons" — Casino. Boston, 7-12; Colum- 
bia. New Tork. 14-19. 

"Bostonlans" — Columbia. Chicago, 7-12; 
Berchel, Des Moines, Iowa, 13-17. "Bow- 
ery" Casino, Brooklyn, 7-12; Empire, 
Newark. 14-19. 

"Burlesque Wonder 8how" — Casino. Phlla- 
delphia, 7-12; Miner's 149th St.. New 
Tork. 14-19. 

"Ben 'Welch" — Gayety, Pittsburgh. 7-12; 
Akron, O.. 14-16; Toungstown, 17-19. 

Burlesque Revue — Empire, Newark, 7-12; 
CaslnO. Philadelphia. 14-19. 

"Cheer Up America" — Miner's 149th St.. < 
New York. 7-12; Park. Bridgeport. Conn., ' 
17-19. 

Dave Marion's — Gayety, Rochester. 7-12: > 
Baatable, Syracuse, N. T., 14-16; Lum- 
bers, Utlca. 17-19. 

"Follies of the Day"— Gayety. St Louis. 

7-12; Star and Garter, Chicago. 14-19. 
"Girls de Looks" — Gayety, Toronto, Ont.. 

7-12; Gayety, Buffalo. 14-19. 
"Golden Crooks" — Empire, Toledo. O.. 7-12; 

Lyric, Dayton, O., 14-19. 
"Girls of the U. 8. A." — Grand, Hartford. 

Conn.. 7-12; Jacques, Waterbury, 14-19. 
"Hip Hip Hooray" — Berchel. Dea Moines, 

la.. 6-10; Gayety, Omaha. Neb.. 12-18. 
"Hello America" — Peoples. Philadelphia, 

7-12; Palace. BalUmore. 14-19. 
Harry Hastings — Baatable. Syracuse, N. Y., 

7-9; Lumbers. Utlca, 10-12; Gayety. Mont- 
real,' Can.-. - 14-19. -- -•■-.. 
Irwin's Big Show — Empire. Albany, N. T..' 

7-12; Casino, Boston, 14-19. 
Lew Kelly Show— Open. 7-11; Gayety, St 

Louis, 14-19. 
"Liberty Girls" — Gayety, Buffalo. 7-12: 

Gayety. Rochester, N. Y., 14-19. 
Mollie Williams' Show — Gayety. Montreal, 

Can.. 7-12; Empire, Albany. N. Y.. 14-19. 
"Maids of America" — Park. Bridgeport. 

Conn., 10-12 ; Colonial, Providence. 14-19. 
"Majesties"— Jacques. "Waterbury. Conn.. 

7-12; Hurtlg A Seamon's New York, 14-19. 
"Merry Rounders" — Gayety. Boston. 7-12; 

Grand. Hartford, Conn., 14-19. . , 
"Million Dollar Dolls" — Empire. Brooklyn/ 



7-12; Jfewbunj. N. T, 14-16; Pough- 

Neb.. 7-12; 

'Puss, pus*" — Gayety/ Washington. 7-12; 

Gayety, Pittsburgh. 14-19. 
'Roseland airls'. 1 — Hurtl*: A Seamen's New 

YorkA*-M?X!aslno. Brooklyn. 14-1S. 
Rose Sydell'a — Star, Cleveland,. O., .7-13; 

Empire, Toledo, O., 14-19; 
Sam Howe's Show — Star and Garter, Chl- 

ca«o/$-il; Gayety. Detroit. 14-tt: 
"Sight Beers" — Palace. Baltimore. 7-12; 

Gayety. Washington, 14-19. 
"Social Maids"— Colonial, Providence, 7-12; 

Gayety* "Boston. 14-19. 
"Sporting Widows" — Columbia. New Tork, 

7-12; ErhP're, Brooklyn. 14-,19. 
Star and Garter Shows — Gayety, Detroit, 

7-12; Gayety. Toronto. Can.. 14-19. 
"Step Lively Girls"— Gayety, Kansas City, 

7-12; Gayety. St Louis. 21-26. 
"Twentieth Century Maids" — Akron, O., 

7-9; Toungstown, 10-12; Star, Cleveland, 

O.. 14-19. 
"Watson's Beef Trust" — Olympic, Cincin- 
nati, 7-12; Columbia. Chicago. 14-19. 

AMERICAN CIRCUIT 

American — Olympic New York, 7-12; Plaxa. 
Springfield, Mass., 14-19. 

"Auto Girls"— Standard, St Louis, 7-11; 
Terre Haute, Ind., 13; Majestic, Indian- 
apolis. 14-19. 

"Aviator Girls"— Wrightstown, N. J.. 10-13; 
Trocadero, Philadelphia. 14-19. 

"Beauty Review" — Majestic, Indianapolis, 

7-12; Gayety. Louisville. Ky., 14-19. 
"Big Review" — Wrightstown, N. J.. 7-9; 

Trenton. 10-11: Empire. Hoboken. N. J., 

14-19. 
"Blue Birds"— Gayety, Philadelphia, 7-13; 

Camden, N. J.. 14-16. . 
"Broadway Belles" — Gayety, Milwaukee, 

7-12; Gayety. Minneapolis, 14-19. 
"French Frolics" — Crown. Chicago, 7-12; 

Gayety, Milwaukee. 14-19. 
"Follies of Pleasure"— Gayety, Louisville, 

7-12; Lyceum, Columbus. O.. 14-19. 
"Frolics of the Nlte"— Sioux City, la., 7-10; 

Century. w«"«" City, 14-19. 
"Girls from the Follies"— Plata. Spring- 
field. Mass., 7-12; Grand. Worcester, 

Mass.. 14-19. 
"Grown Up Babies" — Empire, Cleveland. 

7-12: Cadillac. Detroit 14-19. 
"Girls from Joyland" — Lyceum, Columbus, 

O.. 7-12: Wheeling. W. Va.. 14-16; Beaver 

Fans. Pa., 17; Canton, o., 19. 

"Hello, Pares" — Niagara Falls, 9-12; Star. 

Toronto. Can.. 14-19. 
"High flyers" — Star. Brooklyn. 7-12; Olym- . 

pic New York. 14-19. 
"Innocent Maids" — Lyceum, 'Washington, 

7-12; Gayety. Philadelphia. 14-19. 
"Jolly Girls" — Empire. Hoboken. 7-12: Star. 

Brooklyn. 14-19. 
"Lid Lifters"— Wllkesbarre, 9-12; Majestic, 

Scran ton. Pa.. 14-19. ' 

"Midnight Maidens" — Gayety, Brooklyn', 7- 

12: Wrightstown. N. J.. 17-19. 
"Mlle-a-Mlnute Girls" — Chester, Pa., 7-9; 

Camden. N. J.. 10-12: Wrightstown. N. J.. 

14-16; Trenton. 17-19. 
"Military Maids" — Garden. Buffalo, N. Y., 

7-12; Empire, Cleveland. O.. 14-19. 
"Mischief Makers"— Penn ' Circuit, 7-12; 

Gayety. Baltimore. 14-19. 
"Monte Carlo Girls"— Victoria, Pittsburgh. 

7-12; Penn Circuit. 14-19. 
"Orientals" — Howard, Boston, 7-12; Gayety, 

Brooklyn. 14-19. 
"Parisian Flirts" — Gayety. Baltimore. 7-12: 

Lyceum. Washington. 14-19. * 

"Pennant Winners" — Century, Kansas City. 

7-12; Standard, St Louts, 14-19. 
"Peacemakers" — Star, St Paul, 7-12; Sioux 

City, Iowa. 13-17. 
"Pirates"— Cadillac Detroit 7-12; Engle- 

wood. ' Chicago, 14-19. 
Pat White Show— Star. Toronto, Ont, 7-12; 

Garden, Buffalo. N. Y., 14-19. 
"Paris by Night" — Camden, N. J., 7-9; 

Chester, Pa., 10-12; Easton, Pa., 15; 

Wllkesbarre, 16-19. 
"Razzle Dazzle Girls" — Grand. Worcester, 

Mass.. 7-12; Howard. Boston. 14-19. 
"Record Breakers" — Gayety, Minneapolis, 

7-12; Star, St. Paul. 14-19. 
"Social Follies" — Trocadero, Philadelphia, 

7-12: Camden, N. J.. 17-19. 
"Speedway Girls" — Majestic, Scranton, Pa.. 

7-12; Blnghamton. N. T.. 14-16. 
"Tempters" — Schenectady. 9-12; "Water- 
town. N. T., 14; Oswego, 16; Niagara 

Falls. 16. 
"Trail Hitters"— Wheeling, W. Va., 7-1: 
Newcastle, Pa., 10; Beaver Falls, 11: 
Canton, O.. 12; Victoria, Pittsburg, 14-19. 
"World Beaters" — Englewood, Chicago. 
7-12; Crown. Chicago. 14-19. 

PENN CIRCUIT 

Monday — McKeesport, Pa. 

Tuesday — Unlontown. Pa. 
Wednesday — Johnstown, Pa. 
Thursday — Altoona, Pa- 
Saturday— York, Pa. 

U. S. LIBERTY THEATRES 
Week of April 14th 

Camp 

Devens— First half. Vaudeville: last half. 
Pictures. 

Upton— Billy Allen Musical Comedy (an 
week). 

MlBa— Special Vaudeville (all week). 

Merrltt— First half. "Manhattan Girl Re- 
vue": last half. Vaudeville. 

Dix— First half. Vaudeville; last half, Plc- 



Meade— First half. "RlsJto Girt Revne— . 

last half, "Kiss Burglar." Vaudeville. 
Humphreys — First half, "Parlor. Bedroom 
..and Bath"; test half, "Kiss Burglar." 
Lee— First half. "Sick a Bed": hurt half. 

Pictures; 
Eustls — First half. Camp Show; last half. 
. "Sick a Bed." 
Stuart— First half. Pictures: last ■half. 

"Sick a Bed." 
Jackson— Webster Musical Co. (all' week). 
Gordon— First half. "Rtalto Girl Revue''; 

last half. Pictures. 
Pike— First half, Bernstein Vaudeville; last 

half, Pictures. 
Bowie— First half. Pictures; last half. 

Vaudeville. 
Funaton — First half, Pictures; last half, 

Vaudeville. 

Dodge — First half, "Miss Blue Eyes"; last 

half. Vaudeville. 
Grant— First half. Pictures; last half. 

Vaudeville. 
Custer— First half. Vaudeville; last half. 

Pictures. 
Sherman — Vaudeville (all week). 
Travis — Orpheum Players (all week). 

MINSTRELS 

Fields. A. G.— Springfield. 111.. 13-14; De- 
catur. IE; Logansport. 16; Marian, 17. 

CIRCUS 

Rlngllng Bros. & Bamum & Bailey — Madi- 
son Square Garden, N. T. City, lndef. 

Sells-Floto— Wichita Falls, Tex.. 17; Ft 
Worth. 18; Danes. 19. 

STOCK 

Arlington Theatre Co. — Arlington, Boston, 
Mass.. indef. 

Astor— Guy Players, Jamestown. N. T.. 
lndef. 

Alcazar Players— Alcazar Theatre, Port* 
land. Ore., indef. 

Bessey Stock Co. — Racine. Wis., lndef. 

Blaney Stock Co. — Colonial, Baltimore, in- 
def. 

Blaney Stock— YorkvlUe, New Tork City, 
indef. 

Blaney Stock — Lyceum, Troy. N. T. 

Bunting, Emma— nth . Street New York 
City, lndef. 

Brissac, Virginia. Stock — Strand. Ban 
Diego. Cal., indef. 

Comerford Players — Lynn. Mass.. lndef. 

Cutler Stock Co. — Oswego. 

Columbia Stock Co.— MtUsboro. Del., 7-12. 

Dominion Players — Winnipeg. Manitoba. 
Can.. Indef. 

Desmond, Mae. Players— Orpheum, Phila- 
delphia, Fa., lndef. 

Desmond. Mae — Schenectady. N. Y. 

Ebey Stock Co.— Oakland. Cal.. lndef. 

Empire Players— Salem. Maes., lndef. 

Enterprise Stock Co.— Green Bay. Wis., ln- 
def. 

Grand Theatre Stock Co.— Tulsa, Okla., In- . 
def. 

Gardner Bros. Stock Co.— Palace. Okla- 
homa City, Okla.. Indef. 

Hyperion Players— New Haven. Conn., ln- 
def. 

Hudsn Theatre Stock Co. — Union Hill. N. 
J., indef. 

Howard-Lorn Stock— National, Englewood. 
in. lndef. 

Hawkins-Webb Co.— Majestic. Flint, Mich.. 
Indef. 

Hathaway Players — Brockton, Mass., lndef. 
Keith Stock — Columbus, O., lndef. 
Llacomb Players — Majestic. San Francisco. 

Cal.. indef. 
Liberty Flayers— Strand, San Diego. Cal. 
Myrkle-Harder Co. — Torrington, Conn.. 7- 

Malden Stock Co.— Maiden. Mass.. Indef. 
Majestic Players— Butler, Pa., lndef. 



Morosco Stock Co. — Los Angeles, lndef. 
Metropolitan Players — Blnghamton, N. Y., 

lndef. 
Martin. Lewis Stock Co.— Fox. JoUet. 111., 

lndef. 
Nellie Booth Slayers— (NeUle Booth. Mgr.) 

— Kenyon, Pittsburgh, Pa., lndef. 
Northampton Players — Northampton. Mass.. 

Indef. 
Oliver Players— Shubert. St Paul. Minn.. 

lndef. . "^ . 

Oliver Otis Players — Orheum, Qulncy, III., 

Indef. 
Permanent Players — Orpheum, Moose Jaw, 

Sask.. Can., lndef. 
Permanent Players — Lyceum. Pateraon, N. 

•J., lnder. 
Peck. Geo.— Opera House, Rockford. m., 

indef. 
Plnney Theatre Stock Co. — Boise, Ida., In- 
Poll Players— Bridgeport, Conn., lndef. 
Poll's Stock— Poll's, Hartford, Conn.. Indef. 
Phelan, F. V.— Halifax, N. s7 I ndef . 
Polack. Edith. Stock Co. Diamond. New 

Orleans, indef. ' 

Roma Reade, Edward Keane Players— 

Jamestown, N. T„ lndef. 
Royal Stock Co. — Vancouver, B. C, lndef. 
Shjpman Co., Bert — Hot Springs. Ark., ixt- 
def. 
Savoy Players— Hamilton. Can., lndaf. .. 
Trent Flayers— Hoboken. N. J., lndef. 
Vaughan Olaser Stock Co. — Pittsburgh, ln- 
def. 




28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 9, 1919 



ED. GALLAGHER 
-MID 

KEITH'S PALACE 

THIS WEEK 






The EWjtiful Ballad 



• . . • 




1MWK 



'■'■'.■ 




' --■ •'-.:■■ 




srJ9ssakw*{V 




■■:■■■'■■■■ ^g 




' ■ • • 4m3rit?ii 








st 




A 


WORTOHWWD 


^^r 


CW.MURPHY 




Satessar to" THE SUNSHINE OF YDUB SMILE* 



«" ORBEN & DIXIE -« 

The Jade of Hearts and the Queen of Spades 
loew circuit 



LUCILLE CHALFANT 

DIRECTION— CLAUDE BOSTOCK ....'. 



LEON C PAUL F. 

WHITEHEAD &, FITZGERALD 

Ni mmttm rTOFKANSP AND EPSTIN 



IM 



THE WOP AND THE SINGER 




ui nAvoaoo, c al. 

Dogs— Jim Doherty— Zui 
Cmnto Trio — Lowe * Baker Bisters — McKay"* 
Scotch Berne— William Siato. 

ui. mxao, ""- 

Pantagse— Pekinese Troupe — Spencer ft Wilaos — 

Little Burglar — Weir as Temple — Dancing Tyrella. 

sTFOKAjTE. WASH. 

Tinting Ontitlrr'i Tor Shop— Tax ft Brltt— 

Wmard'e Fantasy of Jewel* — Bookie L e w ie T ine 

A Temple — Harry Tauda. 

SEATTLE. WASH. 
Pantagea F onr Dannbee — Chas. F. Semon— Ool- 
linls Dancere — Hauah 4 LaTelle — Beth Chains — 
Ballet Proof Lady. 

SALT LAKE CTTT, UTAH. 
Paataurea — Pont Mayakoa — Senator Francis Mur- 
phy—Maryland Singers— Begsl A Moore— Murphy * 
Klein— Lore ft Wilbur. 

TACOMA, WASH. 
Fasrtagsa — Minioo Dollar DoUa — Arthur Barrett 
— Cka Marie Deel— Jack ft Marie Grey— Astor Four 

— Aeroplane Girls. 

. _ -VAHCOIJVER, OAK. 
Fsataaxa— Miss 1830— Who la Bel— MeLallan ft 
Carson — Denn Linn — Three Weston Slater*. * 

VICTORIA, CAS. **. 

■ Pastacaa— Three Noaaee — Mel Klee— Mile. Blanea 
A Co. — Valentine Vox — Inlla Clifford — Tnaeano 
Brothers. 

wnuBia a can. 

Pantagea — Anderson's Berne — Barry at Layton — 
Josephine Darts— Kajlyama— raj * Jack Smith — 
Helen Jackley. 

W. V. If. A. 

ALTOH, ILL. 
Hippodrome (First Half) — Jordan Girla — Al 
Wohlman. (Left Half)— Barto ft Clark— Keno. 

Seya ft Melroee. 

BELLEVILLE, WASH. 
WuUortoi (Flrat Half) — Fire Americas Glrli 
— Styne ft Arnold— Inlla Edwards. (Last Half) 

Angel ft Fnller — Al W ohlman — Leon'e Ponies- 

BUTTE, MOST. 
People'. Hippodrome (April 13-15)— Aerial Enella 
— Cleveland ft Trelease — Jolly Wild ft Co- — Harry 

Evans ft Co.— Lockhart ft Laddie. (April 16-19)— 
Two Edwards — Gertmde Grarea — George Lorett — 
InBeld ft Nobh — Waldateln ft Daley. 
BTXLrNGB. KOHT. 

Babeock (April 13-M)— Two Edwards — Gertrode 
Glares — George Lorett — Infield ft Noble — Wold- 
stein ft Daley. (April W)— Appier ft Appier- 
Propeller Trio— Doherty ft Scallo— Trebble ft 
Thomaa — Billy Knight * Hooatera. 
CHICAGO, HL 

American (First Half)— White Bros. — Leroy ft 
Mabel Hart — Geo. Damarel ft Co, — West ft Lerner. 
riant HaU<— Jim ft Irene Marlyn— Daisy Dngas 
& Variety Four. 

Kediio (First Half) — Chlyo ft Chlyo— Benny — 
Cameron 4 Gaylord — Daisy Dngas ft Variety Fonr 
—Legation. (laat Half)— Kale ft Coyne — Thomaa 
ft McDonald— Herman ft Shirley— John ft Win 
Hennlna-s — Roth Cnrtls ft Jaaa Band. 

Lincoln (First Half)— Frosini— Gllroy. Haynea ft 
Montgomery*— June Mills — Herman ft Shirley. (Laat 
Half)— leroy A Mabel Hart— West ft Lerner— 
Three WbeeWn. 

Empress (First Hslfl— Eary ft Eary — John A 
Win Hennings — Dsvle Jamleson — Sllrer A Doral — 
Hong Kong Myaterlea. (Laat Half)— Vada Clay- 
ton — Roach. A McCnrdy— Elsie WlUlama A Oo. — 
Hobbr Hensbaw— Boganny Troupe. 

Hippod r ome (Flrat Half)— Skating Bear— Rem- 
roan ft Wells — McBea ft Clegg— Wella ft Crest — 
Doree's Quintette — Jack Goldle — CreweD. Janton A 
Co. (Last Half) — Anne Hathaway— Nelaon A 
Castle— Mort Bros— Sllber ft North. 
CHAMPAIGN, HX. 

Orphenm (Flrat Half)— Togan A Geneva— Bootb- 
by ft Brerdean — Harry ft Etta Cooler — Williams 4 
Taylor — "Making Moriee." (Last Half) — The 
Meimiee— Corp. Joe Nathan — Sllrer ft Dnral — 
Styne A Amotd— "Making Mories." 

CEDAR BAFTOS, KICB, 

Majestic (First Half )— Max Bloom. (Last Half) 
— Clifford A Marsh — Van Broa. 

CAMP LEWIS. WASH. 

Green Park (Flrat Half >— Bspanosis— Morrison 4 
Carter' — Holland ft Jranuie — Billy Doss — La Vine 
Trio. (Laat Half)— Emlle Wille A Co.— Holland 
ft Cathren — Allen Lindsay A Co. — Hamburg ft Lee 
—Will. and Enid Bland. 

DECATUR. 

Empress (First Half)— •'Pretty Baby"— Victoria 
Goodwin. (Last Half) — Cornelia A Wllbm- — 
Bootbby ft Brerdean — "Somewhere With Per 
ahlog" — Ben Benny— Jordan Girls. 
DAVEBTOBT, LA. 

Columbia (First Half)— Lamberti— Grant A Jones 
— Dnnbar's Salon Singers — Bosch A McCnrdy — Lip- 
ton's Monks. (Laat Half)— Beckless Duo — Newell 

A Most— David S. Hall A Co Jarrow — "On 

Manila Bay." 

DE8 KOIKES, IA. 

Empress (First Half) — Hama A Hanaoka— Jack 
Rotbatl — "Follies of Today" — Mitchell A Mitch — 
Verce A VereL (Last Half)— Grant Gardner— 

Salon Sincere — Van Bros. 

. JIULUTH, MXBTa*. 

Mew Grand (r-lxst Hair) — Dancing McDonalds — 
Harry Bose— Betty Eldert A Co. — Jack George Duo 
— "Ragtime Coort." (Laat Half)— Fitch Cooper — 
Jardln Berne— Detxell ft CarroH— "Two Weeks' 
Notice." 



EVAKBVTLLE, OTB. 
Hew Grand (First Half) — Bicknell — Orando Dno 
— fWWbnod Days — Logan, Dim ft Haael — "Sand 
Man's Honr." (Last Half)— B. L Cycle— SalllTan 
A Myers— Mae Marrtn— "Oh That Matody." 
EAST BT. LOTUS, s-r.r. " 
Erbsx's (First Half)— Resdata— Howard, Marten. 
ft Co.— Hlckey A Hart— Keno, Key* ft Melrose 
Last Half)— Cook ft Bothert— Wood, Young ft 

Pblnlpa— Jnlla Edwards— Flie a— «—- Girls. 
OREEH BAT, WIS. 
Orphsnm (Laat Half)— Polity— 8tan A Mas 
Laurel — Tennessee Ten. 

GB-AsTITE CTTT, TT.I.. 

Waaslagten (April IS)— Sigsbea'a Dogs— Borne ft 
Wager. (First Half) — Bobby Henahaw — Fisher ft 
Ollmore. (Last Half )— Robin'! Family— Dot Mar- 
sell. 

MOUaTE, rxr. 

FaUos (First Halt)— Clifford ft Marab— Beetle 
Heron— Van Bros. — "On Manila Bay." (Last Half) 
— Lamberti— FoBJa rasters ft Le Boy— Law SuIIt— 
Bllla, Nowlan ft Co. ^^ 

MAUISOa, WDJ. 

Orpheasa (first Half) — Pearson TTTn Msllle 
Choate ft Oo?— Walmaley ft Myers— Li Orada. 
(Laat Half)— Chlyo ft Chlyo— Dorsea ft RuaseU— 
"Mile a Minute." 

1?»sk Mean Love 

iV AND 

Love Means You 

Ballad 

Successor mTHE SUNSfWE Of YOUR SMUT 



JAMES MADISON 
Ss^WRITES FOR 
FRANK TINNEY 

For exclusive material call at my 
downtown office, 1493 Broadway 



MADISON'S BUDGET NO. 17 

contains a liberal assortment of my latest 

monologues, acts for two males, acts for 
male and female and for three characters, 
minstrel first-parts, parodies, 200 single 
gags, a one-act farce for 9 people, etc. 
Rice ONE DOLLAR. Back issnes all 
gone. Send orders to JAMES MADISON, 
1052 Third Avenue, New York. 



CHATAUQUA! COUNTY FAIR! 
CARNIYAy«d MEDICINE MEN! 



CORNER THIS OPPORTUNITY 

Asa H will (eat had with 



It it almost aabeUenblel Great authors have been mp- 
nlnci CossnfleTi of history hats 1st this go oser their 
beads! 



The ' Boot coneist bJstory of (be World's War era 
jammed .Into a book. 



It rltrs Its readen in 10 mlnotes wnst they soald oo4 
in 10 ^^ 



It scooalnts yea with the 11ns sad setMtles of the 11 
rest fanxxs Ben in the war. 



It dwa the dales of all the battles, lugs and tsuli. 
and shere faathL 

Wh at this book don't ten log abeat the war rawer hap- 
pened. 

Endorsed by the Prrsidmt of the N. Y. Board 

of Education and N. Y. Timet. 

Writs w Whs Oi Asset 

Ts. WarM War H«t Alphaast 

Essry Stats saaMM ml m. T. m Flrata Tsrrltsry. 

29s. will Maj m taanls sa. ark* list 

World Wir Hen Alphabet Rdunfbaiaor 

Suite xU-ia, jgy Foltoo St_ 
N. Y. 



1?oses Mean Love 

* v AND 

Love Means You 

_ Ballad 

Successor to"THE SUfiSbWE OF YOUR SrMT 







April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 






to avoid mistakes and to 
POSTAL CARD Wt be MM 



tit 



IB 

«kfc u» t, _ 

i ednad with your fall him and the nMnu to which u 
■ Ta bmtlill followed by the Mate thould be wiMwrf 
(or miMtir) of tk. CUPPER 



of the letters e desi U ss J 
nt kttor. It — * 
letter U to to seat, ial tto 




B*aeaea**. Ed B. 

Crawford. Kddto 


Ebrrhirtt, N. 
Icon 


Bertof. Peter 
Rrietnes, L 0. 


McBride, Harry 

Mnatawlu. 


Foliar*. Ed 

Entail . Edwin P. 




Mh I. t 


Bulbar*. Paul 


BteaaAJHRtl 




Callis. DerU M 


Fn»». On 


bis, Enea 


Rote, Joo 


Boren, Sidney 


Das. Battle 


Gretdi. and 


Kirtwood, BUseM 


Meranao. rani 


tact, Stat. . 




OTxrdoo. AU 


Kearney. Jo*. 


Homy. Peter 


ES ft a ^, - 


Robert 


GcaU. frank 


Leahy. Ghat. B. 


Miller. Fred P. 


Strita. DouaM C. 


Daeson. Ell 


GUarse. JU. 


little. J. H. 


Onuses, Q». 


TDoopeoo, Wak 


Denises, Jtek 


ona, Austin c 
Creenletf , Banon 


TJr1n*st£o, Alhert 


0am. 0. 


Tjiawi. Walter 


Dale; Tredt 


Lambert. Id 


O'Day. Mnr 


D. 


Date 4 Tnwr 


Holbronk. A. H. - 


IM I. Frank 


Pembertoo, B. 


. OnoarhlU, Dlek 




HU). Bowell 


RrAta • Latoaa 


Prior. Ernest 


■watntj, h. a 


Dunn, Jae* 


Bertjan. Oa. 


Moore. Arthur T. 


Fewer*, rrank T. 


Welsb. Lew X 


' .UCi 


'•»'.;' ' LADLES 


■ ,-V. ■ ' ■ .':• 


'"•' 




Olbsoo. Rat 


Lomloe. PftgjJ 


Miller Annum 


Wale*. Kara 




Goodrtei. Ana r. 


Lrses, On U into 
Ltedeay, Mn»W. 


Karatf. Jan* 


Was. Mr*, a B. 


Delmar, Jennie 


Hjland. EtU 


Norton. Ike* 


Walker. Annette 


De T*n, Blllle 


Barker, Cornelia 


Lewis, Era 


NeUkjui. Mia. A. 


Tata, Arm* 


EUnore, Kate 


Barnoan, Louise 
Bill. Ella 


La Coot, Marl* 


Pratle. Mr*. Wa. 


Tan Aisden. 


Fox. Leoa* 
Gartner. Uls 


La Mar. One* 
Learltt, Mm 


Bller. HUT 

Bound, dertnak 


Bead* ' 

Wilton. Mr* H. 


Grey, Maode 


Jacobs, loos 


Miller, Ortro* 


Bweet. Dolly 


L. 


Goodwin. Olari* 


Kara*. Hide 


Marioo Ladlle 


Stuart, Era 


Watt*. Bewta 


ttey. Grace 


Laker, -BBewawa 


Mellen. Dan* 


Valle. Both 


Welted. Oertrode 


Gntt, Rut 


M. 


MlTIrr, Grorrette 


White. Ethel 





WANTED FOR PERMANENT STOCK 

Season 1919-20 

LEADING MAN and WOMAN 

Must be young and strong enough to feature 

DRAMATIC PEOPLE IN ALL. LINES. Juvenile man who can play light comedy. Man for 
Heavies, two General Business Men, Strong Character Man, 2nd Business and Character 
Woman, Ingenue, Clever Soubrette. All must be competent to interpret the be»t of 
plavs. Must have A-l modern wardrobe. State age, height, weight. Send your latest 
photo and program* (will return). State all you can and will do and your lowest salary 
lor long season. We want experie'r/ced, versatile stock people,, so don't ' misrepresent.' 

THATS THE REASON FOITTHIS EARLY AD * " " 

Address G. SCOTT HANES, P. O. Box S33, Philadelphia, Pa. 



1?oses Mean Love 

»V. AND 

Love Means You 

B»ll»d 

Succtor to"THE SUMSHME OF YOUR SMUT 




DEATHS IN THE PROFESSION 



FRANK FOSTER, actor, died In Phila- 
delphia recently, aged 74. His last ap- 
pearance was in a minor part in "On 
Trial." -He was the son of Charles Fos- 
ter, a well known actor bait a century ago. 
The Actors' Fund was In charge of the 
burial. 

SCOTT MARBLE died last Friday at his 
borne, 415 Eaat One Hundred and Forty- 
eighth Street, where he had been living; for 
Ave years.' Ho was seventy-four years old. 
Relatives live in Venice. He leaves a wife, 
whose maiden name was Grade Fade 
Jones, two daughters. Cherie and Queenie. . 
and two sons, Scott Marble, Jr., and 
William. His professional career was bo- 
sun at Barnunrs Museum, Spring and Bay . 
streets, soon after the death of .President 
Lincoln. Marble had written' a -number of - 
plays and scenarios. Burial was in the 
Actors' Fund plot. 

MRS. AGNES HIL.L.-ACKERMAN, wife 
of Paul Hlll-AcXerman, died last week at 
8t Rlta'a Hospital. Lima. O.. from pneu- 
monia. Her - husband and son. aged ten. 
survive. The remains were cremated at 
Graceland Cemetery," Chicago. 

ALFRED R. WEBB, a baritone sincer In 
Manhattan Churches died last week at his 
home at Bay-Side, Queens, at the age of 
thirty-eight years. He was born in Chat- 
tanooga and lived at Bay Side for Sve 
Sears prior to his death. He is survived 
7 a wife, one son and two daughters. 

GEORGE H. SHORNEY, music publisher. 
of Oak Park, 111., died last Friday at his 
home after a short illness, as the result of 
pneumonia. He was the president of the 
Hope Publishing Company. Besides his 
widow, he is survived by two sons and a ■ 
daughter. 

"LIEUTENANT THOMA8 KIERNAN, 
J R-, died in the service on March 8 at 
Ohaumont, France. Traumatic shock was 
given as the cause. Lieut. Kleman had 
made himself popular ss« dancer la aa act 
with bis sister Dorothy, which they pre- 



sented in vaudeville and at most of the 
leading restaurants and hotels in this dty. 
among which were the New York," Roof. 
Stanley's, the Marlborough and Imperial 
Hotels, ami Maxim's. , They had been 
bookecV to open an European engagement 
at Monte Carlo when the war broke out 
and Kieman enlisted. 

CHARLES J. KITTS, manager and part 
owner of the PrlsclUa Theatre, Cleveland, 
died on Monday, March SI. Mr. Kltts was 
a member of the Elks, the Knight Temp- 
lars and the Theatrical Mechanical Asso- 
ciation. Lodge No. 9." 

BLANCHE VAUQHAN NESMITH, 
known to the stage as Blanche Vaughan. 
died at her home In this city last week at 
the age of sixty-one. Mrs. Nesmlth retired 
from the stage thirty years ago, after play- 
ing since she was ten years of age. She 
was born in Providence, R. I:, and made 
her debut -as- a child in Mc VI dear's Thea- 
tre in Chicago. When she came -to this 
city, she took leading parts in Daly's Thea- 
tre with the Daly Stock Company. She later 
appeared with A. E. Sothern, father of E. H. 
Sothem. in "The Silver Spar.'' She also 
played with Roland Reed In "Cheek" and 
"Humbug." Her last appearance was 
made in "The Still Alarm" the famous play 
of which a screen version was produced 
last year. She Is survived by her husband, 
a daughter and a sister. 

MRS. FRANCES SHANNON, known On 
the stage as Frances Framme, of the 
Framme Sisters, died In the Cook County 
Hospital.- Chicago. April S, following an ac- 
cident Feb. 2, In which she was severely 
Injured by a gasoline explosion. The de- 
ceased was twenty-nine ■ years of age and 
was married March 4, 1MB, to J. PL shan- 
non at St. Catherines, On t. The couple had 
been separated for some time, the husband 
belng'at present in New York. A thirteen- 
year-old (laughter also survives. The re- 
mains were taken in charge by Mr. Shan- 
non a mother and burial was in Detroit 



£21 Myrkle-Harder Co. 

AN ESTABLISHED ORGANIZATION 

Clever young man 5 ft. 10 in*, or over to play lead*, opposite Miss Myrkit; a wonderful 
opportunity to the right party.. Year around work. Glad to he*r from people who are 
dependable and clever. Alio scsnlo artist. WM. H. HARDER, Weak April T. 
Conn.; Week April 14, tw»J*- »l fi t, N. Y. 



WANTED FOR STOCK 

CLEVER INGENUE; character woman; juvenile man; general business man; 
scenic artist. State all in first letter. To join on wire. Address GEO. ORMS- 
BEE, Lyric Theatre, Jamestown, N. Y. 



Erlau Wilcox W /T Pickert Sisters Stock Co. 



(year around work) general b u s lw ae* meu* or heavy saan with or without specialty. Join at 
once. Slate all. Others in alt lines, who will be at liberty for next aeaion, to join in July 
or August. New York and Pennsylvania all summer. Address ERLAU WILCOX, Strand 
Theatre, Miami, Florida. 



NEW YORK ATTRACTIONS 



CEO. 



mil AN Theatre. E'way ft 43d St. Bre*. 
V»UHi*l" ft .30. Hats'. Wed. ft Bat. 2. SO.- 

GEO. M. COHAN'S 

ROT COWTDV 

"A PRINCE THERE WAS" 

CEO. M. COHAN AS THE PRINCE 

B. T. AUi'U't - Bernard Granville, Runs, 

Xarguerita Sylre, Rand 

Lambert A Ernest R. Ball, 

, Telia Adlar. Alice Sis, 
Broadway a «7tn at. . -- - 

Mat Dally at 2 P. M. Art, O ai l l gW A Poller, 
25. BO and 75c. Btanat A Wr 1 -"*; Chief 

Theatre. W. 42d St. Bret. 8.1B. 
Mats. Wed. A Sat. 2.1S. , 



PALME 



IrWMtCTttA). 



TiE VELVET LADY 

Hilarious Hew Ratios! Comedy. 
MTrSIC ST VICTOR HERBERT. 



W. 44tb St. nr. B'way. 
SJB. Rata. Wed. a Bat. 
A Million-Dollar Bnoottl "— Globe. 

WOODS PRESENTS 



HUDSON 



2.S0. 



ELTDiffi 



LOUIS SAM 

MANN BERNARD 

in FRIENDLY ENEMIES 

By flssTTiTiTil ShipnisVB sjid Asltoii Heffmxn. 

Tbeotre, Wett 42nd St- Etc*. 
at 8.80. Mats. Wed. 4k Bat. 2*80. 
. A. H. WOODS PREKEHT8 

UP IN 
MABEL'S ROOM 

With HAZEL DAWS, J0EX CmMBZBXAHD sad 
WALTER JOtTES. 

B'way A 40th St Ktei. 8.30. 
Mats. Wed. A Sat. at 2.30. / 
C H A RLE S FaOHXAR PXXBRRTS 

WILLIAM GILLETTE 

XR SO RgW COMZDT ' 

"DEAR BRUTUS" 

BT J, R. aaBBTB, 

I V rC* ITU " ,b St. near B'way. Ixt. 
L I LB V n 8.30. Mat*. Thar. A Sat. 2.80. 

DAVID BXXASCO P1BWIW 

DADDIES 

Theatre. Wett 44th St, awes, 
S 30. Mata. Thar. A Sat. 2.20. 
DAVID BXL&S00 >BXgXRTB 
LAST TWO WEEKS 



REPUBUC m -%£XSL t & L "*> 

ARTHUR R0PXTRI PBRSXRTI 

MAfiJORIE RAMBEAU 

(Br arrangement with A. B. WOODS) la 

"THE FORTUNE TELLER" 



fTrT a BT . gg DixxrjroBax razagjrTi 

«• EVERYTHING M 

at the 

HIPPODROME 

A Mammoth Musical Spectacle by B. H. Baraaidt. 
Matt. Deny. Best Beat*. $1. 



OLYMPIC N^iJSAv. 



TM. Vmi 



AMERICANS 

Nonet Week— HIGH FLYERS 



BROOKLYN THEATRES 




Jay nr. rultou 8t. Mat, 
Tel. Mala 1898 Dally 



HIGH FLYERS 

Even, SawaAtr t Bla- ■"■■nasli 
Wrestliaw Every Tuteday 

Next Week— JOLLY GIRLS 



CASIN0 THEATRE 

THIS WEEK - 

BOWERYS 

Naart Weeh— RQ3ELAND GIRLS 

GAYETY .%«>?X^X% 

THIS WEEK! 

MIDNIGHT MAIDENS 

SUNDAY CONCERTS 



- ---BW MOKCAN3TEKN 
Oalrty Th-.tr. Bid,, New Yerk 



FRANCES 

Ih m HGER! TIGER! 



Hay ry Edward Ssemoeh. 



EMPIRE THEATRE 

* R»a.n-a l. uus. I || a. 

. THBWEEK 

$1,000,000 DOLLS 

Next Weed*— SPORTING WIDOWS 



%i\ 



30 



THE NEW YOR K CLIPPER 



April 9,' 1919 



CHIEF BLUE CLOUD & WINONA 

In Indian Novelty 



ANNA VIVIAN & GO. 



"WHAT WOMAN CAN DO 

The Season's Latest Feminine NomeJty 

loew caam 



/» 



— DOBBS & WELCH - 

-rt? ^SOMEWHERE IN TOWN 



DIRECTION-ROSE AND CURTIS 



WILLIAMS SISTERS 

HI THEIR DAINTY REVUE 

SURPRISE A LA MINUTE 



CARLITA and DICK LEWIS 

PRESENT THEIR MUSICAL COMEDIETTA 

M Luzon Love" 



TINY 



MADELINE 



BELMONT and MOORE 

Singing and Dancing De Laze 

DIRECTION-^IACK LE1A 



RUBE MARQUARD 



DIRECTION— JOS. COOPER 



MARGARET 



SUZANNE 



HAVEN and FRANTZ 

Piano and Harmony 

Of VAUDEVILLE 



RECOLLECTIONS 

Fire Operatic Solobts in "From Grand Opera to Ray" 

A SCENIC PRODUCTION 



ETHEL MILTON & 

In "MOVIE rcHNNItt:" 



By W1LLARD MACK 



BOBBY ADAMS 

Personality— Plus 



RAINBOW LILLIE and MOHAWK 

20th Century Indians 



BERNARD TRIO 

Those Three Nifty Girls 

PLATING U. B. O. TIME I 



JEAN LEIGHTO 



and HER MINSTREL REVUE 

B, F. 



STEWART 



Dallas, The Harmonica King 

DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



BERTRAM, MAY & ROSEWOOD 



BILLY 



HOWARD & LEWIS 

fat "DO YOU LIKE ME?" 

DIRECTION— MAYER JONES 



ARTHUR 



TOM O'CONNELL 

Character Comedian and Dancer 

In VaadariDa 



BONESETTIS TROUPE 



DIRECTION— MAX OBERNDORF 



MINNIE FAUST & BRO. 

Comedy Ladder Act 

Playiac U. B. O. Tin* 



— EMMET & MOO 

In "IRELAND TODAY" 



EILEEN 



YOSI 



SMILING 



DIRECTION— FRED BRANT 



■"E^T" BUCK HART 

THE ESCAPED ARTIST OF THE PLAINS Dir.— LEW COLDER 

adeuna ROATTINA & BARRETTE *» 

IN "1CARRTUC1A GOING UP** . Dir»cti<m, LEE MUCKENFUSS 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK .CLIPPER 



31 



WANTED 

Musical Comedy People 



4 



in all lines for the 

Billy Allen Co. 

Summer Stock and Road 
Shows. 

We Never Close! 

Ten Chorus Girls, 
Union Electricians. 

People looking for steady 
employment year around. 
Have a few ope* weeks in 
July and August for Sum- 
ner Parks, for "the Billy 
vllen Road Show* Ad dress 

Billy Allen, 
Gerard Hotel, 
44th St., New York. 



MONEY 

Can't buy better Comedy Material than 
what ia In the new 



MeNALUPS 

BULLETIN 



MO. 4 

PRICE ONC DOLLAR PER CORY 

CMTaim the rtuevisc csacov mtebial 

23 Will M«MHI. 15 rttrtM act! fw tB> 

13 •rHKH era «e ann m* Nan*. M 
2 rwt-Iirtlai trta MB, 2 ™ruiaj 
rtr ilitsk. a mat taMala 
art fir tea faBtk*, 12 
ortiM mlvtnt Int pun, t ertrt ntautM trUa, 
kaatfna) af ilie»m epntrantai. 
Semester Um prloe or MeNALLrs BVLLZmx 
So. 4 Is C3'j one dollar per copr: or will asa joe 
BtLLrrrNS Nor. I and 4 for J1.50. attta aae 
tact CBUaDtte. 

WR, McNALLY, SI East 125th St, N. Y. 



Violin Soloist 
and Director 

win Map po rlflnn In ant euai moil* booh or 
hstdt Umtre. 

gtodhd antral jean In Europe, hat aid J5 jour 
of oreetetril expefieccft. 

"iAJttg out snoes" a taeetaltr eroirrd mam ex- 
perience oooer eminent managers aod directors. 

r u fg ila, a tbeetra with arttrUe . •ranoadl&B, 
ankawaVanl pipe eases i aanjeJl i Harare). 

Cillforoia or other eoatt territory denied. 

Kernel Bebafcle. American horn. Americas loan. 
Pep aod i wrilaWe MretJODU of nttaojlaaa. exheUsj. 
Dot a little of the exotic tastoj gleaned rraa exrtj 
ttudent lanrliftma. 

Write for draaar of prcat nonce, and letters. 
•A L," 1514 Oelerara St. Striatal. Pa. 



Wanted— Manager 

far one of the largest Yaaaertlte end Picture 
Booses la Greater New York. Host be thoroughly 
eiperlesced. Good salary for right man. State 
experience. Addreae 

"OOBTTDEST1AL," care of OXIPPEE. 



. HUBERT WIDOW GETS ESTATE 

The widow" of George H. Huber wilt re- 
ceive the balk of tie $1,000,000 estate 
left, by the .veteran museum proprietor 
who iup> birr -money on' Fourteenth 
Street. This was decided last week by 
the. Appellate Division of the Supreme 
Court? in, approving of the probate of the 
will which wan contested by George Hu- 
ber ThompeoB, the late millionaire's fos- 
ter son. 

The last will of Huber was executed as 
he lay on- his ' death bed and gave the 
widow the residue of the estate and a 
few small bequests to charity. The foo- 
ter son was. practically cut off and he 
tried to break it- on the grounds that the 
will .was not legally executed and that 
undue influence was exerted on Huber, as 
he was ill when ""^"g the alleged will. 
The decision oi the Appellate Division re- 
moves the test obstacle to the probate. 



CABARiaT SINGER SHOT 
Mrs. Jtyactruelma . Shearman, known as 
-Adelaide' Quetus, a' cabaret entertainer, 
was severely wounded last weak when a 
man whom she later identified aa Joseph 
G. Knapp, ; entered hex apartment, and, 
after a chase over fire escapes, shot her, 
inflicting three wounds. Two bullets 
lodged in her back and. one hit her head. 
She was' taken to the Knickerbocker Hos- 
pital in a critical condition. 

The shooting occurred at 20 West One 
Hundred and Ninth Street at 2:30 A.M. 
The wounded singer is the daughter of 
Lillian Lewis, who was an actress and 
died In 1889. 



1?oses Mean Love 

* v AND 
lOVE MEANS\fcU 

Bella* 

Successor taThT SUNSHNE Or YOUR SMaT 



MAX ROGERS 



Now at 

1562 Broadway 
New York 



After AprS 30 

1544 Broadway 

(2 Flights Up) 



Musical Shows and Re- 
vue Productions My 
Specialty 



UNITY HALL 

4 HALLS-GOOD PIANOS 

341 W. 47th St, Now York 

Bryant 3719 B. A. METZGER. Mgr. 



•THE WORLD-WIDE WAR IS OVER', 

1 btauUTal salts-song boo teorim a aaaaatajal hit Plot 
aeon aad socal orehenraUoea FSEE to artist* HAI1Y J. 

UaCSLI BUSIC CO., re I la., ra.; Sr. of id, 147 WlilMT 

at. Bsrtftee, Case. . 

MUSICAL— AT LIBERTY 

Lady with Vocal songs and Guitar — Concert or 
Vaudeville. E. STEWART. 71 West «***. St, 
H. Y. City. - 

anr sons;, any cbaractar, 
10c each, 3 for S8c. Money 
Back Gvarantee, Bxcloslre sketcnea, etc.. writ- 
tea. Terms and references for stamp. KABY 
THAYER, 1190 Bread Street, Pnmdeaoe, B» L 



PARODIES 



IajHa 
an a 

ura, 



IM 



Jfj aje _ for. Mee . To* 



olDtsif Bolobfa Oao to 
~ ~ CKj. VfrUe.C. M. 



STUDIO 

ylu> aaa of arWate ofSee. telepenne, ptaao. XA 
rorram rninios. su w*rt w - 
■«• Tatk. (Ogpoatte asms TBeatra.) 



. e.', . - 



WANTED-SCENERY 



UATEIY 

Flats— Dbora— Jogs tt Arches, 14 foot stuff 
preferred. Must be in good condition. Not 

over 300 itfitea.'fxxfni Grand- Rap ids, M ■***» 

Write or wire price and particulars. 
HAWKINS-WEBB STOCK CO. 

Majeetic Theatre Flint. Mica. 



Character Comedian 

Ex-soldier, baritone voice, would like 
to . join any; act on vaudeville stage. 
DANIEL, ROSE, care L. Bloom, 
1188 Fox Street (Bronx), N. T. 

Poses Mean Love 

* v AND 




Salle* 

&ecM wro sumsisc orvooB srwjr 



The' Beautiful Ballad 




: 



? 



« 



• 



AM© 



C.W. MURPHY 






t» - TWE SUWMUlt V TUB SfUU* 






L. GAUTIER'S 

BRICKLAYERS 

Keith's Palace This Week 




WARREN & WADE 



In "The Chy Employ e e" 



ooc STONE & WALL u» 

UnicTcle. sad Bicjcl. Dtficnos Phfl 



BEATRICE LAMBERT 

THE INTERNATIONAL GIRL IN VAUDEVILLE 



COLLETTE 



& L'ESTRANGE 

amd rortjLAa MELODIES 



I 






: ,j_v3t3UAV Stf 



rLTTtK 



/;:.:::: 



<•. .5»«'js, 



9 



-y: 
• 5»_. 



u - 



■ 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April'S, 1919 



ORDERED TO FIRE THE FIRST GUN 

PUBLIC HEALTH FILMS ANNOUNCES ITS 
DESIGNATION BY THE U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH 
SERVICE TO PRESENT THE FAMOUS FILM 

FIT TO WIN 

AS THE OPENING SHOT OF THE 

BIG^BATTLE TO MAKE THE WORLD 

:- . CLEAN AND SAFE FOR 1»OSTERITY 

WITH 






I 



AS 



Panama? Directed by LIEUT. E. H. GRIFFITH 
Thm Pictar* That Warns Agauut the Unfit Woman 




PUBLIC HEALTH FILMS 

1483 Broadway, N. Y. C. Suite 211 Phone, Bryant 9496 



DOROTHY 



AL 



DALY & WILD 



IN "TRAVELING SALESMAN" 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



MONA GRAY & SISTER 

Two Girl* and a Piano 

MGR. HARRY RICHARDS . DDL LEW COLDER 



YOU 



N 



If to, bo SURE to secure the service* of an EXPERT1 An artistic arrangement of 
your composition may mean SUCCESS! I have den* hundred* Of big hltsl 
EUGENE PLATZMAN, Centre! Theatre Bldfl. , B' way & 47th St. , New York 



PAYTON, HOWARD ® LISETTE 



"Sis Feat of Comic Uproar.' 



Work in One. 



Dir., Che*. BornLanpt 



GUY CUFF 

McCORMICK and WINEHILL 

The Jess Boy* from Dixie D i re c tio n — Lewi* * Gordon 



«•« MYERS and KNISE 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



NETTIE 
i DIRECTION— .WENONAH TENNY 



JOHNNIE 



HERB IE 



DIRECTION— BRUCE DUFFUS 



ROSE & ARTHUR BOYLAN 

IN SONG AND DANCE INNOVATION IN VAUDEVILLE 



AUSTRALIA GETS ENGLISH PLAYS 

Melbourne, An*., April 5. — Hugh Mc- 
intosh boa brought a bunch of n?ngH«n 
productions here for presentation, the most 
important of which is "Gnu Chin Chow," 
Oscar Asohe's huge success which is now 
playing to big business in America and is 

in its third year in London. The *'Lilae 
Domino" is another successful production 
secured by Mcintosh. Other leas notable 
plays in his budget are "My Lady Pragle," 
'The Better 'Ole," "The Man From To- 
ronto" and the revues "Tabs,"" "Tails Up," 
"Some," "Cheap." and "Three Cheers." 



GEST BUYS THREE PARIS SHOWS 

Paris, Ft., April 7.— Morris Gest has 
purchased the American rights to three 
Parisian productions, which represent the 
first . purchase . of French plays since the 
beginning of the war in 1914. 

The first of these is "Phi-Phi," a light 
opera by Willimetz, Sollar and Christine, 
which has been running for two. seasons 
at the Bouffes Parisiens. The second is 
"V Heritier du ' Bal Tabarin," a three 
act vaudeville, by Nichols Nancy, now at 
the Cluny Theatre. The third is "Aphro- 
dite," an acknowledged Parisian success. 



MILLER SHOW OPENS APRIL 21 

London, Eng., April 5. — Gilbert Millei 
plans to give "Monsieur Beaucairc," Andre 
MesBager'B romantic opera, composed to {he 
libretto of Frederick LonBdale, an oat of 
town showing before lie brings! it into the 
Prince's. It will play next week at the 
Prince, pi Wales, . .Birmingham,, lay off 
Holy "Week and ha vc . its ' London premiere, 
April ^j: Maggie Teyte and Lennox 
'Powle, well known in New Yort, will have 
leading roles. 



"MACHREE" PLAY TOURS ENGLAND 

London, Eng., April 5.— "The Daughter 
of Mother Maehrce," an American comedy 
drama by Edward SI. Rose, haa been pre- 
sented at Eastbourne, and goes on tour 
under the, management of Kin&j and Clark. 
The Eastbourne presentation ^marked the 
first production of Jthc play in .fljiis country. 
" ' . -•>' ■ ■ •• l 1,- . 



PARIS TO SEE TDK LADY" 

London, Eng., April 5. — Ivan Caryl! ia 
here preparing to make a production of 
the "Pink Lady" in Paris, using his origi- 
nal score and the origins! book by Georges 
Berr and Marcel Guillemand. 



KURYLOS DANCE Of MELBOURNE 

Melbourne, Aus., April 7.— r-Mons. Ed- 

ouard da Kurylo and : Mile. Kurylo, 
brought from America by Hugh D. Mc- 
intosh, are principals' in a dancing feature 
in ."Bubbly." the attraction, at the Palace 
Theatre. ■ ■ 



Love 




Sueomor toTHE SUNSHINE OF YOUR SMUT 




THE PERFECTION OF ARTISTIC STUPIDITY— Eve-Telegram 

PELHAM-LYNTON 

And a Monocle. "The Symbol of interrogation and] incomprehensibility.'' — 

SIR GILBERT PARKER 



JOE 



& 



LILLIAN 



Singing, Dancing and Comedy 

Bf VAUDEVILLE 



-» HIBB1TT and MALLE — 

**Two Southern Boys** 

MATERIAL BY ANDY RICE DIRECTION— MAX GORDON 



CHAS. ROOT & WHITE WALTER 
ECCENTRIC SONGS AND DANCES 



April 9, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 




TURES 



ALBANY SENATE 

PASSES SUNDAY 

MEASURE 

PERMITS FILMS ON SABBATH 

A 

Albany, April 5.— The bill concerning 
Sunday 'openings and introduced into - the 
Senate 'By 'Senator 'Qeorge &l' Thompson, 
passed t$fe upper house on Thursday by 
a vote of twenty-seven to twenty-one. 

If in any city, town or Tillage motion 
pictures are now exhibited on the first 
day of the week it is provided by' this 1 
bill they may continue to be exhibited 
during such time after 2 o'clock in the 
afternoon as the exhibition of motion pic- 
tures shall not have been prohibited by 
an ordinance hereafter adopted by the 
Common Council or other legislative body 
of such city, town or village, the adop- 
tion, repeal or re-adoption of which Is 
hereby authorized. " . 

If m any city, town or village motion 
pictures are not now exhibited' on the 
first day of the week, they shall not be 
to exhibited except during such time af- 
ter 2 o'clock in the afternoon as 'shall be , 
permitted by ' an ordinance hereafter 
adopted by the Common Council or other 
legislative body of such city, town or 
Tillage, the adoption, repeal or , readop- 
tion of which is hereby authorized.. • 

When the bill came up for final action 
Senator' Thompson, in advocating its pas- 
sage, said that the fact that" Sunday pic- 
tures are now in operation in some places 
and not in others is no reason the mem- 
bers should not favor his bill by voting 
for it, as its adoption will have the effect 
of adjusting the entire proposition of 
Sunday shows 'throughout the ' entire 
State. 

Senator Frederick M. Davenport ' of 
Clinton opposed the bill and said the Sen- 
ate should act slowly and avoid commer- 
cializing the Sabbath Day. The Demo- 
cratic members supported the bill, and 
with the aid of Senators Abeles, Graves, 
Lock-wood, G. F. Thompson, Walters and 
Whitley, Bepublicans, the bill received 27 
votes, one more than sufficient to obtain 
its passage. The bill will now go to the 
Assembly and will probably be acted up- 
on Monday night. 

ATLANTA GETS $500,000 HOUSE 
Macon, Ga., Apr. 5. — Troup Howard, 
who owns and controls the- Grand, Capi- 
tols, Palace, Princess and Macon theatres, 
in this dty, will build a new "house- in 
Atlanta, Ga., at a cost of $500,000. He 
has obtained a lease for twenty -five years 
on a site between the Aragon Hotel and 
the Grand theatre on Peachtree Street for 
the new house, , which will be known as 
"The Howard." ' 

The new theatre will have a motion 
picture policy and la expected to be com- 
pleted, in a year. It will be 100 by 400 
feet and three stories high, with a' garage 
in the back In which the patron's cars 
will be parked free of charge. The house 
will have a seating: capacity of 3,000, the 
meaaanine -floor will contain drawing rooms 
for the ladies and a smoking room for the 
men. A pipe organ will be installed and 
the orchestra will have forty musicians. 



PeanLove 




W. VA. MANAGERS ORGANIZE. 

Winding Gulf, W. Va., Apr. 3. — At a 
meeting held here last week of the theatre 
managers and exhibitors of the vicinity, 
the Winding Gulf Exhibitors' Association 
was organized, with the object of Unking 
all the theatres in this section together and 
putting them under the same booking man- 
agement. Officers were elected as follows: 
president, C. R. Stahl; first vice-president, 
Hiram Siiemore ; second vice-president, J. 
T. Morris {secretary and booking manager, 
J. H. Spencer and J. B. Clinton, treasurer. 

The following theatres were represented 
at the meeting, the Affinity . Amusement 
Company, Winding Gulf Theatre, Stotes- 
bury Amusement " Company, Besoco Thea- 
tre, Wyoming Theatre and the Glen White 
Amusement Company. These are in the 
cities of Winding Gulf, Besoco, Stotesbury, 
Hotcoal, Affinity, Mullens and Glen White. 
Towns unable to be represented but which 
will have the privilege of affiliation' with 
the organization are Fireco, Sullivan, 
Raleigh, McAlpin, Tarns, Vanwood, Itman 
and Ecclea. ' 

The next meeting win be held April 18. 



EXHIBITORS TO 
DROP "LEAGUE" 

FROM NAME 

RE-ELECT NEW OFFICERS 



The Motion Picture Exhibitor's League 
- : held a meeting last Thursday, Friday, and 
,v Saturday at the Hotel '■'. -Aster! and one- of 



-(the many resolutions . ad op ted 



the 



— '- SUES OVER COSTUMES •-• 
George Geoly, proprietor of the Eaves ' 
Costume Company, has brought suit in 
the City Court against, the Charles Rich - 
man Picture Corporation. Geoly, through 
his attorneys, McWflliams and Heffernan, 
is seeking to recover. $1,408. *£ . . .'; 
. In his complaint, Geoly alleges that he 
furnished the picture corporation' cob- 
tumea, rifles and helmets in connection 
with, i one of its motion, picture produc- ' 
tions. Through the picture corporation's, 
carelessness, it is further alleged, rain dam- 
aged - tbe' costumes, rifles and helmets to' 
such an extent that they became unusable. 
i In another action brought by the same 
plaintiff against the same defendant, in 
the Municipal Court, it is alleged by Geo- 
ly that the Richman corporation failed 
to pay him $31025, which sum is claimed 
for costume hire. 



OPERATORS FIGHT STRIKE 

San Francisco, April 3.— At a meeting, 
recently held, of the San Francisco Labor 
Council, Peter Boyle, a delegate from the 
Motion Picture Operator's Union, charged 
that many striking machinists and boil- 
ermakers have entered the motion picture 
field, purchased theatres and have hired 
non-union operators, thus running thea- 
tres that are unfair to union labor. 

He said that protests from the Union's' 
business agent were not heeded and asked 
the aid of the council to establish a boy- 
cott on the theatres if no other method 
could be used to enforce union conditions. 



VERMONT HAS SUNDAY FILMS 

Bubungton, Vt, April 6.— For the first 
time in the history of this state, Sunday 
films were exhibited yesterday for amuse- 
ment purposes without any protest from 
the State or city authorities, clergymen or 
laymen. The performance was held at the 
Strong theatre and turned away crowds 
at both afternoon and evening showings. 

The .exhibition was in direct' violation 
of the old "blue" laws of the state which 
have been on the statute books since 1787. 



'•changing of their name to the Motion 
Picture Exhibitors of America. The word 
"league" was dropped. Peter J. Schaefer 
presided at the conference, at which an 
election of officers also took place. 

Mr. Schaefer was re-elected president, 
while the other officers appointed were 
Marcus Loew, vice-president; Frank Rem- 
busch, secretary, and Ernest Horetmanri, 
treasurer. 

The exhibitors met primarily to discuss 
plana for strengthening their organization. 
The action of the National Association in 
barring out the exhibitors after overtures 
had been made to them to join has 
brought all factions of exhibitors togeth- 
er, determined to make their own organ- 
ization an important factor in the indus- 
try. 

Sunday closing and censorship were two 
problems that were discussed at great 
length. At the opening meeting Hector 
Pasemezoglu, the St. Louis committee man 
and chairman of. the censor board com- 
mittee, presented a motion asking that 
the exhibitors draft a set of resolutions, 
to be sent to Carter Glass, Secretary, of 
the Treasury, offering the Government the 
use of theatres, stages and screens to as- 
sist the coming Victory Loan. Mr. Paae- 
mezoglu's motion was adopted by unani- 
mous vote. . ".' . . • . 

Every member- of the exhibitors' 'or- 
ganization, it was pointed out, would 
benefit by the fire, theft and casualty in- 
surance arrangement the commitee agreed 
to make with the exhibitors now members 
and those coming into the organization. 
A saving of 25 per cent, on ail insurance 
is offered to them. 

Instead of conflicting State exhibitors' 
associations it was decided to invite all 
exhibitors to become members of the na- 
tional organization. Forty-eight States 
are represented and each State is entitled 
to a place on the executive committee. In 
the event the State does not name a rep- 
resentative the president is given tbe 
power to name someone to fill the va- 
cancy. 

Those who answered the roll call were 
W. H. Linton, Utica, N. Y.; L M. Moabee, 
Buffalo, N. Y.; J. Gerson, New York; Pe- 
ter J. Schaefer, Chicago; L. F. Blumenthal, 
New York; Alfred Black, Rockland, Me.; 
Ernest Horstmann, Boston; Daniel Sham- 
berlin, Minneapolis, Minn.; Frank J. Rem- 
buach, Indianapolis; Br. Charles Heaps, 
New jersey; I. Chittenburger, Indianapo- 
lis; William Fait, Jr., Utica, N. Y., and 
Hector Pasemezoglu of St. Louis. 



Sura**** <o""rr!E SUNSHINE Of YOUR SHUT 



MUTUAL BOOKS STATE-LAKE 

The Chicago branch of the Exhibitor's 
Mutual has signed up the new State-Lake 
Theatre, 'controlled by the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit, for the rest of 1919. The new thea- 
tre opened -recently with "What Every 
Woman- Wants" as its film attraction. 
"The Turn in the Road" was the feature 
the following week. 



PEGGY HYLAND ARRESTED 

Santa Monica Beach, April 4.— Peggy 
Hyland waa arrested early this week for 
speeding thirty -six miles an hour on the 
Santa Monica boulevard. She gave her 

age as twenty -Ave. 



FILM CLUB TO DANCE FRIDAY 

The Motion Picture Club of America, 
Inc., 1000 Broadway, will give a prom- 
enade concert and dance at the Hotel Com- 
modore on Friday. With the money made 
at the ball they are going to start bond- 
ing a club house for the members of the 
profession. The music win be by Van 
Baard's Orchestra of twenty -four pieces. 
The concert program will be under direc- 
tion of Dr. Hugo Reiseufeld, of the Rlalto 
and Rivoli. All leading theatrical and 
movie people win be there. Caruso and 
Farrar have promised to be present. The 
Elks have taken six boxes. BMy Hart is 
handling the affair and is arranging one 
of the oest of its kind ever hel3 S the 
city. 



FILM FLASHES 



May Allison baa started work on "His 
Father's Wife " 

Mike Rosenberg of Seattle arrived in New 
York last week. 



Tbe Pioneer Film Corp, will "soon release 

"Virtuous Sinners." 



■Beating the Odds" 
T. MOM* film. 



is the title of the 



Harry 

The Canadian Film Service 
<.Ttfe Upn en* the. Moose." ,r- 

- William Faruum aa*. started work on a new 

Zane Grey story, "The line Banger." 

Tom Melghan will be Katharine Mac-Don- 
ald's leading man in "The Thunderbolt." 

Ivan Abramson Is bavins; a successful tour 
in the interests of the Graphic Film Corp. 

"The Cry of tbe Weak" fa the title of the 
latest Fannie Ward picture to be completed. 

Anita Stewart Is working on a new pro- 
duction called "Should a Husband Ten sis 
Wife*" 



Kw! 



Emmet Dalton will make his personal an* 
^anee at the showing of ''Beyond the 



Paul Swan has been _ 
Film Company to appear 
tares. - 



by the Past 
a series of pje> 



Tom Daly is bad on Broadway again attar 
a two years' absence with the Bail **" 

Forces. 



B. A. Walsh has returned from Bot 

with bis company, which is beaded by 
Cooper. 

Tern Qulnaa has completed the first of his 
26 western dramas. It is called "Sooth of 
Santa Fe."- 



Anna Lehr will be John Barrymore'a lead- 
ing lady in ■ a new French picture for the 
Famons-Playera. 



Jesse J . 
Frohman Amusement Corp., bas 
Coast on business. 



Goldberg, general manager of tbe 
las left for the 



Jerome Beatty, adTertudng manager of the 
Famous-Players, was presented with a boy fey 
his wife last week. 

Anita Stewart's feature, "From Headquar- 
ters," has been booked by the Kunaky ft nines 
ment Co. for Detroit. 



'Relations," 



Evelyn Greely Is the star of 
on which tbe World Films have started ink 
at tbe Fort Lee studio*. 



bated 
Osm- 



Robert A. Bakeznan bas been appo 
director or the Boston office of the 
mnnity Motion Picture Bureau. 



"Model Girls," "Trout," "Kiddles," "Cfe^aa.'• 
"Birds and Flowers" and "Alaskan Bevela- 
tions" are the Prisma releases for AprlL 

Robert . H. Deris and William H. Cowan 
hare bad then- suit against the Screen Club 
dismissed by Supreme Court Justice Piataek. 

Myrtle Morgan has returned from France 
where she has been driving a Bed cross am- 
bulance and expects to be Been la a State- 
right film soon. 

June Elvldge. Arthur Ashley. George liac- 

rie, Ned Spar*-- 

[lns and Philip 
Social Pirate.' 



Quarrie, Ned Sparks, Stuart Bobaon. May 
Hopkins and Philip Van Loan will be seen In 
"Tne P — 




Balls* N5 

<."THE SUNSK Or VOIR SrOT 



r34 



TH£ NEW YQR Kv-eM WE-R 



April .9, 1919 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"VIRTUOUS MEN" 

Cut 

Bob Stokes B. K. JJnwrtn 

Helen Wmard. . : r; . . . .?.-. .Grace- I*rltng 

Marda Fontaine iir-S*" 1 . _ 

Robert Brummon Kobt. W.> P^^g! 

Henry WHlard •ivJ, olm £• 2?3f 

Clarkson V, I / v,n 5 ^.^^ 

Lieut. Walnwrlght ^ftj* r l S^SSI 

William CohiU 

Remarks 

■•Vlrtuouii Men," the Initial offering of 
the Ralph Ince Attract Ions, bears all tho 
Bar-marks of a real box-onlce winner of 
MB mones-.dmwina^capadj^ Judged from 



the standpoint of the popuiar-prlced pic- 
ture theatre audience, ft fa In every sense 
of the word a ?T»lg" feature. 

The dim— which la In eight reels— is filled 
with action, the tempo never letting down 
Sr* moment. At umee, the talc ofwua- 
trial strife, which contains Just about 
.enough love Interest, to relieve the tense- 
nuM of the action, becomes a trifle in- 
volved; This, however, Is a alight detect 
that can he readily remedied by a bit of 

SgsxffS Kr^SffSL? 

Incidentally, can boast of the best screen 
nght staged since the celebrated BUI Far- 
num .crap In "The Spoilers." 

There are numerous bis punches, one 
that stands out prominently being a con- 
vincing -mob" scene In which sorao 6,000 
shipyard employees start a strike move- 
ment and later change their minds as the 
result- of a patriotic appeal made by tho 
hero. . • 

The titles are very good. The dramatic 
ones are forceful, being couched In simple 
direct terms, helping the story JLp^eaaur- 
iJriy. The comedy captions are full of gin- 
ger and scored at least twenty full-fledged 
laughs at the Initial showing on Sunday 
malac at the Fulton Theatre. 

The showing, by toe JWr 1U •xeap- 
Uonauy well handled, a tasteful stage set- 
UniTof blue satin draperies lending a touch 
ot two-dollar atmosphere to the proceed- 

Jn Th» cast Is exceptionally good. -aV.X. 
Lincoln, ■tarred, gives a manly perform- 
ance throughout and nils t be bin In every 

parttoolar. as regards actio*. Otherj 

whose work merithlgh praise are Robert 
'Cummlngs, who makes an excellent 
•"heavy"; Danny Hayes. In a corking come- 
dy character role; Clara Joel, as a vamplr- 
lan sort of vulalness, and Grace Darling, as 
the heroine. . 

The theme of the picture la timely ana 
la sure to excite Interest. Balph Ince'a di- 
rection, especially In the matter of han- 
dling large ensembles, Is a shining example 
■at acreencraft. The picture, as a whole, 
can be depended upon to furnish a capital 
evening's entertainment to the average film 
audience, which, in the final analysis, is 
the chief mission of any photoplay. 
Box Oftice Vahw 

Full run. 



5CHULBERG JOINS NEW CO. 

B. P. Schulberg, who recently resigned 
from: tin Famous Players to go with Hi* 
ram Abramg aa bis assistant with toe 

United Artists Association, resigned from 
that organization last week. He did so 
to join a new international film organi- 
zation which will have its headquarters 
in New York. The organization plana to 
have a Bcriea of exchanges in every large 
pity in the. world outside of America. 
They wfD buy up the world's rights to 
every film they consider worth while pur- 
chasing and if a well-known independent 
producer wants to put on a big. produc- 
tion, they will advance the money in lieu 
of the purchase price for the world's 
righta, even before the producer has start- 
ed work on it. These films they intend 
to release in countries outside of America. 



CD El? Latest 

ri\£iL Issue of 

HOW TO MAKE-UP 




Writ, or CaO 

M. Stein Cesmetlc Co. 

«SO West 31st Sw eat , Hem Veek 



J 



"HEARTS OF MEN" 

Six Raela. 

Cast 

INeoto Rosettl, a oteer gardener' ■■---■• 

George Beban 
Maria Rosetti, his mother .c . Bora* Kernan 

Beppo. his ton. . aeorge Bebesi, Jr. 

Ttnei Ferronnf. a rose of Sapom • J - 

Mabel Van Buren 

Judge Heweombe .Harry Bmttembnry 

Steve, kit clerk ..George Pterton 

Buck Hughe*, construction Does .... 

Clarence Burton 

Hop Sing, by.. Himself 

Story — Dramatic. Written by William 
M. McCoy. Produced and directed by 
Beban. 



'With the exception - of one weak spot 
this la a gripping story of the west and 
that great Immensity the desert. 

Rosettl buys land In Arisona because the 
: doctors nave ordered bis mtrthor to' be 
taken to a high altitude. Bis property 
proves to be covered with rocks and cactus, 

but Rosettl, driven on by his love for his 
mother, sets to work as best he can to 
make a home In "no man's land." "Wild" 
westerners, living in toe vicinity of his 
land, take a dislike to him at first, but- a 
.true friendship Is soon formed and the men 
aid Rosettl in clearing toe and and build- 
ing, a houne. Incidentally becoming very 
devoted to Rosetti's young son, whose 
mother la dead. Rosetti's mother dies and 
the "boya" urge him to get married. The 
bride la Imported from Italy and does not 
like Rosettl. She finally, coaxes him to 
let her visit Italy and takes the youngster 
along, also the village clerk, the villain. 
Rosettl Is heartbroken when he receives a 
letter from his wife stating that toe boy is 
dead. r ~ . 

He discovers oil near his home but before 
he can stake a claim a number of miners 
take possession. Rosettl and his friends. 
including a Chins man, appear and there la 
a. pitched battle that is a farce, doions of 
shots being fired at Rosettl and his party 
and' no one hit. Rosettl finally gets in the 
rear of toe bad men and throws a pall 

of hot water on them. Although his fol- 
lowers are unarmed they put the thugs to 
rout, toe "chink" wielding a mean frying 
pan, felling: several stalwarts with this 
■trusty ^weapon. - This la toe weak spot of 
toe whole film. 
The child, supposedly dead, is restored to 

Roif.tU. 

The character types are excellent and 
there is heart interest throughout. Beban's 
work Is superb. This film is certain to be 
popular wherever shown. 

Box Office Value 

Two days. 

•THOU SHALT NOT' 

Fox—Six Reels 
Cast 

Ruth ....<...'.. Bvelyn Hesbit 

Her Rather Hot Burton 

Her Mother Florida Kingsley 

.ilea Peter* Gladden James 

The Minister Urawjord Kent 

Story — Melodrama. Written by Charles J. 
Brabln, directed by Charles J. Brabln, fea- 
. tores Bvelyn Neablt. 

Bvelyn Neablt does some good work in 
"Thoa Shalt Not," bnt the supporting 
east is not Quite np to the mark. 

The story presents little that is new. It 
Is the conventional tale of the village girl 
who goes to New Xork with toe man she 
trusts, learns her lesson and returns to her 
home to marry the minister and live happily 
ever a/ter. ■"•■*« «! 

Bnth is the pride of her village and the 
most popular girl In Bedford. On her way 
to and from school, she sees Alec Peters, a 
brakeman. Ber father knows Alec to be a 
man ot bad character and orders her to hare 
nothing further to do with him. She. how- 
ever, disregards the pleading of her mother 
and advice of her father, thinking she has 
found her ideal. 

At night, she runs away from home and 
goes to New York with Peters. There, he 
Uvea with her but refuses to marry her. He 
finally tires of her, casting ber out into the 
big city. . 

Meanwhile, Roth's mother la pining away 
and her' father is Willing to forgive her. A 
minister goes in search of her, finds her snd 
brings her back to the village. The natives 
cannot overcome their prejudices against her, 
though, and refuse to sing with her In the 
village choir. -The minister, preferring to 
redeem "one fallen soul" than preach before 
a- hundred goes out of the church with Ruth. 
They decide to leaye the village and face a 
new life or happiness together. 

1?oses Mean Love 

*^ AND 




"PETTIGREWS GIRL" 

Paramount. Five Reels. 
Cast 

Daisy Heath Ethel Clayton 

Private ivtiiiow Petaamo Monte Blue 

Private Jiggers Botley . J a ms / Mason 

Hugh Varick Ohartsar Gerard 

Piggy ' Claris" Whipple 

■ 8»Sry^Draina«e.-'Tv««efi-15»TMrna-"Bu*: - 
nett: scenario by WIH M.- Rltchey:- directed 
by George MeKordr featuring •Ethel Clay- 
itari. •.: . ■ '. ..• . .'..:-. . - ..'" " 



,te Blue have-nut 
" Girl" 



filths} Clayton and 
' tb,<;lr personalities Into "Pcttrgrc w'$ 
' in - sV manner' that la sure to? please any- 
where. ' The -film Itself la one that will go 
over and.jha.sa number of scenes where the 
"real thing"" Is reproduced. Among them 
are the drive of the Lambs and the Friars 
:for war funds on- Fifth Avenue and toe 
welcoming:. of the returning soldiers. 

Mpote Blue in the role of WllliAm PctU- 
(rreW, sT soldier with ho living kin or 
friends, does fine work. His regiment, 
which,. la from the South, is stationed at an 
embarkation camp near New York. Petti - 
Krew gets leave and to pass time decides 
to go to the big town and take in the 
alghts. He has always, had a longing for a 
girl and when he passes -by a novelty shop, 

he Is struck -with the picture of Daisy 
Heath, a chorus girl In a musical Comedy. 
He uuya it and In the evening goes to the 
show' to see her. She plan toe leading 
lady's part as her understudy. Daisy has 
been successfully trying to land Hugh 
Varick. a millionaire, She tosses Pettlgrew 
a rose ajid Is struck with his Adoring gase. 
She then turns her attention to Vanck who 
sends her a note telling her to meet him as 
.usual after the show. Pettlarew, however, 
waits at the stage entrance and Tr-pfrtf her 
acquaintance. He takes her to an ice- 
cream , soda emporium. 
Daisy begins to like him very much and 



when they part at her door she tells him 
to call to say good-by before he sails. 
Varick calls later and they go out. Petti, 
grew returns to camp with the picture on 
which Daisy has written something and a 
rose which she had given him. The next 
morning another soldier finds them and 
an argument starts -which - Is Interrupted 

by the "loole." Pettlgrew takes all the 
blame, because he knows that Jiggers, the 
other .nrlvau?,. has a. girl .and wanta .to see 
her. He Is ordered to "K. P." duty. While 
sweeping the floor, Daisy,. who. has. come 
to damp. to. entartaln the boys, with Varick, 
sees hint, siid sends the latter away so she 
can talk to "Pettlgrew: ' She repeats her 
invitation. 

A few days later Pettlgrew calls and tells 
her he fa to leave in the evening and they 
spend the day together, although she was 
to meet "Varick .to buy an engagement ring. 
After saying good-by, Daisy returns home 
when they part at her door she tells him 
him that- they win never marry and for him 
to forget her. He leaves and enlists and 
is out of the rest of -the picture. 

Daisy, takes. UP war work and- helps In 

the various drives for funds. The" war ends 

and the returning soldiers are shown. Daisy 

goes to meet PattlgrejB and the film ends 

.with her ma rtiilng alongside nimtgL 

B.KOffl»VJ»: , : ,|| . 

One dayv.'i : ■ . , &fj 




■: . z ' **»•*:. ■ •'. •■;■ '■■• 
Smuttier loTHE SUNSKNE> Of YOUri SMUF 




EMIL M. 



IE TWO MISFITS 



& KING 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



LOEW C1RCUFT 



AND 

A 

"At tho Training 




MARK LEVY 



Wanted 



Will either lease or buy Theatre in any city of fifty thousand or more 
pop ulation. . ■ : ■ : ■ "■.-'. 

CHAS. E. TAYtiDR, Pox No. 262 Fair Haven, New Jersey 

FR/lNCHlNI BROS. 

EQIJBUWUSTS^HAJa>-TO-HAfg> BALANCERS— DIRECTIOW^PALY 8AWDER3 



in As EkcteunW Act by Jean Hav 



Best Low* at toe Piano 



A NEW MA ME. BUT A STANDARD ACT 

(4) 

i sv l j p ■ lg jPantow:SJd» ffnggaw Cook. 



Rep, H. B. MarnWli 




A SteBcUftI VancUvtU. Writer cat StsaaJelw 
VaocVvSW Acta. ;. 

1493 Broadway, New York CHy 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



INSURE YOUR MATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 

REGIS TER YOU R ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 



COUPON will be numbered and attached 
mowledgmcxit. ud for future reference. The 

i or lm narTlng the aaaae, and ahoold be en 

ofthe boaae where the met la be ing ued or other 
eaedc by the nimee aad numbere dobs 
Addreai your contribution! to 



• certificate will be returned to you aa 

contribution ehoold be aigued plainly by the 
ol the ahew or 



by the etage mintftr 

witneeeet. Farther acknowledgment will be 



The Registry Bureau, 



NEW YORK CUPPER. UM B: 



•. New York 



Date . 

NEW YORK CLIPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 
Fnrlitinri plaoao find copy of my 



for Rtgittntioa. 

INAflxt • ■ • • • ••>.» • • 

ADDRESS 




FOR STOCK REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES, 

LABGgST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Book. lor home 
amuaement, Negro Playa, Paper, Scenery, Mri. Jariey'e Was 
Work*. Ca talog ue Free I Free I Free! 

SAMUEL FRENCH. 3* Wcat 38th St.. New York 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 

Fi 1 1 adjejiaa Now linn 

JOS. T. WEISMAN, rreprletor 

Northwett Comer 1 4th and Chestnut Sts., St. Louis, Mo. 



Uado-Holp 



Theatrical Hoetaxry, Cole and Cabaret 

(MembwrN. V.A-andBart—qa. a«b) Beet Bet on th. CircuH 



Vaudeville Acta, Moaical Show*, 
Borlewqaoa, Etc 

TAKE NOTICE! 



I am ready to write orig i nal 
word, and mu.ic Alio perfect arranging. 
Prompt delivery. HUGH W. SCHUBERT. 
Creecant Theatre or 4a* State St, B'hivn. 



Central Fibre Wardrobe 




$45.00 

45 x 21 x Oy, 

$50.00 

Equal to the 
average $75.00 
trunk and guar- 
anteed. 

CENTRAL TRUNK 
FACTORY 

SIMONS * CD. 
7W Arch St, 



ASH D ? s "c 



j Mill u OKlcn film tcrtb, (with or without raid 
| nlliori). ditcuded or broken Jcweliy, witthrt, mir- 

netu point, — luytlmir conuininr rold, tilrct or 

— -and we will mend you the full orb nlae h, rrtara 

■Mil (tad bold yonr food, 10 dlv, pendinr your acceptance of 

oor remittance.) Dun ana Bradttmt Referriuwe, 

OHIO SMELTING & REFINING COMPANY 




urr us pbotb 

UJ 



IT IS BEST. 
Wt.. N. T 



SCENERY 

Diamond Dyo, OH or Water Cetera 
3CHELL SCENIC STUDI O. COLUMBUS, a 

LEARN MIND READING 

fc*b taw batm Nav. ertjhwl asaeaa. tewa* 
rmraatml laetrerBee, 11.00. Baa. trTB nnrMt, 



Read the Clipper Letter List 



DR. FREDERICK SOBEL 



DENTIST 
Office Hour*! t A. M.-7 P. M. Sunoayet 
A. M.-1 P. M. Evening* by Appoinl 
Special rata* to the iiroreeelow lag* St 
Ave, Bet, 11 J-mth Sta, Now York. Tele- 
phone, Cathedral era. Handier of the Bor- 
leequ* Club. 



5.000 (ill btralik, i pp.. earn pice Ci9 112.6) 

10,000 BUI hertlia. « pp.. each pica 619 20.90 

S.000 10Url4 herald,. 4 pp.. «eeh par. 7tl0U 13.75 

10.000 lOViilt btralai, 1 pp.. each pap: 7H0H 22.00 

3.000 12x11 herald,, 4 pp.. each pan 9x12 16.30 

10.000 12,18 hernia,, 4 pp., each pap Sill 27.30 

S.000 Uiai herald,. 4 pp.. etch pate IOUiH 19.23 

10.000 14121 hernial, 4 rp.. each para 10V4il4 33.00 

S.000 0X24 bmldi, two «ldea 13.20 

10,000 6x24 herald,, two ildca 2X43 

S.000 7x21 haraloa. tea tide, 13.73 

10,000 Till herald,, tan (Idea 22.00 

5,000 9x24 herakw, two ridel 16.30 

10.000 9x24 herald,, two ndta 27.30 

6,000 lOttxll herald,, two atom 19.29 

10.000 1014x28 herald*, two odea 33.00 

Dalon label on all prating. Toe: Cub with order. 
Prim rubjeet to ehaBt* wlthont notlm 

CAZETTE SHOW PRIMING COMPANY 

Member U. T. ml A. aaaMaea, m, U. *. A. 



TIGHTS 

Silk Open Hose end 
Storfcingi 

An Omr 



QUALITY the BEST am 

LOWEST. 

Gold end Surer Brocadee. Theatrical 
Jewelry, Spangle,, Etc. Geld and Sil- 
ver Trimming,, wig,. Beard, and all 
Gooda Theatric*: 



J. J. WYLE «fe BROS., Inc. 

CSaccceeore to Si rami* and Weil) 
B. nth St. New Yerk 

BatI*THBlBatg«^^ 



PLAYS 



vaudeville 

N. Y. PLAY BUREAU. 

Decatur Ave., New/ York City. 

Stamp C~ 



\ ve.. Nov 
r catalog. 



C L I 




Adwertiaemenu not 
length will be pohliahed, 
thta index, at the rite of SM for one . 

iaanea). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will he tent tree to each advertiier while the 
adrertieement ii running. 



Joae 



A. O'Brien, MB Broadway, New Yerk 



Edward* Doric. Attorney, 421 Merchant, Bask 

Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Jamea S. ntbaman. Equitable Bldg.. 12* 

B'way. New York City. 
F. L. Boyd, 17 No. La Salle St., Chicago. 

MUSICAL "' aeea-b 
A. Bnunneiii, 1012 Napier Awe.. Richmond Hill. 
N. Y. 

MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 
Chaa. L. Lewie. 429 RicJunohd St, OnriTiltl. 
Ohio. 

SCENERY 

SCHELL*S SCENIC STUDIO 

111 m HI South High St- Caluaakaw, Q. 
De Fleeb Scenic Studio. 447 Hal .ej St., Brook - 
lyn. Phone Bedford 8594J. 

SCENERY POR HIRE AND SALS. 
Amelia Grain, 119 Spring Garden St^ Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. „ , 

Win. W. Deiuey, 117 Park Row. New York, 

TENTS. 
J. C Go., Co.. 10 Atwater St., Detroit, Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Bo. ton Regalia Co., 317 Waahington St.. Boa- 
ton. Mi, a 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
A. W. Gcretaer Co., «34 8th Ave. (41. t St.). 
N. Y. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 

Ben Hobaon. 271 Weit 150th St.. New York 

City. 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES. 
Auguit Gemunder at Son,. 141 W. 42nd St., 

at Y. 



TAYLOR TRUNKS 

C. A Tavior Trunk Works 



M I t. A C O 





NEW YORK 1554 Bboidway .■ *6 St 
CMICAGO Suit i McNOor. Sn 



Wardrobe Prop TnjDks, 55. 00 

Bit Bargain. Haw* been Mil Alio a lew 
Read Innovation and Fibre Ward- 



robe Trunks, $10 and SIS. A lew extra lata* 
Piopail, Trunk.. Alao old Taylor Trent. 



Parlor Fleer, aw.n«Jt, New Yerk 1 



MONEY WRITING SONGS 




r wawale ewava aaei 
it. 313 End Fr* at. 



Read ITie Clipper 
Letter list 



BAL'SDREADNAUGHT 

A COOD TRUNK AT 
A VERT LOW PRICE. 

BAL'S XX 

OUR STANDARD TRUNK 
FULLY CiUARANTEED. 

BAL'S STAR 

OUR TRUNK DE LUXE 

TRUNKS 



WILLIAM B AL COMPANY 
146 West 45th St., 

4 West 22nd St. 
NEW YORK CITY 



HlOlt Class 

SECOND HAND GOWNS 

. L. GOODMAN 
231 S S. St. to St., Chic.**©, Hi. 



LIBERTY BONDS 

InatalnMBt Beoka, War Saving* and 

Thrift SUnp« 

BOUGHT FOR CASH 



Ml BROADWAT. NEW YORK 
1 4IS Phoae Franklin *M 



ACTS 



PLAYS, SKETCHES WBJTTBN 

Term, for a Stamp 
E. L. OAMB1 B. Plo / artgal 

Eaat Liverpool. Ohm 



LARGEST THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER IN N. Y. 

TelepboDee | g£e4 1 Ottthwa 

Pimrem-Arrow Truck* 

JOSEPH F. REILLY 

Office, 437 U, 443 W. Slat 

NEW YORK 

S. HEFTERNAN, Goal. ktgr. 



WILLIAM F. (Billy) HARMS 

HOBOTEN. N. J. 

THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 
af T. B.CJ 



WILLIAM RUSSELL MEYERS 

Veud.vll'e Aut tiov 
SM Palaa* Theatre BeUelag, BwW Terk, 
Referencea: Eddie Leonard. Geo. Felia. 
aMckaon, Oordoo Rldree, and .!»■■■ 



For Nofeltie*. 





SHOE SHOP 



RAIL 



154 W.dSth SL,R.T.Eaat el »'»*y Oaa, tvteam 



A. FURMAN 

Theatrical CostDBer for the Best 



Nothing too bin nor too mill Ya 

-Rave.. B eri m e*. Evervooa lornlaawi. 
Sale.room— law Bull 
4M. New Yerk 



WIGS ifc® 




Tmg Ttcwaicu. Ptm, Ngw Yobb . 



r-lit..; 







mr rn 







. 



■ 






-•M ■ 



EG 

- ..... .-. 

r. ! . > 



OF 

PRESENTS 






THE ONLY REAL AND 
AUTHENTIC HISTORY 

- or j .., r 

"BELGIUM, THE KINGDOM OF GRIEF" 

Produced, directed and sditasd by 

THE CITY OF BRUSSELS 

aa conclude proof for lbs Peace Table of what tk. 
Kaiaar did to 



HER SUFFERINGS— 

HER SORROWS 

AND SACRIFICE— 



■XHlBITOBfl' T81DI 



at _ 

Bttr; 



•The feeling et the 

Bfito."* 

St at 



tot 



tata 



that 1* doe this kingdom 
wkida feaarht a» rattan Uy 
acalnat ml treat odea." 



iOTION PICTUBJ3 
KIWI: 

Ths Klnx- 

la a Hnna 

of OaaaVa elaaae 

t: 'aataar an 

the Oauls. the breraet an 



1 -Belgian, 

• »f Orttf.' 



CHICAGO TBQUNX: 
•TBe aaan of the 
committee who aaw 
"Belstam, Tke Klagdom 
of atrlaf when It wea- 
glren for the center aa? 
that It la the moat re- 
markable foreign mm erer 
Drought to this country 
and that It win brio*, a 
tear to the eye ot erery 
oee who is interested In 
stricken tittle Belgium." 



motion pictum 

WORLD: 

■■Be l e ta ra e tlng la this 
nictate we bellere It can 
he gafJMjp without 
any fear of tiring an 
aodlenra." 



L 



' ■ 






vc ii \ ,' j -"•'« >--:'» !"«» 



f.eV«*U » 



I 

! 

I 

i 




NOT A WAR; WCTlJ^E 

No venion of this kind ha* Wen teem 
before 

it IS MStORY! 

__.„ IT-IS PROOF! ..... 1 

IT I S FACTS! 

It ia tbe psychological arraan reriion tbe people 
want to sec. It has been shown at tho Auditor-rare 
in Chicago,' ID., and thai Brooklyn Institute of Arts 
and Sc ien ce* to orer 45,000 people at assaaaaseoai 
prices from $1 to $5. 



TBE BROOKLYN IHBTITUTB OF AETB AND 
BOICMOn 

sVoDoaa uM 

Department ot auocaUoo 

Director: OSc*: 

CHARLES D. ATKINS Academy ot atoete 

~ Norember 6. MIS. 

Classic Films Distributing Oo.. 
The Algonquin Hstel, 

New Tort City. • 

Gentlemen: 

Tbe Members of the InetltDte appreciated the op- 
pertanlty of TiewlDr your gnat Ura Picture entitled 
"Belgium, the Kingdom of wrier." - Xrexy chair la oar 
Hall, seating about 2,400. waa . aBed and many were 
enable to aeeure ad mlaalon. 

' Tbe Picture la an interesting and Tirld portrayal of 
the History- of Belgium aad of her period et deno- 
tation and snffering. la the cosrae of the Beer and 
three-quarters that the Picture waa on the screen. I 
•aw no one leare the Hall, a striking; tribute to tbe 
Interest aroused. 

We are glad to be able to announce to our mem- 
bers that two additional presentations of tbe picture 
will be siren. 

-Xeaxrs rery truly, 

CHAKLBB S. ATKINS. Director. 




^e KINGDOrl y^GRIEF 

For State Rights and Direct Bookings for Theatres 

COMMUNICATE WITH 

JOHN D. FULTON 129 West 44th Street Nei 



York City 











ti 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 



Our Spring Offering to Artists 



■ 



The Beautiful Ballad 




Ctyjrtgki MCXUUhf /towu.Z>tav 4 Mmniti 
All RHti> KcMnrcd 



later ait laail Coprrlfbt St£mrt4 



THE VERY BEST NUMBER THAT HAS BEEN ADDED TO OUR CATALOG IN VEAR5 



T.B.HARhS e, FRANCIS, DAY £~ HUmtR , 62 W.45th ST.,n\Y.C. 

NEW YORK, 1 45 WEST4S STREET PROFBSS/ONAL OFF/CES GRAND OPERA HOUSE,CHICAGO,iLL. 



Copyrighted, 1919, and published, weekly by the Clipper Corporation, 1604 Broadway. New York. Entered at tha Po*t -office at New York, Jane 34. 1179. at i 



i mafl matter tmder Act of March J, 1879. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN. 1853 



NEW YORK, APRIL 16, 1919 



VOLUME LXVn-No. 10 
Price. Ten Centt, $4.00 a Year 



PALISADES PARK 

ADE $203,000 

IASTJEAR 

OVER 100% ON INVESTMENT 




That Palisades Park, over in Fort Lee, 
Mew Jersey, operated by Joseph and 
Nicholas Scienek, made net profits of 
$206,846.51 last year, the same being equal 
to a profit of 103 per cent on the $200,000 
capitalisation, became known last week fol- 
lowing the information that the "park would 
open for the season on May 3. These 
figures represent a net profit growth from 
$66384 in 1015, $117,222 in 1916, and 
$157,410 in 1017. 

The gross receipts during these years 
were as follows: 1915, $330,716; 1916, 
$406,942; 1917, $564,737.60; 1918, $678,- 
734.31. 

The number of. paid admissions totaled: 
1915, 788,265; 1916, 857,899; 1917, 1,093,- 
981; 1918, 1.175.552. The gate receipts 
were: 1915. $73.325 ; 1916. $85,789 : 1917. 
$109,898.10; 1918, $117,55520. 

The swimming pool drew $53,153 in 
1915; $69,826 in 1916; $87,85828 in 1917, 
and $84,764.10 in 1918. Rentals daring 
these yean were: 1915. $33,080; 1916, 
$41,700; 1917, $44,030; 1918, $40,195. 
Scenic railway receipts' were: 1915, 
$28,518; 1916. $42,556; 1917, $56,086.60; 
1918, $78,987.75. The dance hall drew: 
1915, $11,081;. 1916, $16,117: 1917, 
$18,099.55; 1918 $24,987.65. 

Those years mentioned are the years 
during the ten years of the park's existence, 
during which its greatest development ac- 
crued; and that it has developed steadily, 
surely and profitably is evidenced by the 
figures submitted. Jp 

The park was built ten years ago by 
W. 0. Demoresti president of the Realty 
Trust, and A. M. Clegg, another well known 
capitalist, and the Schenck brothers were 
engaged to manage it, the latter receiving 
a salary and commission for running the 
park. Last year, this netted the Schencks 
$30,000 each. 

An the present time, Palisades Park is 
said to be controlled by -the same interests 
that control the Bronx Exposition. The 
officers anddirectors of the latter enterprise 
are aa follows: II. F. McGarvie, .presi- 
dent; E. H. Mount, treasurer, who suc- 
ceeded W. M. Clegg, the latter having been 
elected managing . director, and Charles 
Beebe, secretary. The directors are : . W. 
M. Clegg, H. P. McGarvie, B. H. Mount, 
Charles Beebe, L. A. Mount HVK. Mount, 
George Rilling, John Lambert. 



SEARCH KITTY GORDON'S TRUNKS 

San Francisco, April 11. — A raiil on 
the trunks of Kitty Gordon was made 
here this week by Sheriff Thomas Finn. 
S. ft G. Gump 4 Co. secured a. judg- 
ment for things bought by the actress in 
1916 and .the sheriff seised enough to make 
up for that sum. The goods which Miss 
Gordon bought, according to the bin, In- 
clude - a Buddha, one 'bird cage, one- silk 
shade,: and Chinese "lamps, mirrors, ; candles 
and candlesticks, coo tin* respectively $125, 
$35, $12.50 and $118 



HERD BACKS ANOTHER SHOW 

Anderson T. Herd, the wealthy shipping 
man who backed "The Better 'Ole," real- 
izing a profit of $100,000 when he sold his 
interest to the Cobni-ns several weeks ago, 
Has again' entered the theatrical business, 
it was rumored last week. 

This time be is reported to have fur- 
nished most of the money to produce "The 
Lady in Red," the foreign musical show 
adapted by Anne Caldwell and Robert 
Winterberg which is scheduled to . open 
in Washington April 28. 

A company has been organized known 
as the Hcrcarsi Corporation, of which 
Herd Holds the majority of the ; stock, to 
present the play, which was put on in Chi- 
cago three years ago by R C. Herndon. 
John P. Slocum is general manager of the 
present production. 



SAYS ACTORS ROBBED HIM 

James Monty and Mark Brown, part- 
ners in a rambling act, were arrested last 
week by Detectives Willi and Stepat on a 
charge of assault and robbery. The plain- 
tiff, Arthur Wyatt, did not appear in court 
when the case was called, which resulted 
in the matter being put over until he was 
subpoenaed. He told the detectives that 
he met the two in a saloon, and' that after 
a few drinks they got into a taxicab for 
a ride. He said that the ride ended at 
Crnut'tt Tomb, where the pair took all his 
money, $105. 

Both Monty and Brown vigorously deny 
the charges, but were held .for another hear- 
ing under $5,000 hail. 



ORGANIST SUES RICH MANAGER 

Ai.turm ■ Cal., April 14. — Adele Hal 
thasar, 25, has started a suit here in the 
Superior Court against Fred N. Delanoy, 
wealthy resident of this city and seventy- 
two years' of age, for alleged toying with 
her affections. She is suing for $50,000. 

Miss Bolthasar was the organist at Die 
Park Theatre in this city for five years 
when Delanoy managed the house. She 
claims that he. took Advantage of ner. 
Delanoy- was once a candidate for- mayor 
in this city and has been married twice. 
He is the father of several sons and was 
divorced from his first wife in 1904. 



U. 3. HILL OPERATED ON . 

Aubahy, N. Y., April 14.— Uly S. Hill, 
manager of Harmanus Bleecker Hall, will 
undergo an operation for appendicitis to- 
morrow morning- He is the fourth of his 
immediate family to be ill during the last 
season, His wife recently recovered from 
an operation, both bis sons had pneumonia 
and one of them had to go through an 
operation for throat trouble. 

"OVERSEAS REVUE" TO CLOSE 

Chicago. April 14. — "The Overseas Re- 
vne" will dose hereon May 3. The show 
was produced by Will Morrissey in the 
Princess, an independent theatre, her«,' af- 
ter K. A E. had refused to hook it and 
he had quarreled with the Shubert camp. 
It is said to have got some money here. 
Morrissey intends to take it- to New York 
after the Chicago run. 



WOODS GETS MORE PLAYS 

London, Bag., April 14.— Ai Woods has 
secured a number of English' plays, most 
of them ' un produced, including "Fu Man- 
chu," by Sax Rohmer; The Duie De-' 
ddes," by Harry M. Vernon; "Coming 
Downstairs" (adapted by Jose- Levy) ; sad 
"Sinners Both," by Herbert Thomas. 



PANTAGES GETS 

SITES FOR MORE 

HOUSES 



TAKES DAVIDSON, IN MILWAUKEE 



Alexander Pantages closed three deals 
last week that have been pending for 
some time for theatre sites in Kansas City, 
Omaha and Memphis, respectively, whereby 
he becomes the owner of first-class loca- 
tiona in each of the above-mentioned cities. 
The plans for each of the new houses are 
finished and ready for the builders, and 
construction work will start at once on 
all of them. The houses will each seat 
2,500. 

Pantages also has three sites under con- 
sideration in the loop section of Chicago, 
and expects to close one of them any day. 
As soon as he secures the right spot be 
will start work immediately on the Chi- 
cago house, as the plans for the new thea- 
tre have been ready for several weeks. 
Construction work on a new Pantsges the- 
atre in St. Louis will start in a week or 
so. This house will be bunt by Pantages 
in association with Heib & Kiley, owners 
of the Empress Theatre, St Louis, the 
present Pan stand in that town. , The new 
theatre win be located in the 'downtown 
section and wiU not interfere In any way 
with the Empress, which is situated In an 
entirely different section. This will give 
Pan two houses In St Louis. 

A contract waa signed with the People's 
Theatre, Chicago, last week, whereby that 
house will continue to receive Pantages 
bookings for a long period and become a 
regular link in the Pan chain. 



Mn.w AUKKr. April 14. — It waa reported 
on excellent authority here to-day that 
Alex Pantages has effected an arrange- 
ment with Thomas Brown, of the David- 
son Theatre, -whereby the Davidson will 
play Pantages road shows next season. 
Pantages wss in Milwaukee on Friday and 
Saturday, accompanied by his legal ad- 
viser, J. H. Sweet, and his architect, Arnold 
Pritecka, and it is understood that the 
Davidson, located in the heart of the down- 
town, section of the city, will be greatly 
enlarged as to seating capacity and re-dec- 
orated from top to bottom. 

The Davidson has played legitimate at- 
tractions booked In by K. A B. heretofore, 
and if the plan to play tile Pantages road 
shows becomes effective, the K. ft B. at- 
tractions win he seen at the Pabst next 
season. Neither Mr. Pantages nor Mr. 
Sweet would deny or affirm the story, but 
there seems to be little doubt but that the 
deal has been consummated. 



SELWYNS HAVE NEW PLAY 

Boston, April 1 1.— It was learned here 
today that Selwyn and Company have ac- 
cepted a play for production from the pea 
of Edward Harold Crosby, dramatic edi- 
tor of the Botton Pott. It is celled "Pants 
and Petticoats'' and will be given a New 
York hearing early next season. Kendal 
Weston has already started directing the 
Somerville Players in rehearsals of tile 
piece for a tryoat, 



PRODUCER FOUND DEAD 

LonnoiT t April 14. — Sidney W. Coleman, 
known as" Warwick Stamford, a theatrical 

producer, was found dead In. bis bed here 
on the morning that' his divorce action 
against his wife and the alleged co-respond- 
ent, Simpson, was set for trial. 



When the above news was received in 
New York, many people in theatrical cir- 
cles, aroused by the similarity in name, 
wondered if the cable in any way con- 
cerned Wybert Stamford, the British and 
Colonial producer who recently - came to 
this country to stage "Good-Morning, 
Judge," for Walter Jordan and. the Shu- 
berts.. Stamford returned to England two 
weeks after "Good-Morning,. Judge,** was 
presented here at the iShuhert Theatre. 
Stamford had previously staged in this 
country "Veronique." which waa presented 
at the Broadway Theatre In 1909. 



AARONS HAS NEW SHOW 

"La La Lucille" is the latest title 
adopted for "Your Money or Your Wife," 
the musical play being produced by the 
Alton Amusement Company, in which 
Alfred E. Aarons is said to be interested 
and which is scheduled to open in Atlantic 

City April 31. 

The book was written by Fred Jackson, 
author of "The Velvet Lady," and the 
lyrics by Arthur Jackson, his brother, and 
Bad De Sylva. George Gershwin com- 
posed the score. 

Incidentally, this is the first time that 
the Jacksons have collaborated on a play, 
although both are successful writers in 
their respective lines. Arthur Jackson 
slso wrote the book for "Scandal of 1019," 
which George White is producing. 



TO TAKE OVER HOFFMAN PLAY 

When Aaron Hoffman's new play, "Wel- 
come Stranger," Is presented on Broadway, 
it will, In all probability, be managed by 
Cohan and Harris instead of Lewis and 
Gordon, as previously announced. For, 
at the present time. It became known last 
week, negotiations are pending which, if 
consummated, win make Cohan and Har- 
ris the owners of the play, while Lewis 
and Gordon win retain a smaQ interest. 
. Up to Monday of this week, no definite 
announcement regarding the deal was 
forthcoming from either firm. 



NAZIMOVA GETS BIGGEST COIN 

Nazimova now holds the honor of com- 
manding the highest rentals for ber pic- 
tures of any of the present day film stars 
at the Strand. According to report, the 
Strand pays $3,600 a week for its NarnV 
mova productions, which is understood to 
slightly top the price paid for Pickfords 
and Chaplins. The Strand can play to an 
estimated capacity of $21,000. When the 
house first opened, and for a year or so 
thereafter, the average price paid for a fea- 
ture is said to have ranged from $750 to 
$2,500. 



PICKING NEW "FOLLIES" GIRLS 
Florens Ziegfeld, Jr., returned from 
Palm Beaoh on Monday and almost Imme- 
diately began choosing girls for the forth- 
coming "Follies," aided by Ned Wsybnrn, 
who. returned from Europe last Saturday. 



HOUDIN1 GOING TO CALIFORNIA 
Hoadini wffl leave to-day for/ Los An- $* 

geles to start work en a picture for to* 

Famous Players. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April. 16, 1919 



ACTORS TRIM 

SONGWRITERS 

7 TO 

C A1XED AFTER EIGHT INNINGS 



The Acton came back with s vengeance 
last Sunday and succeeded in wiping oat 
all memories of past defeats suffered at 
the hands of their hitherto invincible ball- 
tossing rivals, the Songwriters, completely 
outclassing the melody merchants and 
trimming them to the tune of seven to 
nothing. 

The sum of $15,000 was realized for the 
fond from the sale of tickets, donations, 
programs, etc Dick Jess promoted the 
field day sports, organized both baseball 
teams and generally supervised all de- 
tails of the affair. The Actors' Fond, in 
appreciation of Jess* efforts, presented him 
with a bouquet of flowers before the 
game. 

The game, which was played at the 
Polo Grounds, and which was the principal 
event of the Actors' Fund Field Day 
sports, given for the purpose of raising 
funds for the Actors' Home, was a rather 
spiritless affair, due principally to its one- 
cudednesa. The game was called in the 
eighth inning by Johnny Evers, who offi- 
ciated as umpire, the crowd invading the 
field at this point in the proceedings to 
give Bennie Leonard and Willie Ritchie, 
the other umpires, the once over at dose 
quarters. 

All bets stand, reports to the contrary 
notwithstanding, Evers declaring that 
both teams left the field, neither making 
an effort to continue the game after the 
crowd piled onto the diamond Conse- 
quently, the game was an official contest, 
according to the rules, and those mis- 
guided persons who figured that the 
Songwriters could really play ball and 
backed their convictions with coin of the 
realm, must pay for their misplaced con- 
fidence, just the same as if the battle had 
extended the full nine innings. 

Before the game started the 15,000 odd 
spectators were entertained by the TJ.S.S. 
Recruit band, the B. F. Keith Boys' Band 
and the Hebrew Orphan Asylum Band, the 
three brass organizations giving a delight- 
ful programme of musical numbers. 

The Police Glee Club, iomc four hundred 
strong, were also largely in evidence when 
it came to helping along the fete day 
atmosphere. The coppers made a great 
appearance and the bunch applauded their 
vocal efforts vociferously. 

Shortly before tie players took _ their 
positions Mrs. George McManus, wife of 
the newspaper cartoonist, made her ap- 
pearance over the field in a Curtis J N — 
2 D 2 biplane, and dipped and dived for 
fifteen minutes in a series of da ring mid- 
air stunts that stamped her as an aviatrix 
par excellence- Before leaving for Min- 
eola Mrs. McManus dropped a baseball 
onto the diamond from a height of three 
hundred feet, and the crowd gave her an 
ovation. 

Capt. M J. Cleary also gave a wonder- 
ful exhibition flight in a Spad, which in- 
cluded several th riHing aerial capers that 
set the spectators wild with enthusiasm. 

The vaudeville show that was to have 
been given did not materialize. On the 
way to the grounds an auto containing 
little Billy, and several other vaudevQ- 
Bans, collided with a touring ear going in 
the opposite direction and, as a result, the 
actors were severely shaken up. Little 
Billy, who received a slight cut on his 
neck, made his way to the Polo Grounds 
by tajricab, however, arriving some time 
after the game had started. The tiny 
entertainer was introduced and loudly ap- 
plauded for his gameness. 

It looked as if the game would have to 
be declared off up to a few minutes be- 
fore starting time, the weather being 
showery and uncertain. Just as Alma 
Qayburgh, a singer from the Metropoli- 
tan Opera House, emerged from the grand- 
stand and made her way to the pitcher's 
box to throw the first ball, however, the 



clouds rolled away and Peter Prunty, the 
official announcer, proceeded to give out 
the names of the opposing batteries. 
The teams lined up as follows: 

SONG WRITERS 
Sitter, ss. 
Schenck, lb. 

Llbonati, 2b. 
Pbelan, catcher. 
Schoenbaum, cf. 
Grossman. If. 
Payton. If. 
Piantadosi, rf. 
Eastwood, Sb. 
Smith, pitcher (capt.) 



ACTORS. 

Donohae. ss. 
Webb, 2b. 
Doniln. lb (capt). 
Mack. cf. 
Stanton, If. 
Lewis, catcher. 
Katz, 3b. 

Robertson, pitcher. 
Davis, rt, 
MalnwaririK- (mar). 

First Inning 

The Songwriters went to bat first, Marry 

Bitter stepping op to the plate with his 
trusty wagon tongue and determination in 
bis eye. lie waited for one to his liking and, 
to the Intense dellttht of the Tin Pan alley 
partisans, hit it right on the nose. The ball 
soared oat to Jeff Davis and he, possibly 
having bis mind occupied for the moment 
with the make-op of the bill for the last 
half at Lynn or Boston, proceeded to drop 
the pellet. Bitter galloped madly for first 
and reached there safely. He was advanced 
to second a moment later by Moc Schenck. 
who hit a snappy grounder between second 
and third, which he managed to beat ont by 
a hair. 

With two on base Jess Llbonati now toed 
the mark and, after giving careful beed to 
Sammy Levy's injunction to "km it" tried 
desperately to oblige, but young Robertson's 
curves were too much for him and he smote 
the air vigorously three rimes. Phelan du- 

elleated Llbonatl's fanning stunt and Shoen- 
sum ended the agony by knocking a slow 
grounder to right field, which Jeff Davis, 
having settled on his last half bills by this 
time, collared with alacrity, nabbing the 
lanky Schoenbaum at first. No runs, 

Donohae raised the hopes of the Actors' 
adherents to a high pitch by working Sammy 
Smith for a pass to first. Webb raised 
these hopes still higher a second later, by 
slamming a clean single to right and . sending 
Donahue around to third. Jeff Davis, who 
is some ball player by toe way, if his show- 
ing on Sunday is any criterion of his ability, 
. hit a long fly smack into Bernle Grossman's 
hands ont In left garden. Bernle Is a song- 
writer and mast nave been computing his 
royalties or doping oat a new number, for, 
sad to relate, be allowed the fly to fall 
gracefully through his fingers. Donahue 
meanwhile streaking it for the borne plate 
with Webb a second behind him. 

Mike Doniln. noted in his day as a ball 
player who always used his head as well 
as his ^sn* 1 * 1 ! Immediately arrived at the 
conclusion that left field was "soft." The 
foxy Mike was correct, for Grossman re- 
peated his dropsy tactics in handling the sky 
scraper sent out bis way by the ex-Giant 
Star, and Davis scored. Doniln ins caught 
on second a minute later, Jess Llbonatl, who 

Is a headline Xylophone player when he isn't 
playing ball, catching Mike unawares and 
nimbly rapping out a Xylophone solo on his 
ribs with the pill, much to Donlln's disgust. 
Pete Mack made a game effort to uphold 
the honor of the Gas Sun Circuit, but best 
that he had to offer was a buah league 
bounder that Sammy Smith grabbed and 
relayed to first before Pete knew exactly 
bow it all happened. Stanton reached for 
three of Sammy's wide ones and the Actors 
retired with what turned ont to be a safe 
lead to their credit. Three runs. 

Second Inning 

Grossman still seemingly intent on creat- 
ing a new summer song bit opened up the 
second stanza for the Songwriters, by strik- 
ing out Piantadosi, who isn't exactly a 
songwriter, but who is quite a ball player, 
walked to first on four wide ones. East- 
wood's grass cutter to short center, settled the 
chances of the Songwriters as far as the 
second session was concerned, however, the 
Actor's infield working like a well oiled ma- 
chine, and palling a snappy doable play. 
No runs. 

The Actors didn't cut much of a figure in 
their half of the second either, Sammy Smith 
striking out Lewis and Eats in the order 
named and retiring his slab opponent Arthur 
Robertson, with the assistance of Mike Don- 
iln. No runs. 

Third Inning 

Sammy Smith who has the reputation of 
being somewhat of a slugger with the willow, 
when he is in trim, fanned industriously and 
sat down to ruminate on his past triumphs 
as a batsman, when he was the star twlrler 
of the Torontos. Marty Bitter, tapped a 
slow one which rolled right into Robertson's 
mitt, and joined Sammy Smith on the players' 
bench. Moe BchensfF laid down a nifty little 
bunt, but failed to beat the ban to first the 
Actors' Invincible Infield distinguishing 
itself by putting over some corking team 
work. No runs. 

After Donahue had flown to Rltter, Webb 
negotiated a pass for the initial sack, and 
moved op to second on Jeff Davis's alxallng 
line drive to deep centre. Things commenced 
to look a bit warm for Sammy Smith once 
more with the hard-hitting Mike Doniln due 
for a turn at the bat, and Sammy's concern 
seemed to be justified when Mike landed 
squarely on the second ball pitched, sending 
the pellet sailing ont toward Chicago, via 
the direction of right field. Mike apparently 
had overlooked the fact though, that one 
Jess Llbonatl, who had previously proved to 
be bis nemesis, by «-g»-fc<»»jr him off second 
base earlier in the game was right on the 
Job In right field, and Mike's hopes of an old 

(Continued on page 28) 



FLU CLOSES ALL 

AUSTRALIAN 

HOUSES 

LATEST OUTBREAK WORST OF ALL 



Sydney, Australia, April 12. — Due to 
the spread of influenza, all theatres and 
places of amusement in Australia have 
been closed by the government. Last week 
there were ninety deaths in Sydney alone 
and hundreds of new cases are being re- 
ported daily. Masking regulations have 
been extended and meetings of all kinds 
forbidden. 



When asked about the above, Edward J. 
Tait, representing J. A N. Tait, Australian 
managers in New York, stated that a cable 
had been received at his office to the effect 
that the Sydney houses had been closed 
and that there was a strong likelihood the 
ban would spread over the entire country. 
Mr. Tait had just returned from London 
and had not as yet got in touch with the 
Australian headquarters. 

According to the cable received by Mr. 
Tait, the Sydney houses closed April 2. 
Nothing has been beard since. 

This has been a disastrous season for 
Australian managers, Mr. Taft said. The 
' rage of influenza has caused the theatres 
to shut down on a number of occasions. 
All the Australian houses were closed from 
January 8 to March 8. They reopened on 
this latter date. The loss to managers is 
several hundred thousand dollars. 

Theatrical units of the Tait interests 
which have suffered under the closing edicts 
are the Pantomime Company, "Peg o* My 
Heart," "De Luxe Annie," and "The Eyes 
of Youth," an the companies of which have 
had to dose. 



DEMPSEY HAS $25,000 WEEK 

Tosonto, April 14. — After a series of 
one-night stands which Included Ogdens- 
burg, Watertown and Montreal, the Jack 
Dempsey Athletic Carnival wound up the 
week here last Saturday. The total re- 
ceipts for the week were $25,000. In this 
city the show drew a tremendous crowd. 



In Montreal, Dempsey boxed six rounds, 
two with Spike Sullivan, whom he knocked 
down, and 'two with each of his sparring 
partners, Dan Daly and Jim Johnson. 

Renato Gardini, the Italian Grappler, 
wrestled Frank Saxon, of this city, and 
failed to gain a fall Tofalos, the Greek, 
did better' and pinned the shoulders of 
Choquette, a local man, to the mat. Sher- 
man and Lajoie boxed a draw. Burke 
boxed three rounds with a colored fighter 
and Young Henry outpointed Young 
Lewis in foor rounds. Dempsey's work 
was declared by the Montreal critics to be 
disappointing. He displayed a good punch 
but did not shape up as a great boxer. 



FRISCO LOCAL ELECTS OFFICERS 

San Francisco, April 12. — Local No. 
16 of the International Alliance of Theat- 
rical Stage Employees held an election of 
officers at a meeting here last week, with 
the following results: 

Robert Wakeman, president ; Max Fo- 
gel, vice-president; Ike Marks, treasurer; 
William 6. Rusk, recording secretary and 
business agent; Oscar Melby, financial sec- 
retary, and Charles Jackson, sergeant-at- 
arms. 



NEW TOURIST RATES COMING 

. -The Railroad Administration will place 
in effect on' June 1, the same tourist rates 
that were in effect last season. The tourist 
rate will be ninety per cent of the regular 
rate, and will remain in effect until Oc- 
tober L 



RAP SUPPORT IN ELTINGE SHOW 

Chicago, April 14. — The opening of the 
Julian Eltinge revue at the Olympic The- 
atre Sunday night was marked by a 
capacity audience, the orchestra and bal- 
cony floors being completely occupied, 
while the galleries held a well scattered 
audience. 

Local critics take the view that the 
show does not do credit to the name of 
Eltinge, and that he outclasses it all the 
way. 

Amy Leslie, writing in the Chicago 
Daily Netct, emblazons the name of 
Eltinge, admires his manly portrait of 
the female character, but distinctly states 
in cold type that the company is one of 
these hurry-out-to-get-the-money affairs, 
with deficiencies. The show is badly 
staged, too, and carelessly directed, she 
says. Miss Leslie praises the efficient 
work of Eddy Trio and dainty Marie. 

Ashton Stevens, writing, in the Ex- 
aminer, says that Eltinge wabbles a 
wicked hip and praises the wonderful 
work of Dainty Marie. Stevens swings 
a vitrolic pen among the vaudeville mem- 
bers of the aggregation. Critics of les- 
ser light seem in accord with the verdict 
of their more famous colleagues. 

The cast of the Eltinge revue is as fol- 
lows: The Eddy Trio, the Radium Ballet, 
Reno, deo, Qascoigne, Arthur S hirley , 
Velma Whitman, Majorie Bennett, Will- 
iam Ferguson, S. Nakada, Misses Betty 
Jones, Nellie Harris, Hazel Clarke, Irene 
Parker, Peta McDonnell, Nellie Reynolds, 
Marienne, Marjorie OaxvUle, Mile. Gorhada 
and Misses Dewey, Arnberg, McDonnell, 
Dainty Marie and Sidney Grant. 

The Eltinge executive staff is as fol- 
lows: James D. Barton, manager; Walter 
S. Kinback, business manager; L. L. 
Cronkhite, advance representative; Chas. 
A. little, musical director; Virgil Ben- 
nett, stage manager; William Donohue, 
master carpenter; Ed. Wentworth, assist- 
ant carpenter; C. A. Ferguson, master of 
properties; Carl Neumister, electrician, 
and Harry Dodge, cinematographer. 

PLAN GREENWICH VILLAGE REVUE 

A plan to capitalize, theatrically, the 
prestige Greenwich Village has gained dur- 
ing the last few years by reason of its 
Bohemians, artists and artists' models, was 
revealed last week when it became known 
that Philip Bartholomae has written a 
musical show called the "Greenwich Vil- 
lage Models," which he is trying to place 
in the Greenwich Village Theatre. Ber- 
nard Gallant, manager of the theatre, stat- 
ed Monday that Bartholomae is dickering 
with him for the house, so that the play 
may be exploited in the principal theatre 
of the village. 

Gallant also stated that a musical play 
would be presented at the Greenwich early 
in June even if the negotiations with Bar- 
tholomae fell through, for he is also nego- 
tiating with Harry B. Smith, A. Baldwin 
Sloan and Ray Hubbeil for the book and 
score of a new musical show. 

The cast for the musical show planned 
for the Greenwich will consist of six prin- 
cipals and twenty girls and already. Gal- 
lant says, he has engaged eight girls who 
were recently in "Hitchy-Koo" show and 
three who appeared in the Ziegfeld "Fol- 
lies" before that show was sent on tour. 



MILL HAS NEW MINSTREL SHOW 

Gus Hill is organizing a new minstrel 
show scheduled to open in Canton, Ohio, 
May 3.- The show is to be known as 
"Gus Hill's California Minstrels," the or- 
ganization carrying forty-five people, of 
whom the following are principals: 
George Wilson, Jimmy Wall, Jack Mc- 
Shane, George Gorman, Ed. Clifford, Eddie 
Horan, Jim Quinn, William Hallett and 
the Saxo live. From Canton, the show 
will journey westward until it reaches the 
coast, where it is scheduled to remain all 
Summer. 



OSCAR EAGLE HAS PNEUMONIA 

Oscar Eagle is confined to his home with 
a severe attack of pneumonia and the re- 
hearsals of "The Red Dawn," the Thomas 
Dixon play which he was to produce, have 
been called off. - *•-•. - •■■ :. 



ARRANGE TWO BENEFITS 
Boston, April 12. — Thomas Lothian, 
G rover BuTkhardt and Frank Cauley will 
be given a testimonial at the Colonial The- 
atre on Easter Sunday evening. 

Another benefit to be held here win be 
on April 27 for Henry Taylor and Vincent 
Fetherston at the HoUis. 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



THEATRES ADMIT 
30,000 SERVICE 
MEN MONTHLY 

OTHERS PAY HALF PRICE 



Seven thousand one hundred and fifty 
free theatre tickets are siren soldiers, sail- 
ors and marines by the Mayor's Committee 
of Welcome, J.M.CA. and the W. C. C. S. 
each week. At an average cost of $2, as 
most of these tickets are for the orches- 
tra, this would mean a monthly outlay of 
about $60,000, if paid for. 

The K. of C. and the Y. M. C. A. also 
dispose of about 2,500 tickets weekly at 
half rate — which means approximately 
$10,000 a month. In addition to the above 
war -work organizations, half -rate tickets 
and. free tickets are given men in uniform 
by a number of other units on special oc- 
casions. These are the Stage Woman's 
War Belief, the Red Cross, Jewish Wel- 
fare Board and Y. W. C. A. 

At the Eagle Hut in Bryant Park there 
is a list posted each day of theatres giv- 
ing the half rate. Last week, on the list 
were The Unknown Purple," "Keep It to 
Yourself," "A Sleepless Night," "Good 
Morning Judge" and Toby's Bow." The 
"Y" gives out 3,000 free tickets a month 
and 9,000 at half rate. 

The Mayor's Welcome Committee hands 
out 4,000 free tickets each week. The 
K. C. handles 250 half -rate tickets each 
week, and the W. C. C. S. gives out 2,400 
free coupons. Tie half-rate tickets can 
be bought by the men in uniform for more 
than one person. 

Tickets given out are for the best seats. 
Frequently, on Saturday, no tickets are 
issued because of the good business which 
the houses do on this day. When half- 
rate tickets are given, the men take a 
slip from the war-work unit to the the- 
atre, where the admission is paid. 

One night last week the Mayor's Com- 
mittee gave out seven box seats worth $3 
each. 

Some of the tickets given out by the 
y. C. C S. are purchased by this organ- 
ization at a reduced rate, but nothing is 
charged the soldier. During the time the 
fleet is in the city this organization has 
been allowed $8,000 for the purchase of 
tickets to be given away. 



SIGN ACTS FOR BRONX EXPO 

H. P. McGarvie, president of the Bronx 
Exposition, began engaging acts last week 
for the Summer season, which will open 
April 26. The acts with which contracts 
have thus far been signed are: The Great 
Calvert, Gertrude Van Deinse, the Rackoe, 
the Onita Trio, Captain (hone) and Mme. 
Ellis, and Victor's Concert Band. 

This will be the second season for the 
exposition, which is spread over an area 
of approximately thirty acres in the Bronx, 
the land being leased. The leases have 
eighteen years to run. 

The Bronx Exposition, Inc., which bunt 
and operates the expedition, is capitalized 
at $850,000 and spent $1,500,000 in con- 
structing the park, which was opened last 
year for the first time on July *L The 
gross business amounted to $190,000 on 
the season, the net profits being $94,000. 
This year the management has expended 
an additional $340,000 for new mechanical 
attractions, repairs and decorations and 
the repainting of all the concrete, which 
will be done in green. 

Last year but six concessionaires rented 
space on the ground, but this year, the 
management rep orts , seventy-five novelty 
booths have thus far been rented, the booth 
capacity being 200. With the additional 
attractions and the swimming pool,, the ca- 
pacity of which is 10,000 people, the man- 
agement expects to do a business totaling 
$2,000,000, reckoning its profits at $400,- 
000. 



"THE NEW GIRL" OPENS WELL 

Washington, April 11, — Charles Dil- 
lingham has scored a hit with his latest 
production "A New Girl" notwithstanding 
the fact that the cast employs the services 
of no particular musical or comic head- 
liner. The piece was enthusiastically re- 
ceived Monday at its premier perform- 
ance. 

Jerome Kern has revamped some of his 
earlier music. But the score is delightful 
and melodious. "The Day of Jubilee" 
which serves as the motif of Griffith's 
"Birth of a Nation" score, has been intro- 
duced by Kern under the title of "Jubilo" 
in an attractively staged and gowned Civil 
War number. The composer has also 
scored with "The First Rose of Summer," 
an inversion of "The Last Rose of Sum- 
mer" and another song "Teacher, Teacher" 
is almost a duplicate of "I Found You" 
from "Oh, Lady, Lady" though it goes 
over with a bang. Another number that 
was well received was ','A Happy Wed- 
ding Day." 

Anne Caldwell wrote the book and lyrics. 
The plot concerns the runaway marriage of 
a seminary girl to a naval lieutenant and 
the subsequent efforts of the lieutenant to 
masquerade as a school girl in order to 
steal his bride, whose guardian wants her 
to marry his son. 

Douglas Stevenson, last seen here with 
"The Royal Vagabond," is a good looking 
juvenile, but he adds little to the part of 
the lieutenant. Ann Orr has a role very 
similar to the one she had is "Leave It 
To Jane." She puts several songs over 
very effectively. 

Ohlin Howland, who was associated with 
her in "Leave It To Jane," shoulders the 
comedy as the "Hick" son. 

Helen Shipman is effective in the in- 
genue role. • 

Others who have parts are the Duncan 
Sisters, with a vaudeville turn, Scott 
Welsh, James C. Marnow, Jay Wilson, 
Elsie Lawson, Gertrude Maitland. Florence 
Edna, Florence Bruce, and Nellie Fill- 
more. 

Great notices were earned by Fred La- 
tham and Edward Royce for the way they 
staged the production. 



SHUBERTS OPEN NEW ONE 

New Haven, Conn- April 10.— A double 
tided play, "Oh, Uncle," or "The Wrong 
Number," was presented here on Monday 
night and, while it cannot be said to have 
made a very deep impression, it has several 
novel ideas and may be turned into a pleas- 
ing entertainment. 

The work is a musical comedy in two 
acts, the book and lyrics by Edgar Smith 
and the music by Jacques Presburg and 
Charles Jules. But it is Smith who will 
have to do the brushing up if the work la 
to meet with any degree of favor. 

Just why the piece should be burdened 
with two titles, neither of which has any- 
thing to do with the other, is a question. 
The doable titles are likely to prove con- 
fusing rather than attractive. 

The story of the play has to do with a 
love affair between Jack Rushton and 
Margot Merivale, a footlight favorite. 
Joshua Blohbs, Jack's uncle, pays a visit 
to his nephew and shows himself to be a 
rounder instead of the pious old man he is 
generally supposed to be. Jack is having a 
little blow-out for a party of theatrical 
friends when uncle arrives and the latter 
joins in the festivities without reserve. 

Under the influence of the flowing bowl 
Uncle Joshua invites the whole party to 
visit him at his country home. When they 
arrive Jack accuses his uncle of saving 
deceived him, but has to acknowledge that 
he (Jack) has deceived his uncle. Ex- 
planations follow and there is the regula- 
tion musical comedy ending. 

The book is bright in spots and many 
of the situations, if not new, are funny. 
One of the novelties of the show Is a 
musical poker game in the first act. 

Bert Hanlon, Sam Ash, Lew Cooper and 
Nancy Fair were the players who deserve 
most praise for their work. 



A. E. A. TO BACK 

UP ENGLISH 

UNION 

TAXES HAND IN COCHRAN MATTER 



The Actors' Equity Association has 
taken a hand in the fight that the Actors' 
Association of Great Britain is presently 
engaged in, with C. B. Cochran, the Lon- 
don manager, who announced a couple of 
weeks ago that he would not employ any 
members of the English actors' organiza- 
tion hereafter. The A. E. A. is affiliated 
with the A. A. of Great Britain, and if 
Cochran carries out his threat the Ameri- 
can organization will issue instructions to 
the four hundred members of the A. E. A. 
now playing in London to work in har- 
mony with the English association. 

This really means that if Cochran lays 
down the gauntlet and bars the Actors' 
Association members, the Actors' Equity 
members will not be permitted to work for 
him. 

The principal cause of the trouble be- 
tween Cochran and the A. A. of Great 
Britain, aside from "union recognition," 
seems to be the question of giving Sunday 
shows. Most of the London managers are 
keen for the Sunday performance idea, but 
the actors frown upon' the plan, their view- 
point being that they will be called upon 
to do more work for the same amount of 
pay. The actors point out in support of 
their contention that the introduction of 
matinees brought them no extra compen- 
sation, and it will be the same with the 
Sunday performance idea, they contend. 

There seems to be a strong likelihood 
that Cochran will be backed up by the 
greater part of the managers if he de- 
cides to take a stand in the matter of 
union recognition. Any decided move 
made by Cochran against the Actors' As- 
sociation, will quickly result in retaliatory 
measures by the actors* organization, who 
are prepared, if necessary, to call a strike 
that would include the stags hands. 




PLAYS RETURN ENGAGEMENT 

"The Little Brother,** with Walker 
Whiteside and Tyrone Power, is playing 
a return engagement at Loew*s Seventh 
Avenue this week. 



BQWDEN SAILS FOR AUSTRALIA 

Harold A. Bowden, manager for J. and 
N. Tait, left . New York last week tor 
Frisco, whence he will sail to Australia. 
Bowden has been in New York in the in- 
terest of the Tait forces since last faD. 



JULIA KELETY 
At an hour when most of the reviewers 
had already left the theatre in order to 
catch the morning editions, Julia Kelety 
surprised the first night gathering at the 
Nora Bayes Theatre, Tuesday night. 
Mile Kelety made her Broadway musical 
comedy debut at 11 o'clock, yet those who 
saw her were unanimous in their opinion 
that this chic French woman is the best 
feature in "Come Along,*' the Bide Dud- 
ley-John Louw Nelson concoction. 

Mile. Kelety- makes her initial appear- 
ance in the Alsatian Village street scene, 
acting the role of. a cabaret singer, who 
is called upon to entertain the assemblage 
of war workers. 

Miss Kelety has been engaged for the 

new Clifton Crawford music*] play, which 

will open early in June. She is under 

the management of Chamberlain Brown. 

• " ■ '" —Adv. 



NAZZARO WANTS HIS CHILDREN 

Nat Nazzaro last week applied to the 
Supreme Court for a writ of habeas corpus, 
directing his wife, Queenie Nazzaro, to pro- 
duce their. two children, Nat (Jimmie), 
Jr., aged 15, and Dorothy, 4, both of whom, 
he claims, are being kept away from him. 
by his wife. Harry Saks Hechheimer Is 
his attorney. 

According to Nasxaro's affidavit in sup- 
port of the writ, which is returnable this 
week before Judge Hotchkiss in cham- 
bers, his wife sent the youngest of the 
two children to Kansas City about two 
months ago to live with her mother, Mrs, 
Lula Happy; Mrs. Nauaro has alienated 
the affections of Nat, Jr., whom they both- 
adopted nine years ago, and the boy is be- 
ing prevented from seeing his adopted! 
father at this time because his adopted 
mother is exploiting him in vaudeville. 
The youngster heads the act known aa the 
U. S. Atlantic Fleet Jazz Band, which 
opened the first half of this week in Proc- 
tor's, Yonkers. 

The Xazzaros were married ten years 
ago. Queenie Nazzaro appeared in her 
husband's musical acrobatic act. Their 
married life, according to Nazzaro, has 
been a series of intermittent quarrels, each 
of which resulted in temporary separation. 
About two months ago, while living in 
the Hotel St Margaret, they quarrelled 
again. As a result of this quarrel they 
engaged separate apartments at the hotel 
and lived apart. Mrs. Nasxaro's mother 
was living with the couple at the time. 
Then she went back to Kansas City and 
.took the youngest child with her. 

Nasarro claims he developed the talents 
of the boy and arranged the act in which 
the boy is now appearing. He booked the 
act, which opened five weeks ago, playing 
Fox time for a week and a half. He 
says he could have booked the act over 
the big time, but Mrs. Nazzaro, in 
alienating the boy away from him, took 
the act away at the same time. 

At the present time, the act is being 
advertised an being under the "direction of 
Morns and Feil, sole management, Queenie 
Nazarro." 

Meyer Greraberg i 8 acting for Mrs. Naz- 
zaro, 



SET ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of the Actors' Fond 
of America will be held at the Hudson 
Theatre, Friday, April 23, at 11 a. m. 
There will be an election of officers for the 
ensuing year. 

Although the professional members of the 
Actors' Fund may put up as many tickets 
for election aa they care to, it is believed 
there will be no rcntest and that the offi- 
cers now serving will, for the moat part, 
be re-elected. Daniel Frohman, president 
of the organization, has temporarily aban- 
doned the producing field to devote his ac- 
tivities toward the accumulation of a per- 
manent $1,000,000 reserve fund. 

A detailed report of the fl»«»„*<^t status 
of the Fund will be submitted at the meet- 
ing 



DAILIES CUTTING OUT NOTICES 

A number of press agents about town 
are up in arms over a growing practice 
among the dailies of running their box- 
office stimulating paragraphs and short 
reading notices in one or two editions and 
then throwing them out in the succeeding 
editions. It is said that the evening 
papers are the worst offenders in tills 
regard. 

This practice gets the press agent into 
all kinds of trouble for, unless his boss 
buys the edition that happens to contain 
his notices, be thinks his publicity pro- 
moter did not send any out, and the latter 
has to go to all the trouble of digging up 
the edition which did can; them. 

STATEN ISLAND GETS NEW HOUSE 

Lee Beggs will be the manager of a 
new thousand seat vaudeville theatre, that 
is now in course of construction at Great 
Kills, Staten Island, and which will he 
ready to open on May 1. Malcolm Beggs, 
Lee Beggs" son, will assist his father In 
the management of the new bouse, A 
vaudeville policy at popular prices will be 
offered, consisting,, of three - acts and pic- 
tures. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 



HARMANUS BLEECKER HALL 

BOUG HT BY F . F. PROCTOR 

Policy After July 1 Will Be Vaudeville and Motion Pictures; 

Leland Theatre, Abo at Albany, Undergoing Repairs; 

Manager Abandons the Annex 



Alba.tt, April 14. — Hermanns Bleecker 
HaD, the leading theatre in this city and 
one of the most widely known theatres in 
upper New York State, has been acquired 
by Frederick F. Proctor, the vaudeville 
magnate, who will adapt the house to a 
policy of motion pictures and theatrical 
productions. . 

The announcement of the purchase of the . 
house by Mr. Proctor was made today by 
Edward Ml Hart, Mr. Proctor's representa- 
tive in this section of the- State, and also 
manager of the hall. The purchase price 
was not announced, but the theatre has 
been a—aarf for $400,000. 

At the present time the theatre is under 
lease to the Shnberts and F. Ray Cam- 
stock, who have been running the house 
for the last few years. Their lease ex- 
pires July X, following which Mr. Proctor 
will take possession. 

Mr. ' Proctor's policy, as outlined by 
Hart, will consist in presenting Broadway 



attractions, such as comedies, dramas, 
musical comedies, grand operas and con- 
certs, the attractions to be booked by vari- 
ous producers and agencies. A large organ 
will be installed in the theatre which will 
be an exact duplicate of the ones in use in 
the Rivoli and Rial to theatres in. New 
York, in addition to which a large orches- 
tra win be engaged. ..-■•;■■ 

The same policy now exists in Mr. Proc- 
tor's Troy theatre, where Broadway, at- 
tractions are being presented in conjunc- 
tion with the motion pictures that -are 
presented intermittently. 

Proctor's Leland Theatre will be recon- 
structed, work on it starting soon. . The 
adjacent property on South Pearl street 
will be taken in, giving the house room for 
a large and capacious lobby and 1,000 ad- 
ditional seats. While increasing the size 
of the Leland, F. F. Proctor has abandoned- 
the Annex, Samuel Luckner having taken:-; 
over the lease of that and will conduct it 
after the end of this month. 



' • I LOVE YOU" STARTS WELL 

Albany, N. Y„ April 12.— William Le- 
Baron's new farce, '1 Love You," opened 
here last night and proved good amuse- 
ment for a large audience at Harmanus 
Bleecker Hall. 

The plot is concerned with the origin 
of the divine passion of love. A young 
man declares that love can be produced 
between any two people of opposite sex 
provided the stage is properly set. He 
believes that it is merely a matter of the 
time, the place — and any fairly attractive 
girl. He Vets $5,000 with a friend that 
Ma theory will work out. The first person 
he finds is to be the victim of the ex- 
periment and it -happens to be a young 
electrician who has come to mend a short 
circuit The girl selected is Betty Dugan, 
who hasn't the slightest interest in the 
young electrician, but who greatly admires 
a butler. The second and third acts are 
concerned with the working out of the the- 
ory. Only it doesn't work out at an, be- 
cause everybody insists upon making love 
a saattar of natural selection. 

Th» process of disproving the theory re- 
quires three acts that are somewhat lack- 
ing in action, but are well supplied with 
clever lines— especially the first one. Le- 
Baion gets a lot of fun out of specula- 
tions on love. 

Q. M. Anderson ("Broncho Bffly" of 
film fame), has cast the play very well. 
The best role is that of the young elec- 
trician which Richard Dix walks into with 
banners flying. John Weatley plays with 
the real farcial touch and Gilbert Douglas 
is excellent aa the butler. Ruth Terry 
does a common, likeable housemaid and 
Doris Mi ti^ril, Diantha Pattison and 
Oypsey O'Brien do well Robert Strange 
and Caroline Morrison are also in the 



'SUNSHINE'* HAS GOOD MUSIC 



STEEPLECHASE PIER OPENS 

Atlantic Cttt, April 14. — Steeplechase 
Pier was opened Saturday after a long 
advertising campaign, and a big crowd 
took advantage of the remodeled amuse- 
ment place. A vast throng made use of 
the different attractions, which included 
twenty-five amusements for little children. 
Lenahan's Jazz Band furnished the music 
at the dance hall. A novelty was the en- 
trance, which looks like a row of candy 
sticks topped with clowns' heads. The ball- 
room is now & much more attractive place 
than it has ever been. Manager William 
Fennan having redecorated it completely. 

ARLLSS CLOSING IN BOSTON 

Boston, April 14. — George Aruaa, who 
la presenting "A Well Remembered Voice*' 
and "The Molina*' at the HoTlia here, will 
dose on April 19. 



TBENTOlf, April 12. — "Sunshine," a new- 
musical comedy, which was presented nere- 
for the first time at the Trent . Theatre' 
last night, is so srintillaringly tuneful that 
it bids fair to become one of the most suc- 
cessful musical shows of the season. The 
score, which was composed by Alexander 
Johnstone, abounds in musical gems which 
may be reckoned as its chief asset, for the 
book and lyrics, written by William Carey 
Duncan, do not compare in brilliancy with 
the_ score. Nevertheless, the warmth with 
which the audience last night received this 
initial production of the recently organ- 
ized Shaw- Johnstone Producing . Corpora- 
tion portends well for it elsewhere. 

The locale of "Sunshine" is set in Spain 
and the book is not burdened with any 
real plot to speak of. The producers have 
provided expensive and elaborate settings 
for the piece and credit must be given to 
Robert Marks for the way in which he 
staged the song numbers. 

Harry Short, who is cast as Richard 
Skinner, a breezy American, provided most 
of the humor, giving a performance that 
does him credit Jane Richardson, as 
Santa, sang several delightful numbers, the 
best one of which was "Love Is Like This 
Little Wheel of Mine." Carl Cochems, aa 
Bombito, sang his part very well Juliette 
Lange was a truly flirtatious senorita and 
Gertrude Johnstone also played the role 
assigned to her acceptably. Suaanne Wills, 
was a cheerful American woman, but Eld- 
gar Norton lacked spontaneity in the role 
of Pnddinfoot Trotter. John J. Ward 
played acceptably. 

Lew Murdock danced well enough, as did 
also the girls in the show whenever they 
were given an opportunity to do so, but 
the opportunities did not come often 
enough. A few additional dance numbers 
would go a long way in establishing this 
as a great musical show. 



ENTERTAIN MANY SOLDIERS 

Many members of the theatrical profes- 
sion throughout the country are donating 
their services for the entertainment of the 
overseas convalescents in hospitals. 

Following is a list of those who appeared 
under the direction of Abram D. Gillette, 
Bureau of Entertainments, American Red 
Cross, at the different Bed Cross Conva- 
lescent Houses throughout the -Atlantic Di- 
vision : 

Ardo, Agnes Kendall, Betty Hall, Steph- 
ens and Bordeaux, Wells De Veaux and 
McGowen and Gordan. They appeared in 
the hospitals at Camp Mills, Ellis Island, 
Eastriew, N. Y. ; Lakewood, N. J.; Camp 
Dix, N. J. ; OrisTffle, N. Y. ; Fox Hills, 
S. I. 

Bob Tenny, Elsie Ford, Samp J. Har- 
riss, Lachman Sisters, Mary Maxfield and 
Steward and Niff appeared in the hospi- 
tals at Camp Upton, Camp Merritt, Fox 
Hills, S. I.; Camp Mills, Ellis Island, 
Mitchel Fields, X^L; Eastvjew, N. :( jSr. ! 

Mrs, Moody, Louis Davidson, Eisa Zieg- 
ler, Joy Sweet and -Mr. and Mrs. Emmet 
Whitney appeared in the hospitals at U. S. 
General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, 
Conn.; Camp Dix, Otisrille, N. Y. ; Camp 
Merritt, Upton, Plattsburg and Bahway, 
N. J. 

The following acts appeared at the Base 
Hospital, Camp Custer, Mich., under. the 
auspices of Emery H. Jarvis, Associate 
Field Director, Red Cross: Gilroy. Haynes 
and Montgomery, Charles B. Middleton and 
Leora Speumeyer, Naval Base Quartette, 
Melroy Sister, Blanche and Jimmie Creigh- 
ton, Elsie Williams and Company, Harry 
and Lay-ton, and Marriott Troupe, Martin 
and Courtney, Hugh Skelly and Emma 
Heit, Cal Dean and Marie Fay with the 
"Sorority Girls:" Roberts, Pearl, and 
Straw. * 

Under the auspices of the War Hospital 
Entertainment Association' performers who 
gave their services were Frank Gillen, the 
Pot>t Jazz Band, Beatrice Lambert, Eu- 
genia Jones, Lewis and Brown, Camilla 
Ponzilla, Burger, Aubrey and Rhodes, 
Henrietta Byron, Barber and Jackson, the 
Four of Us, Sammy Wilson, Elmer and 
Jerome, Lambert and Currier, Delanoy and 
Leroy, Shirley Sisters, Dolores Gray, Jim- 
mie Hnssey, Katherine Bradley, Goldie 
and Dunbar, Harrie Downing, Mae Hunt, 
Fogarty and Foster, Harry Thompson, J. 
P. Giorgio," Paula Preston, Robilio and 
Rothman, Harry Crawford, Eileen Castles, 
Olga, Murray and Irwin, Mayme and 
Dayse Remington, Three Fifers, Florence 
Meredith, Fay Courtney, Kajamo and Za- 
rillo, Dunham and O'Malley, Duquesne 
Comedy Four, Henrietta Byron, Liane Van 
De Griffe, Hastings and Williams, Lucille 
Campbell, Baby Gladys, Maxey Burkhardt, 
Mildred Delmonte, Margaret Kadel, Mans- 
field and De Tar, Astor Gour and Frank 
Markley. 



GUILD PICKS SECOND PLAY 

"John Ferguson" is the title of the next 
play chosen for presentation by the The- 
atre Guild, which opened its season at the 

Garrick Theatre last Monday night with 
"The Bonds of Interest," adapted from the 
Spanish of Benevente. It is by St. John 
Ervine and has been presented successfully 
in London. 



"FLO FLO" GOES TO BOSTON 

Boston, April 14.— "Flo Flo" is 
scheduled to open here at the Tremont 
Theatre on April 21. The Rainbow 
Girl," which was to have closed at the . 
house on April 12, has had its run extended 
one week, bringing the dosing date up to 
April 19. 



RE-OPEN LABOR DAY 
The Sam Bernard-Louis Mann company 
of "Friendly Enemies" will open at the 
Manhattan Opera Honse for a four weeks' 
run Labor Day, after which it will go on 
the subway circuit and then the road, 
starting in with Washington, Baltimore 
and then going West. It is probable, 
though, that only Mann win go West 
with the show, Bernard dropping out at 
Baltimore. It is said that Sam Collins 
will shortly go into the cast in Bernard's 
place, at the Hudson. 



DATES AHEAD 

"Haruxa" (Spanish)— Park Theatre, April 

19. 
Dress Rehearsal Green Boom Club— Hud- 
son Theatre, April 20. • 
Commonwealth Opera Co. — Academy of 

Music, Brooklyn, April 21. 
"Three for Diana" — John D. Williams— 

Bijou Theatre, April 21. 
"Dark Roaaleen" — David Belasco— Belasco 

Theatre, April 22. 
"The Rose and the Ring" (marionettes) — 

Tony Sarg — Bunch and Judy,- April 22. 
Actors* Fund,' Annual Meeting — Hudson 

Theatre, April 23. 
Bronx Exposition opening — April 26. 
Treasurers Club Benefit — Hudson Theatre, 

April 27. 
"Take a Chance" — Columbia Students — 

Hotel Astor, April 28. 29, 30. 
Three Plays— Duncan Macdougalla Barn. 

May J. 
Palisades Park opening — May 3. 
N. V. A. Benefit — Hippodrome, May 4. 
Brighton Theatre opens — May 19. 
Henderson's, Coney Island, opens — May 26. 

OUT OF TOWN 

"It's Up to You"— A E. Root— Springfield. 
Mass., April 17,ot . - > . 

"Mary, Be Careful" (New edltlon)-^Weber 
and Andersonr4WDkes-Barre, Fa.}OApril 
18. i5 - -O " "' s 

"Let's Go Again" (new edition) — Farichon 
and Marco — San Francisco. CaL, April 20. 

"The Dangerous Age" — Ed. Dublnsky — Chi- 
cago, April 21. . 

"La La, Lucille" — A. E. Aarons, Jr. — At- 
lantic City, April 21. 

Albee Theatre opens — Providence, April 21. 

"Dark Horses" — William Harris — Washing- 
ton. April 27. 

"Oh, FegsTi Behave" — Illinois Theatre, 
Chicag-o. April 27. 

"The Opels"— Hollond, Ohio, April 28. 

"The Lady In Bed"— John P. Slocum— 
Washington, April 28. 

Gus Hill's "California. Minstrels" — Canton. 

Ohio. May 3. 
"Through the Ages" — Comstoek and Gest— 

Buffalo. May 5. 
American Federation of Musicians, Annual 

Convention — Dayton, Ohio, May 12. 
"Passing Show of 1919" — Shnberts — Palace 

Music Hall, Chicago, May 14. 
"Look and Listen"— A. H. Woods— Atlantic 

City. May 18. 
"Follies" (new edition)— Florens Zlegfeld, 

Jr.— Atlantic eity. May 2L 
I. A. T. S. E. Convention — Ottawa, Can., 

May 26. 
"A Pearl of Great Price" — A. H- Woods- 
Stamford, Conn., -August 12. 

CLOSING DATES 

"Tiger! Tiger!" — Belasco, April 19. 
"A Sleepless Night"— Bijou, April 19. 
"Keep ft to Yourself" — Broadhurst, April 

19. 
"Penny Wise" — Punch and Judy, April 19. 
"The Fortune Teller"— Republic, April 26. 



CHICAGO MAY GET "HOBOHEMIA" 

"Hobohemia," which is scheduled to close 
at the Greenwich Village Theatre May 17, 
may open in Chicago the following Mon- 
day if the efforts of the management to 
secure a house for the play in that city 
are successful. Bernard Gallant, manager 
of the Greenwich Village Theatre, who is 
also one of the officers of the corporation 
which has leased the house from Margaret 
Lewis, the owner, tried to get a Broadway 
house for the show, but was unsuccessful 
because the managers with whom he ne- 
gotiated wonted too large a percentage. 

The last house Gallant negotiated for 
was &e Belmont. The Shnberts, who con- 
trol this house, demanded a split of 6040, 
the major portion going to the show. 



STAMPER HAS NEW PIECE 

"The Ahkoond" is the title of a new 
Japanese operetta now being completed 
by Dave Stamper. F. T. Richards wrote 
the book and Gene Buck the lyrics. 



MAY FORM NEW COMBINATION 

Elliott, Comstoek and Gest have the idea 
in mind of having Jerry Kern write a 
show especially suited to the abilities of 
Anna Wheaton and Oscar Shaw, bnt noth- 
ing definite has yet been decided upon. 

"OH, MY DEARf TO MOVE 
"Oh, My Dear!" will on Monday go into 
the Thirty-ninth Street Theatre, where 
"Take It From Me" is to close on Satur- 
day night. The Princess will probably be 
dark for some time. 



TAKE ACTION AGAINST SPECS 

Boston, April 12. — At- a meeting recently 
held here of the Association of Theatre 
Managers of Boston, it was -voted that any 
manager belonging to the association who 
encourages or permits any speculator or 
solicitor to do business on his premises or 
finds that any of his employes are in 
collusion with any such speculator and does 
not discharge "*m shall be expelled from 
the association. Any member can file 
charges against another member and re- 
quest the president to appoint a special 
committee for a hearing. 



"PARLOR" SHOWS CLOSING 

A. H. Woods has already closed one of 
his "Parlor, Bedroom and Bath" compa- 
nies, it being headed by Edna Von Luke 
and Frank Moore and dosing at the Na- 
tional Theatre, Chicago, last week. Two 
others are also scheduled to close soon, 
one, headed by Bertha Bel more and George 
Hare, being slated to half at Trenton on 
April 27, and the other, headed by Flavia 
Arcaro and "Walter Perkins, being down 
on the books to coma to a stop at Ottawa, 
Can., on May 10. 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



DU PONTS TO BUY FOUR 

HOUSE S, IS LA TEST REPORT 

With Negotiations for the Rivoli and Rialt o Admitted, It b Now 
.1; Said That They Contemplate Purchase of the 
Strand and Capital Also 



That the Da Pouts are about to not only 
take over the Rialto and Rivoli theatres, 
but the Strand and Capital in addition, 
and also furnish the money with which. 
Marc Klaw is to buy out the Erlanger in- 
terest in the firm of Klaw and Erlanger, 
was reported on Broadway early this 
week.-' 

As,.,-putlined in the latest report, the 
idea. of the big powder, r people. now is to 
put a show into the Capital that would 
be a cross between the Winter Garden and 
the Hippodrome spectacles of former days, 
with plenty of girls and big punch ef- 
fects. The scale of prices was mentioned 
at $1.50 top, based upon an estimated 
capacity of 4,800 for the house. 

The Strand, it was said, would be turned 
into a legitimate house, catering to large 

productions and musical comedies, which 
it is equipped to do, having a 44-foot 
stage. 

With the Strand picture policy gone, the 
Rivoli is to be left a film house, it is said, 
and, with the competition of the Strand 
out of the way, could make a lot of 
money, its nearest opposition being the 
Rialto which, it is said, is figured to be 



too far away to either hurt or be injured 
by the Rivoli. 

The name of Arthur- Voigtlin has been 
mentioned several times as being the man 
who would have the direction of the' Cap- 
ital, his broad experience at the Hippo- 
drome and in other big undertakings 
peculiarly fitting him for the. task. 

Inquiry in many directions regarding 
the foundation for these reports failed to 
get a confirmation, although it was ad- 
mitted by an official of the interests that 
control the Rivoli and Rialto that the 
purchase of those houses by the Du Fonts 
had been discussed even to the point of 
setting a price upon them. Nothing fur- 
ther than this had been done, however, it 
was said. Others questioned in the mat- 
ter refused to deny it, even admitting that 
something was doing, but that they were 
not at liberty to disclose what it was. 

The part of the report that included 
Marc Klaw was to the effect that the big 
explosive makers have long desired to get 
into the theatrical business and see a 
chance, through the reported trouble in 
the K. and E. offices, of acquiring some 
intensely valuable interests. 



MONTREAL PAYS $300,000 TAX 

Montreal, Canada, April 14. — The rev- 
enue from amusements in Montreal which 
has amounted to about $300,000 per year, 
under the control of the province, will 
again be controlled by the city after 
July L 

Ei -Alderman L>. A. L/apointe introduced 
the amusement tax scheme in 1915. The 
revenue gathered was used for charitable 
purposes. During the first year, $161,000 
was collected, all going to city hospitals. 
At the end of 1916, the province adopted 
a law whereby the tax was no longer con- 
trolled by Montreal, but instead by . the 
provincial government. The provincial 
statute increased the revenue from 1 cent 
on all tickets to 2 cents on any ticket 
costing up to 34 cents-; 3 cents on any 
ticket for which the charge is from 34 to 
74 cents, 5 cents on those up to $1.50 and 
10 cents for any pasteboard costing more 
than $1.50. 

By a new law, the city will again as- 
sume control of the tax. The new statute 
will give hospitals the money secured by 
the original 1915 tax and the use of the 
balance will be optional with the city leg- 
islature, the provincial tax rates being re- 
tained. 



IRWIN SHOW MAY COME IN 

May Irwin and her newest musical vehi- 
cle, "The Water's Fine," which dosed in 
Oswego a week ago last Tuesday, are 
scheduled to open in a Broadway house 
the latter part of next month, according 
to Kurt Eisfeldt, Miss Irwin's husband 
and one of the producers of the show. 

At the present time Miss Irwin is in 
Mt. Clemens recovering from an attack of 
neuritis, as " a result of which she was 
forced to quit last week, with the result 
that the show closed and the company was 
brought to New York. 

The show played to $1,493 in Norwich 
on Monday, and in Watertown, where the 
show was booked for Wednesday, the day 
after it closed, the advance sale on the 
day's double performance amounted to 
$2,593. 

The company has been disbanded and 
a new one, beaded by Miss Irwin, will be 
chosen for the play's presentation here. 
In the meantime, the book is being rewrit- 
ten by Aaron Hoffman. 



TAXPAYERS OBJECT TO THEATRE 

Because it is believed negro patronage 
for a theatre will cause a depreciation in 
the value of property in the vicinity of 
the sbowhouse, taxpayers around 129th 
street and Lenox avenue have started a 
movement to prevent the construction of 
a motion picture house on the northeast 
corner of 129th street. 

As soon as an application had been 
filed for a license at the Bureau of 
Licenses, agitation was started to prevent 
the erection of the house. There is a 
large negro population above. 130th street, 
and the taxpayers believe a theatre erected 
at 120th street would draw it further 
down. Ln that event, they claim, property 
values would go down. 

Several attempts have been made to 
secure a license for a theatre on this 
corner, but the taxpayers have always 
defeated the plan. A general meeting is 
to be held this week, when plans will be 
formulated for a basvi'ng before the license 
commissioner. At present, the site is oc- 
cupied by a florist. The application for 
a license was filed by Benjamin MenscheL 



"TEN NIGHTS" CLOSES 

After playing thirty-five weeks this sea- 
son. Robert Downing, in "Ten Nights in 
a Barroom," closed last Saturday at the 
Lexington, where he played a return en- 
gagement with the play, opening for a 
week's engagement on April 7. 

"Ten Nights in a Barroom" will be pre- 
sented again next season with Robert 
Downing featured, and he win also be 
presented in another play in conjunction 
with the vehicle he is now using, opening 
the season early in August under the 
management of Arthur C. Alston. 



- SEEK E, A O'HARA 

B. J. O'Haxa. » .who sr**»ved fifteen 
wounds while fighting, in France and was 
last heard from at Wallace, Idaho, is being 
sought by the rinil f I TTiisssslil Actors, 
located at 1400 Broadway, New York. 

O'Hara and his wife were stranded in 
Wallace .because of the influenam epidemic 
some time; ago. He wrote to the Fund, 
but, due to unsettled conditions and all 
sorts of delays, communication was diffi- 
cult. He has not been heard of since 
then. O'Hara still limps from a wound In 
the leg, caused by a bayonet, and has .been 
gassed, but, in spite of the fact that the 
latter necessitates the use of an ar- 
tificial palate, he sings well. Any one who 
knows anything about his whereabouts is 
asked to communicate with the Fund. 



MARIONETTES TO RETURN 

On April 22 Tony Sarg will present his 
annual marionette production at the 
Punch and Judy. The new maritvnette 
drama is in four acta and has been ;aken 
eray's well-known tale. -Hattie Louise 
Mick dramatised the play, which will 
have, in addition to the usual evening and 
matinee performances, a presentation at 
11 a. m., on Saturday, so that the younger 
children will be enabled to sea.it > 



TAIT GETS BELASCO PLAYS 

J. and N. Tait, the Australian managers, 
have concluded arrangements with David 
Belasco for the production in Australia of 
two New York successes, "Daddies" and 
"Tiger Rose." 

JACK BRATTON ILL 

Jack Bratton, of the firm of Leffler and 
Bratton, has been confined to his home for 
several days with a bad attack of stomach 
trouble. 



TYLER TAKES OVER HOUSE 

George C. Tyler has secured the Na- 
tional Theatre .. in Washington, and will 
begin in June the presentation of a series 
of new plays there. In the casts will be 
Lynn Fontanne, Helen Hayes, Alfred 
Lunt, Patricia Collinge and Philip Merri- 
vale. Mr. Tyler will establish headquar- 
ters in Washington for the production of 
the series. 

The plays to be produced include "Clar- 
ence,'* "Made of Money," a comedy by 
Richard Washburn' Child and Porter 
Emerson Browne; "A Young Man's 
Fancy," a modern fantasy, by John T. 
Mclntyre, and a comedy, tentatively en- 
titled "The Blossoming of Mary Ann," 
by Sidney Toler and Marion Short. 



SYMPHONY TO PLAY VAUDE 
B. S. Moss, who has taken over the 
Symphony Theatre at Ninety-sixth street 
and Broadway, will reopen the house on 
May 2 with a straight picture policy. 
Moss will put vaudeville into the Sym- 
phony after Labor Day, presenting six 
acts and a feature picture. The Sym- 
phony, which was formerly a skating rink, 
and which was reconstructed as a picture 
house about a year ago by Thomas Healy, 
owner of the property, will be thoroughly - 
renovated by Moss. A new . stage will be 

built during the Summer, 'and other im- 
provements made that will include a brand 
new lighting system. 



"THREE FOR DIANA" OPENS 

New Haven, Conn., April 14. — "Three 
for Diana," a comedy by Chester Bailey 
Ferneld, was produced here tonight by 
John D. Williams, with Martha Hedman 
in the leading role. Others in the cast are 
John Halliday, David Glassford, Blanche 
Chapman, Anne Faystone, J. Beresford 
Hollis and T.m,«n Brennan. The play 
deals with the devices of Diana and her 
faithful maid, Burdford, in keeping three 
lovers guessing. It goes into the Bijou 
Theatre, New York, next Monday. 



LOST SCENERY DELAYS OPENING 

The scenery for Bert La' Mont's "Sub- 
way Revue" went astray last week, and, 
as a result, the act failed, to open on 
Thursday at the Majestic 'Theatre, Plain- 
field. ~'.' 

That the scenery didn't arrive in time is 
the fault of the transfer company which 
handled it here, says La Monti For, in- 
stead of being carted to the Twenty-third 
Street. Ferry, the sets were taken down 
to the Barclay Street Ferry, where they 
were located by La Mont after he had 
been notified of their non-appearance in 
Phunfield Thursday afternoon. However, 
the act, which is a new one, opened in 
Plainfield the following day. 



TAIT BACK FROM LONDON 

Edward J. Tait, visiting managing 
director for J. and N. Tait, Australian 
managers, returned last Friday morning on 
the Megantic from London, where he has 
been since February. 

Mr. Tait saw no English show which he 
believed was satisfactory for Australian 
production. He states that all London 
houses are playing to capacity and Amer- 
ican plays and acts are much desired by 
the English public. "' ; J - 

GETS $8,400 ON WEEK 
"Seven Days' Leave" closed a week's 
engagement at the Auditorium Theatre, 
Baltimore, last Saturday night, where it 
played to a total of $8,400, playing to 
$752 on the opening night. This business 
is quite an achievement, when it is con- 
sidered that Baltimore is a city of many 
orthodox Catholics and the week was 
during the Lenten period. 



BLANCHE RING SELLS HOUSE 

Blanche Ring has sold Sunny Gables, her 
country home at Orient Point, to Fred- 
erick Brown, through O'Reilly and Dohn. 



THIS WAS SOME STREET 

Attorney street, down on the East Side, 
may not be such a fashionable thorough- 
fare, but, when it comes to s up pl yi ng the 
world with theatrical men it is all there, 
for A. H. Woods, Gus Hill, George Goett 
and Hose Reis, at one time the owner of 
more than fifty theatres in this country, 
were born within one block of each Other 
on that street Ami within a short dis- 
tance of where they all were bom lived 
Billy Florence,' then in the height of his 
fame. Some street. 



HAD TO LOSE SUNDAY SHOW . 

Washington, April 12. — Richard Wal- 
ton Tally's "Bird of Paradise" wss unable 
to open in Washington Sunday, owing 
to the fact that the show did not arrive 
until 7 :30 o'clock in the evening, and three 
hours were required to set the piece. The 
inability to open resulted in the lose of 
about $1,200 worth of Sunday night's 
business. 



WILL START NEW GARDEN SHOW 

The Shuberts will begin casting next 
week for "The Passing Show of 1919," 
scheduled to open at the Winter Garden 
the latter part of June. The show, which 

is -almost completed, is being written, this 
year, by Harold Atteridge, Sigmund Rom- 
berg and Jean Schwartz. It will be staged 
by J. C. Huffman. 



USE LILLIAN RUSSELL'S CAR 

San Francisco, April 11.— The private 
car which Lillian Russell used for years 
while she toured the country, is bring 
used for the transportation of wounded 
soldiers here. Miss Rnssell has loaned it 
for their use. Today it brought in fifty 
wounded men from overseas to the Letter- 
man General Hospital for convalescence. 



WILL TRY OUT NEW ONE 

"Mary, Be Careful," a new comedy, will 
be opened by Weber and Anderson in 
WUkes-Barre on Friday, after which it 
will play several small towns and then go 
into Pittsburgh. This work, it is expected, 
will show them what they have and, if it 
looks good enough, they will then take ft 
off and hold it for next season. • 



GOING INTO "FROLIC" 
After closing with "Jack o" Lantern," in 
which they are now appearing, the Six 
Brown Brothers are scheduled to open in 
the Ziegfeld "Midnight Frolic." Their ap- 
pearance' will be brought about under an 
arrangement Ziegfeld now has with Charles 
Dillingham. 



TO USE FIVE RINGS 

It is reported that the Ringling Brothers- 
Barnum-Bafley -Circus will use five, in- 
stead of the regulation three, rings when 
it leaves the Garden and starts out under 
canvas next week. The show is using 
three rings and four platforms at the 
Garden. 



FINAL BENEFIT SET FOR MAY 16th 
The final benefit of the regular series 
given by the Actors' Fund has been set 
for Msy 16th at the Colonial Theatre, 
Boston. This performance was to have 
been held April 25th. but was postponed 
on account of the Liberty Loan drive. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April i5, 1919 




PANTAGES ACTS 

TO OPEN IN 

DETROIT 

CHANGE EFFECTIVE JUNE 1ST 



The Vantages Circuit will change its 
present routing arrangements on Jane 1, 
all acts engaged to open on the Pantages 
time on and after that date, starting at 
the Regent Theatre, Detroit, instead of the 
Pantages house in Minneapolis as at 
present. 

The Pantages acts will go from Detroit 
to Chicago, where they will play three days 
at the People'g Theatre and split the week 
with St. Louis. The acts will then be 
routed to Minneapolis, from which point 
they will proceed to the coast 

One of the reasons for the changing about 
of the present Pantages routing plan is that 
a round trip ticket can be purchased from 
St Louis to the coast and return for 
$152.75, which is considerably cheaper than 
the rate from Chicago to the coast and re- 
turn. Following their closing at Kansas 
City, the Pan acts will play the Texas and 
Oklahoma time in the southwest, closing at 
Dallas. 

The above plan was decided upon at a 
conference held by Pantages and his book- 
ing chiefs in Chicago last week, and will 
remain in effect for at least a year, or 
until such time as the new house that 
Pantages is building in Toronto is finished. 
When the Toronto, house is ready the Pan- 
tages acts will open there. 



CHANGES IN LOCAL BILLS 

Montgomery and Allen are out of the 
Royal bill for the week and have been 
replaced by Felix Adler. 

Willie Solar injured his leg on the stage 
at the Palace on Monday afternoon and 
was compelled to leave the bill. Ben Bernie 
replaced him, doubling at the Riverside. 

Helen Ware was taken ill after the after- 
noon ahow at the Riverside and was com- 
pelled to cancel the rest of the week. Later, 
her physician phoned the theatre that her 
entire route would have to be cancelled, as 
she was seriously ill. Norton and Lee re- 
placed her at the Monday night perform- 
ance, but another act will doubtless be 
secured to play the balance of the week. 

Watts and Hawley are out of the Alham- 
bra on account of Watts' illness. No one 
replaced tbem. 

NAZARRO AND UNGER SPLIT 

Nat Nazarro and Sol linger, booking 
agents in the Strand Theatre building, 
dissolved partnership last week, the dis- 
solution becoming effective May 1. 

Nazarro and linger have been in part- 
nership for the last six months, and their 
dissolution at this time is due, they de- 
clare, to an insufficiency of business for 
both under the existing arrangement. 
They- are parting on the best of terms, 
Nazarro retaining the offices heretofore 
occupied by the firm, and linger establish- 
ing offices for himself in another part of 
the building. 

OPEN NEW ALBEE THEATRE 

Providence. R. I.. April 14. — The follow- 
ing is the bill for the opening of the new 
E. F. Albee Theatre next Monday : M me 
Marguerita Sylva. Cressy and Dayne, Four 
Mortons, Walter C. Kelly. Ivan Bankoff 
and Company. Seven Bracks, Newton Alex- 
ander and the Lightner Girls, and Libonati. 



DISAGREE OVER CHINK SONG 

Newhoff and Phelps filed a complaint 
against George Whiting and Sadie Burt 
last week, claiming that Whiting is sing- 
ing a Chinese number, which, they allege, 
is a direct infringement on a song writ- 
ten by W. B. Friedlander, the exclusive ■ 
performing rights of which they (New- 
hoff and Phelps) control. The song is a 
part of an act originally written by 
Friedlander for Whiting and Burt, and 
done by them for several weeks. Whiting 
and Burt turned back the act to Fried- 
lander about six months ago, and shortly 
after Friendlander sold or leased the 
specialty to Newhoff and Phelps. 

In order to straighten out the dispute 
that has arisen over the song, the N. V. A. 
has asked Whiting to submit the words 
and music of the number he is now using 
to the complaint board, so that a compari- 
son of the two songs may be made and a 
decision arrived at. 



CHARGE LEWIS WITH LIFTING 

Laurie and Bronson have filed a com- 
plaint with the N. V. a; against Syd. 
Lewis, '" which the team alleges that - 
Lewis Is infringing on the copyrighted title 

of their act "Let *Er Go." Laurie and 
Bronson further assert that Lewis is using 
the expression, "Let 'Br Go," several times 
in his act Inasmuch as they claim to have 
been professionally identified with the use 
of the remark since they entered vaude- 
ville, eight or ten years ago, they have re- 
quested the N. V. A. to ask Lewis to cut 
it out hereafter. The Complaint Board is 
conducting tn investigation. 



DARLING'S DOG DISAPPEARS 

Al Darling, manager of the Royal, lost 
his favorite bull pup last week, the canine 
having mysteriously disappeared from the 
lobby during intermission. Although Darl- 
ing has enlisted the aid of half of the 
population of the Bronx, the whereabouts 
of the missing pup still remain an unsolv- 
able mystery. Arthur White, the Keith 
emergency manager, was bitten by the 
Darling blue ribbon winner the day before 
the dog pulled the disappearing stunt. 



SAIL FOR SOUTH AMERICA 

Burt she pli anl. the Australian whip 
king, with his wife, sailed April 12 on 
the S.S. VeatrU for Buenos Aires, where 
they will stay six months, after which 
they will play for three months at the 
Circus Parish in Madrid, Spain. From 
there they will go to Paris to play under 
the management of Rafael Beretta at the 
Folies Bergere for two months. Richard 
l'itrot secured the contracts for them. 



TOM SWIFT ILL 

Tom Swift and Mary Kelly opened at 
Proctor's, Tonkers, last Monday with a 
new act that they intended to break in 
for a metropolitan showing this week, bnt 
were forced to quit the bill .after the Tues- 
day matinee owing to. an attack of illness 

suffered by Swift. 



ORPHEUM HANDS OUT ROUTES 

The Orpbeum Circuit routed a few more 
acts over the time for next season this 
week. Pianovflle opens at the Orpheum, 
San Francisco, Sept 7 ; the Three Jahns 
at the Majestic. Chicago, June 22, and.' 
Morris and Campbell at the Majestic, Chi- 
cago, June 15. 



DEVLIN SUSPENDED BY N. V. A. 

James J. Devlin was suspended last week 
by the National Vaudeville Artists. His 
suspension was brought about according 
to an official of the N. V. A., for "eon- 
duct unbecoming a member of the organ- 
ization." 



WANT BELLE BAKER IN FILMS 

Belle Baker is negotiating with a well 
known motion picture producing company 
- for an early appearance in the films. 



. BERT WALTON HAS NEW ACT 

Bert Walton, formerly of Walton and 
Francis, will open with a new act April 
28 at the Greeley Square and American 
theatres. 



SUN TO HAVE 

FOUR NEW 

HOUSES 

TO BE READY IN SEPTEMBER 

Springfield, Ohio, April 11. — Four new 
theatres will be opened by Gus Sun when 
the new vaudeville season starts in Sep- 
tember, it has been announced here. 

The first one will be built in this city, 
and will involve an expenditure of $150,- 
000. C. Howard Crane, of Detroit, well 
known as a theatrical architect, is super- 
vising construction of the house, which is 
now under way. Associated with him in 
the erection. of the new theatre is Will- 
iam Fuller, of this city, acting in the 
capacity of construction engineer. - The 
seating capacity of the house will he 1,600, 
Of which 1,000 will be in the orchestra. 

The Orpheum, in Lima, Ohio, now on the 
Sun circuit, will be torn down during the 
'Summer, and, in. place of it, a new theatre 
will be erected. It will occupy, in addi- 
tion to the ground on which the Orpheum 
now stands, adjacent property, which will 
make it possible to build u larger and more 
modern structure, that will seat 1,000. 

The Hippodrome, Huntington, West Vir- 
ginia, . recently destroyed by. fire, and 
booked by the Sun office is being rebuilt. 
The size of this house will not he in- 
creased, but it will be built somewhat dif- 
ferently, so as to be more up to date. 

George Shafer's Victoria, Wheeling, 
West Virginia, is being remodelled so that 
its seating capacity will be increased by 
600. Shows will be presented there until 
June 1, when the new and old structures 
will be joined together. 

NEW SISTER ACT FORMED 

Madeline Clark and Frances Summer 
have formed a partnership and will appear 
on Big Time in a sister act Miss Sum- 
mer returned some time ago from Europe, 
where, she had spent seven years in musi- 
cal conservatories. Miss Clark will handle 
the comedy. A novelty in the act is a 
barnyard number with special costumes. 
Frank Folsom has supplied the patter. 



LIEUT. METCALF TO ENTER VAUDE 

Lieut Earl Metcalfe, who served with 
distinction in France during the war with 
the "Fighting Sixty-ninth," is to be fea- 
tured in a new vaudeville production that 
Joe Hart will shortly place in rehearsal. 
Anthony Kelly wrote the act, which Js a 
travesty on the exaggerated drama of the 
currently popular movie serials. The play- 
let calls for a supporting oast of five. 



SAUBER HAS BICYCLE ACT 

Harry Fisher and his Cycling Models, 
who appeared last season in burlesque 
with the "Hello, Girls" show, is rehearsing 
a new bicycle-musical act with which he is 
scheduled to open in vaudeville the latter 
part of this week. There will be seven 
girls in the act which is owned and booked 
by Harry Sauber. 



GOING TO MEXICO 

Contracts were closed last week by 
•Hoelin and Richards for Shirley Sherman 
and Her Five Jass Beauxs to play a ten 
weeks' engagement in Merida, Yucatan, 
Mexico, for the Compania Internacional 
de Variedadas. The act will sail from 
New York Saturday. 



MASON & COLE OPEN IN NEW ACT 

Mason and Cole open on the Loew time 
this week with a new act entitled "Just 
for a Kiss." The team will play the Ful- 
ton, Brooklyn, the last half, of the week. 
Tommy Curran arranged the booking. .-'.. 



RESUME REHEARSAL OF ACT 

Grace Sibyl Meehan, who, up till about 
a week ago, had had in rehearsal an act 
by herself entitled "The Doctor of Brook- 
lyn," and was taken ill with influenza, 
has resumed work on the playlet. There 
have" been two changes in the cast, however, 
Agnes Earl has replaced Florence Stewart 
and Miss Copes has taken the place of 
Alice Irwin. J. McConnick Beeten remains 
with the act. The offering has not been 
presented in this country as yet, but has 
been seen in Great Britain and Canada. 



FRITKfNS DANCERS REHEARSING 

Fritk in's Dancers, a. new song and dance 
review, is now in rehearsal at the Amster- 
dam Opera House. Included in the. cast 
are Boris Fritkin, Igor Buckdonoff, Leo 
Fritkovski, Ivan Zeunanoff, Ivan Orion", 
Anna Fritkovski, Maria Velnova, Elsie 
Perlovska, Viola Fedrova and Maluta 
Netchiova. The act carries special cos- 
tumes and settings and includes both 
classic and modern dancing. Seasue 
Phillipoff is the conductor. 



RUTH ST. DENIS HAS PLAY 

Berkeley, Oal., April 10.— Ruth St. 
Denis will appear on the speaking stage 
for the first time in her career, in August 
She will be seen in a biblical play called 

"Merriem," written by Constant and Max- 
well Armfield. - It will be presented at the 
Greek theatre of the University of Cal- 
ifornia. Miss St Denis is at present tour- 
ing, vaudeville with her husband,. Ted 
Shawn, in a dancing act 



HENDERSON'S RE-OPENS MAY 26 

Henderson's Theatre, Coney Island, will 
re-open for the season on Monday, May 26. 
The. house will play about the same grade 
of vaudeville show as has been its custom 
in past seasons. The Keith Exchange will 
furnish the acts, as heretofore. The Hen- 
derson restaurant, adjourning the theatre, 
will re-open on April 10. The restaurant 
will not maintain a cabaret entertainment 
this season. • 



LA MONT HANDLING CURTIS ACT 

Bert La Mont has taken Sam Curtis' 
school act under his managerial wing. 
Curtis was the first to stage a school act 
for vaudeville, ante-dating the Avon Com- 
edy Four and the various Gus Edwards 
schoolroom productions by several years. 
La Mont will scenically refit the Curtis 
turn and send it out over the pop circuits 
with Sain Curtis featured. 



MIDGETS PRECEDED BY FILM 

A hundred-foot motion picture, showing 
the Singer Midgets traveling, their domes- 
tic life, etc., is being utilized to herald the 
coming of the act in each of the local 
Proctor housesi An announcer appears be- 
tween acts every day in each Proctor 
house and gives a little talk about the 
midgets and their forthcoming engagement. 

ELABORATE "TOO MUCH MARRIED" 

Billy Grady has called off the current 
bookings of "Too Much Married," a musi- 
cal production carrying twelve people 
which has been playing around New York 
for die last four weeks. He will elaborate 
the act a bit and replace one of the prin- 
cipals before the production re-opens again 
at the Alhambra on April 21. 



TEAMS LEAVE TfNNEY SHOW 

The Leightons, and Boyle and Brazil. 
closed with Frank Tinney's "Atta Boy" 
show when the attraction finished its run 
in Chicago last Saturday. Both teams have 
received routes on the Keith time that will 
keep them busy in the middle west for 
several weeks. "Atta Boy" is playing in 
Louisville this -week. 



. RUSSELL LEAVES FLATBUSH 

Walter Russell, treasurer of the Flat- 
bush Theatre for the last three years, re- 
signed last. week. E. Shellenberger is the 
new. treasurer. . 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 



Music of the better class is a feature 
at the Palace this week, for there are 
two prima donnas on the bill, Phyllis 
Neilson Terry, the English actress-singer, 
is in the first half, and Yvctte Rugel in 
the last. If some means could but be 
found to combine the talents of these two 
sopranos, if the luscious tonal quality and 
excellent enunciation of the little Ameri- 
can could be combined with the vocal tech- 
nique and singing knowledge possessed by 
the stately English woman, what a singer 
would be heard 1 By some peculiar trick 
of fate not only are the singers of ex- 
actly opposite types physically, but each 
one possesses to a marked degree just 
what the other lacks vocally to make of 
her a great artist. 

John Regay and the Lorraine sisters, in 
some original dances, opened the show. 
Late arrivals, and there were many at the 
opening performance, missed the act, 
which deserved a later position. 

Willie Solar, with his funny voice and 
funnier mannerisms, rendered some clevel 
songs and finished with a dance marred by 
lack of space in one, where be appeared. 

Una Clayton did excellently with her 
little sketch "Keep Smiling," in which she 
is supported by Herbert Griffin. Miss 
Clayton cleverly portrays a slavey type 
and made the most of her lines and situa- 
tions. An actress of ability is the author- 
ess-actress, and her present vehicle is most 
acceptable. 

Bernard Granville is deserving of the 
thanks of every vaudeville patron, for, 
held, over for the second week, he has dis- 
carded every portion of the act shown 
last week and presented a brand new offer- 
ing. All of his material was not only 
new, but untried as well, and Granville 
unhesitatingly put it to' the teat. It is 
a pleasure to record that the greater part 
of the new act scored remarkably well. 
A new poem called "When Your Boy 
Comes Back," by J. Kiorn Brnnan. is a 
gem and some new songs are excellent. 
"The Greatest Thing that Came from 
France" is a cracker jack, and "He was 
My Pal" and "You Dont Need Wine" are 
exceptional. "Friends" was rendered as 
an encore and Granville left with one of 
the hits of the biU to his credit. 

Phyllis Neilson Terry closed the first 
part with three songs and a dramatic reci- 
tation. She did well, and her altitudinous 
voice with the "G" in "alt" as the climax 
aroused the usual enthusiasm. Miss 
Terry is singing a popular ballad, the 
effect of which was entirely lost, due to 
her faulty enunciation, apparent in all her 
selections. ' ♦ 

Nelson and Chain opened after inter- 
mission and once more proved that audi- 
ences have poor memories. The oldest 
portions of their act, things seen years 
ago, were roundly applauded. 

Yvette Rugel, with her warm, colorful 
voice, rich and appealing, made an 
excellent impression with . a well selected 
repertoire of special and semi high-class 
numbers. The success with which Miss 
Rugel is meeting in vaudeville, in spite 
of her faulty vocal method and lack of 
knowledge of the singing art, should 
be an incentive for this talented girl 
to study. 

Harry Green's new sketch "George 
Washington Cohen," is an excellent sequel 
to his former Aaron Hoffman offering and, 
while perhaps a little lower down the 
ladder of dramatic writing than the old 
one, is fully as humorous and will serve 
Green for many a season. While some 
few may object to a setting .showing the 
gates of heaven, with St. Peter on guard 
questioning each sinner as he asks ad- 
mission, the fact that there is a laugh in 
almost every line cannot be denied. 

Walter C. Kelly, the Virginia Judge, 
back at the Palace after over a year's 
absence, did well with some new Irish 
stories. -'. 

Yerke's Jazarimba Orchestra, a collec- 
tion of phonograph record-makers, with 
Eddy Wiedoft, closed the show. W. V. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



(Continued OB p»»r It) 



RIVERSIDE 

Withdrawals necessitated a complete re- 
arrangement of the bill for the night per- 
formance. Stuart Barnes was moved down 
from the second half to the place originally 
held by Ben Bernie, who, at the evening 
performance, went down to the seventh 
position following O'Donnell and Claire. 

Lady Alice's Pets, a collection of trained 
dogs, cats and mice, opened the show. 

Lubonati, the xylophbnist, scored a hit 
in the second position with his well-ren- 
dered ragtime and popular selections. 

Stuart Barnes found the third position 
ail too easy and scored a decided hit with 
his clever bodes and sayings. He has about 
the best collection of prohibition songs and 
sayings heard in vaudeville and these, com- 
bined with his breezy manner of putting 
them over, made of his act an excellent 
bit of entertainment. 

Norton and Lee scored one -of the ap- 
plause hits of the bill with some finely ren- 
dered songs and excellent bits of dancing. 
Miss Norton was in excellent voice and 
rendered all her numbers with much vocal 
spirit. Lee has improved greatly in his 
work since last seen at this theatre, due 
doubtless to his ability to again regain the 
stage form which army life bad taken from 
him. 

George White and his four dancing girls 
closed intermission with the dance revue 
which has been seen recently in all the lo- 
cal theatres. For some unaccountable rea- 
son, the act failed to score its usual suc- 
cess. White's dance imitations, which are 
always sure fire, hardly got over in spite 
of the fact that White did some of his best 
stepping. 

O'Donnell and Blair, in "The Piano 
Tuner," opened after intermission and eas- 
ily scored the laughing bit of the show. 
O'Donnell's antics are screamingly funny, 
and his falls from tbe stepladder and piano 
brought peals of laughter from all parts 
of the house. O'Donnell does not make the 
usual mistake of comedians of his type and 
attempt too much, but has the act timed 
excellently and brings It to an abrupt end 
Just at the right moment "The Piano 
Tuner" will make the worst grouch laugh. 

Ben Bernie with his syncopated violin 
melodies and a few stories, profited greatly 
by his late spot on tbe bit! and scored one 
of the real hits of the show. Outside of 
the violin playing there isn't a great desl 
to the Bernie act, but he is a clever young 
fellow, ascertains quickly the desires of his 
audiences, gives them exactly what is want- 
ed, and lets it go at that. Pleasing of 
manner and with a crisp style in relating 
his story bits, he is an entertainer of much 
merit. 

Marie Cahill has made several changes 
in her act since seen at the Palace recent- 
ly. One or two new songs have been added 
to ber repertoire and the telephone conver- 
sation with tbe mysterious Ethel has been 
improved by the addition of several min- 
utes of funny dialogue. This is really the 
strongest portion of her act and as Miss 
Cahill doubtless realized the fact long ago, 
she is making the most of it. A medley 
of old-time songs with which she wss asso- 
ciated during ber days as a musical com- 
edy star did not get over well, dne more 
to the failure of a large portion of the au- 
dience to recognize them rather than her 
singing ability. It is a long time since 
"Nancy Brown." "The Bamboo Tree" and 
"Congo Love Song" were whistled along 
Broadway, isn't it? 

Bessye Clifford in art impressions closed 
the show. W. V. 



KEENEY HAS TWO NEW MANAGERS 

James Thorns has succeeded Walter 
Betts as manager of Keeney's. Brooklyn, 
and Charles Johnson is now the resident 
man at Keeney's. Newark, having been ap- 
pointed to the post formerly held by 
Lewis Fossee. 



COLONIAL 

Ten acts, with pictures, constitute this 
week's programme and it will be neces- 
sary for the management to either curtail 
the running time of some of the offerings 
or to ring up at 2 or 8, as it was dose 
to 6 o'clock Monday afternoon when the 
final curtain fell. The show was excel- 
lent in every detail with comedy and danc- 
ing predominating. The bill is advertised 
as an Easter festival, and a big house 
greeted the players. 

The pictures opened and were followed 
by the Marino Brothers, who, at first, 
found difficulty in getting their apparatus 
started, but, after a few seconds, the 
principals whirled about the stage, while 
one propelled the motor and the other per- 
formed many hazardous tricks on the hor- 
izontal bar. The one foot hold was truly 
sensational. 

"Sailor" Reilly delivered a budget of 
popular songs to the delight of all. His 
voice is pleasing and he surely knows the 
art of song delineation. The "Boulevard" 
number is still retained and was one of 
the outstanding features of his offering. 
The "Sailor" made the early spot an easy 
one and scored a tremendous hit. 

Owen McGiveney undoubtedly proved a 
sensation with his one-man version of 
"Bill Sykes." The protean artist changed 
so quickly, at times, that the audience 
gasped in wonderment. Seldom, at an 
opening performance, do things run 
smoothly, and this had a tendency to 
hinder the work of McGiveney. He made a 
speech of thanks after the audience ap- 
plauded loud and long. 

The Four Mortons received an ovation 
on their entrance and laughs a-plenty 
were heard throughout their stay. Joe and 
Martha are developing fast and their per- 
formance won merited applause. . The eld- 
ers surely were a riot and the act is sure 
fire. 

Stone and Kallz presented their latest 
offering, but the Colonial clientele did not 
warm up to it, probably due to the dainti- 
ness of the "Song Romance." Kalir ap- 
pears too sure of himself, but Miss Stone 
worked valiantly throughout. The finish 
received a fairly good hand. 

Bradley and Ardine followed intermis- 
sion, and did extremely well with an as- 
sortment of songs and dances. Bradley 
has a fairly good voice, but it is of light 
texture. The dancing of the pair, and the 
beautiful wardrobe of Miss Ardine, are the 
features. 

Jimmy Hussey, assisted by William 
Worsley, carried off one of the hits of 
the show with their soldier act. Hussey 
sang four "Yiddish" comedy songs, and 
the ballad by Worsley went big. Some of 
the war gags have been heard many 
times, but the way these boys deliver 
them makes laughsefollow in close succes- 
sion. They could have remained on view 
for an hour, but the time was growing 
late. 

Alan Brooks and a company of three 
presented "Dollars and Sense," in which 
Brooks portrays the character of the 
bachelor who. through common sense, 
brings about the happiness of a husband 
and wife. He gave a fine performance and 
the balance of the cast were convincing. 

Milo held them in as well aa could be 
expected, aa it was 6.30 when he appeared, 
and those that remained were treated to 
several good laughs and a ballad rendered 
in splendid tenor voice. The tramp com- 
edian has inserted a few new hits that 
hit the mark. 

Haclcett and Delmar worked to a fast- 
moving house, and if they held a more 
advantageous position on the bill would 
have went over. But tbey seemed dis- 
heartened and could not put the proper 
spirit into their work. Tbe act is prettily 
staged and the pair dance well. J. D. 



ORPHEUM 



There is a wealth of talent on this 
week's bill, but the arrangement of the 
numbers is not a wise one. Three danc- 
ing acts follow one another at the head 
of the bill, and the fourth one consists 
largely of a dance number. It would be 
advisable to shift one of the first three 
down to a lower spot on the programme. 
Georgia Price, originally slated to dose, 
has been shifted to position number eight, 
and Franklyn Ardell is closing. 

The La Vara, a man and woman danc- 
ing act, opened and held their own. Their 
closing dance, consisting of a series of 
whirls that left them breathless, got them 
a generous round of applause. They are 
a capable pair of steppers. There Is a 
tendency on the part of the girl, how- 
ever, to watch her feet too closely — a 
habit easy to remedy. 

Ted Doner sang and danced his way 
into favor. He is possessed of a pleasing 
personality, presents a neat appearance 
and is a remarkably clever dancer. The 
opening bit, where he went through a 
flirtation "with an imaginary girl," was 
a novel one. A waltz, with his cane 
representing the imaginary partner fol- 
lowed, and then came an imitation of 
Frisco. Doner did not include the rest 
of the imitations that feature his act, 
hut stopped rather abruptly. 

Ivan Bankoff, assisted by a pianist and 
a girl, neither one of whom was billed, 
found the going difficult at first because 
of the two dancing acts that preceded 
his, but zealous efforts and the excellent 
way in which the trio worked helped 
ring up a big hit. The girl is an excellent 
toe dancer, and deserves to have her name 
in the programme. 

James Watts, ably assisted by Rex 
Storey, scored solidly with a travesty. 
Watts impersonation of an English- 
woman drew laugh after laugh, and the 
dance farce had the crowd giggling with 
mirth. 

Gus Van and Joe Sohenck, now in their 
sccond week at this house, duplicated 
their hit of last week, singing a different 
repertoire of special and published 
numbers. They are one of the beat sing- 
ing teams in vaudeville, and their per- 
formance is always a delightful one. Gas 
and Joe are in a class by themselves. 

"A Rainbow Cocktail," a splendidly 
staged musical playlet with a cast of 
eight, seven girls and a man, went on 
after a demy that made the crowd im- 
patient. Walter Lawrence played the 
leading role— that of the wizard a n d 
Elmer Chapman directed from the orches- 
tra. The turn will be fully reviewed 
under "New Acts." 

Bert Williams came in for a rousing 
reception and worked in his usual clever 
manner. Williams is one of the best, if 
not the best, comedians now on the variety 
stage. He tells his stories and renders 
his songs in a quiet, dignified way, that 
is very humorous. The poker pantomime 
at the finish is an excellent bit of acting, 
and a new blues number is just suited for 
his style. For an enoore, and in re- 
sponse to a special request, he sang his 
old hit, "I Never Did Nothin' for No 
One," and would have had to take several 
more encores had he not begged off. 

Georgie Price, assisted by Henri 
Young at the piano, was another per- 
former to join the hit class. The offer- 
ing includes imitations of Eddie Foy, 
Eddie Leonard, Raymond Hitchcock, Al 
Jolson, George M. Cohan, Fannie Brice, 
Jimmy Hussey and Belle Baker. The 
latter two were worked in as encores, as 
were imitations of Pat Rooney and 
George White. Price would do well to 
drop one or two of the impersonations, as 
they are not faithful. 

Franklyn Ardell, assisted by Marjorie 
Sheldon, closed the show and kept the 
crowd glued to the seats. An earlier spot 
would have been much better for him, but 
even in the difficult position, he regis- 
tered heavily. L 8. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 




FIFTH AVENUE 

Mabel Burke opened with an animated 
6oug and, aa usual, came in for a big re- 
ception. 

Frank and Milt Britton, styled jazz 

hounds, lived up to their billing, render- 
ing a series of jazzy melodies. They 
opened working upon xylophones. After 
a medley, which was fairly well played, 
one took a trombone and the other a. 
cornet and they proc ee d e d to blow out" 
soma more' lively tunes. The audience 
took to their work and applauded them 
heartily, the boys ringing up a big hit 
in spite of their early position on the MB. 
They took an encore. 

Man* Gray sang a repertoire- of Scotch 
ofttpu' tjT numbers in fins fashion. She 
has an excellent voice and a pleasing per- 
sonality. She' lingered a bit too long on 
this occasion, however. It would be well 
for her to try to vary her offering some- 
what, for, in spite of the clever rendition 
of her numbers, there is an evident lack 
of speed. Her opening comedy song 
turned out to bo a clever one and, of the 
rest, a ballad stood out. The latter 
selection was a gem and the best one she 
offered. One or two other light numbers 
were also liked. 

Hayward and Stafford, a man and girl, 
offered a little skit that, for the main part 
consisted of a series of puns built around 
the word chicken. Host of the material 
is old, but has been rehashed. The turn 
carries a pretty setting, and a novel fea- 
ture is the flf«htr»g of a number of elides 
upon the screen, prior to the appearance 
of the performers. With their present ma- 
terial, however, they win find the going 
rough. 

Weston and Eline, a man and woman 
combination, presented a little skit that 
consisted mainly of a travesty on a young 
couple in as inexpensive cafe. It was 
somewhat overdrawn, but drew a goodly 
number of laughs, nevertheless. There 
are one or two gags that should be 
dropped. 

Two comedy songs are included and they 
are put over with a punch. A bit of 
shimmy *»™-"ig is worked for comedy 
purposes. It bits its mark. 

The Dooley b, Bill and Jed, rode out on 
unicycles, sang a little ditty and scored 
from the start. The turn includes almost 
everything — some singing, talking, rope- 
gpinning and slap-stick comedy. Follow- 
ing the opening bit, they donned Chinese 
costumes and did a song and dance. Then 
came the work* with the lariat, accom- 
panied by a line of patter. A few stories 
by Jed Dooley were followed by an im- 
personation of Bernard' Granville by Bill. 
Jed did some work on the saxophone, 
drawing some laughs with a bit of talk. 
The Oriental travesty, although similar 
bits have been seen at this house re- 
cently, went well at the finish. 

Staley and Bierbeck, two men and a 
girl, one of the trio not being billed, 
offered a novel musical act that was well 
received. At the rise of the curtain, the 
interior of a blacksmith shop is seen. 
Three men, for the girl wears male attire 
at the start, are seen at work on what 
apparently are wheels. They turn out to 
be musical instruments — xylophones in 
different form. A number of tunes are 
rendered upon these and then comes some 
work on other instruments, concealed on 
what are apparently anvils. By an elec- 
trical device, sparks are produced by 
striking these. There is a quick change, 
both in costume and in the stage settings, 
and later on a second change, back to the 
original scene. The offering should be 
able to hold its own anywhere. 

Frank Fay scored the hit of the bill 
with his talking and singing. He re- 
sponded readily to the call for encores and 
made a decided impression. 

Trovilla, Seal and Girlie, a man, woman 
and seal, did a number of aquatic stunts 
and held the crowd in well. One of the 
f e atur es was the length of time during 
which the man stood under water. 

L 8. 




ALHAMBRA 

An All-Favorites Bill is on at this the- 
atre and, despite the Jewish holiday, the 
house was very well filled. Whiting and 
Burt were shoved up into the first half, 
and Chuck Biesner down to the second 
section. 

Erford's Whirling Sensation opened 
with a dandy aerial offering that started 
the show at a good pace. Erford works 
with two pretty girls in white wigs who 
put over some sensational iron- jaw work 
and feats on whirling ladders. The, act 
does not lack for thrills and holds in- 
terest. 

Crosby's Corners was in the second spot, 
as Watts and Hawley were out of the 
bilL The company has not made any 
noticeable changes in the offering and 
would do well toget a newer variety of 
popular- songs. The band does its work 
well, however, with the material it has 
and took a big hand. Tie eccentric danee 
of one of the members of the company 
was well done. 

Ida May Qmdwick and "Dad," although 
they followed a "rube" act, did not have 
any trouble, and took the house by storm. 
They received an ovation on their entrance 
and were not permitted to leave until 
Miss Chsdwick begged off. They started 
with the old post office scene, with Dad 
putting in the comedy. Ida May put her 
"show girls" stuff over well and, with her 
"hick" numbers, scored her usual big hit. 
Dad did his dancing well and put over 
some extempore comedy at the expense of 
one of the ladies in a loge. 

George Whiting and Sadie Burt were 
also fresh in the memories of the patrons 
here, as was shown by the applause they 
received at the opening of the act. Miss 
Burf s personality is the kind that will 
make a hit with any one. The "Sleepy- 
head" number is a dandy. Whiting put 
over his numbers in his pl easing manner, 
and they were compelled to take ' an 
encore for which they rendered one of 
their last season's numbers. 

Mile. Dazie and company, assisted by 
M. Constantin Eobeleff and Ed. Janis, 
closed the first half with their dance offer- 
ing. Mile. Dazie is undoubtedly one of 
the best toe -dancers in vaudeville, and 
her jazz toe number' is a pleasing novelty. 
The four girls do their work capably, and 
Kobeleff and Janis are in every way 
assets to the act. 

Chuck Biesner opened the second half 
with a jazz song that is supposed to be 
inspired by Frisco. His baling is The 
Cheerful Pessimist," and in his patter he 
lived up to it. He described the daily 
routine of a millionaire in a manner that 
almost makes one desire to be poverty- 
stricken and avoid the poor millionaire's 
fate. Chuck has a Billy laugh which he 
inserts in his monologue a bit too often. 

Ruby Norton and Sammy Dee made 
their usual hit with their dancing and 
singing. It is a pleasure to watch an 
artist like Lee. Miss Norton also ren- 
dered her numbers well and, as a team, 
they size up excellently. 

Lillian Shaw still opens with an Italian 
number, but this time she used a popular 
"shimmy" song, made over to suit the 
character. She offered her "bride" and 
"baby carriage" numbers and kept the 
house laughing all through her offering. 

Howard's spectacle had the lateness of 
the hour to their disadvantage, but held 
the house fairly well with their animal 
offering. G. J. H. 

THREE ACT SPLITS 

Charles E. Dunbar, formerly of Green. 
McHenry and Deane, is now doing s sin- 
gle act. Homer Deane has retired from 
the business and Is devoting his entire 
time to the operation of a flat bunding, 
which he recently purchased in Chicago. 



ROYAL 

The effect' of the Jewish holidays was 
noticeable in this house Monday after- 
noon. Generally, the theatre is crowded 
to capacity, but there were many empty 
seats Monday. 

The bill dragged for most of the first 
half, but speeded up toward the end. 

The Pederson Brothers opened with / a 
good aerial act The work of the boys, 
especially the one ma3e up aa a down; 
contains thrills. A feature of the act is 
a jump in mid-air bv the clown, who 
catches himself by bis feet on a per- 
pendicular bar and elides down without 
th e o f his hands. • 

William Cutty did not have any diffi- 
culty in the second spot with his offering, 
billed as "Symphonic Minstrel." He . 
started on the piano with a medley of 
classical and popular songs, very well 
played. He followed them with a few 
Irish stories, some of which were good 
and others ordinary. A prohibition song 
went well and a piano selection from 
Chopin sent him off to a fair hand. 

Mack and Vincent have material of a 
pleasing variety, but were handicapped 
by tiie failure of their trunks to appear 
and had to work in street clothes. Mack 
started the offering with patter which con- 
tained a number of stories. He could 
easily utilize some new ones for this part 
of the -act. On Miss Vincent's appear- 
ance, some more gags were put over, and 
a number of songs, delivered nicely, com- 
pleted the offering. 

Moss and Fry nave a number of new 
foolish . questions, among them being 
"What Kflled the Dead Sea!" The house 
could not get enough of this clever pair's 
patter. 

Louise Dresser and Jack Gardner took 
a, big hand. The opening bit, showing how 
they came to play together, is- cleverly 
presented. Miss Dresser's numbers were 
delivered nicely and Gardner's singing is 
exceptionally good. One of Us numbers, 
about the ghost of John Barleycorn, went 
over for one of the biggest hands of the 
offering. A number of their old songs sent 
them off to a dandy finish. 

Fred Allen started a fast pace for the 
second half with his "nut" offering. Allen 
has some exceptionally good material and 
handles it in a manner that is sure to be 
A laughing hit on any bill. His ven- 
triloquist burlesque is cleverly done, and 
his applause gags great stuff. He tells 
a story during the beginning of his act 
and in the latter half, if any one enters 
while he is doing a juggling stunt, he 
immediately drops it and starts to tell 
the story again for the benefit of the new- 
comer. 

Felix Adler, assisted by Frances A. 
Boss, followed with another style of "nut" 
comedy and, in spite of .the success of the 
previous offering took one of the biggest 
hands of the bill. "The "I Know Them 
All" bit, in which he satirizes a vaudeville 
bill, is old, but as handled by Adler, is 
a dandy burlesque. 

"Not Yet, Marie," a musical tab with 
eight girls, two female leads and three 
men, held the house better than any act 
seen here in a long time in dosing posi- 
tion. Some of the costumes and scenes 
are rather startling, as are a few of the 
lines, which should be changed Other- 
wise, the offering is fairly well presented 
and is one that will please. G. J. H. 

27th BAND POSTPONES TOUR 
The jazz band composed of members of 
the 27th Division, that started on a vaude- 
ville tour under the direction of Charley 
Potsdam and Walter Plimmer, a couple. of 
weeks ago, has called off all of their book- 
ings for the present, and win not resume 
until all of the band has been mustered 
out 



MAJESTIC 

(Chicago) '. 

Will Ferry opened the matinee with a 
gorgeous display of scenery in which he 
performs many difficult feats of contor- 
tion. 

Susan Tompkins proved a rare morsel 
in the program, rendering i»l««i«l ■elec- 
tions upon the violin that proved refresh- 
ing. She displayed rare technique. 

Sheila Terry, in "Three's a Crowd," 
scored the first hit. .. 

Keeney and Nobody rendered meritor- 
iously blackface .comedy of the clear 
water .type. . He supplied laughter almpjt 
c^Hitinufllry. j , --=-e ' " n 1< 

Charley Grape win and Anna Chance en- 
acted a. comedy sketch, "Jed's Vacation.'' 
It is on the order of their former vehicle, 
"Ponghkeepaie," and carries a theme which 
is funny and interesting. 

Bills Burke's "Tango Shoes" was a 
screaming innovation from beginning to 
end. It registered continual laughter and 
ended with boisterous applause. . 

Leon and Mayfield were the second 
choice of the Monday matineers. They 
sang songs in the manner that only they 
themselves can sing. Leon and Mayfield 
are refreshing, artistic and always wel- 
come in Chicago. 

Leo Beers and his piano-song: storiettes 
found many admirers and he was heartily 
applauded. 

The Littlejohns closed with a flashy 
display of juggling that held the greater 
portion of the audience. H. F. R. 

McVICKERS 

(Chicago) 

Busse's Dogs, with a clever display of 
canine intelligence, opened the program 
with a routine of tricks which proved 
very enjoyable. 

Patrick. i.nd Otto, a two-man, Hebrew- 
comedy talking turn, supplied - much 
laughter. Their army conversation is 
timely and very funny. 

The Cavana Duo offered a wire-walking 
act that contained action throughout. 

Malcolm and Lamarr, a sister team, 
displayed ability with piano playing and 
singing. Both proved themselves worthy 
of the applause received. ' 

Quigley and Fitzgerald, two men, offered 
talking and dancing that hit home in- 
stantly. 

Wolf Stewart and company offered a 
sketch which failed to score much of an 
impression. The only real interesting bit 
was the girl's dancing. She is ripe for 
single ey try into vaudeville. 

Frank Morrell, with his cultivated and 
pleasing voice, scored the honors of the 
program. The applause was instantane- 
ous and riotous throughout his entire 
offering. 

The Advance Trio, with saxophone and 
violin playing, proved a rather weak clos- 
ing number, the greater portion of the 
house leaving before the act had concluded. 

H F. B. 



SONGWRITERS TO PLAY SERIES 

The Actors and Songwriters will play a 
series of seven games, it was announced 
on Sunday evening, following the game at 
the Polo Grounds. The first game of the 
series will be played at Ebb-ets Field, 
Brooklyn, shortly, and wfll be followed by 
contests at Troy, N. Y. ; Marrison Field, 
Harrison, N. J., Boston and Philadelphia. 



KEEFE RETURNS FROM CHICAGO 

Walter Keefe, New York representative 
for the Pantages Circuit, - returned from 
Chicago on Monday, where he held a four 
days* conference with Alex Pantages on 
future plans for the circuit, embracing the 
building of several new houses. 



A PARTY FOR TO MMffi GRAY 
Friends of Tommie Gray, recently re- 
turned from Over Seas, are planning a 
dinner *and reception . to be given In his 
honor on Saturday night of this week. 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YQRK CLIPPER 



u 




"A RAINBOW COCKTAIL' 



Theatre — Orpheum. 

Style — Mutical playlet. 

Time — Twenty minvtes. J 

Setting— Special, 

"A. Rainbow Cocktail" is a sort of 
miniature extravaganza. It is gorgeous- 
ly costumed, splendidly staged and a 
pleasing offering. Haasard Short, and 
Kenneth and Roy Webb hare provided 
some good -musical numbers, and, while 
the plot is of little importance, the way 
in which it is pot on will keep the of- 
fering; in the public eye. , Walter La w - 

. rence, who is featured, does some good 
work, although his .singing is not ally 
tiat could he desired.--' He has the role 
of a wizard and is. assisted by Bvange- 
■ line Murray; Albertrna Manson, Jean 
Pouaique, .Marie Mills, Helen Crewe, 

. Victoria .Wynne and Emily Fitzgerald, 
respectively, in the roles of Floradora, 
the first, second and third little maid, 
Piff Pad Pouff, the merry widow, and 
Pousse Cafe, while Elmer Chapman is 
carried, along as a special conductor. 

The curtain rises while the wizard 
is brewing a mystic potion in a cauldron 
suspended ■ from a tripod. He wears a 

i dark gown and high pointed hat, while 
a red spot plays on him. He delivers a 
few lines telling what a wonderful wiz- 
ard he is and then come his customers, 
an old nun, who would like to be young 
once more, three maids, Piff Paff Pouff 
and Floradora. The three maids do a 
song ensemble, and musical numbers are 
provided by each of the other female 
members of the company. 

The wizard makes up another marvelous 
potion, gives each one of them youth 
and also transforms hlmerif But then 
comes the demand that they pay his 
price. He orders them to go and bring 
troubles, inconstancy, jealousy, passion, 
etc.,. into the world. Pousse Cafe then 
makes her appearance and does a song 
and dance. The rest of the offering is a 
display of costumes, an joining in the 
final tableau. There is a closing song 
and a bit of dancing. The finish is a 
brilliant spectacle, in which all, beauti- 
fully attired, join. It is sore to score. 

I. S. 



MONAHAN AND CO. 

Theatre — Bigkty-firtt Street. 

Style— Skating. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — Full ttage. 

Monahan, assisted by a pretty blonde, 
baa turned out a,, neat skating act that 
will look well on any bin. 

Monahan started with an exhibition 
of a 'few stunts. He had a small red 
electric light attached to each toe and, 
as he skated round, a number of electric 
light stands, operated by strings, moved 
slowly on the mat, giving a dandy ef- 
fect to- the stunts. He then skated in 
and ont among the stands, doing the 
feat blindfolded. After walking on a 
barrel, with the skates on, the young 
lady, acting like an automaton, went 
through a few dances on skates with 
him. G. J. H. 



BILL AND BERTHA MORRIS 

Theatre— Proctor'* 125tk 8t. 

Style—Black-face. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

The man of the team works in black- 
face make-up and the woman as a. Creole. 
They start with a fast jazz number, 
delivered in good voice on the part of 
both. A comedy number by Bin Mor- 
ris was well delivered and brought some 
laughter. The patter which ensued be- 
tween the two could be improved upon 
in spots. An impersonation of an old 
negro Civn. War veteran by Morris and 
a song and dance by the two completed 
the offering. . 

The numbers are fairly well rendered 
and the team win have easy going on the 
small time. '•'-. G. J. H. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



«> 



ERMALOFF AND GERMONT 
Theatre— Proctor'* 125t» St. 

Style — Singing and talking. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

The lady member of this team started 
the offering by entering without any in- 
troduction from the orchestra, seating 
herself at the piano and breaking into 
an opera selection. In. which the male 

- member joined, offatage. ',. • J 

^ff^f'r .another number by , the lady, 
the- man entered and started a conver- 
sation with her that could be heard 
only in the first row. As the house was 
beginning to get nervous, the man sud- 
denly began to sing a "peace" number. 
Both are the possessors of good voices, 
which can he heard only when they sing. 
After his number, it seemed they 
hadn't settled the subject of their former 
discussion, for they again took up the 
private confab. " This time they spoke 
a bit louder and could be heard in the 
first three rows. The conversation 
seemed to be funny, as three people 
snickered, and almost drowned out the 
yawns of boredom from the rest of the 
house. Again they ended it with a- song, 
this time a waltz number, which closed 
the act. 

Both are good singers, but If they 
have a stock of clever patter it is a mys- 
tery why they do not allow the audience 
to get in on a laugh. After the pair 
learn to speak loud enough, they may 

. be booked on the small time. G. J. H. 



SAM ST ED AND MARION 

Theatre — Eightv-firtt St. 

Style — Strong mam. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting— Boa. 

This act, billed as "The Bachelor's 
Vision,'' opens with a man seated in his 
apartment, reading of a beautiful girl 
who wants to marry a physically per- 
fect fellow. The lights are then dimmed 
and she appears on a platform after a 
curtain drop has parted. She sings a 
ballad, the curtains close, lights go on 
and the man exhibits his fine physical 
form through poses. She then comes 
on stage and he lifts and twirls her 
around with amazing ease. For the 
close, he is again shown at the table 
reading, the whole routine evidently 
having been a dream. 

During the turn the strong man lets 
the audience in on his system of build- 
ing muscles and does a few simple ex- 
ercises, advising persons out front to try 
them every morning. The patter con- 
tains comedy. 

The act is very entertaining and the 
pair have given it novelty through the 
introduction of the vision. It is a good 
turn for the better small time bouses. 

J. I* 



CHAS. EDENBURG 
Theatre— Proctor'* 125*» St. 

Style — Acrobatic. 
Time — Twelve minute*. 
Setting—/* tteo. 

Edenburg started his upside-down of- 
fering by balancing himself on two shaky 
chairs with his hands and the chairs on 
two legs. The rest of Us offering con- 
sisted of stunts while walking on his 
hands, eating, smoking and reading while 
on his head, and a dandy finishing stunt 
' of standing on his head on a revolving 
stool and turning himself by the muscles 
of his neck only. 

The act is 'a good opener or closing 
number for the small time. G. J. H. 



J A DA TRIO 

Theatre— Proctor** 23rd St. 
Style — Singing. 
Thne-r-Twelve minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

The Ja Da Trio, composed of three 
. sailors recently discharged from service, 
and headed by Bob Carleton, who wrote 
"Ja Da," are doing a singing act in 
vaudeville that should soon land them on 
better time. They wear their, uniforms, 
but do not need them to -score a success. 
They also sing well, have selected a num- 
ber of jazzy melodies that enable them 
to make the best of their ability and 
have a singing offering that meets all of 
the requirements of an act of this sort. 

There is also an evidence of vim, vigor 
and vitality in their work that will make 
them favorites almost anywhere. It 
would be a good idea to let the audience 
know at the start that Carleton is the 
author of "Ja Da" instead of just an- 
nouncing it casually during the proceed- 
ings. Song writers are always popular. 
The boys should take advantage of the 
fact that they have a song writer -among 
them. As it is, the turn is sure Ate. 

They started with a jassy song, with 
Carleton at the piano and got off to a 
good start. A tenor solo, a "cry" ballad, 
was fairly well done. A comedy number 
by one of the trio in an eccentric cos- 
tume, was followed by the "Ja Da" song 
and the usual business. The closing 
song; another comedy number, was pnt 
across with' a punch by the trio, who 
whooped it np furiously. I. S. 



HAYDN AND EITELLE 

Theatre— Mt. Vernon, 
Style— Mutical and Singing. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

This team opened with 'a dance by 
Haydn and a violin accompaniment by 
Misa Eitelle which sent them off to a 
fast start. A violin solo by the young 
lady followed and showed good ability 
on that instrument A "drank" number 
by Tommy, while the lady played her 
instrument, was put over in fine style 
and brought a good many laughs. 

Haydn then gave an Englishman's 
Impression of a baseball game which he 
. witnessed, delivering the number in a 
green checked golfing costume. He makes 
a corking English comedian and the num- 
ber is good for a laugh on any bill. An 
eccentric dance by Haydn, while Miss 
Eitelle again accompanied on the violin, 
netted them an encore which they filled 
by both playing the violin. While 
Haydn may be a good violinist, he did 
not show it in the closing number, as 
he played the instrument in the position 
ot a. 'cello. It would be good for comedy 
purposes, but, as an exhibition of music 
should be omitted. Or, if he really can 
play, be should place the instrument 
eorrectly. , 6. J. H. 



Mm*. Cbilson Ohnnan will sail for 
Europe on July 11, where she win spend 
the Summer studying. 



JOHN OLMS AND CO. 

Theatre— Proctor'* 125th Street. 
Style — Magician*. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting— Full rtage. 

John Olms, assisted by Nellie Fuller, 
put over a clean magician's offering that 
should get plenty of bookings on the 
better class .of small time houses. His 
apparatus and stunts contain a lot of 
new features. The tricks are neatly 
done and prove the old "hand Is quicker 
than the eye" maxim. 

One of bis stunts is taking blue con- 
fetti in one pitcher and white in another 
and pouring coffee and milk out of them 
into enps and then ajgpajsng the liquid* 
back to their original paper forma. 

O. J. H. ' 



CAMPBELL SAXO FIVE 



Theatre— Proctor's 1251* St, 
Style— stsaM 

Time — Fourteen minute: . 
Setting — in one. 

This act was originally billed as the 

Campbell Saxo Five, but only four went 

on, so that there waa either a mistake 

■ in the billing, or one of the performers, 

for some reason or other, was absent. 

Three men, one of them in blaekface 
and wearing a wop costume and a 
woman who, in addition to playing the 
saxophone, performed upon the piano, 
are included in the offering There it 
a bit of pantomime at the '■i'p" 1 "! in- 
cluded, for some inexplicable reason. It 
could just- ss well be omitted. .The rest 
of the offering, consisting of a number 
of tunes played upon saxophones, Is 
fairly well done, but there is not suffi- 
cient variety and the melodies selected 
are not all soluble for the act. 

At the start, two men are seated at 
a table, playing cards. Some remarks 
are hurled forth from the wings In wop 
dialect, and then a man in blackface 
makes his appearance. The bit is very 
much like one used by Fenton and 
Fields. Following some patter, the three 
men then played a medley ot jazz tunes 
upon saxophones, while the woman 
member tickled the ivories. The woman 
then sang an old fashioned song that 

was fairly well liked. They followed 

with a medley of songs, all using saxo- 
phones with occasional flourishes by the 
member of the quartet in blaekface for 
comedy effects. I. S. 



BALDWIN, BLAIR & CO. 

Theatre—Proctor'* 126th St. 
Style— Bedroom playlet. 

Time— Sixteen minute*. 
Setting — Full ttaae. 

Baldwin, Blair and Company, & jama 
and two women, have an act which la 
neither well written nor acted. The 
theme is an old one, although worked 
out in a slightly different manner. It 
appears to be due for a stay on the 
small time. 

A man, in a hotel, enters the wrong 
room. After he removes his trousers 
and tosses them ont to an attendant 
for pressing, and turns on the light, lie 
suddenly discovers a girl asleep on the 
bed. She wakes up, emits a scream, 
and he hastily switches the light off. 
There is some dialogue and some com- 
' edy provided by having the girl as* a 
mouse running across the floor. 

The* young man then dons one of the 
young lady's petticoats and they be- 
come friendly. Her chaperon, in the 
next room, later enters and there Is a 
general mix-up. Some more tallrtwg sjsnl 
bits of business constitute the rest of 
the turn. 

At the finish the man announces 
calmly that he is to marry the girl, and 
that fate sent him to her room. The 
chaperon concludes with the remark 
"Why didn't fate send him to my 
room!" J. B. 



CAMPBELL AND CAMPBELL 

Theatre— Proctor 1 * 12St* St. ' 
Style — Violin and comedy. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

This brother and sister act is a fast 
violin offering that will go good in the 
better class of small time houses. 

After they get acquainted through one 
breaking the other's violin, the girl nut 
over some comedy playing. The patter 
between the two, containing musical 
terms, is clever, but did not get over 
very well here. After a few Jass num- 
bers by the dao. they rendered an im- 
personation of a "rube" teacher with a 
dty girl for a pnpiL b this part they 
put over some jazz and a dance that 
waa nicely executed. The act b one 
that pleases. G. J. H. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 




REVUE COMIQUE 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Home. 

Style — Musical tab. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting— Three (special). 

Five girls, passably good looking, and 
two men, constitute this offering. The 
numbers are all presented in minstrel 
show style, the company sitting in a 
semi-circle and each number being an- 
nounced. The two men work in Pierrot 
make-up but wear black tuxedo suite. 

The/ girls all sit in front of screens 
with the men at either end. After the 
opening comedy and songs, one of the 
girls played a violin solo, p ro vin g her- 
self the p o ss es sor of ability on the in- 
strument. A dance by one of the men ' 
and one girl was fairly well done. An- 
other of the girls rendered a vocal solo, 
and, while she really has a good voice, 
she makes a mistake in continually 
trilling, for while such vocal pyrotech- 
nics may be all right for operatic sing- 
ing, they certainly do not go well with 
the type of song she uses. The men 
sprang a few comedy remarks while she 
was singing which could not be heard, 
however, beyond the first few rows. 

While the two were singing, the girls 
went back of the screens and undressed 
and dressed again in full view of the 
audience, and it is doubtful if that part 
of the program is in good taste. 

An eccentric dance by one of the men 
and a song by the company sent the act 
off to a good finish. While it would not 
do for big time, it will go very well in 
the better class of email-time houses. 
G. J. H. 

McLAIN, GATES & CO. 

Theatre — Proctor' j 58th 8t. 

Style— Comedy sketch. ' 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting — Full stage and one. 

McLain, Gates and Company have an 
interesting little sketch which is ably 
presented by a man and woman. There 
is plenty of humor, a bit of pathos and 
a novel finish which may not be liked. 
At the end the man announces that 
the author did not know just how to 
finish the playlet, so that it had to be 
terminated abruptly. This is probably 
not far from the truth, for the story 
was rapidly approaching a tragic climax 
which would have made it a poor ve- 
hicle for a vaudeville team. 

Jimmy enters the home of his girl, 
explaining that he has just purchased 
new clothes, a house and lot on the in- 
stallment plan, and will marry her 
shortly. He keeps on telling her how 
he has changed for the better since 
she but saw him, and paints a picture 
of their life together as he sees it. She 
is constantly trying to tell him some- 
thing, but he refuses to allow her to 
speak. Finally, it is explained that 
she is engaged to another man. There 
is a pathetic moment and Jimmy tries 
to take the news with a smile. 

At this point stage hands begin to 
remove the scenery and they are left 
without a Butti ng. They come forward 
and a drop is lowered in one, whereupon 
the man delivers a short talk and they 
concluded with a sons- I- S. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 

(Cootbuad from pace 11) 



FREDERICKS AND CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's 126th Street. 
Style— Sketch. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — Full stage — special. 

"Father's Daughter" is the name of 
this offering, and it is one that is sure 
to please. 

The setting shows the rear platform 
of a train and moving scenery is flashed 
all through the sketch to give a natural 
effect. This works very well. 

The story is about a young couple 
who have Just eloped and have been 
married. Her father has objected to the 
marriage, as he still regards his daugh- 
ter as a baby. She tells Bobbie, her 
husband, she generally gets anything 
wanted from her dad by pretending to 
cry. They go on in the mushy manner 
of newly weds and are interrupted by the 
conductor who shows them a telegram 
from the girl's father telling the train- 
man to stop the eloping couple. 

Bobbie goes inside to smoke. The 
girl's father, having caught up with the 
train, boards it. He starts to scold her 
and she displays the marriage certificate. 
The father tells her she is not too old 
to be spanked and actually starts the 
operation. The conductor comes on the 
platform and the girl tells him she never 
saw her father before. 

Finally, as they near a station, they 
start to say good-by and the girl, breaks 
into tears. The father softens, forgives 
them and decides to pay their honey- 
moon expenses. G. J. H. 



ROGERS AND BARRETT 

Theatre — Twenty-third St. 
Style — Talking, singing, comedy. 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting — One (special drop) 

Barrett was formerly of the team of 
Gallagher and Barrett, who did "The 
Battle of Too Soon" for several years. 
Barrett is the same natural "Tad," 
working without exaggerated make-up 
and delivering his lines with the same 
degree of ease and unction that char- 
acterized his efforts while appearing 
with Gallagher. 

The present combination of Rogers 
and Barrett is offering a line of con- 
versational get-backs and cross-fire dia- 
logue practically the same, in form, as 
the routine contained in "The Battle 
of Too Soon." Rogers wears the uni- 
form of a captain, and Barrett is seen 
as an Irish private. A special drop 
showing a tented encampment is em- 
ployed to give color to the talk, which 
consists mostly of war gags, some old 
and many new. Rogers, who has a very 
pleasant baritone singing voice, sings a 
couple of ballads during the act. They 
went over very welL Barrett also does 
one song as a single. The finish finds 
both men singing a double number. 

H. E. 



DAN LOZIER 

Theatre— Proctor'* 125i* St. 

Style — Bone solo. 

Time — Ttcelve minutes. 

Setting— I m one. 

Dan Losier uses the clappers to ad- 
vantage and if his other work were up 
to the same standard, he would be as- 
sured of booking over one of the small 
time circuits. The rest of the act, how- 
ever, is not up to par. 

Losier in his talking failed to bring 
out the point of his story and his sing- 
ing also left much to be desired. The 
latter consisted of two parodies on a 
song that was popular some years ago, 
and in addition to their age they lacked 
cleverness. I. S. 



REEDER AND TUCKER 

Theatre— Eighty first Street. 

Style — Violinists. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Both these boys are good players and 
present a good appearance. 

They started with a medley of popu- 
lar and classical numbers and made a 
fast getaway. This was followed by a 
solo, the player using his fingers only, 
as he held the bow between his kneea. 
He rendered the "Poet and Peasant" 
overture. The other followed with a 
Red Cross ballad. An eccentric dance by 
the latter, while the other played in 
"rube" make-up, made a fair finish. 

O. J. H. 



BILLET THIRTEEN 

Theatre — Proctor's 23rd St. 
Style — Talk and Songs. 
Time— Fourteen minute*. 

Setting— Special. 

Three men in trench attire, wearing 
helmets, uniforms and other trench ac- 
cessories, and representing Canadians, 
have a singing and talking act which 
carries a special setting representing a 
battered old cottage used for shelter by 
soldiers. In spite of the fact that the 
end' of the war has brought with it a 
desire to forget the sorrows caused by 
the great conflict, these three men pre- 
sent a skit which treats the matter 
humorously, excepting for a few places. 
The portrayal of the "Cootie hunt" 
should certainly be dropped. Generally, 
the material is handled creditably and, 
on the small time, it should be able to 
hold its own. 

As the curtain rises, showing the glow 
of a fire, one of the troopers is sitting 
by it. The other two soon make their 
appearance and, after the customary 
greetings and a bit of comedy, they go 
thr/ragh gestures representing the elim- 
ination of some cooties from their 
clothes. The bit is displeasing and 
shonld be cut out. A song by one of 
them, telling bow to distinguish an 
American, comes in rather peculiarly, 
since, toward the end, they sing a song 
' in which they tell that they are Can- 
adians. A dramatic recitation by one 
of the men was delivered with a peculiar 
voice inflection that did not win favor. 

More talk of a fareial nature, some 
business with it, and then another song, 
"I Ain't Got Weary Yet," were followed 
by the announcement that they were to 
march in five minutes. The announce- 
ment of peace then followed and they 
finished with singing, "Take Me Back to 
Blighty," a tune popular with the boys 
in the trenches. 

The characters perform well, but the 
material, in places, has not been selected 
with the best of judgment The offering 
has the makings of a good act. Improve- 
ment could be worked in a number of 
places, however. They should do some 
more singing ensemble, as the two dos- 
ing songs disclosed the fact that they 
know how to sing well together. 

I. S. 



SABINI LA PEARL 

Theatre — Proctor's 58th St. 

Style — Talking and musical. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. * 

Setting — In one. 

Sabini La Pearl has himself billed aa 
"the world's greatest aerialist," which 
helps him get bis surprise over. 

A man steps out in gymnasium cos- 
tume and, after displaying his muscles 
for a few moments, seizes a pair of 
flying rings. With the calm ease of a 
great athlete, he begins to hoist him- 
self aloft, when, suddenly, the ropes 
' holding the rings give way and he takes 
a fall. An argument- with one of the 
stage hands, who remains off stage, en- 
sues. Meanwhile, two "plants" in one of 
the lower stage boxes start gesticulat- 
ing and shouting in "wop" dialect that 
,~ the show is a fake. Some comedy is 
provided, after which one of the "plants" 
comes forward and plays the Hawaiian 
steel guitar and piano. 

The. turn is cleverly arranged, the ma- 
terial good and the three men bam ila it 
excellently. The "plants'* work well, as 
does the man who impersonates the 
aerialist. The surprise is a genuine one 
and, taken as a whole, the offering is in 
shape for a swing over the big time 
houses. It win. give a good account of 
itself most anywhere. L 5. 



AN ARTISTIC TREAT 

Theatre — Eighty-first Street. 

Style — Posing. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting— Special. ■''■■-■*■ 

Stuart and Company, one man and 
two women, who bill their act as "An 
Artistic Treat," take poses that repre- 
sent art from the sculpture of Paris. 
The three are well formed, hold difficult 
positions with ease and have an offering 
that is truly artistic. The setting is a 
pretty one, and the music bas been ju- 
diciously fitted to the torn. The act 
is one that can hold Its own on any 
bill in an early spot. 

The first pose assumed was that of 
"Portals of the: Past" and was fol- 
lowed by "The Parting," which was a 
bit stiff. "The Defense of the Flag" 
was splendidly portrayed and "Apollo, 
Charming the Sheperdesses" was also 
nicely done. "The Slave Merchant" was 
followed by "Danseuse," an exceedingly 
difficult pose, in which one of the girls 
stood upon the toes of one foot with 
her body barely balanced. 

"The Archer" was another tableau 
that drew applause, and "The Discus 
Thrower," the best known of the statues 
portrayed, got a big hand. "Joan of 
Arc" was well done and "At the Win- 
ning Post" at the finish was another 
difficult pose. This called for an encore. 

I. S. 



THE GERALDS 

Theatre— Proctor's 125** St. 

Style — Musical. i 

Time — Twelve minutes. 
Setting— Special. * 

The Geralds, a man and woman, have 
a musical novelty that should land them 
on the big time. They do some work 
on the violin and banjo at the start 
that is not of great importance. 

The big punch of the act is contained 
in the work upon a sort of mandolin 
piano. They have a carriage with a 
number of mandolins, each bearing only 
one string, arranged upon it like the 
keys On a piano. Their work upon this 
instrument sounded like a chorus of 
mandolins and the melodies rendered 
produced a pleasing effect. At this- 
house, the turn was billed number one 
and stopped the show in the early posi- 
tion. 

They started with a violin duet of a 
' classic tune, while a red light from what 
represented a fire with a kettle .boiling 
above it upon a tripod, created a sort 
of grotesque effect. Under a red spot 
light, they then played some melodies 
upon banjos. The sextette from "Lu- 
cia" was then rendered upon the con- 
traption previously described and wag- 
followed by a medley of popular tunes 
that called for encores. I. S. 



SHAW AND CAMPBELL 

Theatre — Yonfcer*. 
Style— Singing. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — In one (special). 

Two girls, blonde and brunette, form, 
this act and use a pretty pink-and-blne- 
curtain, bung in one. 

The blonde started with an introduc- 
tion on the piano and the other offered 
a. song. The brunette is pretty, has a, 
dandy voice, an attractive personality, 
and put her number over very well. A 
ukelele duet, with both singing, was 
nicely rendered and played. 

The blonde young lady then rendered 
a solo on the piano. She showed ability, 
but had to use a poor instrument in this 
house, which subjected her to a bad 
handicap. A song by the other, accom- 
panying herself on the piano, and an- 
other by the two, completed the offering. 

The girls have good voices and a pleas- 
ing selection of songs. They present big 
time possibilities. G. J. II. 



April 16, 191? 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 



ey*pis 



Founded In USS by Fruk Qa**s> 

PaWiihed by the 

CLIPPER CORPORATION 

Frederick C Mailer 

Orland W. Vso«tum....r v rcsidrnt ui Secretary 

1604 Broidiray, New York 
Telephone Bryant 6117-6118 

ORLJUHD W. VAUCHAN, EDITOR 
Paul C Swdnhmrt. M'—^g Editor 



NEW YORK, APRIL 16, 1919 



Entered Jane 24, 1879, at the Pott Office at 
New York, N. Y., ai second chat matter, un- 
der the act of March 3, 1879. 

THE CLIPPER U iasned erery WEDNESDAY. 
Fonai Close on Monday it S P. if. 

SUBSCRIPTION 
One year, in advance, $4; six months, S3; 
three months, (1. Canada and foreign point* 
extra. Single copies will be seat, postpaid, on 

receipt of 10 ccats. 

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 



my sister, she should change it, since she 
has just started, the use of the name. 

As an added proof of oar right to the 
name Mile. Marguerite, let us state that 
we successfully danced on the Harry Rich- 
ard's time in 1914 and have letters from 
the Hngh Mcintosh' offices to prove it. 

Let me .make it clear that this second 
Mile. Marguerite is now appearing in a 
dancing act, which,' of course, harts my 
Bister, Mile. Marguerite, who has her spe- 
cial offering in vaudeville. 

Mile. Marguerite has also appeared in 
motion pictures* under this name, playing 
a leading feminine role with Nat Good- 
win in Universal productions. 
Sincerely, 

Frank Gill, 
(Mile. Marguerite and Frank Gill.) 
312 West 48th Street, 

New York City. 
April 14, 1918. 



Chicago Office— Room 214, 35 S. Dearborn St 
Hxaav F. Rota, Manaci*. 

Address All Communication* to 

THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

MM Broadway. New York 

Registered Cable Address. "Authority." 

Im Curra car as ostaimsd wboumii ud 
utail, at our agents, Doringe American News 
Agency, 17 Green Street, Charing Cross Road. 
London, W. C, England; Brentano's News De- 
pot, 37 Avenue de "Opera, Paris, France: Gor- 
don ft Gotch. 123 Pitt Street, Sydney, N. S. W., 
Australia. 



HELP LITTLE THEATRES 

Little Theatre movements and little the- 
atres, in general, should be encouraged. 
For the most part, they are a direct refu- 
tation of the charge, often made, that there 
is no sincerity in the theatre in this coun- 
try. Those who tritely make this charge 
of insincerity almost always fail to state 
wherein the insincerity lies, and those who 
do, generally tell us with a self-satisfied air, 
that it is the practice of the so-called 
"Commercial" manager and the "Commer- 
cial" actor. Beyond this they explain 
nothing. 

Let as take the most recent Little The- 
atre movement, the Theatre Guild, which 
opened its season last Monday night at the 
Garrick Theatre, presenting "The Bonds of 
Interest," from the Spanish of Jacinto 
Benavento. Phillip Moeller staged the play. 
The cast includes Helen Westley, Helen 
Freeman and Amelia SummerviDe. Moel- 
ler is a successful playwright whose work 
is in demand by the "Commercial" mana- 
gers. The three women mentioned can 
easily firfd employment in productions pre- 
sented by these commercial managers. 

Instead, we find these people lending 
their names and talents to a theatrical 
venture that, at best, will bring them in bnt 
a fraction of the money they could earn 
elsewhere. And they are doing it because 
their intelligent artistic sense tells them 
that it is the thing to do — to associate 
themselves with, the Little Theatre move- 
ment — because there is real sincerity be- 
hind the movement notwithstanding the 
cynical scoffing indulged in by those less 
intelligently endowed and who think they 
possess talent, bat only possess an ability 
to gab about it. 



OBJECT TO USE OF NAME 

Editor New York Cijfpeb: 

Dear Sir: I note that a Mile. Margue- 
rite, a graduate of Mme. Mcnscli's Con- 
servatory, has' made her appearance in 
vaudeville. This young woman's use of 
the name of Mile. Marguerite is doing us 
a great injury, as my sister has been us- 
ing this name in vaudeville for -six years 
in this country, Europe and Australia. It 
is a matter of record that we used the 
name Mile. Marguerite and Frank Gill, 
when we danced six years ago at the Cafe 
de Paris, Paris, when the Castles were 
making their great reputation there. 

While I believe this, injury is uninten- 
tional on the part of this second Mile. 
Marguerite, the facts of the case are that 
it is hurting ug seriously. . In fairness to 



P. A. — Katherine Bonner and Harry 
Fern were married on Oct 5, 1916. Both . 
were members of the profession. 



WANT LAY-OFF ACTS 

.Editor New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir: Due to the fact that there 
are so big agencies in the city of Min- 
neapolis, we are especially desirous of 
booking acts which are forced to lay over 
in either one of the twin cities for pres- 
entation before the wounded men at the 
Government Hospital, adjacent to Min- 
neapolis Due to the fact that the wound- 
ed men are mostly overseas men, we feel 
that only the best should be provided for 
them, and, as a result, we do not desire 
to have amateur performances at these 
places. 

May we ask that all lay-over acts get 
into communication with our representa- 
tive at Minneapolis, Dr. Marcus, Lumber 
Exchange Building. We will be glad to 
pay a nominal price for any lay-over act. 
Very truly yours, 

J. H. Sktbboix, 

Sectional Director of Entertainment, 
Central Military States. 
Minneapolis, April 11, 1919. 



DO THEY FEAR V. S. ACTORS 

Editor New Yore Cltppeb. 

Dear Sir: — By jove, it's charming, 
Jontcherknow, for the British actor folk to 
warn American performers not to come 
across, as they are liable to be left flat and 
stranded. America and England are the 
best of friends and any differences between 
our respective soldiers and sailors is due 
to the fact that our boys made too much 
of a hit with the bonny English lassies. 

The American actor is just as game as 
the American soldier. An army of them 
will soon invade dear, old England, or as 
soon as the passport business ig modified. 
I am getting my trunks packed. 

Yours truly, 
Happy Mack. 
150 WeBt 36th street, 

New York City. 
April 10, 1818. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Prof. Alexander Hermann was . tour- 
ing the country with his own company. 

The Davidson Theatre, Milwaukee, was. 
burned. 

The Silbon Family was at the Winter- 
garten, Berlin, Germany. 

Sadie MacDonald and Florrie West 
sailed for England. 

"The Sleepwalker'' was presented by 
Robert Billiard at the Bijou Theatre, Mew 
York. 

"Rival Candidates" was presented at 
Hoyfs Madison Square Theatre, New 
York. 

T. O. Seabrooke produced "Tobasco." 



Answers to Queries 



C. G. — Horace Yachel wrote 
He?" a detective comedy. 



'Who la 



A, N. — Mary 
Owen Moore. 



Pickford is married to 



W. Z. — "I Know I Got More Than My 
Share" was written by Grant Clark and. 
Howard Johnson. Leo Feist published' it. 



E. A. — Forbes Robertson came to the 
United States as a member of Henry 
Irving' a company. 



W. J. CD. — The party you want is not 
with the show now. We cannot aay where 
she is at present. 



A. D. — Don Barclay was with the "Fol- 
lies" in 1916. He later appeared in vaude- 
ville. 



J. L.— David Craig Montgomery, Fred 
Stone's partner in musical comedy and 
vaudeville, died in April, 1917. 

J. B.— Salaries of actors are not usually 
made public. We have no way of securing 
the information. Write to the person to 
whom you refer and he may tell- you. 

C. S. W.— "Chu Chin Chow" had Ha 
premiere at the Manhattan Opera House 
on- October 22, 1917. Oscar Ashe wrote 
the story and Frederick Norton the music. 



L. I. — Charles Klein was the author of 
"The Music Master," a three-act drama. 
When it was revived on Oct. 10, 1916, at 
the Knickerbocker, ' David Warfield was 
starred. 



D. S. Q.— "Go to It" was written by 
Anne Caldwell, John L. Golden and John 
Hazzard. It opened at the Princess on 
Oct. 24. 1016. F. Roy Comatock and Wil- 
liam Elliot produced it. 



G. S. N. — Very frequently acts change 
their billing when on the big or small time. 
This act played under a different name at 
the bouse first mentioned, bnt, when on 
the other circuit, was billed differently. 



R. U. — William L. Bowron was the or- 
chestra leader at the Fourteenth Street 
Theatre when popular drama was presented 
there. He died Oct 18, 1916, at the age 
of seventy-eight years, at his home, a abort 
distance from Los Angeles. > 



H. H. — The Williamson Brothers were 
the first to produce submarine motion pic- 
tures. The first such film was "20,000 
Leagues Under the Sea." Yes, it ran for 
some time at one of the Broadway Pic- 
ture houses. 



O. D. L. — There are only about four or 
five motion picture stars whose earnings 
per snnnm amount to over $1,000,000. 
The only ones we know of are Mary Pick- 
ford, Douglas Fairbanks, Charlie Chaplin 
and William & Hart. 



J: - J. — The Vitagraph Company produced 
"Through the Wall," a five-reel picture. It 
was released on Oct 2, 1916. Marguerite 
Bersch wrote the scenario for it adapting 
it from Cleveland Moffet's story of the 
same name. 



T. E.— Tony Hart died at Worcester, 
Mass., in November, 1881. 



K. L. — The Bronx Theatre was former- 
ly a. vaudeville and motion picture thea- 
tre on the Keith circuit. It was built by 
Percy Williams. B. F. Kahn leased it in 
November, 1917, for stock burlesque. It 
is now playing Columbia, burlesque shows. 

H. O. — You can hire a room to rehearse 
your act at any one of a number of re- 
hearsal halls. A good one is Unity Hall, 
on Forty-seventh Street near the police 
station. Bryant Hall, Sixth Avenue, near 
Forty-second Street and the Amsterdam 
Opera House, 340 West Forty-fourth 
Street, are others. 

P. C— The World Film Corporation pro- 
ducedV'The Page Mystery." It waa re- 
leased on April 30, 1917. Frank R. Adams 
wrote the story for it and Haley Knoles. 
directed it Carlyle Bleckwell, June El- 
vidge and Arthur Ashley appeared is H. 
Write to the World Film Corporation, 130 
West Forty-sixth Street : They will be 
able to tell you. 



RiaJto Rattle* 



THEATBICAL MYSIEfi Y NO. 38- 

Whatever became of that magical the- 
atre that Harry Houdlni was going to -build 
on Broadway? ^ m ^ m 

GOOD NEWS FOE PIANO TUNERS 

Sixty more vaudeville piano accom- 
panists added RachmaninofTs Prelude to 
their repertoires this week, making an 
estimated total of some 6,000 key punch. 
era who are taking a daily fall out of the 
composition. 



JACK CANT UNDERSTAND IT 

Jack Dunham says he read a book two 
weeks ago called Gulliver's Travels that 
has some great stuff in it for a biff vaude- 
ville act. Although he has cabled to the 
author three times now asking for a figure 
on the vaudeville rights to the story, Jack 
asserts he has not received any reply. 

ECONOMY NOTE 

A sign over the entrance to the office of 
one of the Putnam Building agents informs 
actors that they must knock before en- 
tering. Suppose the agent takes it for 
granted that his clients Will knock wheal 
leaving, anyway, making one sign suffice 
for both entrance and exit. 

VAUDEVILLE VETERANS 

Don't you wish you were good looking? 
Yes — don't youT 

I'm glad to see so many ladies present. 

Don't be disappointed girls— but Fm 
married. 

We are not keeping you awake— are weT 

Its » hard life, but look at the fun we 
have traveling around. 



HOW ABOUT THIS, JAKE ? 

One of the characters in "Come-on, 
Charley," that of a small time vaudeville 
agent, is named Jacob Lubin, according to 
the program line-up. Can it be possible 
that Jake Lubin, head booking man of the 
Loew Circuit, is leading a double life and 
doing a little acting on the side at the 
Forty-eight Street Theatre T 



FALSE REPORT 

A new. style of miniature buckboard 
automobile holding two persons excited 
the curiosity of the regulars along the 
Rialto last week. One report had it that 
the new-fangled machine had been engaged 
to transport Fally Marcus' shows around 
his Greater New York circuit but the 
rumor seems to have been groundless. 

MORE TRUTH THAN POETRY 

Sing a song of sixpence, the music sounds 

real fine, 
Four and twenty chorus girls a-standing 

in the line; 
But when they started singing, such noise 

you never heard, 
There's not a person in the house could 

understand a word. 



JOE IS PUZZLED 

Joe Flynn. the publicity man. received 
a letter from a friend who lives in Phila- 
delphia last week stating that he was 
coming to New York for a visit shortly 
nnd adding that he wanted to see a show 
awfully bad. After reading the last part 
of Jthe letter over four times Joe isn't 
qnite sure yet whether he should advise 
bis friend to see "Sometime" or not 



AN IDEA WORTH TRYING 

That proposal of the musicians' _ 
which calls upon a vaudeville actor to pay 
ten dollars a week for the privilege of 
holding converse with a musician during 
the coarse of a show, seems like a great 
stunt to us. But why stop there? Why 
not amplify the idea and introduce the 
plan in every department of show busi- 
ness, with a table of conversational rates, 
well say, somewhat- as follows; Puis 
agents who speak to editors must pay five 
dollars for five minutes, proper ty men 
who allow actors 'to talk to them must 
receive a dollar a word. Managers who 
speak to chorus girls to be charged ai the , 
rate of fifty dollars a sentence, etc 



14 






NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 



CHICAGO NEWS 



HERRMANN AND TWO PATRONS 
BATTLE IN THE ATRE LOBBY 

Fistic Encounter Start* in Row Over Tickets Purchased from a 

Scalper; Manager b Said to Have Trounced Opponents; 

Foyer in Uproar as Police Were Called. 



TJ. J. (Sport) Herrmann, manager of 
the Cort Theatre, engaged in a fiatic en- 
counter in the lobby of the house Sunday 
evening, giving two. of his prospective pa- 
trons a trouncing:, it is said. 

.The trouble started when Bernard Neu- 
berger, president of the Broadway Motor 
Sales Company, and Secretary Isaac H. 
Buraeide called at the box 'office window 
for seats that had been purchased from 
the Ernie Young ticket brokerage office. 
He was given seats in the eighth row and 
demanded to hare fourth row tickets, as 
were promised, he claims, by the ticket 
scalper. Herrmann interceded and was 
called a liar, after which a fight started 
and the other patron is said to have struck 



Herrmann from the rear. Herrmann then 
took on both opponents and was victori- 
ous in the encounter. The theatre foyer 
was thrown into an uproar. Both sides 
called police, bat the theatre manager se- 
cured his first.' . .-• o •-."•• 
Burnaule endeavored to have, Herrmann 
held on a charge, but was informed that he 
could secure a warrant Monday morning 
for his arrest, which was done. Bunwide 
was permitted to leave the police station 
after his wife's diamond ring,, worth 
$1,00©, was offered as bond. He was re- 
leased on his promise. The case was heard 
Monday morning and Burnside was fined 
$6 and costs, the charges against Herr- 



WILL DAVIS NEAR DEATH 

Win J. Davis, dean of Chicago theatrical 
managers, lies at the point of death. He 
is being constantly attended by specialists 
who hold out very little hope for his re- 
covery. 

Mr. Davis is seventy-five years old and 
just recently retamed from Hot Springs, 
where he went endeavoring to recuperate 
his health. He was formerly General Man- 
ager of the Haw & Erlanger interests in 
this city. X-ray photographs taken of Da- 
vis at the Presbyterian Hospital disclose 
a very serious internal organic displace- 
ment, resulting; it is believed, from a 
shock received in a runaway accident six 
months ago. Physicians say that if he 
was a younger man an immediate operation 
might possibly save his life. 



GOLDBERG HAS ACCIDENT 

Lew M. Goldberg, of the Lew M. Gold- 
berg Agency, had a narrow escape from 
death last week when his automobile col- 
lided with a street car on the South side 
of town. In an attempt to avoid the ac- 
cident, Goldberg stopped his car instantly 
and the force skidded it completely around 
and directly in the path of a swiftly mov- 
ing street car. The automobile was com- 
pletely demolished, bat Goldberg escaped 
with only a few minor braises. 



HOUSMAN TO BOOST KALICH 

Lou Housman, who was injured recent- 
ly in his automobile, plans to return from 
Hot Springs, where he is recuperating, in 
time to take charge of the publicity work 
for Bertha Kalich. who will shortly open 
an engagement at Woods Theatre. 



EARL AND EDWARDS REJOIN 

Jack Edwards, formerly of Rodway and 
Evans, is now working again with his for- 
mer partner, Boul Earl, and using the 
team name of Earl and Edwards. They 
have been routed for a tour of the W. "V. 

M. A. 



BARNEY WALKER CHANGES 

Barney Walker, who for the past four 
years has been on the staff of the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association, has re- 
signed his position and accepted a place in 
the office of the Helen Murphy Agency. 



HELD FOR OBSERVATION 

Happy RieUy, late of Lew Dockstader*a 
Minstrels, and emergency comedian for 
B. D. Berg's girl acts, is a patient at the 
American Theatrical Hospital, where he 
is being held for observation. 



TUDOR CAMERON'S WIFE DIES 

Tudor Cameron, widely known hi theat- 
rical circles, is mourning the death of his 
wife, who passed awsy in Clinton. la., last 
week. 



- WILL MOVE APRIL 22 

Official Moving Day has been declared 
by the Western Vaudeville Managers' As- 
sociation, Orphenm, Keith Booking Office 
and Interstate Circuits, as April 22, on 
which date the entire Majestic Theatre 
Building will vacate their offices and travel 
northward to Lake street. The interior of 
the building has not been completed as yet, 
but extra shifts of workmen are being 
engaged so that occupants can be accom- 
modated immediately. 

A number of •theatrical firms have al- 
ready moved into the building and are at 
present occupying their offices. All inde- 
pendent agencies which, at the last mo- 
ment, could not secure offices in the new 
building, - have completed arrangements 
with the management of the Woods Thea- 
tre Building for offices. 



EUL AND FOSTER TO SPLIT 

Following a tour of the Loew Southern 
Circuit, the act of Eul and Foster will 
dissolve partnership. Miss Jane Foster, 
of the team, will become the principal 
dancer of Earl J. Cox's new song and 
dance revue, to be staged in Forest Park 
during the Summer season. Following the 
park engagement Miss Foster has signed 
with a local producer to appear in tabloid. 



LOTTIE MAYER RE-MARRIES 

Lottie Mayer, formerly the wife of Wil- 
liam Mann, black-face, comedian, is re- 
ported to have again married. The cere- 
mony took place in St. Louis, Mo., last 
week. Sergt. Kenneth Warfield, of Chi- 
cago, is the groom. 

Miss Mayer is known in the profession 
as "The Diving Venus.*' This is the sec- 
ond matrimonial attempt for both parties. 



ARCHIE SCHAEFER RELEASED 
Archie Schaefer, actor^wairer of the Log 
Cabin Cafe, 'arrested. Fast week and held 
as an acceesory-Ho -ft>bberyj'-; ! fcas freed in 
court on Wednesday' last winVn there was 
no evidence offered that would- warrant a 
conviction. * 



TRY TO ROB THEATRE 
Burglars "attempted, to blow, 'the safe of 

the Shakespeare Theatre on Friday night 
bnt were frightened away before any dam- 
age could 'be done." This marks the fourth 
attempt made to" rob the theatre. The 
house is controlled by Starkey and Kra- 
mer, who recently assumed the proprietor- 
ship. ■' *■ ''"-' **" ;,.,' 



WILSON OPEN FOR LEASING 

It is reported that the Wilson Avenue 
Theatre, now ploying a. resident stock com- 
pany, is on the market for I— I '"g Sev- 
eral parties have been negotiating for the 
theatre, planning ' to', play vaudeville, its 
former policy. 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 



MALCOLM FASSETT TO HEAD 
NEW C OMPANY AT ALBANY 

Spring and Summer Season Will Open Monday with "Lilac 

Time"; Anna Mason, Edward Pointer, Eddie Menlove, 

Nedda Harrigan and John Saunders in Cast. 



. Albany, N. T., April 14. — Malcolm Fas- 
sett will head a new company which will 
open a Spring and Summer season at Har- 
manus Bleecker ..Hall, .next week. He 
brought the members of the. east here to- 
day, from New York, where they have been- 
rehearsing. The balance of the week-will 
be passed at the hall in potting the finish- 
ing touches to the "first production, "Lilac 
Time." 

The character of Jeannine, which Jane 
Cowle portrayed^ win be played by Anna 
Mason, leading woman of the Fassett play- 
ers. She is well known in Albany, having 



appeared here last in "Erstwhile Susan." 
Eddie Menlove, who. recently closed with 
"The Mormons" in vaudeville, has been 
signed as stage manager and Mabel Buell 
will attend to the -scenic effects and dec- 
orations. Edwird' Pointer will play? sec- 
ond-lead : knd Nedda Harrigan is > w6 in- 
genue. John SanttHera, the operatic'' com- 
edian, will be in the cast. The complete 
personnel of the company" will be an- 
nounced in a few days. 

The scenic embellishment used by Sel- 
wyn and company at Republic Theatre in 
New York will be used. 



MANY NEW ENGAGEMENTS MADE 

Many engagements were made for stock 
companies in all parts of the country last 
week. 

■ Anna Hill, Victor Bond and Fritz Adams 
joined the Lewis and Worth Players, 
Beaumont, Texas; Marie Welter joined 
the Byers Musical Stock, Fort Worth, 
Texas; Warren Wade joined the New 
Unique Theatre Stock, Minneapolis; Larry 
Sullivan and Ida Belle Arnold, with the 
Walton Pyre Stock Company, Fargo, N, 
Dak.; Bill in Robinson, with the. Harry 
Shannon Players; Larry Bingham with the 
Magic Theatre Stock, Fort Dodge, Iowa; 
Denver Storer with the Wilson Todd Stock 
Company, Springfield, O., Marie Lauren, 
with the Earl Hawk Stock ; Brookhard and 
Parillo; Dale Brown and Dora Mitchell 
with the Jack Lewis Stock; E. W. Borman 
with the Sanford Stock Company, Okla- 
homa City, Okla.; Barry Townaley with 
the Lyceum Theatre Stock, Duluth, Minn.; 
Patrick Alhoun, Carl McMahon and D. C. 
Seldon with the North " Brothers Stock 
Company, at the Lyric Theatre, Lincoln, 
Neb., and Ratherine Dean, Parker Fen- 
nelly, Knowlea Entricken and wife, Jose- 
phine Worth and Jim Baugh with the Joie 
Canada Stock Company, Springfield, Ohio. 
All were engaged through the Milo Ben- 
nett Musical and Dramatic Exchange, 
Chicago. 

LEXINGTON CAST SELECTED 

Wales Winter has engaged the follow- 
ing people for his company, which will 
open at the Lexington Theatre Monday: 
Frances Feme, leading lady; Wilmer Wal- 
ter, leading man; William Bailey, second' 
lead; Hal Brown, character man; Charles 
Coghlan, juvenile; Marguerite Mason, 
ingenue; Bertha Creighton, characters; 
James Donlan, comedian; Blaine Ivans, 
Victoria Wilson and Wallis McCullough. 
J. E. Horn is manager, Harry McBae 
Webster, director, and Arthur Keith, stage 
manager. 

PLAYING THIRTIETH SEASON 

Nellie Booth and her associates have 
rounded out a stock season of thirty 
weeks at the Kenyon Theatre, Pittsburgh. 
They have a new play called "Title Hunt- 
ers," written by J. Simpson McLaughlin, 
in three acts. 

The roster of the company is as follows : 

■ J,. Simpson McLaughlin, . William M. 

Crookshanks,' Matt McHugfa, Sam T. 

Reed, G. EHwood Appell. Nellie Booth, 

Mrs. Ed. McHugh and Kathryn McHugh. 



OLIVER TO PRODUCE 

St. Pato, Minn., April 12. — Otis Oliver 
has decided to use his company in this city 
to try out new plays and, if they give 
promise of success, he will produce them 
elsewhere.' 

His decision followed the success of "The 
Naughty Bride," by George Saunders, 
which he offered at the Shubert Theatre 
here and then played in the better middle- 
west cities. Vada Heilman, in the inge- 
nue role, scored a hit in -the play. The 
company has been playing for ten weeks 
so far and reports capacity business. 



GETS TWO-YEAR CONTRACT 

- Mary Daniels has been signed for two 
years by the Blanc v Players. She got the 
contract through her efforts when she 
jumped into a bole left in the ranks of the 
company by the departure of Frances Mc- 
Gratb, who left the company recently. She 
wiQ be seen in the leading role with one 
of the Blaney organizations. 



LEADING MAN IS ROBBED 
Chicago, April 14. — George Taylor, one 
of the leads in the stock company at the 
Great Northern Hippodrome, was robbed 
last week of wearing apparel, a valuable 
slick pin and $100 in currency. A sneak 
thief gained entrance to his dressing-room 
while the actor was on stage. 

SEYMORE HAS REPERTOIRE CO. 

Seymore and Ferguson have organized 
a company, to play repertoire during the 
Summer. The company will open Monday 
at Sussex, N. J. Twelve persons are in 
the cast and special scenery will be car- 
ried for each play.. 

ETHEL TOWNSEND RECOVERING 

Chicago, April 14 — Ethel Towns end. 
formerly leading lady with -the Boyer- Vin- 
cent Stock Company, Boston, recently un- 
derwent a serious operation at the Amer- 
ican Theatrical Hospital.- She is doing 
wen. . * .., 



VINTON GOES TO DULUTH 
Arthur Vinton; who has been playing 
at Pittsburgh with the Harris Stock Com- 
pany, has signed as leading man for the 
Lyceum Theatre, Duluth, 



LAWRENCE JOINS BLANEYS 

William Lawrence, character man, has 
been engaged by the Blaney Brothers for 
an engagement at the Yorkville Theatre 
next week. 



"HOMESTEAD" IS REVIVED 
There will be a revival of "The Old 
Homestead" at the Yorkville Theatre next 
week. _ . 



LEIGH JOINS SHEA CO. 

Bert Leigh has been engaged as lead- 
ing man for the P. F. Shea company. 



POINTER CLOSES AT HARTFORD 

Edward Pointer, who has been playing 
juvenile leads for Poll's Hartford house, 
closed there April 5. . . 

PITTSBURGH STOCK CLOSES 
The stock company playing at< the Per- 
shing .Theatre, Pittsburgh, has dosed. 



-:. .-.t~&4 v^^d^Si^S^.C^^ ■■i-K-- . .-.': vsfiBSSl ; ■■ '' - 



April 16, 1910 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




AMERICAN GIVES 

OUT EXTRA 

TIME 

STARTS AFTER MAY 5th 



The American Burlesque Circuit shown 
that grjll play supplementary time after 
the.c^jee of the regular,- season. May 3, 
are given below. All th^ghowiiiOf the cir- 
cuit -.w£l play the extia time except the 
"Blue Birds," "Innocent' Maid*," "Mile 
a Minute Girls," "Orientals" and the 
"Speedway Girls." . 

The "Lid Lifters" will play Toronto 
week of May 5 and Buffalo the week of 
May 12. "Paris by Night" wUl opme back 
to Hoboken for the week of May 5. 

The "Aviator Girls" have Freeland, N. 
J., May 5; Shenandoah, N. J., May 8; 
Mt. Carmel, N. J., May 7; Trenton, May 
8-9-10, and Wrightstown, May 11. 

"Midnight Maidens" go to Wilkesbarre 
May 7-8-9-10; Scran ton week of May 12; 
Baltimore week of May 19; Wrightstown 
week of May 25, and the Star, Brooklyn, 
week of June 2. 

"Ramie Dazzle Girls" play Scranton 
week of May 5; Star, Brooklyn, week of 
May 12; Olympic, New York, week of 
May 19, and Hoboken the following week. 

"Girls from the Follies" play the Troca- 
dera, Philadelphia, the week of May 12. 
The "Americans" get the Gayety, Brook- 
lyn, the week of May B. 

The "High Flyers" are in Boston for the 
week of May 5 and the Gayety, Brooklyn, 
the week of May 12. 

The "Jolly Girls" play Worcester the 
week of May 5 and Boston the week of 
May 12. 

The "Big Review" plays Springfield week 
of May S; Worcester week of May 12; 
Boston week, of May 19, and the Gayety, 
Brooklyn, week of May 26. 

"Military Maids" are at the Crown, Chi- 
cago, week of May 4 and Milwaukee week 
of May 11. 

Pat White plays the Englewood, Chi- 
cago, week of May 4; Crown, Chicago, 
week of May 11; Terre Haute and In- 
dianapolis week of May 8; Loolsrflle week 
of May 25 and Columbus week of June 2. 

"Hello, Paree" has Detroit week of May 
4 and the Englewood, Chicago, the fol- 
lowing week. 

"The Tempters" plays Cleveland week 
of May ■* and Detroit week of May 11- 
"Social Follies" goes to the Star, Brook- 
lyn, week of May 5. 

The "Parisian Flirts" have Wrigbta- 
town week of May 4; Beaton, May IS; 
Wilkesbane, May 14-15-16-17, and the Gay- 
ety, Brooklyn, week of May 19. 

The "Mischief Makers" go to the Olym- 
pic, New York, week of May 5; Hoboken 
week of May 12, and the Star, Brooklyn, 
week of May 19. 

The "Monte Carlo Girls" have the 
Trocadero, Philadelphia, week of May 6; 
Olympic, New York, week of May 12 ; Ho- 
boken week of- May 19, and the Star, 
Brooklyn, week of May 26. 

The "Trail Hitters" are booked in 
Washington week of May 5. 

The "Girls from Joyland" go to Balti- 
more week of May 5; Washington week 
of May 12; Wrightstown week of May 18; 
Olympic New York, week of May 26, and 
Hoboken week of June 2. 

"Follies of Pleasure*' have TJniontown, 
Pa, May 6; Altoona, May 8; York, May 
10; Baltimore week of May 12, and Wash- 
ington week of May 19. 

The "Beauty Revue" have Pittsburgh 
week of May 5; TJniontown, May 13; 
Altoona, May 15; Cleveland week of the 
19th, and Detroit week of the 25th. 

"Auto Girls" play- Zanesvffle,- 0„ May 
5; Belair, May 6, and Steubenvffle, May 7. 

"Peanut Winners** -week of May 5 to 
be filled in; Wheeling, May 12; Steoben- 



ville, May 13; Belair, May 14, and Zanee- 
ville, May 15. 

"Frolics of the Nite" go to Milwaukee 
for the week of May 5. "Pacemakers" 
have Terre Haute and Indianapolis the 
week of May 5, and Louisville week of 
May 1L 

The "Record Breakers" go to St. Louis 
week of May 4; Tern Haute and In- 
dianapolis week of May 11, and Louisville 
week of May 18. • 

The "Broadway Belles" are booked in 
Kansas City week of May 4; St. Louis 
week of May 11; the week of May 19 is 
open; Baltimore week of May 26; Olym- 
pic, New York, week of June 2, and Ho- 
boken .week of June 9.- . ". 

"French Frolics" go. to Sioux City for 
May 4-54 ; Kansas City week of May 11 : 
St. Louis week of May 18 ; Terre Haute 
and Indianapolis week of May 26. 

"World Beaters" have St Paul for the 
week of May 4 ; Sioux City, May 11-12-13, 
and Kansas City for the week of May 18. 

The "PirateB" have Minneapolis week of 
May 4, and St. Paul week of May 11. 

"Grown Up Babies" will play Lonlflvflle 
week of May 4; Columbus week of May 
12; Zanesvflle, May 19; Belair,. May -20, 
and Wheeling, May 21. 



BAKER SIGNING THEM UP 

Charlie Baker has signed the following 
for next season: Max Fields, Bert Bert- 
rand, Stella MorriBsey, Gertrude Ralston, 
Margie Hilton, Edith Lyons, Frank Ander- 
son, Frank Hanscom, Billy Harris, Dor- 
othy Dean, Charles Cole, Charles Levine, 
Jr., Anna Pink, Forest Dwyer, George 
Ward and Harry and Flossie Morrisey. 

STELLA MORRISEY REJOINS SHOW 

Scranton, Pa„ April 12. — Stella Mor- 
risey, prima donna of the "Speedway 
Girls," has entirely recovered from her 
•recent attack of pneumonia and rejoined 
her show here this week. Miss Morrisey 
was taken ill when she was playing Spring- 
field two months ago. 

BEATTY SIGNING PRINCIPALS 
E. Thos. Bestty has signed the follow- 
ing principals so far for three shows next 
season: Al. Raymo. Harry Fields, Lena 
Daly, Gladys Jackson, Jack Riee, Lillian 
Bernard and Jack CMalley. 

EVANS TO HAVE TESTIMONIAL 

Newark, N. J., April 12. — A testimo- 
nial will be given at Miner's Empire, this 
city, on April 27, to Leon Evans, treas- 
urer of the house. Fifteen acts will be 
on the bill 



LA MONTS LOSE THEIR MOTHER 

BAXxmoBB, Md., April 10. — Mrs, La 
Mont, mother of Marie and Margie La 
Mont, members of Kahn's Union Square 
Stock Company, died at her home here 
yesterday of pneumonia. 

FRIEDELL JOINS SHOW 
Cleveland, O., April 14. — Scotty Frie- 
dell joined the "Twentieth Century Maids" 
here to-day, replacing Billy Barnes and 
working opposite Jim Barton. 

WALDRON ENGAGES TRIO 

The California) Trio of the "Cheer Up 
America" company has been engaged by 
Charles Waldron for his "Boetonians" next 



RE-NAME "PENNANT WINNERS" 
The "Pennant Winners," on the Amer- 
ican Burlesque Circrupt, has been renamed 
"Hello Frenchy" for: next season. 



VALLERIE TRUE BACK Of SHOW 

Vallerie True rejoined Fred Irwins* 
"Majesties" last, week at the Jacques The- 
atre, Waterbury. ■ 



PARK THEATRE 

INDIANAPOLIS 
CHANGES 

WILL PLAY A B C SHOWS 

G. E. Black closed a deal is New York 
last week with the Anderson Estate and 
Henry Ziegler to take over the Park The- 
atre, Indianapolis, May % next. Black also 
has the Majestic in that city. :• s 

Black had a lease on the Park, com- 
mencing July I, 1920, which he had closed 
with the owners of the house, Dixon and 
Talbot, a short time 'ago, but he wanted to 
get the house for next season in order to 
book the American Burlesque attractions 
in it, instead of the Majestic, in which 
they are now showing. 

Irons and Clamadge now have the Park 
and are playing stock burlesque there, 
which is alternating weekly with the Hay- 
market, Chicago, and Avenue, Detroit. 
They opened the house four weeks ago 
and have been doing big business. 

The American Burlesque Circuit has a 
contract with Black to play their shows 
at the Park, commencing next season, and 
the contract also states that musical or 
burlesque shows can not play' the Ma- 
jestic, which will, in all probability, have 
pictures and vaudeville. 

It is said that Irons and Clamadge hare 
another house in view in Indianapolis 
which will be put on the National Bur- 
lesque Circuit next season. 



ATTACKED CHORISTER, GETS JAIL 
Joseph De Benedetto, of 211 Boerum 
street, Brooklyn, the last of the three men ' 
convicted of assault upon Alys and Lil- 
lian Andrews, of the "Follies of Pleasure" 
company, was sentenced last , week by 
Judge Dyke, in the County Court, Brook- 
lyn, to Sing Sing Prison for from two and 
one-half, to four and one-half years. The 
assault took place last October in Brook- 
lyn, where the girls were playing. 

In passing sentence, Judge Dyke paid a 
tribute to Mounted Patrolman Thomas 
O'Brien, who arrested three of the as- 
sailants, and O'Brien's horse, which 
directed his rider to the scene of the as- 
sault. 

"Praise is surely due to Patrolman 
O'Brien for capturing three of you," said 
the judge, "and notice must be taken of 
O'Brien's horse, whose animal instinct car- 
ried his rider, who was unable to trace the 
cries for help, to the spot where the crime 
was being committed. 

WALSH GOES TO TEXAS 

George Walsh closed at the Crescent 
Saturday night and left Sunday for Fort 
Worth, Texas. He opens in stock at the 
Byers Theatre that city April 20. He was 
booked through Roenm and Richards' 
office. 



SIGN FOR CABARET 

Boehm and Richards have booked 
Underwood and Smith and Faachon, Perry, 
at Famham's, Albany. They opened Mon- 
day, replacing The Boy ces and Edith 
Do Ian. 



FAD BECOMES AN ELK 

Corp. Lester Fad, of the "High Flyers," 
was initiated into the Elks, Lodge No. 1, 
in New York; last Sunday. 

JOINS MMSKEY COMPANY 

Emma Kohler has been engaged as the 
prima donna of the 'National Winter 
Garden. She will open there next Monday. 



"BON TONS," WITH 
, LESTER ALLEN, IS 

BIG LAUGHING HIT 

The "Bon Ton Girls," featuring Lester 
Allen, Is at the Colombia this week, and It la 
one big laughing show. 

We have seen this fellow Allen work a 
number ot seasons bat be has never im- 
pressed us before ss he does now. He has 
now developed Into one ot the most versatile 
comedians In burlesque. Be Is still doing 
bis tramp Impersonation with the misfit- 
suits, ot wblcb has many changes, and the 
Urge collars, bnt his style ot work has so 
unproved that It would be bard to find say 
better In bis line. Be has a good voice for 
singing, plsys half a dosen different maatesl 
Instruments well. Is a corking good dancer 
and Us tumbling and acrobatic stunts help 
til m greatly. He has good facial expressions 
and never falls to get a laugh with his hat 
and cost tricks. Alien Is only a young fel- 
low, bnt. if be keep* on going, there la no 
telling where we will see him next. 

Allen Is a hard snd consdentlons worker 
snd the Colombia audience Uked him Monday 
afternoon. 

Jobs Barry is doing much better than he 
did last season. He Is also doing s tramp 
and. at times, his work reminds one ot Jim 
Barton. He is working easier than be dM 
In the past. He can also dance. 

Harry O'Neal only Joined the show a few 
months ago, after hut discharge from the 
United States service. It really seems good 
to see him again, as he Is one of the heat 
"straights" on the burlesque stage. He is 
a master ot the Bngltah language and de- 
livers bis lines most effectively. He Is a 
goed "feeder" sad a neat dresser. More 
work could be given O'Neal, ss ha Is not 
on the stage enough st present. He does a 
good character bit la the last set. 

Jack Btrouse Is also doing straight and 
several character roles, sU or which he takes 
care ot wen. 

Ethel Albertinl. a new comer to burlesque. 
Is the prima donna. She Is a very pleasing 
looking young lady wbo displays an attra.-- 
tive wardrobe, lllss Albertinl la ens of the 
few prima donnas visiting the Columbia this 
lesson, who has a really good voice. She 
rendered all her numbers most successfully 
and they took well. 

Martha Horton, a shapely snd rather 
pretty young- blonde, la the aoubrette. Walls 
her numbers went over nicely, she would, 
no doubt, do much better with them if she 
Injected some dancing Into them. Her cos- 
tumes look well snd she can wear them be- 
comingly. 

Flossie BadcUffe, the ingenue, looks well 
snd has a pretty wardrobe, bnt has only s 
fair s i n gi ng voice snd does not get what 
she should out of her numbers. 

Eddie Simmons snd Body Willing sre do- 
ing bits and take care of what thsy have to 
do very nicely. 

The girls In the chorus sre not afraid 
to sing sad do nicely In the numbers. They 
are costumed well In a variety of colorings 

" n b 



that blend. Good Judgment wss shown _ 
designin g the scenery, as the bright coloring 
and dainty effects are pit 
The "love salve" bit wt„ 

the 



effects are pleasing to the eye. 
salve" bit was well worked up 
by Allen, Barry, O'Neal, Btrouse sad the 
Hisses Horton, Albertinl snd n.A»HwW 

The "Imaginary." bit. which has been dans 
so often, was not the Mast tiresome the way 
Allen, Barry and O'Neal put It over. 

Btrouse did a good Italian specialty In 
one. In which be wss assisted by Allen and 
Barry. The act was well liked and the 
material was good. 

The "Hontvlaud" scene had lots or Isugha 
In it, with A3.'en and Barry doing the cobm 
snd O'Neal -roralnx straight. The ao 
ence liked the wry O'Neal threw Allen around 
the stage. Allen proved a great tumbler In 
this 



Allen snd Strauss put over a good musical 
specialty that pleased. Allen played half a 
dosen different Instruments and his bur- 



lesque 1 
^AUen 



ue Hawaiian , danee went over wen. 

again aeored at the opening of tha 



burlesque with his singing, 'daneug 
clowning. He held the stags nearly half an 
boor, and then the audience wanted more. 



The "wiahing" bit was well done by Ansa, 
Barry, O'Neal. Btrouse. Simmons and the 
HI— Albertinl, Horton sad Badcllffe. 

The "boob" bit pleased the way Barry, 
Btrouse and the Misses Horton and Bsd- 
cUffe worked It op. 

Body wniJng,_who hlBs himself the "Boy 
From Dixie." offered a blackface specialty 
that more than pleased. 

The "Boa Too Obis'* Is the best we have 
seen In the past few years and. from a 
comedy standpoint, win stand up with any 
•how. Sre. . 

SIGN DON CLARK •' "" 

t,^ " C !*£J ,IM b * en «-8»ged by George 
Peck and William Y. Jennings to produce 
their show and engage all .people far it 
next s ee s on . He has also been engaged to 
work in the show. «»«-*~ w 



on Pages 23 and 32 



CRESCEKT HAS NEW SOUBRETTE 
Bonne Lloyd la now the soobrette at 

the Crescent. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April i 6, 1919 





NEW COPYRIGHT LAW 
STRONGLY SUPPORTED 

C— Jh— A wake to Fact Thml Native 
Writcn Are Inadequately Pro- 
tected 

The new Canadian Copyright hill, now 
before the Senate Special Committee, has 
aroused great interest throughout all Can- 
ada. Men of public affairs, previously un- 
interested in copyright matters, have taken 
up the proposed legislation with great 
spirit and are devoting much time to ex- 
ploiting the merits of the new measure. 

The present law has for years worked a 
great hardship on Canadian composers and 
writers, limiting their earning capacity not 
only at home but in foreign countries as 
well. These hardships, unknown to the 
general run of people, have aroused much 
comment and the bill has suddenly found 
itself supported by some of Canada's best 
known people. 

Philip Gibbs, in speakings of the new 
copyright bill now before Parliament, ex- 
pressed his astonishment at the inadequacy 
of the protection to Canadian writers af- 
forded by our previous legislation. 

"It is obvious," he said, "that a change 
is necessary, if proper encouragement is to 
be given to Canadian literature, art and 
music" 1 

Mr. Gibbs was particularly favorable to 
the extension of the term which, following 
the British Act, is to consist of the life of 
an author or composer plus fifty years. 
Mr. Gibbs referred to cases, previous to 
the present British Act, where the families 
of famous British authors, Dickens, for ex- 
ample, received no financial benefit from 
their father's work. 

Mr. Gibbs was also pleased to note tie 
protection to be afforded to individual 
writers of newspaper articles as well as to 
the owners of the papers themselves. He 
felt that the adoption of the underlying 
principles of the British -Act. was a move 
in the right direction, since, on the whole, 
the British legislation was adequate, and 
was working out for the protection of 
newspapers and writers alike. 

At an organization meeting of the special 
committee on the new copyright bill,. Sen- 
ator William Bennett was appointed chair- 
man. The first meeting for argument and 
evidence will be held in the Senate com- 
mittee room next Tuesday morning. 



NEW MOTHER SONG RELEASED 

"That Wonderful Mother of Mine" one 
of the best liked of all songs writen on 
the mother theme is going stronger every 
day not only commercially but with the 
big acts in vaudeville all over the conn- 
try. It is one of the best things in the 
popular catalog of M. Witmark & Sons, 
and possesses qualities that will un- 
doubtedly make its popularity permanent. 
One of the latest acts to report its en- 
thusiastic reception everywhere is that of 
Shaw and Bernard. At Baltimore last 
week the song proved a tremendous fa- 
vorite and both Winn Shaw and Lester 
Bernard are agreed that it is one of the 
finest and most appealing numbers they 
have ever essayed. 



BIG PUBLICITY FOR FIELDS 

"If a Up. to You, Arthur," la the head- 
ing of a big- two-page advertising spread 
which the Edison Co. is »»H"|r in the big 
imtin nul magazines, advertising the phono- 
graph records of Arthur Fields, the song- 
writer, who up to a few months ago was 
connected with the professional department 
of a music publishing house. 

The advertisement will appear in fifteen 
publications- and will cost $50,000. 



LAMEERT St BALL AT THE PALACE 

Every time Ernest R. Ball and his wife, 
Maud Lambert, appear together at the 
Palace, their act goes better than ever. 
Last week the work presented by this fa- 
vorite team was nothing leBs than a sen- 
sational success. They are certainly en- 
tertainers de luxe, and the audience can't 
get enough of them. On their opening, 
and at all subsequent performances, so 
insistent was the audience for more, the 
re-calls seemed numberless. Eventually 
the lights were shut off and in that way 
the fires of enthusiasm were temporarily 
kept under. Ball introduces a number of 
his new songs in the act, and, as usual, 
they are tremendous hits and tremendous 
sellers, not always the same thing by any 
means. The chief of the new favorites 
is undoubtedly ''You're Making a Miser 
of Me," which is beyond question one of 
the best popular songs Ball has written 
in recent years, a large statement, but 
fully borne out by the facts. Other new 
numbers featured included the new comedy 
song "They May Be Old, But They Want 
to Be Loved," a real novelty by Gerber 
and Silver; "The Gates of Gladness," by 
Brennan, Cunningham and Rule; and, 
perhaps the most liked of all, Ball's beau- 
tiful balled, "Dear little Boy of Mine," 
which, as Miss Lambert renders it,' is al- 
ways a pistol shot of a hit, and little 
wonder. All these numbers are published 
by M. Witmark & Sons, who report 
countless acts using with invariable suc- 
cess both, "Dear Little Boy of Mine," and 
"You're Making a Miser of Me." 

WOOLWORTH LEFT $40,000,000 

That the late Frank W. Woolworth died 
without signing a will that he had been 
working on for some time before his death 
became known this week when Charles E. 
F. McCann, Mr. Woolworth's son-in-law,, 
made the announcement. 

The estate which is variously estimated 
at from $40,000,000 to $60,000,000 was 
willed to bis wife nearly thirty years ago 
and the old instrument is still in force. 
The wife, Mrs. Jennie Woolworth, is now 
sixty-seven years old and last June was 
declared incompetent by a sheriff's jury. 
Mr. Woolworth brought the proceedings in 
which he declared she was incompetent and 
at the time created a trust fund for her. 
He said the action was taken with "great 
sadness and regret, but that he considered 
it necessary to safeguard her interests." 

In spite of the existence of the will, the 
estate, according to Mr. McCann, will be 
divided according to the terms of the new 
will which was never executed. By its 
terms the great fortune will be divided 
among relatives, friends and charities. 



J. WILL CALLAHAN IS ILL 

J. Will Callahan, the songwriter, au- 
thor of "Smiles," is confined to a dark 
room at his home in Petoskey, Mich, suf- 
fering from a severe attack of iritis. The 
affliction, which in everyday language is 
acute inflammatory rheumatism of the 
eye ball, is one from which Callahan has 
suffered for several years. Most of Calla- 
han's lyrics are dictated in a dark room 
to his wife. 



WILL SPEND $10,000 ON ONE SONG 

Gilbert & Friedland have announced 
their intention of spending $10,000 to pop- 
. ularize a new high-class song called "Mend- 
ing a Heart," by Wolfe Gilbert and Joe 
Cooper. 

The publishers are devoting ocnsiderable 
time to the building up of their high-class 
department, which is to be made one of the 
features of their publishing business. 



BEN BORNSTEIN IN NEW YORK 



Bernstein is back in New York 
after a six weeks' tour through the Middle 
West 



STERN HAS NEW COMEDY SONG 

Jos. W. Stem & Co. have a clever com- 
edy song in "All Those in Favor Say 
Aye," by Sam Downing and Tom Ken- 
nedy. Sam Downing, who wrote the 
words of the number, has dedicated it to 
Frederick F. Goldsmith, Exalted Ruler of 
No. 1 Lodge, B. P. O. R, New York City. 



HOME SONGS WANTED 

FOR THE SOLDIERS 



Song, of "Cay Pare." and "Broadway- 
Type Frowned Upon by U. S. 
Officials 

Songs that ridicule small town and coun- 
try life and picture pleasantly the M*» of 
"Gay Paree" and the lights on Broadway 
are being frowned upon -by U.S. Govern- 
ment officials, who see in their publication 
insidious propaganda to keep the . soldier 
in the big towns and cities instead of re- 
turning to his previous home. 

The importance of the popular song is 
indeed great and the Government officials, 
realizing the fad, have started early in 
incouraging the publications of the old-time 
songs of home. . These numbers will, in 
the belief of the officials, do much to in- 
fluence the discharged soldier to leave the 
big cities. . 

The thousands that have recently arrived 
from France are overrunning many of the 
large Eastern cities and the matter of ob- 
taining employment for them is a matter 
of great importance. Especially does the 
Government want those who came from 
farms to return to their former homes, 
where labor' is so badly needed. 

There is naturally- a tendency for the 
young soldier to remain in the big towns 
and to offset this the Government has taken 
up the song question. • 



LIEUT. BIER OUT OF THE ARMY 

Lieut. Joseph Bier, M. D., prominent 
physician and well known to the theatrical 
and musical profession, has recently been 
discharged with high honors from the 
United States Army. 

In recognition of bis good work, Dr. 
Bier received the following commendation 
at the -instance of the Surgeon General of. 
the Army : 

"Upon your discharge from the service, 
the Surgeon General has directed me to ex- 
press to you his personal appreciation and 
that of the Medical Department for your 
patriotic devotion to duty and the self- 
sacrificing .spirit that you have manifested 
in giving your valuable assistance to the 
Medical Department and to the army when 
it was so badly needed and to express the 
hope that you will continue your connection 
with the Medical Department by joining 
the Medical Reserve Corps." (Signed) VaL 
E. Miltenberger, Lieut CoL, Medical Corps, 
U. S. A. 

Dr. Bier announces he will be pleased 
to have his old-time acquaintances and 
friends pay him a visit. 

Before joining the army Dr. Bier was 
official physician for many prominent music' 
publishing concerns such as Jos. W. Stern 
& Co. and many others. * 



JACK COOK WRITES A SONG 

Chicago, 111., April 12. — J. Norman 
Cook, known professionally as Jack Cook 
and recently convicted for the murder of 
Bin Bradway but at liberty on bond await- 
ing an appeal, has written a song which 
has been dedicated to bis daughter, Norma 
Cook. It is entitled "Sweet Baby Girl 
of Mine." The song is now on the presses 
and will be handled exclusively by Cook. 
Norma Cook is at present .engaged in writ- 
ing an answer to her father's' song, .-which 
will carry the title of "Dear Daddy of 
Mine." Miss Cook, is preparing to enter 
the motion pitcure field and will have the 
support of Mrs. Sydney Drew, who is a 
cousin through marriage. 



LIEUT. WILSON TO PUBLISH 

Lieut. H. S. Wi lson, formerly of New- 
hoff, Beyers & Wilson, is to open a music 
publishing " establishment in Chicago. He 
will make a specialty of artistic title pages 
in connection with his publications. 



PRAISE FOR THE FEIST HOUSE 

George Bob Wick, army song leader at 
Camp Eustis, Va., sent the following let- 
ter last week to the Leo Feist house. The 
communication, which is but one of many 
received by the company recently, speaks 
for itself. 

Leo Feist, Inc., 

Sirs: Your very generous supply of 
songs, song slides and orchestra music re- 
ceived, and I wish to thank you for it. 
If yon knew the appreciation of the fel- 
lows for everything that is done for them, 
your firm would surely feel repaid. 1 hope 
that some time the public may be informed 
in some way just how much Feist 4 Co. 
have, done to make the life of the soldier 
pleasant. ■ ' 

You have shown your patriotism in a 
way that has cost your firm many thou- 
sands of dollars and yon have done it in 
such a way that no one except those on 
the inside know anything about it Thank- 
ing you again, believe me, yours, 

George Bob Wick, 
Army Song Leader, 
Gamp Eustis, Ya. 



COHEN SONG SCORES AT PALACE 

Bernard Granville scored a big hit. on 
Monday with a new song called "The 
Greatest Thing That Came from France," 
a new release from the Meyer Cohen cat- 
alogue. The song is well written lyrically 
and is melodious to a degree. Well con- 
structed, the punch . line -is in just tile 
right spot and after describing the wonders 
and beauties of, France tells of the best 
thing that came from .that wonderful 
country. It is the boat that brings one 
back! ,.. -._..' .*■ 



BORDON1 FOR VAUDEVILLE 
M. S. Bentham is arranging to present 
Irene Bordoni and Lt. Gitz-Rice together 
in vaudeville. Gitz-Rice, the Canadian 
soldier songwriter, is writing a new mus- 
ical show for the Shuberts and also has 
completed seevral new songs which will 
be first heard in the new act. 



NATHAN WITH WATERSON CO. 

Chicago, 111., April 12. — Casper Nathan, 
writer and former newspaperman, has 
joined the forces of Waterson, Berlin and 
Snyder in the capacity of a manager of one ' 
of their local departments. The offices of 
Waterson, Berlin and Snyder have been 
remodeled and put into handsome shape. 



CASEY OF THE K. C. READY 

"Casey of the K. C." is the title of a 
new song by Percy Wenrich. Vaudeville 
patrons will hear it for the first time when 
Dolly Connelly, with Wenrich at the piano, 
opens at the Colonial next week. 



STASNY GETS DAMAGE VERDICT 

A. J. Stasny, the music publisher, was 
awarded a verdict of $222 damages 
against Guilo Gatti-Oasazza, director of 
the Metropolitan Opera House, as the re- 
sult of an automobile accident. 



TOMM1E GRAY HOME AGAIN 

Tommie Gray, the songwriter and 
vaudeville author who has been in France 
for the past year entertaining the sol- 
diers, arrived home on the Lapland, Sat- 
urday. 

ELWOOD OUT OF THE ARMY 

Paul El wood, formerly Eastern sales 
manager for the McKinley Music Co., has 
received his discharge from the army after 
serving nearly a year in France. 



PHIL. KORNHEISER IN CHICAGO 

Phil. Kornheiser, professional manager 
for Leo Feist, Inc., is spending the week 
in Chicago. . 



JOHNSON OUT OF THE NAVY 

Howard Johnson, -the songwriter, has 
received his discharge from the navy and 
is once more actively engaged- with the 
Leo (feist, Inc., establishment 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 




<jsr$8< 




USICJSL 



"THE JEST" DESTINED 
FOR LONG RUN AT 
PLYMOUTH THEATRE 



"THE JEST." — A four act drama 
adapted from the Italian of Sem 
Benelll'a "La Cena Delle beffe," pro- 
duced Wednesday evening. April 9, 
1919. at the Plymooth Theatre, by 
Arthur Hopkins. 

OAST. 

Giannetto Maleaplnl John Barry more 

Nerl Colaramenteti Lionel Burr? mo re 

Gabrlello Cblaramantesi... Charles Kennedy 
Tornaqulner Arthnr Forrest 

. Fsxio ...*. J. Ballantlne 

Calandra ......Paul Irvine 

l&tenclo - .George Casselberry 

Cimui -. H. Battai Smith 

Clntla >•', , Hand Dnrand 

Gloevra Maude Hanaford 

I-apo Rankin Davenport 

A Lieutenant Jacob Kingsbury 

The Doctor Cecil Cloven? 

The Executions*' ......Alexander F. Frank 

Uiabetta .V, Margaret Farelelgh 

Lncreila ..* Martha MeGraw 

Flamctta ....": Gilda Vareal 

A Singer Tbomas Williams 



NAME NEW POTTER PLAY 

"Pretty Soft" is the title of the new 
three-act farce which Walter Sanger and 
Robert Campbell, probably in conjunction 
with the Sbuberts, will present before the 
middle of next month. It was adapted by 
Paul Potter from the French of "Mont- 
martre," by Anthony Mara, which had a 
long run in Paris. 

"A GOOD BAD WOMAN" 
IS BASED ON FEAR 
OF MOTHERHOOD 



HOBARTS FARCE 
LIKELY TO HAVE 

A LONG SEASON 



When an audience on the opening night 
of a play cheers to voice its acclaim of a 
piece, as was the case last Wednesday night 
at the Plymouth Theatre, where Arthur 
Hopkins presented "The Jest" from the 
Italian of Sem Benelli, there is evidently 
something about that play deserving of the 
enthusiasm displayed. And, in this in- 
stance, it is the acting of the brothers 
Barrymore, John and Lionel, the co-starred 
players in the cast. It might be added that 
their acting will make of this play one of 
the most notable dramatic offerings pre- 
sented in this country in recent years. 

The play, which, in the original Italian, 
is called "La Cena Delle Beffe" (The Sup- 
per of the Jesters), and which was called 
by Jules Bichepin in his French adapta- 
tion "La Beffe," has been presented in this 
country before, Mimi Aguglia, the Italian 
actress, having played in the piece on the 
Bowery. Sarah Bernhardt, during the 
Winter of 1911, announced its perform- 
ance at the Globe Theatre, but failed to 
present it. However, Arthur Hopkins' 
present revival will probably be the one 
that will count most in the theatrical an- 
nals of this country. 

"The Jest" is a grim tragedy in four 
acts whose locale is Tuscany in the fif- 
teenth century. It tells the story of two 
brothers, Neri Ghiaramentesi and Gabriello 
Cbiaramentesi, the former played by Lionel 
Barrymore and the latter by Walter P. 
Richmond, who bullies Giannetto Male- 
spini, a sensitive young artist, played by 
John Barrymore. The latter" s life has been 
made unbearable by the actions of the 
brothers Chiaramentesi, one of them hav- 
ing ravished the bride-to-be of Giannetto. 

The youth seeks revenge. So he plots 
"The Jest" that proves the brothers' un- 
doing. This consists of separating the 
brothers so that the shrewd machinations 
of the sensitive artist may be used to kill 
- one of the brothers and cause the other 
one to lose his reason. How all this is ac- 
complished is set forth in the play with 
grim reality. 

John Barrymore suggested the slender, 
bashful young artist, whose soul rebels at 
the injustice he has suffered with unerring 
artistry. His acting rose to heights that 
establish him as the leader of the younger 
American players. Lionel Barrymore plays 
the spectacular role of a burly captain of 
the Lorenzo's Mercanaries and the chief 
torturer of Giannetto in a manner that 
stamped him as being no less capable than 
John. 

Maude Hanaford played file role of the 
ravished sweetheart of , Giannetto, who is 
afterward forced to become a courtesan, in 
a subdued manner that, at times, appeared 
to be lacking in warmth but, for the most 
part, was capable. 

Sam Bransky officiated as treasurer of 
the Majestic, Chicago, last week, during 
the absence of Fred Ackerman. 



"A GOOD BAD WOMAN"— A drama 
In three acta, by William Anthony 
McQuire, produced by Richard Bennett, 
at the Harris Theatre, on Tuesday, 
April 8. 

CAST. 

Eichard Brant Robert Bdeson 

Dr. John Calvert Wilton Lackay* 

Roth Brant Margaret Tlllnaton 

DoUle Bennett Katharine Kaelred 

Evelyn Martin Haael Tnrney 

Harold Spears Richard Tiber 

Hilda Jones Amy Ongley 



- "A Good Bad Woman" is a sincere at- 
tempt to lay bare the iniquities of the 
illegal operation, but the delicate nature 
of the subject under discussion and the 
frankness with which the playwright has 
gone into details with respect to the mat- 
ter has resulted in a play that is at times 
rather disagreeable. 

The theme of "A Good Bad Woman," 
the avoidance of motherhood, has been 
utilized on several occasions in the last 
four or five years by picture playwrights, 
"Where Are My Children," a sensational 
Universal feature film which was ■ pre- 
sented on Broadway, being based on the . 
same subject. 

The story treats of a woman who is ex- 
pecting the birth of a child and whose 
fear of the outcome of the forthcoming 
physical ordeal makes her a rather will- 
ing listener to the advice of a female 
friend. The arguments of the woman's 
friend seem plausible enough and a physi- 
cian is sought who, to all intents and pur- 
poses, performs an abortion in order to 
prevent the expected birth. 

The physician, however, misleads the 
woman into thinking that the object de- 
sired has been achieved. The woman's 
husband, who is not in on the secret and 
who, incidentally, discovers that the 
physician is an old college chum of his, 
decides to take a hand in the proceed- 
ings. He seeks out the supposed mal- 
practitioner, accordingly, and threatens to 
shoot him. Explanations follow and the 
husband is informed of the true nature of 
things in a highly dramatic scene that is 
exceedingly well played and which atones 
for much that is overdrawn in the play. 
"A Good Bad Woman" is, essentially, 
a melodrama, and', on the whole, is rather 
crudely constructed. The cast is excep- 
tionally good, all of the parts having been 
intrusted to players of proven worth. 
Wilton Lackaye is the physician and gives 
his customary smooth and technically per- 
fect performance. Robert Edeson plays 
the part of the husband and succeeds in 
making a difficult role convincing. 

Margaret Illington, as the wife whose 
dread of giving birth to a child nearly 
leads to a tragedy, plays in a subdued, 
quiet fashion that contains a direct ap- 
peal. Miss Illington is an emotional act- 
ress of genuine ability and her interpre- 
tation of the misguided wife adds another 
laurel to her already large collection. 

There is plenty of comedy relief in the 
plya, Hasel Tnrney, Richard Taber and 
Amy Ongley handling the lighter roles 
with a true sense of comic values. Kath- 
arine Kaelred, as the female friend of the 
wife, whose advice causes all the trouble, 
gives a likeable performance throughout. 
The piece may give rise to enough dis- 
cussion to put it over as a hit. Worse 
plays have succeeded as big box office win- 
ners without the added value of the sen- 
sational dement this one contains. . 



"COMB ON. CHARLEY."— A tares In 
three acta, by Georgo V. Hobart. Pro- 
duced April 8 at the Forty-eighth 
Street Theatre by George V. Hobart. 
CAST. 

William J. Drew Oharlea Abbe 

Howard Oarsey Bnjael Parker 

Dorothy Draw Amy Loath Dennis 

Jerry Page BnsseU Morrison 

Amanda Higgtna Eunice Elliott 

Jacob Lubln Maurice Barrett 

John O'Brien Dan Kelly 

Johlah Walnwrlght W. H. Dupont 

Perclval Teeters Frank McCormack 

Tony (a newsboy) Edwardo Flammtro. 

Harry Cnthhert Ijnham .... Robert Beodal 

Charley Carter Lynne Overman 

Mrs. Bascom Millie Butterfleld 

Pansy Lily an Taahman 

Panatella Estella Taylor 

Maurice Binnmun M. Tello Webb 

Teddy Ball Vinton needier 

Victor <a waiter) Pierre rortea'ux 

Hugo (a waiter) Alphonse Ethler 

Madeline Norris Marguerite Forrest 

Jennie Mlas Arpentinl 

Major Norris James Hester 

Wllllsm Negley Charles Keano 

Robert Kearney Charles Mason 

Morton Butler Walter Alien 

Inspector Shaw Bawhn Herbert 



"AGE?' CAST COMPLETE 

The cast of Guy Bolton and George Mid- 
dlemen's new play, "Through the Ages," be- 
ing produced by F. Bay Comstock and 
Morris Gest, has been completed. The 
drama will have its premier early in May. 
In addition to a number of singers and 
extra people, those in the cast are Pedro 
de Cordoba, Ralph Kellard, Jane Cooper, 
Clara Joel. Helen Chandler, Charles 
Crompton, Carl Anthony, Henry Stephen- 
son, Hubert Druce, Rollo Lloyd, Jules 
Epailly, Leslie Palmer, Ernest Elton, Rich- 
ard Melchen, Claire Eamea. Irving Jack- 
son, Helen Crane and Boots Wooeter. 

"PAPA" IS COMEDY 
CONTAINING MANY 
FUNNY SITUATIONS 



"Come-on, Charley" looks good for a 
long season at the Forty-eighth Street. 
The play is a mixture of light comedy, 
low comedy, farce and melodrama and 
the various elements entering into its 
make-up have been very well blended. 
The net result is an entertainment that 
will stand the acid test. 

At the- opening a lawyer is seen in his 
office preparing to advise a young man 
named Charley Carter of an inheritance 
of $10,000 that has been left to him by 
an uncle in China. Charley Carter is a 
shoe clerk in Stamford, and because of 
the fact that he is an easy mark is called 
"Come-on Charley." The lawyer has a 
theory that $10,000 can be parlayed into 
a half million in six months, if properly 
invested. Complaining of a headache, the 
lawyer takes a couple of tablets and falls 
asleep. He dreams he has made an ar- 
rangement with "Come-on" whereby the 
young man will receive his $10,000 with 
the provision that he is to run U up to 
half million inside of six months. If he 
does so the lawyer will give him another 
million. 

Everything Charley touches turns to 
gold. The very crooks who would do him 
are done themselves. In the second . act 
We find the so-called easy mark living in 
New York in a swell hotel, with a staff 
of friends and advisers around him. Char- 
ley gets the half million before the time 
fixed, with ridiculous ease. In the third 
act, which ia laid in a haunted house, the 
crooks attempt to "get" Charley, the ac- 
tion here becoming quite melodramatic. 
In the final scene the lawyer wakes up 
and finds he has been romantically dream- 
ing. 

Lynn Overman, as Charley, gave a per- 
formance that should make him as a 
two-dollar star. Others whose character 
interpretations merit the highest com- 
mendation are Chan. Abbe, as the lawyer; 
Frank McCormack, who plays the role of 
an eccentric private secretary and scores 
the comedy bit of the piece; Dan Kelly, 
as an Irish inventor; Robert Rendal, as a 
smooth confidence man; Maurice Barrett, 
as a vaudeville impressario, and Walter 
Allen, as a millionaire. Lillian Taahman 
and Estella Taylor, as a couple of vaude- 
ville artists of the Cherry Sisters type, 
scored individual laughing hits. Amy 
Leah Dennis had the role of the heroine 
and looked and acted the part to perfec- 
tion. 



"PAPA." — A comedy In three acta by 
Zoe Aklns. Presented Thursday evening. 
' April 10, 1019. at the Utile Theatre, 
by r. C. Whitney. 

<un. 

Doris Vloletto Wilson 

Chine .Ann Andrews 

Papa John I*. Shine 

Mr. Roderick Bamett Parker 

Dick .Robert Andrews 

Doln'es Miriam Batllsta 

The Governess :\ N . U ™ XJST* 

Zlmsapansl Adolpbe Millar 

Mrs. Blylha Jobyna Howland 



SKINNER GETS NEW PLAY 

Otis Skinner has accepted a new play 
by G. Ivor, a writer who has hitherto con- 
fined his talents to financial subjects. It 
will be seen next 



"Papa," the three-act comedy by Zoe 
Atkins, which was presented at the Little 
Theatre last Thursday night, is a play 
that will interest foundling asylums, be- 
cause -it is concerned largely with a child 
whose paternal authorship seems to be a 
mystery. And when it is considered that 
in addition to being an illegitimate off- 
spring this child is suffered to have an 
illegitimate mother, i. e., she made be- 
lieve she was the child's mother, it may 
easily be said that the infant's lot was 
not an 'appy one. 

The fault really was papa's, "grand 
dad," or "Da-da,"' the babe would call 
him. He got into financial difficulties 
and had to get money somehow, so he 
conceives the plan of marrying off his 
daughters to men with money.. However, 
one of the daughters, without benefit of 
clergy, becomes the mother of an inno- 
cent chee-ild. The man who is going to 
many her must not know about it, of 
course; so the motherhood of the child 
is foisted upon the "pure" Bister. But 
there's also a man that wants to marry 
the latter sister. 

The complications begin at this point. 
The indiscreet sister marries the man 
who wants her. The "pure" sister tells 
the man she loves that she has been 
guilty of the indescretion heretofore men- 
tioned and asks her lover to forgive her 
for having borne an illegitimate child. 
And not only does friend lover forgive 
her, but he also adopts the child, "Papa" 
is furnished with the wherewithal to 
meet his financial obligations, and every- 
thing ends happily. 

All of which furnishes material for 
this comedy, which hits the high spots 
at times, but very often does not, due to 
a paucity of scintillating lines that some 
of the very funny situations might war- 
rant. 

The work of the players is far from 
satisfactory. Mostly they did not appear 
to be sure of the purpose of it all. Ann 
Andrews, who plays the ruined daughter, 
has a pleasing personality and acted well, 
at times. Violette Wilson as Doris, the 
other daughter, hardly played up to the 
part assigned to her. John L, Shine 
played one scene well, that in which he 
makes love to a woman who believes him 
to be the father of the illegitimate child. 
In this scene he reached some real com- 
edy high spots. Bamett Parker and 
Everett EMred were the ingenuous hus- 
bands, but failed to play up to possibili- 
ties in their respective roles. Adolphe 
Millar, as the tenor who is the real father 
Of ttw child, performed . satisfactorily. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 





Song Headquarters Is Again in the Urr 
Outshines All Previous Efforts to Intrc 
Most Popular, High Priced, and Widely 

Singers using FEIST songs will receive the benefit of this gigantic publicity campaign. . 

Theatres in which FEIST songs will be sung, likewise will reap their share of good will from their 
patrons, because, as We have previously stated, die public has become accustomed to reading FEIST 
song announcements in their favorite magazines and immediately recognizes and appreciates them 
when heard in the theatres. 



"How Are You Going To Wet Your Whistle?" 

"Johnny's in Town" 

"Chong" 

"Heart Breaking Baby Doll" 

"Alabama Lullaby" 

"The Navy Will Bring Them Back 



HERE IS THE LIST, TAKE 1 

"The Rose Off I 
"The Kiss Thai 



11 



" Every Day Will I 
When the 



cc 



In 



Land Of I 



If we didn't know that these National Advertising campaigns have 
artist and tite theatre great service, we could not continue spending 
them. '■•«', 



and will continue to do the 
of thousands of dollars upon 






-■ ; ,'" : ■ Bjv r2» 'j : --'- ■ ,.." : 






' . . . ■ '■ ■ ■ 



// you do not already have copies of theme 






are, or tomave timet 






MINNEAPOLIS 
Lyric 



sot 



BaB 



NEW ORLEANS 
115 VmWmO»r 1 
ST. LOUIS 
HoOWBaUfc 
SAN FRANCISCO 



181 



CHICAGO 

MHtW 

BOSTON 



««*h 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



49 







light With a Publicity oampatign _ 
uce Songs to the[ Public Through the 



tead Publications of the Hemisphere. 

"The Saturday Evening Post," issue of April 24th; "Collier's," issue of April 22nd, and the "Literary 
Digest," issue of April 26th, will all carry great, irresistible advertising to millions of people which 
should make FEIST songs die greatest hits America ever sung. 

Get the Spirit! Spring into the game with us! We know the songs are great. Our publicity and 
your singing will make them HITS! 



JR CHOICE AND GO TO IT! 



Man's Land" 
ade Me Cry" 

Sunday 

Dwn Goes Dry" 

ginning Again" 



ti 



..- ■ .-.-.IN'* 



fi 



Is Peaches Down in Georgia" 
"Jerry" 
"I'm Sorry I Made You Cry" 

Is Nice That Comes From Dixie" 
"Salvation Lassie" 
"Ja-da" 



WW: 



\ v'.-V; 






n 



Both artist and manager now know, that it is important and pays to "hook up with the 'FEIST* hits/ 
Important too, is the fact that we couldn't make good with these campaigns, if they were not b acked 
by the best songs procurable, for we must live up to the slogan: YOU CANT GO WRONG WITH 
ANY FEIST SONG. 



"^mediate action you can obtain copies at small east at any music store or at any Woohvorth, Kresge, Kress, MoCrory or Kraft Store 






■ ■- 



I n 



PHILADELPHIA 



» ? 



DETROIT 
213 Woodward Am. 



BUFFALO 
488 Ibi nSt 

PI1 IS8URCH 
301 



KANSAS CUT 
11SS Otmma Aw, 



LOS ANGELES 
*- — * 









20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 






j 
•= 

i 

■m 



1 
I 



J 
J 



1 

Z 

u 
s 



u 

« 
2 













liiT 45 




If it 




E n 




\(m s; 




mU 


r! 


111 


B-«[| 


fin as 




|| u 


«L 


UU{ *i 




n >^ 




3 s 




1 * 




1 " 




i |E 


. J 


ffijl IS 








u 







. I 



1 



-z 
o 

■ CO 
i4 
ft 

< u 



-a 

I J 



5 ° 

5CQ 






id 

ID 

SO* 

o 

is 



SO 
fO 

la: 

(d 
S 



I* J 

551 

Ul U -J 

ill 

■ a ■ 

lis 

ex: 
U Ul s 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



Frank Worth is now with Boyle Wool- 

fOlk. ...... 



John Riley hag a new juggling act in 

rehearsal. 



Mae Nelson is mourning the death of 
her father. 



Earl Pingree has signed for the "Unmar- 
ried Mother" company. 



Charles Reid has a new piano act in re- 
hearsal at Unity HalL 

Blanche Haxelton has been engaged for 
the Valerie Bergere act. • 

Evelyn MseVay has succeeded Helen 
Clarke in "Oh, My Dear." 

Mildred BrowneU intends to return to 
musical comedy next season. — 



Angela Ogden has been added to the 
cast of "The Little Journey." 



N. C. Waters has sold the Rex Theatre 
in Purcell, Okla., to Hugh Smith. 

Will F. Crocket and Sex Wilson a*« 
with the Sherman Kelly Flayers. 



Hughie Thompson will soon play vaude- 
Tille .in a new act, "Who's Who." 

Harold Whales has signed with Will- 
iam Elliot for the coming season. 

Abraham Goodside has- re-opened the 
Jefferson Theatre in Portland, Me. 



Lieut Wells Hawks, U. S. N., formerly 
publicity man, is back in New York. 

Hamilton Christy and Celette Scndder 
have signed for "The Dangerous Age." 

' . William Small has been engaged as bus* 
in ess manager "for the Spanish Theatre. 

The Miller Sisters have been engaged 
^for one of the "Better 'Ole" companies. 

Merle Stephens arrived in New York 
last week after a vacation in Los Angeles. 

The Magleya, a man and woman, have 
a new dance act in rehearsal at Unity 
HalL 



Charles Brooks and company have in 
rehearsal a new act called "Country Min- 
strels." 



Ed. Aiken, Dolly Day and Una Carpen- 
ter have signed for "The Naughty Bride" 
company. 

Percy Benton has signed with Barry 
MacConnick for a seven-week tour in 

"Macushla." ■ ~'~ 



Sergt, Jack Aldrich has been mustered 
out and is back as property man with the 
Winter Garden. 



Jack Marvin has left stock and is now 
with Alan Brooks' vaudevile skit, ^Dol- 
lars and Sense." 



Joseph Santley and his wife, Ivy 
Sawyer, will be with Charles B. Dilling- 
ham next season. 



Marjorie Ram beau win be starred . in 
"The Pearl of Great Price," next season, 
by A. H. Woods. . 



ABOUT YOU ! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



Violet Vance, who has been seriously 111 
at her home in Brooklyn, is now on the 
road to recovery. 

Alice May played the part of "Anne" in 
"A Little Journey" last week on only 
three hours' study. 

Doris Moore took Irene Haisman's role 
in "Miss Nelly of HP Orleans" last week, 
due to the bitter's illness. 



George Reed, a young juvenile from the 
West, will open with the new show at the 
Palais Royal next Monday. 

Hoyt's Musical and Military Review 
opened at the, Hamilton last Monday. It 
is a new instrumental act. 



F. R. Mullin, bill poster, has been dis- 
charged from the American Theatrical 
Hospital, Chicago. 

James J. Confrey has been engaged for 
GaakeB and McVitty by Bennett's Ex- 
change in Chicago. 

Richard Carryle and Mabel Hart were 
signed last week for the "Honeymoon 
limited'' company. 



Louise Dunbar, Anna Hamilton and 
Marie Marion were engaged for George 
Gatta* new show, last week. 



Mrs. Fred S. Rounds is mourning the 
SEss of her only sister, Mrs. Richard 
■ Vaughn, who died last week. 



:*f 



B. McDanieL a popular Chicago mu- 
sician, has been discharged from the 
American Theatrical Hospital. 

J. M. Van Zant ' has been engaged to 
compose several new musical numbers for 
the musical act "Going Some." 

Mollie King has left the Century roof 
and will shortly reappear in motion pic- 
tures, heading her own company. 

E. W. Byington was engaged by Ben- 
nett's exchange last week for Raymond 
Bodd's vaudeville act "Remnants." 

Joseph E. Shea, the booking agent, is 
doing jury duty in the Supreme Court. 
He finishes on Friday of this week. 

Henry Hull has been engaged to appear 
with Margaret Anglin in a special per- 
formance of "Electra" and "Medea." 

John Spaxgur, musician and conductor, 
will have charge of the Seattle Symphony 
Orchestra for the coming three years. 



Sidney Schallmann, former Chicago 
vaudeville agent, has formed a partner- 
ship with Louis Pincns in New York. 

Marjorie Pringle entered "Come Along" 
last Monday night in the role of Barbara 
Benton. She is a soprano-comedienne. 

Earl Benham and Penman Maley have 
signed- with the Selwyns to appear in the 
new musical play "Among the Girls." 

- The Zicglcr Slaters have been signed for 
ten consecutive weeks over the Loew Cir- 
cuit. Sam Fallow handles the booking. 



Elisabeth Marbury directed a vaudeville 
entertainment at the K. C. Longacre 
Square hut last week for the soldiers and 

sailors. 



Earl and Wilson have a new sketch in 
"One" called "Waiting at the Pier." The 
turn will open this we!: in Philadelphia- 

~ L. C. Scott and J. C. Kerhl have pur- 
chased the Electric Theatre in Dflworth, 
Okla., and have installed new equipment. 

Frank A. Gladden, Chicago agent, who 
has been in the American Theatrical Hos- 
pital for some time, is recovering rapidly. 

Arthur Deagon's . bookings will be han- 
dled, hereafter, by Harry Weber. He was 
formerly booked through the Casey office. 

The Sherlock Sisters sailed for London 
last week, where they will fill an engage- 
ment with a new review opening May 1. 



Abe Cohen, manager of the Midway 
Theatre, Chicago, is r ec upera ting at the 
Wesley Hospital, Chicago, where. he re- 
cently underwent a serious operation. 



George Vivian has been appointed stag* 
manager of the "Good Morning Judge" 
show at the? Shubert Theatre, where he 
last week succeeded Cecil Govelley. 

Louis Hallett baa taken over the build- 
ing at No. 110 West Forty-ninth Street, 
and after alterations are made will have 
several rehearsal studios for artists. 



Albert Fritche, acrobat, in vaudeville 
with The Flitches, is recovering from an 
operation in the American Theatrical 
Hospital. 

Cathleen Nesbit has been engaged for a 
role in the new Bhip man-W ilde comedy, 
"Dark Horses," which William Harris la 
producing. «_ 

Florence Macbeth sou J-ujpea* T. Powers 
were signed last week by Director Wm. 
G. Stewart for the Commonwealth Opera 
Association. 



Lillian Morton, formerly in "Pom Pom," 
has been placed under contract by Evan- 
geline Weed for a new musical production 
next season. 



Bflly Sharp is getting ready to put on 
a new revue at Healy'a Restaurant, which 
is scheduled to open the first week in May. 

Dave Walton and Beatrice Turner will 
open with a new act April 21. The torn 
win be in "one" and is titled "Yes, She 
Did.* - 



William H. Whitton has been engaged 
as agent of the Bates-Allen Wagon Show 
after an absence of three years, from the 
circus game. 

Nan Gray, a Scotch character enter- 
tainer, opens for a. showing at the Fifth 
Avenue this week. Morris and Feil have 
the bookings. 



Loretta Eglin, A. M. Zinn, LeCompte and 
Fleaher have been engaged for "My Mili- 
tary Girl" company through Bennett's Chi- 
cago Exchange. 

Arthur Byron, Frederick Perry and 
Margaret Lawrence have been engaged by 
the Selwyns to appear indefinitely in 
"Tea for Three." 



The Burlington Four have closed their 
act for a week in order to enlarge it. ' A 
chorus of ten girls will be added. It wfll 
reopen April 21. 

Susanne Morgan, formerly , in "Here 
Comes the Bride," has been engaged for a 
part in "Nightie Night," Adolph Klauber*e 
forthcoming production. 

Frances Earl and Ed. Mullen are re- 
hearsing a new singing and dancing act, 
which opened on Monday in Syracuse, 
playing the Keith time. 



Catherine Proctor is again playing the 
leading feminine roles in "The Marquis 
de Priola" and "The Matinee Hero," op- 
posite Leo Ditrichstein. 

Johan Cohan, fifteen years old, won the 
silver loving cup offered last Tuesday 
night by Sophie Tucker at Reisenweber's 
for the best imitation of herself. 



Eduardo Aroxamena has come to the 
United States from Mexico to conduct the 
rehearsals of the Spanish opera, "Manna," 
which opens at the Park, Saturday. 

Jassbo, who has been appearing in 
cabarets, has a new vaudeville act, con- 
sisting of a hand and himself, in which 
he is scheduled to open in vaudeville 
April 27. 

Lewis Seymour, an English singing 
comedian of the George Lashwood type, 
made his initial appearance on this side 
of the water, at the Halsey in Brooklyn, 
last week. 



Ernest Lansing has been engaged as 
manager of the Colonial Theatre, Akron, 
Ohio. C Glasgow is the new treasurer and 

C M. Wflland the assistant treasurer. 



The Perkins de Fishers, who have been 
appearing in the sketch called "The Half 
Way House" for the last fifteen yean, an 
headed for New York, after a two years* 
absence. 



M. S. Epatitt, the Putnam Building 
agent, fell from a Fifth Avenue 'bus re- 
cently and- sprained his wrist and was 
otherwise shaken up. He is around his 
office again. 

Private Eddie Rickart, of the 27th Di- 
vision, was the winner of the silver lov- 
ing cup presented by Sophie Tucker at 
Reisenweber's last week for the best imi- 
tation of Al Jolson. 

Nathan Burkan, th.i theatrical lawyer, 
returned from Canada last week, where 
he went to urge the passage. of a reciprocal 
copyright law affecting American songs 
used for mechanical purposes. 

Charles King has joined the Actor's 
Colony at Great Neck, L. L, and Snap 
Camp, who plays with him in "Good 
Morning, Judge," has purchased the W. 
P. Allen residence at Rye, N. Y. 

Peggy Barnstead, John A. Murphy, Will- 
iam T. Ryan, William Street, Paul War- 
ren, Roy R. Buckley and William M. 
Swayne have joined the Co-operative 
Players for the Julius Hopp dramas. 

Dolly Gray, the soubrette with Frank 
Folsom's musical comedy sketch "Going 
Some," has been confined to her noma 
with influenza. She is now recovering 
and will rejoin the act after Easter. 

Marguerite DeVon and Ban Mulvey 
opened last week with a new act at New- 
ark. It is a singing and danring turn 
and wUl .begin a tour over the camp cir- 
cuit this week, starting -at Camp Merritt. 

Harry McNaughton has been appointed 
to succeed Richard Temple as "Bert" in 
"The Better "Ole," Chicago company. He 
is a cousin of Charles McNaught on, play- 
ing the same role in the New York com- 
pany. • 

Mabel Livingston-Frank, the press agent, 
has written the lyrics to a book of songs 
composed by Mana Zucca, the soprano- 
composer. The book is called "A Child's 
Night in Song," and is published by 
Scbircner. - 

Boris Thomashevsky will give a testi- 
monial benefit at his National Theatre, 
April 23, to Harry Kaufman and Sam 
Levy, treasurers at the theatre. Bessie 
Thomashefsky will appear in "The Green 

Milionaire." 



E. A. Turner, formerly in vandevflle 
with the "Young Mrs. Stanford" act, has 
been appointed manager of the dramatic 
and musical department of Evangeline 
Weed, Inc. 

Sophy Tucker, Honette, the Watson 
Slaters, William and Gordon Dooley, 

Esther Walker, Ralph Hen, Crmirhiflurm 
and Clements, De Haven and Nice, PHI 
Baker, Rev. Frank Gorman and Donald 
Roberts appeared at the Winter Garden 
last Sunday night. 



Arthur Burgess, Hal Churchill, John H, 
Elliot, Edith Facett, Ray Clemens, Bob 
King, Chick and Lloyd. Thnrman and 
Charles Wittaker have been engaged for 
Princess Theatre Opera Company in San 
Antonio, Texas. 



Pliny Rntledge is now preparing the set 
in which he appeared hereabouts five years 
ago for a revival. In the cast of "The 
Fatted Calf," which is the title of the 
offering, are Marie Aymea and R. A. 
Dowse. Edward A. Weitzel is the author. 



Mary Garden, Estelle Win wood, Frances 
Starr, Ethel Stanaaru, Margaret Law- 
rence, Violet Heming, Mahal Taliaferro, 
Janet Beecher, Juliet Day, Florence Nash, 
Mary Nash, Ana Case, Blanche Bates, 
Alice Brady, Jane Cowl and Marjorie 
Rambeau will assist as saleswomen 
during the coming two. weeks at the Red 
Cross Shop - • . 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 



&SS.S/JS&S/ , SSj?SfM/?SMS*/fff/'/M?fM 



FROM 

IN THE U. 



S. NAVY 



HOWARD JOHNSON 



In 



Ens 



the profession; tils new sure-fire comedy hit 

"GOOD-BYE, WILD WOMEN, GOOD-BYE" 

LEO- FEIST* INC. ^ i: - 






^g* 



^•--.-a 



-19 : 
red i 
.a 



te#!W 



w/w>/»w/;/w/w^^^ 



M& 



•s>vsssss/s/yss//ssss//yyssss///jr///ss s sss/y/ss//sjm , s/y//^^ 



'xmmxmmxm"*wnMMW*'*MM 



The Act that has all New York Talking 



-WESTTON and ELESTE 



ALL IN FUN 



..-Direction of ROSE & CURTIS 



A SOLID HIT The Funniest Cabaret Scene in Vaudeville 

Moved Down Next to Closing at Proctor's, Newark, After Monday Matinee 



VJMVM>M/SMUWAM»/>MM^^^^ 



& GORDON 



PRESENT 





in his new offering 



"George Washington Cohen" 



35* 



**. 



fe 



By 

AARON HOFFMAN 

..",.' NEW YORK 

THIS WEEK (APR. 14) '"f 



THELMA CARLTON 



p- 



Still doing good at Moulin Rouge 
begin rehearsals with Cohan and Harris' New Production latter part 

of May. THANES TO MAX ROGERS. 




J1MMIE HODGES' 
ATTRACTIONS 

4-SHOWS NOW PLAYING-4 

Jimmie Hodges Musical Comedy Co. 

Pretty Baby Eastern— Pretty Baby Tabloid 

Jimmie Hodges Company with himself 
Can use a few more chorus girls 
• Address J. E. EVISTON, General Manager, 
Mozart Theatre, Elmira, N. Y. 



CLEAN COMEDY ACT IN ONE 

Harry Fiddler 

Chinese Character Entertainer 

The Man with Many Facea; plajad mm return data*. 
A Hit everywhere. Address 28 W. 131st Sfc, N. Y. 




ed CORELLI & GILLETTE chas 



VARIETY ENTERTAINERS 



>GEO. KALALUHI'S HAWAIIANS 



DIB. GEO. SOFRANSKI 



BOOKED SOLED LOEW TIME 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



TX 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

For Next Weeit 



EEW TORE CXTT. 

Palaoa — Evs Tangos 5" — Leo Donne Uy — Hals A 
Loekett — Whiting A Bnrt — Montague Lore. 

Colonial— Van A Sebenck— Doll* OonaUly * Oo. 
— Conclli ft Gibson— flach Bros, f 

Royal— Nonette— Gibson * ConeUl— Bernard * 
Duffy — Wellington Cross — Stuart B mm W right 
A Dietrich — Chrli Richards — Will J. Ward ft Oo. 

Alnambra^-Allc n Brooka A Co. — Herd A Goodrich 
—Stone * Kallss— Aerial De QroBe — Catherine 
Powell— The Gerald*. 

Rirersiae— Maurice Bute bard — Bands Across Baa 
—Lambert * Ball — Julius Tannen — James Watta ft 

BEOOXLTB, V. T. 
Orphenm— O'DocneU * Blair— Boot. T. Balnea * 
Co. — Claudia Coleman — Dickinson A Deaauu — Not 
Yet Marie— W. J. Beilly— Yrette RogeV— Mlrano 

Broa Frsoeis Remold— Prank far*. " 

Baakwiok— Bert Wllllama— DiUe at Co.— Dtrti ft 
Dixrrll— The T1THTH Mirk * Vincent— Nelson * 
Coals — Three Daring Sisters — Geo. McFsrlss*. 
B AXTTatOBE, MS. 
Msrylind— Marion Harris — Helen Ware — Toto— 
Powers Hi Tony * Normsn^Jlmiaie Cook 
A Partner — V. S. Nary Jsxs Band. 
BUFFALO, H. T. 
Bass's— Petticoats— Patten A Marks— Koran A 
Hack — Walter Weems — Four Readings — Willie 
Hale A Bro. — Olgs. Petxova. 

BOSTON, MAES. 
Keith's— Rooney Bent— Mr. A Mrs. J. Barry— 
Flnk'a Moles— Harry Cooper— Sybil Vane — Geo. N. 
Brown A Co. — Be rnard Oranrllle. 

err-w o wr aw n OHIO. 
Hippodrome— Al Shayse— Sylrester A Vine* — 
Rita Mario Orchestra— Tip Yip Taphanker— Donald 
Roberts— Martjn A Florence— Emma Caras— Her- 
bert Clifton — lean Adair & Co. 

OOLEKBTTB. OHIO. 
Keith's — Avon Comedy Pour— Campbell Sisters- 
Mrs. O. Hnghe s A Co. 

cnormn, ohio. 

Keith's — Frank Crnmmlt — A. A F. Stedman — La 
Bernicla A Co. — On tie Blgb Seas — Selma Braara 
—Harry Hotman A Co. — Donald Boberts — Ones) De 

Mar. ■ 

DATTOH, OHIO. 
Keith's — Belene Darls — Adroit Bros. — Brace Do- 
fett A Co.— Clark Sisters — Marx Bros — Frank 
Gaby— Doree'a Im p. Qu intette. 

DETROIT. MICH, 
Temple — Prosper A Moret— Susan Tompkins— 
Doree's Celebrities — Bob Albright— Ames A Win- 
throp— Gonn* A Alberts — Jas. C. Morton A Co.— 
Tanakl Duo. 

ERIE, PA. 
Colonial— Edward Marshall— Harry Beresford. 

GRASS SLAPXDS, 1C0H. 
Emyisai Jinies J. Mortsn— Orrine Btamm — 
Green- A De Ller— Cahlll A Bomelns — Cantwell A 
Wanna — Frisco. 

HAHXLTOsT. OAK. 
Orphenm — Klein Bros. — Stereni ft Hollliter— 
Helnotte Duo — Mayo A Lynn. 

rHDIANAFOIJa, TJTD. 
Keith's— Tor Pity's Sake — Mme. Chllson Ohrman 
—"Somewhere In France" — Elsa Ruegger — Van 
Cellos— Lerttstion — Julie B ins; A Co. 
LOUISVILLE, XT. 
Keith's— Snow A Velmar— Aerial Mitchells— 
What Glrl» Can Do — Eddie Foyer— Frank!* Heath- 
Oliver A OOP. 

LOWELL, MASS. 
Keith's— ImboB. Cons ft Coreene — Lee A Cran- 
ston— Juliet Dike — Xakse laps — Wilson Bros. — 
Masters A Kraft— Harold Dnkane ft Co. 
MONTREAL, CAN. 
Orphems — Naah A O'Donnell — Tarsan — Goerro A 
Carmen — Stone A Hayes — Olsen A Johnson — Roth 
Boye — Fire Pandurs — Qretchen Eastman Co. 
PORTLAND, MX. 
Keith's— "Somewhere with Pershing"— Jsck 
Inglls— MlUette Bisters A Co. — H. A A. Seymour— 
Manning A Lee — Seven Honey Boys— Chaflen ft 
Keke. 

Mm*.»lHS IlTA pa. 

Keith's— Owen McGlreney— Walter C. Kelley— 
Robbie Gordone — Gns Edwards A Co. — Adler A 
Boss — George Price — Trscey ft McBride— HsJllgan 
A Sykes — Howanl's Pon ies — Marie Nordstrom. 
PB0VTDE3TCE, R. I* 

Keith's — Llbooatl — Poor Mortons — Ivan Bsnkoff 
Co. 

prrrBBUROH, pa. 

Daris— Coaror ft Murphy— Arnold A Ailment— 
Reynolds A Donegan — Hyams A Mctntyre — Bell* 
Bake* — Bradley A Ardlnc 

ROCHESTER. V. T. 
Tempi* — Harry Watson. ft Co. — Emma Stereos— 
Laurie A Bronson — Khanun — Symmons ft Brsntly— 
Stanley ft Blms— Janls ft CuapUm. 
TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Bksa's — qiidiog O'Hesrss — Cbappelle ft Stinnett* 
— Krans A La Salle — Creasy A Dayne — Bobbins A 
Co.— Playmates. --" 

- TOE ONTO. CAN. 
Shea's — Hickman Bras. — Harry Hlnes — 8elHe 
Fisher A Co. — Bane Lnby — Isbakawa J ap s Mown 
A Wiser— Darrell A Edwards— Ford Sisters A Co. 
WUKHOTOS, DEL. 
derrick — William Emba A Co. — Texas Comedy 
Four. 

WASHTEGTON, D. 0. 
Keith's— Meyers A Moon — Memory Book— Men- 
linger A Meyer— Gallagher A Robley. 
TOtTHGSTOWN, OHIO. 
Hlposdroma— Fonr Haley Bisters— Ethel V 
Doooogh— American Ace— Marconi ft rittgibhon 
Le Ms I re ft Hayes — Gertrude Hoffmann — Fred Bar- 
rens. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

..." CrTTOAOO. 

Majastln Bine Goodrich A Co.— Barr Twins— 

Campbell— Scotch Lad* ft] 



Bros. — Mile. NlttaJo — La Malre ft Crouch— J. ft 
M. Harklns — p«™«a»ii« ft Deyo. 

Stat* T a ke T ack Norworth — Robinscn's Ele- 
phants — Smith ft Austin — Clark A Bergman — Osskl 
Troupe — Sepe ft Dotton — Billy Rogers. 
CALGABT. CAN. 
Oiuhsain Trlile Frlganl* Msnd Earl ft Co. — 
Sidney ft Towneley— Mike Bernard— Muriel Worts 

ft Co. — Wilson Aubre y Tri o. 

DTJLTTTH, affjafssa 
Orpnaaa — An American Ace — Delro — Harry Jol- 
son— Hersehel Henlere— Nora Kelly — Aerial Shaw*. 
DEB HOrSES, IA. 
Orpheum — Sae Samoela — Senor Westony — Hamp- 
ton ft Blake— At hos A Be ad. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphairm loon B. Hymer A Co. — McKay A Ar- 
dine— Henry B. Toomer ft Oo. — Lerolos— aid 
Townes — Bodrldues Bros. — Walters ft Walters. 
KANSAS CITY, HO. 

OrphaBBr— Ic*.r- HOWael's Rerae — Bert- Baker & 
Co. — BTatr A O'DonneB— Burns ft Friilto.-^Soot 

Gibson — Tomer A Grace— Shrapnel Dodgers. 

LOB ASOELES, CAL.— - - -— 
Orphems— Toco. Koslcff A Oo.-^CoeEIey A Du- 
lery — Jean Barrios — Flemlnrs — Martha Hamilton — 
Natalie Sisters — Fonr Husbands. 
LINCOLN, NKB. 
Orpheum— Florence Boberts A Co.— Sue Smith — 
Brack's Models— Wanser ft Palmer — Everest 's Cir- . 
ens — Primrose Fonr — Jan Robinl. 

MTNNEAPOLIB, MTNN. 
Orphenm— Morgan Dancers — Santos ft Hares— 
Jot. B. Bernard ft Co. — Harmon A O'Connor— Jen- 
nings A Mack — Three kttsano s. 

MXLWAEEEE, WIS. 
Majearlo— Bessie Clayton A Co.— Harry Langdon 
ft Co. — Officer Tokea ft Don— Leo Beers— Martha 
Hamilton A Co. — Bnrt A TTos a dsl e — Frank Brown. 
HEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Oiphsna— Alia Moakorn A Co.— Yates ft Reed— 
Ryan A Byan. 

OMAHA, EBB. 
Orpheum — Frank Dobson A Co. — Claodtas A Scar- 
let—Kennedy A Booney — Walter Fenner ft Co. — 
Valledta's Leopards — Street Urchin — Three Bennett 
Sister*. 

OAKLAND, CAIm 
Orpheum — Paul Dickey ft Co. — Cfcae. Irwin — 
Adams A Grlfflth — Hlckey Bros. — Jonant A Berri — 
Helen ScboUer— FaotiBO TTOope. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 
Orphenm — Recklfss Ere— Crawford ft Broderlck 
— Nlta Johnson— Bessie Bempel ft Co.— Merrltt A 
Bridewell — The Sterlings. 

SAE FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Orpheum — Miracle— Harriet Bempel A Co. — Clara 
Morton — Darts A Bleb — Panl La Varle ft Bro. — 
tfoseonl Bros. — Polly Moras— -Sam Mann ft Co. 
SEATTLE WASH. 
Orphenm — Annette Kellermann — Great Lester — 
Geo* Greene — Margaret Young— EL ft A. Adair— 
Alec A Dot Lamb. - 

ST. LOInB, MO. 
Orpheum— Cecil Lean ft MayHeld— Morton A 
Gin* Williams ft WoLTus— Whipple, Huston A Co. 
— Uttlejohos — Katbryn Monay— Sanaone ft Do- 



TKli.VS 



IICKSSKS 



1 :.:»ii l.rnad\va\-;.N. v {'. j 1 V \i>. (■"lark St ... <'lucau«». III. 



hit. I "EV'RYWHERE THAT 
t° -; WILSON GOES" 



hit! "ALL THOSE IN FAVOR 
No - SAY AYE" 



iiini- I.ODlii; jmi: 



Palac*— Mabel 



McCane— OaroUne Kohl ft 
A K. 



salt ease city, ut ah. 

Orpheum — Valelka Soratt ft Co.— Rockwell ft Fox 
—Geo. Yeoman— Lewis ft White— Nolan ft Nolan— 
Demareat A Collette — Nate A Wller. 
BACRAMENTO, STOCKTOV AES PBXSNO, CAL. 

Eaatages— Eddie Foy A Family — Gensro A Gold 
— Hooaon A Beatty— Cbaa. Wilson— Kirksmlth Sis- 
ter*— Glrla of iUUtude— Ifclntyre*. 
ST. PAUL. MINX. 

Orpheum — Only Girl — Hector — Masle King ft Co. 
— Brlerre A King— Wm. Smythe — Bailey A Cowan. 
TAECOVTES, CAN. 

Orpheum— Lucille Caranaugh ft Co. — Bessie 
Browning — Mason ft Keeler — dark ft Verdi — Sllber 
ft North — La Rue ft Dupree. 

WXHELTEe, CAN. 

Orpheum— Blossom Seeley— Patrleola A Myers — 
Whitledge A Beckwitb— Mollle Kelntyr* ft Co.— 
Williams ft Mitchell— Olga lUsnka ft Co.— Dunham 
A Edwards. 

POLI CIRCUIT 

HEXOOEPOET. CONE. 

PoU (First Half)— Glngraa— Sum. Klaa* ft gaxe 
—Nat Naxarro, Jr., ft V. 8. Nary Band. (Last 
Half)— Lorner Girls— Ed A Lottie Ford— Morris A 
Campbell — Venetian Gypsies. 

Haas. (First Half)— Ben Smith. (Last Half) — 
Otto A Sberiden— Klein ft Fraser— Elsie Halo and 
Black ft White Boy*. 

KABTFOBD, CONN. 

Poll (First Halt) — Dlngley A Norton — Keating 
A Walton — Amoro* ft Obey— Mumford ft Stanley — 
Mar*;. Hill**. Com. circus. (Last Half) — Archer A 
Belforo — Corcoran A Mack — Btgoletta Broa. 
MEW HAVEN, COEE."" 

Palaee (First Half)— Lorner Girls— Morris A 
Campbell. (Last Half)— Sum. Klals* A Saxe— Nat 
Nasarro. Jr.. A U. 8. Nary Band. 

Bijou (First Hall)— Otto A Sberiden — Archer A 
Betford — Klein A Fraser — Venetian Gypalea. (Last 
HalfH-CarroU. Keating A Fay— Copeland A Mc- 
Clond. 

SPRINOFIEI D. MASS. 

P-Uce (First Half) — CecU A Beenlec — Liberty 
Trio— Tnst's Mr Wife, (last Half)— Mshoner A 
Anborn — Alice Manrdng — 1918 Version Pretty Baby. 
8CEAET 0E. PA. 

Pali (First Half)— Four Dsnclax PfUi o m B* » 
nest Dopille — For Lore. A Money — Wm. A Mary 

Rogers— Btrtb Bndd. (Last Half)— Mason rear 

Wilfred Clarke A Co.— Eugene n jmctt— Wright ft 
Pe j f i ta l Short. 

Pell ' (First Half)— M-.h-*gr A Anborn — Alice 
Manning— CarroU, Ke.-!— A Fay— Corcoran A 
T tnsto n'a Water lions. (Last Half)— 
-WnUe Are...*— Ling- ft Long— Momford ft 
y— Winston's Water Lion*. 

< C g asf sja.i l gas sag, ji.) 



HIT 



HIT 



HIT 

No. 



^ WAIT AND SEE 

Sonu- U AI.TZ Sunt; 

'TEARS OF LOVE 

Some ^Successor Ln 'SMILES ' 



'OH HELEN 

Souie COrviKDY Son» 



hit -I'M GLAD I CAN 
"M MAKE YOU CRY" 



HIT 
No. 



HIT 



HIT 



Some WALTZ Sonu 



INDIANOLA 

Some NOVELTY Sonu 



PAH JAMAH 

Some ORIENTAL Sonu 



KENTUCKY DREAM 

Sum.- HI <•;..(•: LASS WALTZ Sohji 



hit ; "MY GAL'S ANOTHER 'GAL' 
N ° LIKE GALLI-CURCI" 

1 Sonu WONlJLK! II. Sum; 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 






HAROLD WHALEN 

JUVENILE 

with "Beauty Trust" Next Season in the Legitimate 

EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT— CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



USED 

FOR NEXT SEASON 




COLE 



UNDER THE DIRECTION 
CHAS. M. BAKER 



Thanks to Managers for Kind Offers 



*.- 



Season's Sensation 
Direction Ike Weber 



GRACE HOWARD 



Soubrette 

GHAS. WALDRON'S 

BOSTONIANS 



ss/s/s-sssssssyy'ssy/ssss/yr^^^ 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 



■>/sss///s//ss/y'//yss/sv///s//y//y/ys///s/^^ 



PAT WHITE SHOW 





\A/ 










CLARA GIBSON -£S 



\A/ WITH 
IRWIN' 
IVI A J ESTI OSB 



FEATURED 
MIDNIGHT 

MAIDENS 



IMI 



AND 



MANAGEMENT 

HURTIG & 

SEAMON 



EDDIE AKIN 

JUST PUNTING ABOUT MIDNIGHT MAIDENS 



IM IM 



IM 



Mr N« 



i atr IdNl te tk. 
Exit.-) 



EEVA GRIEVES 

at A*r 



FAT WHITB SHOW 



KITTY GLASCO 



J O 



*K> COMEDIAN 



HUS1UHI AND 

MIDNIGHT 



IM 



BY NIGHT 



GENE and ETHEL BEAUDRY 



THK UTIU HAN WITH THK 

DiMEcnoH-noam ^ «ichaw» 



BIO VOICE ANI> THK PKKSONAUTY GOO. 

HIP HIP HOORAY GIBU 



At Uberty «&- J. HARRY 



mi 



VAN and KELLY 



NOW PLAYING FOX TIME 



JUVENILE MERRY ROUNDERS 



DIRECTION CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



AMEXA 



NES 



UTH SKASON WITH BKHMAM SHOW 



PRIMA DONNA 



SECOND SEASON 



BROADWAY BELLES 



BRIANS TO BUKLKSQUZ AS SIMON 



SMILING NELLIE WATSON 

SOUBRETTE DAVE MARION'S "AMERICA'S BEST" 

I am under an exclude contract to CHAMBERLAIN BROWN and have not nsned 
any burlesque contracts. 

JOHN O. Of~ 



NK 



CHARACTER MAN— PARIS BY NIGHT 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from page IS and oo K) 



1 



BERTRAND HELPS 
"HIGH FLYERS" TO 

SET FAST PACE 

The "High Flyers In Bohemia" in the name 
Charlie Baker put on his show at the Star 
last week, with Bert Bertrand aa the feature. 
The show Is fast from both a comedy and 
mdslcal viewpoint and gave entire satisfac- 
tion last Thursday night. 

Bertrand, who Is doing the principal 
comedy, offered his Hebrew role most amus- 
ingly, and the way he works keeps the speed 
of the show up to a nigh pitch. He never 
lays down a second, but work! all through 
the performance at top speed. His make-up 
Is good and the style of comedy he does was 
liked. 

Charlie Cole, doing, a "bum." Is ' working 
opposite Bertrand. - He portrayed this char- 
acter well and also works fast. Cole can 
dance and gave a flash of his ability several 
times. He and Bertrand work wdl together. 

Corp. Lester Fad, who was discharged from 
the army recently, Is taking pare of the 
straight. Tnls young fellow makes a tine 
appearance and dresses well- He has a 

corktnggood voice and can put a number 
over. His all around work pleased. 

Frank Hauscom took care of the Juvenile 
role very well. He 1r a dandy "hoofer," can 
put over a number and offers a neat ward- 
robe. His "tough" character went over 
nicely. 

Gertrude Ralston, seen here for the first 
time In several years, baa Improved greatly 
In her work since we last saw her. She la an 
Ingenue prima donna and her voice was In 
rare form the evening we heard her. All her 
numbers were offered well and were ncored 
generously. She Is a good straight woman as 
well and her gowns are very pretty. 

Barbara Douglas, who plays the lead, did 
well In all her scenes and her wardrobe has 
been selected with care. 

Msxgorle Hilton, who returned to the stage 
after three years' absence, still retains her 
famous dimples. She has a pleasing person- 
ality. She la the soubrette and her style of 
work Is different than others. She works 
well, but Is not what one would call a real 
fast soubrette. Her dresses were becoming. 

In the chorus are a number of pretty girls 
who work hard to get the numbers over. 

The comedians make their entrance In con- 
vict suits. Bertrand then changes to a 
comedy female costume, to work In a bit, 
after which he goes back to his regular 
clothes. 

The "forefathers" bit was taken care of by 
Bertrand, Colo, Fay and Miss Douglas. An 
excellent duet was offered by Hauscom and 



Miss Balaton. They harmonize well and the 
number went big. 

The "airplane" bit was well taken care of 
by Bertrand and Miss Douglas. The "fare" 

bit had many laughs in It the way Bertrand, 
Cole. Fad, Hauscom. Miss Hilton and some 
of the chorus did it. 

The "contract" bit pleased when Bertrand, 
Cole and Fad worked It up. The burlesque 
opera was amusing with Bertrand, Cole, Fay, 
Hauscom and Miss Ralston In It. 

The "hero" bit went over with Bertrand, 
Cole and the Hisses Balaton and Hilton do- 
ing It. 

In the cabaret scene. Fad and Fancy 
offered a singing specialty of two numbers. 
The act was a real hit and excellently pre- 
sented. Miss Fancy la a dainty young miss 

of an Ingenue type, who sings well. She 
wore a very attractive costume. Fad works 
In a dress suit. 

Hlle. Fausttlne In a toe dance followed and 
offered a graceful dance. 

-Hauscom, In a song and dance specialty, 
held op hla end. He did very well with his 
soft shoe' dance. ' ' ..-• :, 

Miss 'Balstpn's drinking song was rendered 
exceptionally well. It Is a pleasure 1 to hear 
her sing. Seldom do we hear a voice as clear 
as hers at this house. 

Bertrand In an up-to-date monologue, put 
his material over for good results. He has a 
good line of talk and knows bow to get It 
over. He finished with a song. The act 
more than pleased. 

The "drinking" bit was well taken care of 
by Bertrand, Fad and Miss Douglas. Bertrand, 
assisted by a number of the girls in the 
chorus, did a pick-out number. 

The "Maid of Mystery" bit proved worth 
while, and It was nicely worked up by the 
comedians. Bertrand, Cole, Fad, the Misses 
Ralston and Douglas and several chorus girls 
were In It. 

An excellent "dope" bit wss offered by 
Bertrand and Hauscom, with the latter doing 
the "dope." . Hauscom portrayed this char- 
acter very well with Bertrand "feeding" him. 
The material they used was good and the bit 
took well with the audience. 



The Moyt Artif tic, 
5on$&Valt5/^ 
in Many/- 
yearx / 



ABijTimeJbnJ 



M B# Time 

\ Am 



Sid. 



BAKER MODIFIES STOCK PLAN 

Oharles Baker returned to hie office 
Tuesday of last week after a four weeks' 
visit at Hot Springs, Ark., and announced 
he had given up the idea of putting on 
stock burlesque in Brooklyn, Hoboken, 
New York and Philadelphia. He has de- 
cided, however, to put on stock at the 
Cadillac, Detroit, and the Empire, Cleve- 
land, opening these houses May 12. 



Joy V km e- Co. 

1556 Broadway. NYC. 

■ Hiv; Tenne> M^r 
!I9 No.CUrk St. Chicago 

Sig A Boil'?;' - M3r 



^ Dream . 

the writers of Indianola V^ 
\Teaix' TahjamahV 



f Prof. Copy 
Orchestration 
in iny^k'.y 
FREE lo twinned lrhstf 
Dance Orchestration 
ro Lcaderr 25* Band 50* 






MARTY COLLINS 



THE DANCING HOBO. 



-. 



I Hli, JOLLx vjlrvLIS 



n 



At the Star, Brooklyn, this week and the Olympic, New York, next week 



Direction— ROEHM and RICHARDS 



B. F. KAHN'S UNION SQUARE THEATRE 

STOCK BURLESQUE 

With All Star Cast 



BILLY (GROGAN) SPENCER 
JAS. X. FRANCIS 
LOUISE PEARSON 
BABE WELLINGTON 

ETHEL DE VEAUX 
AMD 



FRANK MACKEY 
BRAD SUTTON 
LORRAINE 
MAE DIX 



BIG BEAUTY CHORUS 

WANTED— Good Chorus Girls At Once 



Who have had Burlesque experience as Prima Donna, Ingenues, Soubrette, 
Comedians, Character Men and Chorus Girls; also Producers. Write and 
send Photo. FOLLY THEATRE, Pennsylvania Avenue at Ninth Street, 
Washington, D. C. 



\A/ AIM 



FOR 



Bostonian Burlesquers 

A te«m of man, novelty musical act, a good trio, and two good singing bar- 
losque women. Address Chas. H. Waldron, Waldron" s C a sino , Bo ston , Mas*. 






INGENUE 



COMIIMS 

FRED OtWDtS BIG SHOW 



RUTH DENICE 



PARIS BY NIGHT 



SOUBRETTE 



EN ROUTE 



.JIM McINERISJEY 

AN ACE WITH "AVIATORS" THIS WEEK— TROCADERO, PHILADELPHIA 



CHIEF BLUE CLOUD & WINONA 

™^' In Indian Novelty J^LTSTS 



ANNA VIVIAN & CO/j j 



"WHAT WOMAN CAN DO 

The Season' m Latest Feminine Novelty 

•OLID LOEW CIRCUIT DIRECTION-SAM 



/> 



— DOBBS & WELCH ™- 



SOMEWHERE IN TOWN 

' D«icnoN-«»t and cuit-ns 



WILLIAMS SISTERS 

IN THEIR DAINTY REVUE 

SURPRISE A LA MINUTE 



CARUTA and DICK LEWIS 

PRESENT THEIR MUSICAL COMEDIETTA 

u Luzon Love" 



TtNY 



MADELINE 



BELMONT and MOORE 



in 



Singing and Dancing De Luxe 

DIRECTION— JACK LEIA 



RUBE MARQUARD 



DIRECTION— JOS. COOPER 



RAINBOW LILLIE and MOHAWK 

20th Centupy Indians 



BERNARD TRIO 

Those Three Nifty Girls 



PLAYING U. B. O. TIME 



JEAN LEIGHTO 



and HER MINSTREL REVUE 

Now PUyin* B. P. 



STEWART SMITH 

Dallas, The Harmonica King 

DIRECTION JACK SHEA 



IM 



THE WOP AND THE SINGER 



MARGARET 



SUZANNE 



HAVEN and F R ANTZ 

Piano and Harmony 

Of VAUDEVILLE 



RECOLLECTIONS 

Fire Operatic Soloist* in "From Grand Opera to Rag" 

A SCENIC PRODUCTION 



ETHEL MILTON & iCO. 



In "MOVIE MINNIE 

By WILLARD MACK 



•9 



BOBBY ADAMS 

. Personality — Plus 



BILLY 



HOWARD & LEWIS — 

In "DO YOU LUCE ME?" 

DIRECTION— MAYER JONES 



TOM O'CONNELL 

Character Comedian and Dancer 



In VaaferiB* 



BONESETTIS TROUPE 



DIRECTION— MAX OBERNDORF 



HAPPY 



EMR.M. 



THOMPSON & KING 



THE TWO MISFITS 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



«i CHAE l EMMET & MOORE eueen 

In "IRELAND TODAY" 

Faatariag Hit Own Soon 



YOSI 



SMILING 



DIRECTION— FRED BRANT 



Raymond Fisher 



Present a 
THE ESCAPED ARTIST OF THE PLAINS 



Dir.— LEW GOLDE 



CHAS. ROOT & WHITE WALTE. 

ECCENTRIC SONGS AND DANCES 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



< DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Route* Must Reach Thi. Office Not Later 
Than S»Hn-»lay 

Arllss, George — Hollis, Boston, Mass, 14-10 
National Washington, D. C, 21-28. 

"Atta Boy" — Olympic, Chleaco. 7-12. 

"Adam and Eve" — Park Sq... Boston, Mala., 
indef. 

"Business Before Pleasure" — Woods, Chi- 

•B?uer 'OlV'— (Mr. and Mrs. Cobnml — 
Cort N. T. City, Indef. • » 

"Better 'Ole" (B)-^8acrainento, Calif, 23- 
24 ; Oakland, 25-20 ; San Jose, 27 ; Col- 
ombia, San Francisco, 28-May 24. 

"Better 'Ole" (C.) — Orillla, Canada, 18; Bar- 
rie. Id; Q. O. H., Hamilton. 21-23; Lind- 
say, 24 : Peterboro, 25-26. 

"Better 'Ole" (B)— Illinois, Chicago, 111., 
indef. 

Bayeo, Nora— Lyric, Philadelphia, 14-19. 

"Burgomaster of Belgium" — Belmont, New- 
York City, Indef. 

"Black America" — Auditorium. Kansas 
City, Mo.. 14-20. rt 

Barrymore, Ethel — Terre Haute, Iud., 17; 
Urbana, 111.. 18; Springfield, 19. 

Barrymore, John * Lionel — Plymouth, N. I, 
Indef. WX f\. 

"Bonds Of In*£t" — Garrlcfc, Ne^| lork 
City, 14, - Index: 

"Cappy Ricks" — Morosco, New York City, 

Chicago' Grand Opera Co.— A. of M., Phila- 
delphia, Pa., Indef. 
Carmelo's Ted. Musical Comedy Co. — 

Sherman, Begins, Snsk., Canada. Indef. 

"Crowded Hour" (Jane Cowl) — Manhattan 

O. H.. New York City. Indef. 
Carle-Richard — El Paso, Texas, 21-28; Loa 



Vegas, New Mei., 24 ; Baton, 23 ; Trinidad, 
Colo., 26-27: Broadway, Denver. la-May 8. 
"Come On Charley" — 48th Street, New York 



City, Indef. 
"Cave Girl" The — Qarrlck, Philadelphia, 21, 

indef. 
Collier Wm. — Wilbur, Boston, 14-19. 
"Dear Brutus" — Empire, New York City, 

Indef. 
"Darktown Frolics" — CoUlseom. St. Louis. 

Mo., 14-20; Grand; Chicago, 20-May 4. 
"Dark Rossleen" — Shnber£Belasco, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 14-19. 
Dempsey, Jack — Canton, O, 10; Munde, Ind, 

IT: Indianapolis, 18; Terre Haute, 19; 

Cedar Rapids, Is., 21 ; Waterloo, 22. 
"Dangerous Age. The" — Illinois, Chicago, 21, 

indef. 
Dltrlchsteln, Leo — Broad Street, Philadelphia, 

Indef. _. • 

"Everything"— Hippodrome, New York City, 

indef. 
"East Is West"— Astor, New York City, 

Indef. 
"Eyes of Youth"— Walnut, Philadelphia, 

Indef. 

Eitlnge, Julian — Olympic, Chicago, indef. 

"Friendly Enemies"— Hudson, New York 
City, Indef. 

"Forever After" — Playhouse, New York City, 
Indef. 

"Fortune Teller" — Republic, New York City, 
indef. 

"Flo, Flo" — Forest, Philadelphia 14-19; Tre- 
mont, Boston. 21, indef. 

"Friendly Enemies" — Johnstown, N. Y., 17; 
Amsterdam, 19; Poughkeepsie, 22; Sara- 
toga, 24 : Burlington, 2d-; Plttsfleld, 29. 

Gilbert * Sum van Operas — Park, New York 
City (Last week.) 

"Good Morning Judge" — Shubert, New York, 
indef. 

"Going Up" — Cohan's O. H.. Chicago, DL 

"Glorianna"— Colonial. Chicago, indef. 

"Good Bad Woman ' — Harris, N 
City, indef. 

Hodge Wm. — Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, 

"Happiness"— Washington, D. Ci, 14-19. - 
"Jack O'Lantera" — Colonial, Boston, 14-26. 
"Keep It to Yourself" — 89th Street, New 

fork City (Last week.) 
"IJghtnin' •'— Gayety, New York Cty, Indef. 
"Listen Lester*'— -Knickerbocker. New York 

City, indef. 
Little Journey, The" — Vanderbllt, New York 



la. New York. 



mOUTE LIST 



City, indef, 

"Little Simplicity" — Shubert, Philadelphia, 
Indef. 

"Let's Beat It" — Century Theatre, New York 
City. 14-19. 

"LltUa Brother"— Loew's 7th Avenue, New 
York City, 14-19. 

"I.ombardl Ltd."— Lyric, Philadelphia, 21, 
Indef. 

"Melting of . Molly"— Chestnut St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa.. Indef. 

"Midnight Whirl"— New Century, New York 
City, indef. 

"Masquerader. The" — Stndebaker, Chicago, 
indef. 

"Miss Nelly of New Orleans" — Henry Miller, 
New York City, Indef. 

"Monte Cristo, Jr." — Wlntergarden, New York 
City, Indef. 

"Mollere"— liberty. New York City, Indef. 

"Mutt & Jeff Co7'— Boseman, 18 : Big Tim- 
ber, 19; Glendlne, 20; Mandon, N. D, 21; 
Valley City. 22; Wahperton, 23: Fergus 
Folia, 24; Bralnard Union, 26; Supe- 
rior, 28. 

'Moonlight & Honeysuckle" (Ruth Chatter- 
ton) — Powers,' Chicago, Indef. . 

MantelL Robert— Newark. N. J., 14-10. 

Maude Cyril— Hartroan, Columbus, O., 17-19. 
N 1Kb. tie Night" — 8bubert, Oarrlck, Waablng- 

. ton, I>. C, 21-20. - • -.•—■-• ^ 

Opera Comlqne — Park, New York City (Last 
week). 

"Ob, My Dear"— Princess, New York City. 
Oh, Look" — Shubert, Boston, Indef. 
Oh Lady! Lady!"— La Salle. Chicago. Indef. 
Odds and Ends"— St Joseph, Mo., 18-19. 

"Oh Unci*"— Poll's, Washington. D: ]&• 14- 

•Please' Get Married"— Fulton. New York 
City, Indef. -• 



"Prince There Was" — Cohan, New York City, 
Indef. 

■•Penny Wise" — Standard. ■ New York City, 
14-19. 

"Parlor. Bedroom and Bath"— Adelphl. Phlla- 
'delphla. indef. ■_ 

"Papa"-^tlttle, New York City, lo-lndef. 

"Royal Vagabond; The" — Cohan A Harris, 
New York City, Indef. 

"Riddle Woman"— Woods,' Chicago, 20. Indef. 

"Rainbow Girl"— Tremont, Boston, 14-19. 

"Sometime" — Casino, New York City, indef. 

"Sleepless Night"— BUou. New York City, 
indef. 

Skinner, Otis— Globe, New York City, indef. 

"Scandal" — Garrlck, Chicago, Indef. 

"She Walked la Her Sleep 7 '— Plymouth, Bos- 
ton, Mass., Indef. 

Susan Lenox— Majestic. Providence, R. I., 

7-i2. m 

"September Morn" — Toronto, Can., 7-12. 
"Seven Days Leave" — Majestic, Boston, Mass., 

14-19. . 
"Sinbad"— BortonTO. H.. Boston, 21, indef. 
"Shakuntala"— -Greenwich ^Village, New York 

City, indef. 
"Tea tor Tnree" — Maxlne Elliott, New York 

City. Indef. 
"Three Faces East" — Longacre, New York 

City, Indef. 
"Three Wise Fools"— Criterion. New York 

City, indef. 
"Tiger! Tiger I !"— (With Frances Starr)— 

Belasco, New York City, Indef. 
"Toby's Bow" — Comedy. New York City, 

"Tlllle"— Blackstone, Chicago, indef. 
"Thirty Days" — Cort, Chicago, indef. ■ 
"Tumble Inn" — Selwyn, New York City, indef. 
Taylor, Laurette — Broad Street, Philadelphia, 

Pa., Indef. 
"Turn to the Bight" — Garrlck, Philadelphia, 

14-19. 
"Thirty-nine East" — Broadhurst, New York 

City, Indef. 
"Thirteenth Chair"— Shubert-Garrick, Wash- 
ington. D. C. 14-19. 
Thurston, Howard — Macauley, Louisville, 

Ky., 14-19. 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin Co. — Worcester. Mass., 

16; Webster, 17; Danlelson, 18; Taunton, 

19; Plymouth, 21. 
"Unknown Purple, The" — Lyric, New York 

City, indef. 
"Velvet Lady" — New Amsterdam. New York 

City. Indef. 
"Ziegield Midnight Frolic"— New Amsterdam 

Boot, New York City, Index. 

MINSTRELS 

Fields, A. G. — Logansport, Ind., 16: Marlon, 
17; South Bend, 19-20: Elkhart, 21; Kala- 
, maioo, Mich., 22; Battle Creek, 23; Jack- 
son, 24. 

CIRCUSES 

Rlugllng Bros, te Barnum 4s Bailey— -Madison 
Square Garden. New York City, indef. 

Sells-Flo to — Ft. Worth, 18; Dallas, 19; Okla- 
homa City, Okia., 21 ; Tulsa, 22 ; Bartells- 
TlUe, 23: CoffeyvUle. 24 ; Joplln, Mo., 23; 
Springfield, 26 ; St. Louis, Mo., 28-May 8. 

TABLOIDS 

Lord A Verum — Strand, La Grange, Ga:, 
14-19. 

COLUMBIA CIRCUIT 

Al Reeves Big Show — Peoples. Philadelphia, 

14-19; Palace, Baltimore. 21-26. 
- "Beat Show in Town"— Olympic. Cincin- 
nati. 14-19; Star and Garter, Chicago, 

21-26. 
"Beauty Trust"— Majestic, Jersey City, 

14-19; Peoples, Philadelphia, 21-28. 
"Behman Show" — Orpheum. Putereon. 

14- 19: Majestic, Jersey City, 21-26. 
"Bon Tons" — Columbia, New York, 14-19; 

Empire, Brooklyn. 21-26. 
"Bostonians" — Berchel, Des Moines, Iowa, 

13-17; Gayety, Omaha, 19-25. 
"Bowery" — Empire. Newark, 14-19; Casino. 

Philadelphia. 21-26. 
"Burlesque Wonder Show" — Miner's 149th 

St., New York, 14-19;- Park, Bridgeport, 

Conn., 24-26. 
"Ben welch" — Akron. O., 14-16; Youogs- 

town, 17-19; Star, Cleveland, 21-26. 
Burlesque Revue — Casino. Philadelphia. 14- 



10: Hurtlg & Seamon's, New York, 21-26. 
Cheer Up America" — Park. Bridgeport, 
Conn.. 17-19: Colonial, Providence, 21-28. 



Dave Marlon's — Bastablo. Syracuse. N. Y.. 

14-1S: Lumbers. Utlea, 17-19: Qayety. 
Montreal, Can., 21-26. 

"Follies of the Day" — Star and Garter, Chi- 
cago, 14-19; Gayety. Detroit, 21-26. 

"Glrla de Looks" — Gayety. Buffalo, 14-19: 
Gayety, Rochester, 21-26. 

"Golden Crooks"— Lyric, Dayton, O., 14-19; 
Olympic, Cincinnati, zi-26. 

"Glrla of the U. S. A." — Jacques. Water- 
bury, 14-19; Miner's 149th St., New York, 

"Hip Hip Hooray" — Gayety, Omaha, Neb., 

12-18; Gayety, Kansas City, 81-26. 
"Hello America"— Palace, Baltimore, 14-19; 

Gayety, Washington, 21-28. 
Harry Hastings — Gayety, Montreal, Can., 

14-19; Empire, Albany, 21-26. 
Irwin's Big Show — Casino. Boston. 14-19: 

Columbia, New York. 21-26. 
Lew Kelly Show — Gayety. St. Louis, 14-19; 

Columbia, Chicago, 21-26. 
"Liberty Glrla" — Gayety, Rochester, N. Y., 

14-19; Beatable, Syracuse, N. Y, 31-11; 

Lumberg. Utlca. 24-26. 
Mollle Williams' Show— Empire, Albany, N. 
. Y., 14-19; Casino, Boston, 21-24. 
"Maids of America" — Colonial. Providence. 
14-19: Gayety. Boston, 21-26. 



"Majesties" — Hurtlg & Seamon's, New 
York, 14-19: Casino, Brooklyn. 21-26. 

"Merry Rounders"— Grand. Hartford, Conn.. 
14-19; Jacques, Waterbury, Conn., 21-16. 

"Million Dollar Dolls"— Newburg, N. Y., 
14-16; PouKukeepale, N. Y., 17-19; Or- 
pheum, Patereon, 21-26. 

"Oh, Girls"— Oayety. Kansas City. 14-19: 
open, 21-26: Gayety. St. Louis. 28-May 3. 

"Puss. Puss"— Gayety. Pittsburgh. 14-18; 
Akron, O.. 21-23; Youngstown, 24-26. 

"Rosebud Girls"— Casino, Brooklyn. 14-19: 
Cohan's. Newburg, N. Y., 21-28; Pough- 
keepsie. 24-26. 

Rose SydeU's — Empire, Toledo, O.. 14-19: 
Lyric, Dayton, O.. 21-26. 

Sam Howe's Show— Gayety, Detroit, 14-19; 
Gayety, Toronto, Ont.. 21-26. 

"Sight Seers"— Gayety, Washington, 14-19; 
Gayety, Pittsburgh, il-se. 

"Social Maids"— Oayety. Boston. 14-19: 
Grand, Hartford. Conn.. 21-28. 

"Sporting Widows''— Empire, Brooklyn, 14- 
19; Empire, Newark, tf. J., 11-26. 

Star and Garter Shows — Gayety. Toronto." 
Can.. 14-19; Gayety. Buffalo. N. Y.. 21-28. 

"Step Lively Girls"— Gayety. St. Louis. 
21-28. 

"Twentieth Century Maids" — Star, Cleve- 
land. O., 14-19; Empire. Toledo. 1I-SS. 

"Watson's Beef Trust" — Columbia, Chi- 
cago. 14-19: Berchel. Dea Moines. Iowa, 
20-23. 

AMERICAN CIRCUIT 

American — Plaza. Springfield. Mass., 14-19: 
Grand. Worcester, Mass.. 21-26. 

"Auto Girls"— Majestic. Indianapolis, 14-19: 
Gayety, Louisville, 21-26. 

"Aviator Girls" — Trocadero. Philadelphia, 
14-19; Camden. N. J., 21-23. 

"Beauty Review" — Gayety, Louisville, Ky., 
14-19; Lyceum, Columbus, O., 21-26. 

"Big Review" — Empire, Hoboken, N. J., 
14-19; Star, Brooklyn, 21-26. 

"Blue Birds"— Camden, N. J., 14-16; 
Easton, Pa., 22; Wllkesbarre, 23-26. 

"Broadway i Belles"— Gayety. Minneapolis, 
14-19; Star. St. Paul, 21-26. 

"French Frolics" — Gayety, Milwaukee, 14- 
19; Gayety, Minneapolis, 21-26. 

"Follies ot Pleasure" — Lyceum, Columbus, 
O.. 14-19: Wheeling. W. Va., 21-18: New- 
castle. 24; Beaver Falls, Pa., 25; Canton, 
O.. 26. 

"Follies or the Nlte"— Century, Kansas 

City, 14-19; Standard, St. Louis, 21-26. 
"Girls from the Follies" — Grand. Worcester, 

Mass., 14-19; Howard, Boston, 21-26. 
"Grown Up Babies"— Cadillac. Detroit. 14- 

19; Englewood, Chicago, 21-26. 
"Glrla from Joyland" — Wheeling, W. Va.. 

14-16: Beaver Falls, Pa.. 17: Canton, O., 

19: Victoria. Pittsburgh, 21-26. 
"Hello, Paree" — Star, Toronto, Can., 14-19; 

Garden, Buffalo, 21-26. , 

"High Flyers"— Olympic New York.. 14-19: 

Plaza. Springfield. Mass., 21-26. ' 
"Innocent Maids"— Gayety, Philadelphia, 

14-19; Camden, N. J„ 24-26, 
"Jolly Girls"— Star, Brooklyn, 14-19; Olym- 
pic, New York. 21-26. 
"Lid Lifters"— Majestic Scranton. Pa., 14- 

19; Blnghamton. N. Y..- 21-22. 
"Midnight Maidens"— Wrightatown, N. J., 

17-19; Philadelphia, 21-26. 
"Mile-a-Mlnute Girls"— WrightstOwn. N. J.. 

14-16: Trenton, 17-19: Empire, Hoboken, 

21-26. 
"Military Maids" — Empire. Cleveland, O., 

14-19; Cadillac, Detroit, 21-26. 
"Mischief Makers" — Gayety. Baltimore, 14- 

19;' Lyceum, Washington, 21-26. 
"Monte Carlo Glrls ,; -5'enn Circuit, 14-19; 
Gayety, Baltimore, 21-26. 

"Orientals" — Gayety, Brooklyn, 14-19; 

Wrightatown, N. J., 24-26. 
"Parisian Flirts" — Lyceum, Washington, 

14-19; Philadelphia. Pa., 21-26. 
"Pennant Winners"— Standard. St. Louis. 

14-19: Terre Haute, Ind.,' 20; Majestic, 

Indianapolis, 21-26. 
"Peacemakers" — Sioux City, Iowa, 13-17; 

Century, Kansas City. 21-26. 
"Pirates" — Englewood. Chicago. 14-19; 

Crown. Chicago. 21-26. 
Pat White Show— Garden, Buffalo, N. T., 

14-19; Empire, Cleveland, 21-26. 
"Paris by Night"— Easton, Pa., 16; Wllkes- 
barre. 16-19: Majestic. Scranton, Pa.. 

21-26. 
"Rasxle Dazzle Girls" — Howard, Boston, 

14-19; Gayety, Brooklyn, 21-26. 
"Record Breakers" — Star. St. Paul, 14-19: 

Sioux City, Iowa, 20-28. 
"Social Follies"— Camden. N. J., 17-19; 
Wrightatown, N. J., 21-23; Trenton.24-26. 

"Speedway Girls" — Blnghamton, N. Y.. 14- 

16; Watartown, N. Y.. 81; Oswego. 22: 

Niagara Falls. 23-26. 
"Tempters"— Niagara Falls. 18-19: Star. 

Toronto, Ont., 21-26. 
'■Trail Hitters"— Victoria. Pittsburg. 14-19: 

Penn Circuit. 21-26. 
"World Beaters" — Crown, Chicago. 14-19; 

Gayety, Milwaukee, Wis., 21-26. 

PENN CIRCUIT 

Monday — McKeesport, Pa. 
Tuesday — Uniontown. Pa. 
Wednesday— Johnstown, Fa. 
Thursday — Altoona, Pa. 
Saturday — York, Pa. 



Mills— First half. "Kiss Burglar"; last half, 

"Parlor, Bedroom and Bath." 
Merrltt— First half. Vaudeville; last half. 

"Parlor, Bedroom and Bath.'' 
Dig— All week, Billy Allen Musical Co. 
M e«d-*im balfTrKiee Burglar"; urn hair, 
_ Feature Pictures. 
Humphreys— First half. "Kiss Burglar" : last 

half Vaudeville. 
Lee— First half, "Flo, Flo" : last half. "Mimic 

World." 
Eustls— First half. Camp Show; last half. 

"The Brat," 
Stuart- -First half. "Hick a Bed" : last half. 

The Brat." 
Jackson— First half, Webster Musical Com- 
„ edy Co.: last half. "Mimic World." 
Gordon — First half. "Mimic World": last 
_ bait, Webster Musical Comedy Co. 
Pike— First half. Vaudeville: u»t half. Pic- 
tures. 
Bowie— First half, VaudevUle; last half. 

Pictures. 
Funston— First half. Pictures; la it half. 

Vaudeville. 
Dodge— First half, "Hearts of Humanity"; 

last half. Pictures. 
Grant— All week. Vaudeville. 
Custer — All week. Pictures. 
Sherman— All week. Vaudeville. 
Travis — AB week. Orpin- nm Stock Co. 

STOCK 

Arlington Theatre Co. — Boston. Mats.. Indef 
Astor— Guy Player*. Jamestown. N. Y., Indef. 
Alcaxar Players— Alcazar Theatre, Port- 
Ore, Indef. 

Bessey Stock Co. — Racine, Wis, Indef. 
Blaney Stock Co. — Colonial, Baltimore, Indef. 
Blaney Stock. — YorkvlUe. New York City, 
Blaney Stock — Lyceum, Troy, N. Y. 
Bunting Emma — 14th Street. New York city, 

Indef. 

Brissac, Virginia, Stock — Strand, San Diego. 
Cal.. lode?; 

Comerford Players — Lynn, Mass., Indef. 

Dominion Players — Winnipeg, Manitoba, Can., 
indef. 

Desmond, Mae, Players — Orpheum, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., Indef. - 

Desmond, Mae — Schenectady, N. Y. - 

Ebey Stock Co.— Oakland, Cal., Indef. 

Empire Players— Salem. Mass., indef. 

Enterprise Stock Co. — Green Bay, Wis., Indef. 

Grand Theatre Stock Co. — Tulsa, Okla, In- 
def. 

Gardner Bros. Stock Co.— Palace. Oklahoma 
City. Okla., indef. 

Hallman Stock Co. — Bex, Kingston, N. Y., 

14-24. 
Hyperion Players — New Haven, Conn., index. 
Hudson Theatre Stock Co. — Union mil. N. J.. 

Indef. 
Howard-Lorn Stock — National, Englewood, 

ill., Indef. 
Hawkins-Webb Co.— Majestic, Flint. Mich., 

Indef. 
..Hathaway Players — Brockton, Mass., Indef. . 
Keith Stock — Columbus, O., indef. 
Uscomb Players — Majestic, San Francisco, 

C«l., indef. 
Liberty Players — Strand, San Diego, Cal : 
Myrkle-Harder Co. — • Poughkeepsie, N. Y-, 

Maiden Stock Co. — Maiden, Mass.. Indef. 
Majestic Flayers — Butler, Pa, Indef. 
Morosco Stock Co. — Los Angeles, Indef. t 

Metropolitan Players — Blnghamton, N. Y,,' 

Indef. 
Martin. Lewis Stock Co.— Fox, Jollet, la, 

Nellie Booth Players— (Nellie Booth. Mgr.) 
— Kenyon, Pittsburgh. Pa, Indef. 

Northampton Players — Northampton, Mass, 
Indef. | 

Oliver Players — Shubert, St. Paul, Minn, 
Indef. 

Oliver Otis Players — Orpheum, Qulncy, III, 
Indef. 

Permanent Players — Orpheum, Moose Jaw, 
Saak, Can, indef. 

Permanent Players — Lyceum, Patereon. N. 
J, indef. 

Peck. Geo. — Opera House, Rockford, 111, in- 
def. 

Plnney Theatre Stock Co. — Boise, Ida.. Indef. 

Poll Players — Bridgeport, Conn, Index. 

Poll's Stock — Poll's, Hartford. Conn., Indef. 

Phelan, F. V.— Haiffai, N. 8, indef. 

Polack. Edith, Stock Co. — Diamond, New 
Orleans, indef. 

Roma Reade Edward Keane Players— 
Jamestown N. Y, Indef. 

Royal Stock Co. — Vancouver, B. C, Indef, 

Bhlpman Co, Bert— Hot Springs, Ark, lnaef. 



Savoy Players — Hamilton, Can., index. 
Trent Players — Hoboken, 
Vaugban Glaser 8tock Co, 



Trent Players — Hoboken, N. J, Indef. 

-Pittsburgh, Indef. 



U. S. LIBERTY THEATRES 
Week of April 21st 
Devens — Vaudeville (AH week). . . 

UptoD— First half. "Crowded Hour": last 
half, "Kiss Burglar." 



FRFF i- ate ^- 

I IV ju JL Issue of 
HOW TO MAKE-UP 



w, lit ot Caff 
, M. Stein Cosmetic Co. 

120 West Slst Stveet, New Veefc 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16, 1919 



E.F. ALBEE 

President 



J. J. MUKDOCK 



F. F. PROCTOR 



B. F. Keith 
Vaudeville Exchange 

(Agency) 

(Palaca Ths-tr. Building, New York) 

B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 

Artists Can Book Diract by Addressing S. K. Hodgdon 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Executive Offices, 130 West 46th St., New York 
JACK W. LOEB 

Cuilll SL»«JWt.g M.n.,«r 

EDGAR ALLEN • 

Miuiii 
PsrsoauU latarriaws with artists from 12 S9 6, or by 



tre Wanted 



Will cither lease or buy Theatre in any city of fifty thousand or more 
population. : II - : 

CHAS. E. TAYLOR, Box No. 262 Fair Haven. New Jersey 



MISS POLLI BARRI 

IN 

Songs, Comedy, Versatile Impressions, etc 



THE PERFECTION OF ARTISTIC STUPIDITY Eve-Telegram 

PELHAM-LYNTON 

And a Monocle. "The Symbol of interrogation and mcomprahonsibility/' — 

SIR GILBERT PARKER 



b,iiy HIBBITT and MALLE £bdie 

"Two Southern Boys" 

MATERIAL BY ANDY RICE DIRECTION— MAX GORDON 



MORE OVERSEAS ACTS SAO. " 

The following artists sailed recently on 
the LaLoraine under the auspices of the 
Overseas Theatre League of the Y.M.C.A. : 

Rex Adams, Vera Thomas, David Adler, 
Sim Bordeau, Dixie Brown, Jimmle Brown, 
Florence Carey, Frank De Mont, Gracia 
De Mont, Del Elliott, Edna Elliott, Al 
Findlay, Libby Arnold Blondelle, George 
Lawrence, Jack Lawrence, Thelma Law- 
rence, Will Lea, Phil Mills, Besse Moul- 
ton and Adeline Packard. 



ACTORS TRIM WRITERS 

(Continued from page 4) 

time Giant's homer, were nipped In the bod. 
LlbonatTs catch of Donlln's long fly inci- 
dentally, was a wonder, the basebaU playing 
xylophonlst, grabbing the sphere out of the 
atmosphere with one hand, while balancing 
himself gracefully on his ear and elbow, 
somewhat after the fashion of a contortion- 
ist. Ernie Stanton, much to Sammy Smith's 
relief bit at three dew drops and Webb and 
Davis were left on bases. No runs. 

Professor Glnsburg, an Itinerant magician, 
and a character as familiar as the Times 
Building ' to all Klal toltes, stood up in the 
stand while the teams were changing posi- 
tions, and proceeded to give the Songwriters 
a bit of fatherly advice on how to play ball. 
The Professor, encouraged by the plaudits 

of the rooters then -went on to entertain -the 
gathering, with a few choice witticisms on 
general topics. Sammy Levy, noticing that 
Ginsburg was making a hit joined in the 

clowning, the pair furnishing a pleasant 
Interlude of good natured banter that made 
the grandstanders yell their heads off. 

x Fourth lwsiiwaj 

Ubouati bunted and died at first. The 
decision struck Sammy Smith as open to ar- 
gument, and the Songwriters' pitcher went 
down to the coaching lues to have It out with 
Benny Leonard. Benny wasn't there to argue 
however, bnt to umpire, and following a 
short exchange between the ball player and 
Rcrapper. Leonard started to walk off the 
field. Leonard re-consldered after a min- 
utes reflection, however, and returned to his 
job of judging infield decisions. No casual- 
ties. Schoenbaum and Grossman retired in 
order. No runs. 

Katz hit safely and stole second, after 
Lewis was disposed of, but Robertson and 
Donahue failed to connect and Eats was left 
on the bag. No runs. 

Fiftb !■*»»■** sr 

Plantadosl batted a fly out to Donlin. 
Eastwood died on an inneld hit. Sammy 
Smith got his batting eye on the ball this 
time, snd .redeemed bis previous strike out 
by slamming out a two bagger. Kilter fol- 
lowed with a Texas leaguer into the infield, 
and Sammy's dream of scoring was cruelly 
shattered. No runs. 

Ubonatl made soother circus catch of 
Webb's long fly to deep right, and Davis 
popped an easy one to the Songwriters' short 
stop. Mike Donlin tried to duplicate bis 
right field tactics, but failed, Tom Payton 
who had replaced Grossman, grabbing a long 
fly, that Mike sent directly into his paws. 

Sixth IwTiiwp; 

Donlin made a great catch of Moe Schenck'a 
liner. Libonatl struck out. The crowd let 
out another rosr when Benny Leonard 
called I'helan out on first, and it really 
seemed »» If the Songwriters' catcher had" 
beaten the bail by a second or two. No runs. 

Fete Mack flew out to the Songwriters' 
third baseman. Stanton struck out. Lewis 
hit safely and stole second and third suc- 
cessively. Sammy Smith looked nervous 
again but pulled himself out of a hole by 
striking out Katz. No runs. 

Ssa e B Sa aaaaaaSI 

Schoenbaum flew out to right field, i'ay ton 
died at first, on a slow grounder and Plan- 
tadosl after getting to first on balls, was 
easily caught trying to steal second. No 
runs. 

The Actors made two runs in their half 
of the seventh. Robertson got to first and 
Jeff Davis kept up his onslaught on Sammy 
Smith's best In-suoots by slamming out a 
clean single. Mike Donlin hit another long 
fly into Tom Payton's mitt, but the hoodoo 
was working overtime in right field, and 
Tom let the ball bounce right off of his 
thumb. Robertson ant Davis scored. East- 
wood caught Pete Mack's fly and Stanton's 
ambitions were settled by some fast fielding. 

Eighth. I— wit s ? 
The Songwriters started off well in the 
eighth, Eastwood bitting safely over second, 
and Smith going to first on balls. The two 

men got no further, the next three song- 
writers going out in one, two, three order. 

The. Actors scored two more runs in the 
eighth, partly due to sloppy fielding by their 
opponents, and largely to a two bagger that 
Robertson contributed as his portion. Dur- 
ing the eighth inning a large black dog 
roamed over the field and had the time of 
his young life chasing the ball about. The 
crowd took the Incident good natnredly and 
when a couple of small boys left the grand 
stand and endeavored to capture the wan- 
dering canine, some three or four hundred 
of the spectators made up their minds to 
follow suit Benny Leonard and Willie 
Ritchie Immediately became the centre of ad- 
miring throngs, and Johnny Elvers finding 
that It was impossible to clear the field, 
called the game. 

Final score — Actors, seven; Songwriters, 
nothing. 




f/iirdc not 
lamwAaf 
Iappear" 

— arson 

•*l\fO. sir. " soon as I can shed this royal 
■i- 1 raiment and get busy with ALBOLENE 
to remove this make-up, I'll go with you to 
the hotel for something to eat." 

ALBOLENE 

Every man and woman on the stage knows 
that nothing equals ALBOLENE to remove 
the pjint and to keep the skin in good con 
dition. 

For the make-up box 1 and 2 ounce tubes. 
Also in 3>2 and 1 lb. cans. 

ALBO LENE is sold by -druggists and 
dealer* in make-up. 
Free sample on request. 



McKesson & robbins 

iBceisoratal 

Maoofac-tnrina Chemists 

list. IKS 

91 Fulton Street, NewYork 




MAX ROGERS 

Now at 
IT 1562 Broadway 
New York 



After April 30 

1544 Broadway 

(Z Flights Up) 



Musical Show* and Re- 
vue Production* My 
Specialty 



YOU MAY 



NO. 4 



ftll-In bits or also a 
new act. You can get cither of 
from thm new 

Mel* A LLY' S 
BULLETIN 
PM1CC ONC DOLLAR PER CORY 

casTAiat the rauswiae castor smteiial 
23 scnualBi shSmio, 15 retrial nil tat two 
snMs. U srsjlssl acta far as* sad fssaW, 90 
osro-an ostoswa, g root -i miaa am ana, 8 isttflsi 
owortetts Kts. a s«w sssMsydates; a snst nalsM 
esaaij art sstusssi, is art tw in ttaiMS. 12 
tertiii alastrtl ate* tsrg, a a nal alittnri Is**, 

leifrwts of illewaJI coniwnallasi 

■eo s r m hrr tho price at HeNALLVS EULLgflN 

No. 4 ■ s aw one dollar per copy; or sill snd *oa 

MJLLKTINS Nee. I lad I for I 1.60, with BOMf 

but manuitta. 

WM. McNALLY, 81 East 12Stb SI., N. Y 



3,000 eiia heralds. 4 pp., «ira piss 8i» $12.65 

10.000 8ii2 heralds, 4 pp.. etch pan 6r0 20.90 

6.000 10}4 X i4 heralds. 4 pp.. etch pub TxlOH 13.75 
10,000 lOVbilt bertha, 4 pp.. neb part TxlOH 22.00 

5.000 12x18 heralds. 4 pp.. nth ptft Sxlz 16.50 

10.000 12il8 bertha. 4 pp., etch page 9il2 27.30 

6,000 14x31 beralrtj, 4 pp., etco pair lOVsill 1».2> 
io.ooo 14x21 oaths, 4 rv . etch page 10MU4 33.00 

6.000 8x24 bmloa, two stool VT7. ...... 13.20 

10.000 6x24 hermltk, too aldee 21.45 

5.000 7131 Denude, too adea .'.. 13,75 

10,000 TlSl heralds, two .Ion 22.00 

3.000 8x24 herald*, two sides 16.30 

10,000 8x24 heralds, too ddes 27.50 

6,000 10)4x28 heralds, too tldtt 19.25 

10,000 104x28 heralds, too Udeo 33.00 

Union label on in prlnUnt. . IWfflt: Cash with ardor. 
Prices auUl o rt to ^whsw without notice. 

GAZETTE SI0W TOOTING COMPANY 

U. T. at A. M« ttoon. ni_ O. S. A. 



DR. FREDERICK SOBEL 

DENTIST 
>ora> t A. M.-7 P. M. Sosssaysi U 
P. M. Ewswaxosr. by Allllllail 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 




LETTER BOX 



In order to avoid if'*'**-* and to Insure tha prompt eVaUrwry sf th. lattan a d is r tlssd 
to this Uet, a POSTAL CARD must b* Mat i»i|ii— lra« aa to ha w ai d yaar latter. It moat 
U abraad with, your full nana and tha addraaa to which tha latter la to ha east, and tha 
ltoa of bosiaaawa followed by th. under should ha iwas tins art 

i tk. data (or saustVsr) of vh» CLIPPER as wbieh tha latter* earn for 



Bangb, Jim 
Bduco, Jean 
Bertraad. Prank 
Deltonlll, Jot 
Dillon, Elmer 



Anmtimc 
DonUv 
AiUlr, Ju tt 
Allen. Marls. 
Bennett, Orate 



Daly, Ue 
Dab- a wild 

Drummood, Oeedl 
rronnl . 
Fltaeerald, %. U 



Betts. Mrs. Geo. 
Byno, Vn B. B. 
■Bradley, Bobble 
Caliert. Mar- 

roerUe 
CDkTTlnxnaVin, Ann*- 



GENTLEMEN 

Henry ft Uiell LAW ft D il 8 

BuCetaklM. Bd D. . Mijtr, Ju. 

Bern. Ju. Morrison ft CUT 
Klot. a T. un 

TJoyd, Bkhud Miner, Nelson 

LADIES 

Cbnrland. Huel Hears. Mir 
Cole. Beatrice Buaroak, Mis F. 

Darin, Gladys Joyce, laaim: 

Fcareejl, Bitte la Guar. Maria 
Gnbu, Mesa Ioddurt. Mabel 



Miller. Fred P. 
Manbail. Bat 
Power. Herbert 
Bldtdale. Frank 
BJebarda. R. T. 



Laker, Eleuara 

M. 
Mayhew. Kale 
Mansard, Vlr- 

dnU 



Sarars, Barnard 
Sharp. Beo 
Bylwster 
Toaeano. Otis 
Urban Stock Co. 



McCnth. Eileen 
Isabel 



Lillian 
WMUhnrst. Billy 
Wlntera. Mae 



CHORUS GIRLS WANTED 

Fifty-two weeks' work. Liberal salary for stock in New York . City. 
MINSKY BROS. — National Winter Garden, Houston Street and Second 
Ave. See Ray Perez. 



TENNEY 



ON AN ACT is a guarantee of something: new, novel, and original 
in the way of vaudeville offerings. Start right, and write for me 
to. write for you. I can be of "MATERIAL.* assistance if it's 
"MATERIAL" you want. Write, phone, wire, or call. ALLEN 
SPENCER TENNEY, 14*3 Broadwajr, Now York City. 



DEATHS IN THE PROFESSION 



In loving memory of my dear Hgoband 

HAROLD HEARN 

Who passed away April 11, 1919. 
Mourned by hla sorrowing wife. 

LILLIAN. 
Ood Raat His Soul. 



SIDNEY DREW, the well-known actor, 
died Wednesday, April 9th, at hla home In 
New York from uraemia, from which he 
had suffered for several yean. With hla 
wife he had been touring In "Keep Her 
Smiling" and his condition became serious 
about ten days ago arid it was decided to 
close the company. He was brought to this 
city from Detroit on April 7th and shortly 
after his arrival here ha became uncon- 
scious, "In which condition he remained 
until the end. . 

Sidney Drew came from a family of 
actors, being the son of Mrs. John Drew, 
the elder, and half brother to the present 
John Drew, and waa himself a noted actor, 
for years being considered one of the best 
exponents, of light comedy and light eccen- 
tric comedy on the American stage. 

He was born nfty-slx years ago In Cali- 
fornia. Hla early life waa spent in Phila- 
delphia, in which city he made his pro- 
fessional debut at the age of eighteen at 
the Arch Street Theatre, appearing- as 
Dolly Spanker to the Lady Gay Spanker 
of Fanny Davenport. 

His success was Instantaneous and before 
he was twenty-one he toured the country 
at the head of his own company. He con- 
tinued on the dramatic stage for a number 
of years, during which time he not only 
appeared In modern comedies but In re- 
vivals of some of the old-time comedies in 
which his mother also appeared. 

In 1896 he and his first wife, Gladys Ran- 
kin Drew, appeared in vaudeville, where he 
met with continued success and was for 
years a ■ leading; headllner. One of the 
greatest hits the Drews made in vaudeville 
was In "Billy's Tombstones," a Bkctch writ- 
ten by Gladys Drew, which was later 
elaborated Into a three-act farce, and re- 
named "Billy." and in this the Drews re- 
turned to the dramatic stage. After the 
death of his first wife in 1914. Drew mar- 
ried Lucille McVey. 

As Sidney Drew was one of the first 
noted dramatic actors to enter vaudeville, 
so was he one of the first to go Into the 
picture field, his first engagement In the 
film field being with the Vltagraph. Here, 
as in the drama and vaudeville, he waa 
again successful and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney 
Drew became famous for a round of come- 
dies and respectively as "Henry"- and 
"Polly" they won a place among the best 
known of the film stars. 

Sidney Rankin Drew, the only son of the 
deceased actor, and himself a motion pic- 
ture actor and director, joined the Lafay- 
ette Eseadrille In 1917, and was killed May 
18, 1918, In an air duel over the German 
lines. His son's death deeply affected Drew 
and he never fully recovered from the loss. 

VIRGINIA KELSEY died suddenly last 
Week of Influenza. She was last seen In 
the "Military Maids." 



MARIA DAVIS, well known on the stage 
before her retirement ten years ago and, 
In private life, known as Maria Belosco, 
the widow of George Belasco. died last 
week at her home. She was born in Eng- 
land and played for twenty years before 
she retired. Her last appearance was with 
David Warfteld In "The Auctioneer." 

E. PERCY BAYLOR, well known as a 
comedian for thirty years, died last week 
at the Hamburg tuberculosis sanitarium In 
Pittsburgh. 

Mr, Saylor waa known to the stage as 
Eddie Redway and, besides touring the 
United States, has played In England, Ire- 
land and Scotland. He left home at the 
age of eleven and made his debut on the 
stage at the age of seventeen years. At 
nineteen years of age he appeared In the 
Academy of Music, now the Rajah, in 
Pittsburgh, with "We, Us, and Company." 
He later appeared with Eva Tanguay In 
"The Cbaperone" in 1902 and In "The Gin- 
gerbread Man" In 1906. Two years after- 
ward he played In "Babes in Toyland," by 
Victor Herbert, ills lant theatrical work 
was with the Hsaatuty Photoplay Company. 
Saylor was forty-nine years old and was 
born In Pittsburgh. He Is survived by his 

father and three orothers. 

HAROLD DUKANE, a young dancer and 
vaudevllltan, waa killed last Saturday near 
Portland. Me.. In an attempt to Jump from 
one sand dune to another in an auto of hla 
own make. A big crowd waa on hand to 
see the feat. Dukane got up speed over a 
long level stretch, coming to the edge of 
an opening 25 feet wide. He went Into the 
air at a height of 25" feet above the beach. 
Intending to land on a dune 25 feet away 
and about 10 feet below hla take-off. As 
soon as* the car left the ground the weight 
of the motor pulled It down In front and It 
turned over and dropped. Dukane fell un- 
der the little machine, which waa not heavy 
enough to have crushed him, but he landed 
on his head and broke his neck. 

His mother is Mrs. Benin Connolly, Bor- 
deaux Apartments, 127th Street and River- 
side Drive. Dukane was born In Rochester 
twenty-four years ago and became a pro- 
fessional dancer at eighteen. With June 
Edwards as a partner he danced one year 
at the Hotel Astor. Two years ago, with 
Miss Edwards and Hilda Curling, he went 
on the Keith Circuit, and last week he 
played In Portland. It was Dukane'a cus- 
tom to ride from town to town on the cir- 
cuit in an automobile he had fashioned out 
of two motorcyclea. 

MRS. J. R. SHANNON, formerly one of 
the "Flamme Slaters," died April 4th. The 
-cause of her death was an explosion of 
gasoline while she was cleaning her gloves 
ten weeks previous to her death. She waa 
badly burned and suffered until she passed 
away. 

HAROLD HEARN, husband of Lillian 
Hearne, died suddenly at his residence. No. 
9S3 Eighth Ave., N>. Y.. on Friday, April 
11th. He was recently employed at the 
Central Theatre and previously was with 
the "Alone At Last" Company. He Is sur- 
vived by his wife, mother, sister and two 
brothers. 

BILLY BETTS, of the vaudeville team 
of Betts and Chidlow, died last Tuesday. 
The act was well known in the eastern 
small time houses having played continu- 
ously In and about Greater New York for 
the last two years. . 



GLADYS KLARK COMPANY 

WANTS IMMEDIATELY. Repertoire people, with or without specialty. Also 
AGENT. Answer by WIRE only. Address J. E. BALFOUR, Somergworth. N. H. 

Owing to my partner meeting with accident sod less completely of his left band, he will sail for eaah. at east, hit 
entire brand new, completely nickeled trash*. Never been owed, at yojr pries. 14 x 5. lacludlne bar sad eTotSMs tat of 
rloo: also carrying ease. 

WAST also to hear from woman (touts 6trona tUnctac and Dentins Art, lane aresoo. 1 pay ait expenses. Can aha, 
on say male shade, ameleal If possible. Write quirk. JACK CLIFFND, 333 Watt 48t» St. las York. 

%a»sf am JVt,TP,gf\ Musical Conrdv Ptjopiti! all Unit for 
WAIl I C.U BATES MUSICAL COMEDY CO. 

Prins» Deauaa, Novelty Girl Acts, Eapsrksaazsstl Chorus Girls. State age, height, weight and 
lowest salary for summer and next season. This is not a "Tab" show. Playing one and twi 
week stands best theatres. Address Loomer ThwwtrB, WiUUmatic, Cnaan,. Weak April M| 
Orpheum. Kingston, N. Y., Weak April 21. 



AN ODDITY IN SKILL 



DOROTHY 



DALY & WILD 



IN "TRAVELING SALESMAN" 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



NEW YORK ATTRACTIONS 



CEO. f All AN Theatre, B'wsy A 43d at. Bess. 
H. VVllAIi 8.30. Mats. Wed. A Sat. 2.30. 

GEO. M. COHAN'S 

sflrfJ COMEDY 

"A PRINCE THERE WAS" 

GEO. M. COHAN AS THE PRINCE 

Phyllis Hsilson-TSITT, Bar- 
nard OranTiUe, Yvatts 
Rngsl, Walter a Kelly, 
Harry OlSU A Co.. Helton 
Broadway A 47th 8t. a Chain, Una Clayton A 
■VUU " Co., Joha Bsgay * th. 
Lorraine slitara, lltllls 



PM.AK 



28, 00 and 7Bc. 
■ very Klikt 
fj 80 75 $1 II .50 Solar. 



elans lIssswTlssill Theatre. W. 43d Bt. Byes. 8.10. 
rtfW rUaBIUasfMI Mats. Wed. a Bat. 2.IS. 

wr.aw a ehlanoer PErani 

TIE VELVET LADY 

Hilarious New Bntleal Comedy. 

MUSIC BT VIOTOB BKBB1CB T. 



HUDSON 



W. 44th 8t. nr. B'wsy. Brie, 
sjs. Hats. Wed. * Bat. 2.so. 

"A Million-Dollar l uu osst " — Globe. 
A. H. WO0D8 PRESENTS 

louis SAM 

MANN BERNARD 

IB FRIENDLY ENEMIES 

BY sssssssl Ehlpman SSd Aaron Hoffman. 



M.llrlll.1*. st 8.80. Mats. Wed. a Sat. 2.30. 
A. H. WOODS PRESENTS 

UP IN 

MABEL'S ROOM 

With wraTter. DAWN. JOHaT CTTMBEKT-AnTD sad 

WA1TEB JONES. 

B'wsy A 40th Bt E«ee. 8.20. 
slats. V7ed. A Bat. at 2.20. 
ohables raoHMAjr presents 

WILLIAM GILLETTE 

IB THE NEW COMZDT 

"DEAR BRUTUS" 

BY J. at. BABBIT. 



LYCEUM 



tStb St. near B'wsy. 

B.30. Mats. Tbnr. A Bat. 2.30. 



nlvrolffiUMo PREhTNTB 

DADDIES 

Theatre. West «u. St. Brcs. 
8 M. Mats. Thar. A Bat. 1-20. 
DAVID BKT.IBCO F BXSEMT8 
LAST wrasaast 

FRANCES STARR 

In "TIGER! TIGER!" 

TawS. April 33— DAVID ssasassasssB 

M 



DC DIID I IP W. «2<1 St. Brew. 8.30. Mats. 
RXrUDLIL Wed. a 8at. 2.80. 



LAST TWO 
ARTHUR HOPKINS PRESENTS 

MARJORIE RAMBEAU 

(By airangeasat with A. B. WOODS) la 

•THE FORTUNE TELLER" 



fTHABTiFB DILLINOHAM 

EVERYTHING 1 



at tha 



HIPPODROME 

A Mammoth Moaioal Spectacle by R. H. BavsasUe. 
' slats. Dally. Bast Beets. II. 

OLYMPIC F* 



waVf 3rd Ave. 



This Week 



HIGH FLYERS 

Naxt We»k—JOLLY GIRLS 

BROOKLYN THEATRES 

tO 1 **"' A B*> Jay nr. Tnlton St. MaL 
IkZf a. ai^BsjBVV Tel. Msln lfM Dally 

JOLLY GIRLS 

^ST* J S? 4 »".* »lg C asi t a ras 
Wr—tlin, Cvarr Tntadaw 

Next Weak- BIG REVIEW 

CASINO THEATRE 

THIS WEEK 

ROSEL AND GIRLS 

Nest Weak— MAJESTJCS 

OAYETY .KTCAftt 

THIS WEEK 

ORIENTALS 

SUNDAY CONCERTS 

sfctsjjaaj by MORCANSTEBN 
Galwty Tsawetra Bids , Nsw Yaws 

EMPIRE THEATRE 

THsS WBEK 

STORTING WIDOWS 

N.*t Wamsc—BON TONS 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16. 1919 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES, 

LAnGXST ASSORTMENT DT THE WOSLDl Books for bow 
wiwirt. Negro Plays. Piper. Scenery, Mr*. Juiey*s Wax 

Work*. Catalogue Free! Free! Free! 

SAM I EL FRENCH, M Wert 3th Sl, New York 




ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 

Formerly lis New Rtrmt 
JOS. T. WE13MAN. r»u s» t o u.i 

Northwest Corner 14th and Chestnut St*., St Louis, Mo. 

Theatrical Hostelry, Cafe ami Cabaret 
Union Help (H.mb«r N. V. A. and Burlesque Club) But Bet on the Circuit 



BUSS 



FAY 



THE QUAKER CITY FOUR 

AMERICA'S GREATEST HARMONY FOUR 

NEUHAUS DIR.-NICK FELDMAN SHALKER 



MONEY 


GANSON 

-JO 'V ;S 

Singrmg-, ihnring and a little 

-. DIRECTION- NAT SO BEL 


novelty 


LASHER 

3 . 



DOROTHY DOYLE 

"Melodic* of the Moment." la Vsuderille 



Co otortiowwuT Dir. — Tommy CuniB 



VINCENT MOORE- 



"The Thief," by Miss Blanche Merrill 



NELLIE CRAWFORD 

Singing and Dancing Sonhrette Direction — Rochm or, Richards Oriental* 



WARREN & WADE 



In "The City Employee" 



doo STONE & WALL m 

Unicytle end Bicycle 



PAUL SWANN DANCES 

Paul Swann, who haa appeared in vande- 
ville, notably at Hammersteiirs some . 
years ago, presented a dance recital at 
the Selwyn Theatre last Thursday. Six 
girls assisted him. 

Following the rendition of an overture, 
Glade's "Legend of 108X08" was rendered. 
Then came "Lungi Dal Caro Bene," by 
Secchi, snug by Walter Mills, baritone, 
and- assisted by 'Clara Wullner at the 
piano. 

Two East Indian dances were then done 
by Martha Claiborne and Isabel Grey. 'An- 
other selection by .the orchestra was fol- 
lowed by a dance by Swann alone. 

After the intermission came another 
number by the orchestra, followed by some 
more singing by Walter Mills. '"To Heroes 
Slain" was finely done by Swann, after 
which Dorothy Day did the Nantch dance. 
Swann's "Narcissus" was received with 
delight and the Egyptian ballet, with 
Martha Claiborne, Isabel Grey, Vera Lee, 
Helene Jesmer, Lola 'rHepper and Dorothy 
Day, was 'a decided hit. A final number, 
by Swann and the girls, left a strong im- 
pression. 

HELEN WARE SUES BROKER' 

Helen Ware has filed a complaint with 
the County Clerk in which she alleges that 
John H. Hobbs, a stock broker, obtained 
from her $1,000 for stock which he has 
failed to deliver and also that he did not 
return the money paid to him and with 
which he was to purchase the stock. 

According to Miss Ware's complaint, 
Hobbs told her, in April, 1914, that he 
was organizing; the "Vanscope Sales Com- 
pany," which was to handle valuable prop- 
erty. The complainant further alleges 
that Hobbs agreed to sell her $1,000 worth 
of preferred' stock in the company, yield- 
ing 7 per' cent per annum and include 
$2,400 worth of the common stock for 
$1,000. Miss Ware charges that she gave 
him $1,000 to dose the deal, bnt that on 
May 15, 1814, Hobbs appeared with an 
offer supplementing his first arrangement 
for the delivery of the stocks. On that 
occasion, gays Miss Ware in her complaint, 
the defendant told her that the company 
was already organized and that it "had 
become possessed of a very valuable pat- 
ented machine." He added that he would 
sell her $1,000 in 7 per cent, preferred 
and $2.60 par value common for $1. Miss 
Ware demands judgment for $3,000. 



Vaudeville Acta, Musical 

Etc 



TAKE NOTICE! 

m ready to write mist— I assesesre, 
dt and mnsic Also perf e ct arraaglag. 
Prompt delivery. HUGH W. SCHUBEKT. 
r sat State St, sVUjra. 



WIGS a«d BEARDS 

tN AJ1 Styles and Qualities 

THEATRICAL JEWELRY AND 
SPANGLES, TIGHTS, OPERA HOSE 
AND STOCKINGS, FANCY BRO- 
CADES, GOLD and SILVER TRIM- 
MINGS, and all Goods Theatrical. 
Hifh Crads Qualities at Lowest Prices 

O SAMPLES UPON BEQUEST 

I. J. WYIf & BM, Inc 

Successors to 

S1EGMAN * WEIL 

18 A 20 E. 27th St New York 




PLAYS 



New Patriotic 

Bar 'War Time 

Benefits. 

VaadcvmeSketcaes. Stage Mono- 

logoes. New Minstrel Material, Jokes, 

HandBooka,C- 




losns FREE. 

T.S. OENWON * CO. 



GARDEN PIER RE-OPENS 

Atlantic Cut, N. j„ April 14.— Keith's 
Garden Pier Theatre reopened here to- 
night with a splendid vaudeville bill 
beaded with Marie Dressier.. It also had 
Claire Vincent, Leo- Donnelly, Emmett 
Welch, Slim Klaiss, Saxe Klntings Enter- 
tainers, and the Royal Urania Japs. 



SCENERY 

Dfassoad Dye. OH or Water C ate r s 
SCHELL SCENIC STUDIO, COLUMBUS, O. 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS, 
N. T. PLAY BUREAU, JbH 
Decatur Ave, New York Otj. 
Stamp for catalog.' ■ 



UNITY HALL 

4 HALLS-GOOD PIANOS 

341 W. 47th St., New York 

Bryant 3719 B. A. METZGER, MgT. 



GOOD APPEARING YOUNG MAN 

"Satires to join Ibestrlcals, Musical or Stock Co. 
Good voice for chores, s^so good Falsetto. No pre- 
vious experience. For particulars, address B. A. 
O., P. 0. Box 87, arattoa, Kasa. 



Attention Vaudeville Acts 

John Quigley Theatrical Agency, Inc. 

Can book acts consecutively for 5 weeks. Extra Sundays, 
Short Jumps. New England's Leading Independent 
Agency. 184 Boylston St, Boston, Mass. All corre- 
spondence answered. 



BEATRICE LAMBERT 



THE INTERNATIONAL GIRL 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



'— .. COLLETTE MA1SIE 

BATISTE & L'ESTRANGE 

CLASSICAL AND POPULAR MELODIES 



A D R O I 

VerMtfle Variety Offering 



PLYNN 



lesteb FAD and FANCY «*■»' 

Straight and Do in* S mging Spec iaJ ty C has. Baker's H igh Fliers 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 



(Continued (rasa page S) 



Foil (lint Half)— Bert Draper— Ed * Lottie 
Ford — Bigoletro Brae, (lilt Half) — Dlngley ft 
Norton— Amorce A Obey— Keating ft Wiltoo — John 



Plaxs (rii»t Half)— WMBe Archie— Cepeland i 

McCkwi — Adelaide - B*lki A Clef Cash JsaK Band. 

(Last Half)— Cecil ft Berniee— Liberty Trio— BllUa 
BecTes A CO. 



.* 



LO EW CIRCUIT 



juw yobx cm. 

American (First Half) — Harlequin Trio — Fields 
o ttj t e ri -Bomani Troupe — Montrose ft Allen — Great 

Howard — Cook A Oatatta — "Girl from Rock 

laUnd"— Barron ft Bart. (Lest Half)— BrightODS 
— Goets ft Duffy — Baraban ft Grohs — Dudley Doug- 
laa — Hymen. Adler ft Co. — Kane A Herman. 

Boulevard (Flrat Bain — Com 1 He. Peraoni * Co.— 
Foley . * McGowan — Dorothy Sothern Trio— Cooper 
ft Blcanlo— Edwards Broa. (Last Half) — Header- 
•on ft HalUday— Lane A Harper — Hodler, Stein ft 
Phillips— ZlegWrW^rlne A Co. mf r 

Linooln Sonar* (Flrat Half) — Frank Hartley— 
Bran ft Moor e 'J& Man from Dearer" —Kaiie ft Her- 
man — Chalf onto -.Slaters. (Last Half) — Kremka 
Broa. — Folej AlatcQowan — Hal Stephens — Cooper ft 
Bleardo — Eight Black Dot*. 

national (First Half)— Margot ft Franco!*— Mar- 
belle Beat— "Old Fashioned Olrl"— Paul Bolln— 
La Petite Jennie. (Lait Half)— sterling A Mar- 
guerite — Montana Five — Julian Hall. 

Aram B (Flrat Half)— Orben ft Dixie— Ash ft 
Hxama — Benry Frey — Carl Boalnl * Co. (Last 
Half) — Cole ft Dunaby — Charlotte Leslie — Billy O. 
Hall A Co. — Feme ft Howell — Pleas A Rector. 

Orphean (First Half) — The Brightens — Beck ft 
Stone — Goeta ft Duffy— Joseph Remington ft Co. — 
Lyons ft Tosco— Sterling A Marguerite. (Last 
Half)— Harlequin Trio — Byan A Moore — Han-la A 

Lyman — "Pretty Soft" — Lyons A Tosco— Lata Sal- 

Delaaosy (First Halt) — Veronica ft Hirrlfalll 
Charlotte Leslie — Hall A Shapiro— Lane ft Harper 
—Hodler, Stein A Phillips — EqulRo Bros. (Last 
Half)— Edwards Bros.— Msaon ft Cole— Maybeile 
Best— "Olrl from Bock Island"— Montrose A Allen 
— Uncle Sam's Boys.. .... 

. Victoria (First Half)— Kremka Bros— Jim Bey- 
oolda — Hyman. Adler ft Co. — Mayo ft Nerlns— 
Baraban ft Grobs. (last Half )— Margot A Fran- 
cois— Jewett A Elgin— Great Howard — Cook A Oat- 
man— Carl Boalnl. 

Greeley Square (First Half) — Wellington A Syl- 
via — Storey A Clark — Hal Stephens ft Co. — Dudley 
Douglas — Zlecler Twins ft Co. (Last Half) — 
Dorothy Sothern Trio — Hall ft Shapiro — Janet of 

France — Merlin — Koto Carniral. 



DeXalb (First Half)— Gang ler'a Dogs— Jewett ft 
Burin— "Pretty Soft"— Brady ft Maboney— Lai Sel- 
WnL (Last Half)— Wellington ft SjlTla— Panl 

Bonzi — "Man from Denrer" — Mayo A Herlns — 
Chalfonte Sisters. 

afstrspolUss (First Half) — Sherman ft Bear 
Mason A Cole— Koka Carnlral— JaUarj Hall— Anas 
Chandler. (Last Half) — Jack A Jose Laugh u D — 
Beck A Stone — Harry First ft Co. — Anna f*an*W 
— Botnaa Troupe. 

Palaoe (First Half)— Montana Flse— Ferns ft 
Howell — Randow Trio. (Last Half) — Henry Frey 
— Ash ft Hyams — Chaa. McGoods ft Co. 

Fulton (First Half)— Aronty Bros.— Francis ft 
Connolly — Janet of France — Merlin— Eight Black 
Dots. (Last Half) — Frank Hartley— Storey ft 
Clark— Cam! lie. Personl ft Co.— Carole Trio— La 
Petite Jennie. 

Warwick (First Half) — Cole ft Donaby— Mel 
Eastman— Billy 8. Hall ft Co. — Carlo Trio. (Last 
Half)— Jim Reynolds — Gorman Bras. — Bandow 
Trio. 

BALTIMORE, KS. 

Hippodrome. — K Legal — Lone Nose — Friends ft 
Downing— Six Virginia Steppers. 



PANT AGES CIRCUIT 

BTJTTE, MONT. 
Pantage* (Four Days) — Guy Weadlrk'a Stampede 
Blders- Eddie Boss — Raines A Goodrich — Deal- 
shawn Dancers — Gordon A Day. 

, CALOABY, CAJt. 

Paatagoa— Camp Dlx Jan Band — Tom Kelly — 
Martha Russell ft Co.— Backer ft Wlnlfr-G— Locy 
Valmont A Co. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Bsssaegss T s Petite Era— Tellyho Girls — Jack 
Boas — Burke ft Burke— Zuhn ft Drcls— La Toy's 
Dogs. 

EDMONTON, CAM. 
Pantaye* — "Some Baby" — Harris ft Mar-nlon— 
Sterer A Lovejoy — Maldlc DeLong — Victoria Fonr- 
Wlll Morris. 

GREAT FALLS, MONT. 
Fantages— Caltea Bros, ft Co.— Race ft Edge— 

Both ST. Denis — Alice Teddy -Joe Reed. 
LOB ANGELES, CAL. 
Pan ta g as M ogastne Girl— Lew Wilson— llcCon- 
nell A Simpson — Van A Vernon— Joe Desley ft 81-- 
ter. ■■ i - J »-» ■' ■ >' ' V ■.-•-■- . .-. i" - 

; S V JOAKXAHD, CAL. ejf> ,. -- 

Fantages — DeLkln's Dogs — Jim liohi-rry — Zara 
Carmen Trio — Lowe A "Baker Slaters — McKay's 
Scotch Be toe — William SIsto. - ' 

OODEN, UTAH. 
Fantages— Fonr Mayakos — Senator Francis Mux- 
pr-y — Maryland Singers— Begsl A Moore — Murphy 
A Kiel o — Lore A Wllhnr. 

PORTLABD, ME. 
Pantages— MIDlon Dollar Dolls— Arthur Barrett 
— Uka- Msrie Deel — Jack A Marie Grey — Astor Foot 
— Aeroplane Girls. 

BEGIN A. CAM. 

Pantages (First Half)— Anderson's Ecvoe — Barry 
ft Ley ton — Josephine' Deris — Kajlyssua — Fay A 
Jack Smith — Helen Jackley. 

BAH FRANCISCO, OIL. 
Vastsass — Spanish Dancers — Barnes ft Freeman 
— Sandy Donaldson — Aleko, Panthea ft Preoco— Phil 
La Toeka. 

SAB DIEGO, CAL. 
Fantagas — World Wide Berne — Ned Norworth A 
Co. — ProTol— OW Time Darkles— Delton, . Hareena 
A Delton. 

SPOKANE, WASH. 
Pantages — Dorothy Roye — Mennettl SldeUl — John 
G. Sparks ft Co. — Denn Linn — Klaas ft Termini — 
Hoosier Girls. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Faatagee — Gantiera Toy Shop — Fox A Brltt — 
Wlllard's Fantasy of Jewels— Bookie Lewis— Vina 
ft Temple— Barry Tsnds. 

SALT LAKE CTTT, UTAH. 
Pantsgss — Pekinese Troupe — Spencer A Wilson — 
Little Burglar — Weir A Temple — Dancing TyreUs. 
TACOKA, WASH. 
Futagea — Three Nooses — Mel Klee — Mile. Blanca 
* Co. — Valentine Vox — Julia Clifford — Tcscano 
Brothers. 



vAsoorrvrm. cam. 

Pantaaae Foot Danube* — Chaa. F. Bemea — Ool- 
llnls Dancers — Haosh ft Larelle— Beth Cnaola— 

Ballet Proof Lady. 

VICTOsUA, CAN. 
Pantages— Mas lSOD— Who Is Her— McLellan A 
Carson — Denna Una — Three Weston Sisters. 
uif i n wn CAN. 

Pantages — Scnepp's Comedy Circus — Rhoda ft 
Crampton — Jimmy Britt — Samaroff Trio— Teeter 



lnF , V. Wn» A. 
rTCT T X V 1 1 T.S? TT.T. 

(First Half)— Slgsbee'a 

' Bbta A Vletor. (Last Half) 

— Gilroy. Haynes ft Mon tgomery— Jordan Girts. 
BBAJTTTORD, CAM. 

Brant (First Half)— Jack A Jlll-Bd ft Mln Foo- 
ter— Vsllamoraa Gypsies. (Last Half)— Mason A 
Austin — Foor Jacks and a Queen — Lind. . 
BTLLIHGS, MONT. 

Babosek (April 20-21 )— Jimmle Gallon— Lamey A 
Pearson— Johnsou Dean Berne— Lillian Ds Vere — 
nelene Trio. (April Z4> — Too Aatellaa— Kline A 
KUftou— Delmar. Flsber ft Delmar— Jimmle Lyons 
— BellmonU fiiatera. 

- BUTTE, MOST. 

Poople's TTlpgoJuiilie (April 20-22) — Appier A Ap- 
pier—Propeller Trio— Doberty A Scallo— Trebble ft 
Tbomas — Billy Kolgbt ft Roosters. (April 2S-7S) — 
Jimmle Gallon — Lamey A rearsoo — Johnson-Dean 
Rerue-^LUUau IS Vere— Helen* Trio. ~'* T - ■ 
CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 

Orpaeum (First Half)— Middletoo A Spellmeyer 
— Sulllrsn A Myers — Cath. Crawford A Fashion 
Girls— Al Soblman— Wheeler Trio. (Last Half)— 
Btcknell — Bill A Edna Frawley — John A Winnie 
Hennlngs— Ray ft Emma Dean — The Rials. 
CHICAGO, TT.T.. 

American (First Half)— Hoshl— Gregory A Lsn- 
noo — Keroe De Luxe — The Brisnts. (Last Half) — 
Ray Francis. 

Xedxia (First Half)— Wands— Stanley A Dale— 
Winter Ganlen Rerue— Jack Ostennan — ^Tlie Rials. 
(Laat Halt)— Skating Bear— BlUle A Dot— BSsSsSs* 
A Fr^ter — Teonesaee Ten. "' 

Empress (First Half)— BUlle ft Dot— Harry ft 
Etta Oonley— Briscoe ft Bsoh — John Oelger — Mori 
Bro*. • (Last Half)— West ft Lemer— SUber ft 
North — Four Casters. ' 

Hippodrome, — Vada Clayton— Flab er ft Oilmen — 
Elan- Williams— Bobby Hensnaw— Visions De Mllo 
—Daisy Dugas ft Variety Fom — Stan ft May 
LaureL 

CAMP LEWIS. WASH. 

Greene Park (April 20-Z3)— Corsn ft Helens- 
Hello Toklo — B. Kelly Forrest— Csrdner'a Meniere 
—Toe Heyns. (April 24-26)— Wheelock ft Hey- 
day ft Robinson — "Cycle of Mirth" — To ui e s tl — 
Knrty's Troope. 

DECATUR, XIX. 

Empress (First Halt) — Corp. Joe Nathan— Bill A 
Edna Frawley — Sitter A DuVal — 8tyne ft Arnold— 
"Making the Marie." (Last Half)— Middletoo ft 
Spellmeyer — Orando Duo— Al Woblman — Making 
Movies — McUreevey ft Doyle. 

DES atoms. XA. 

Empress (First Half) — Heraa ft Preston — Fer- 
guson ft Sonderland — Baby Bugs — Wlutergardea 
Four — "Manila Bay." (Last Half)— Clifford A 



Marsh— Thomas ft McDonald— Jack Gardner ft Co. 

— Jardln's Berne. 

DTJBXfQtTE, IA. 
Majestlo— Clifford A Marsh— Rainbow Berne— 
Pearsoo Trio. ■ 

TJITLUTU. Mnnr. 
Mew Grand (First Half)— Curtis ft Buster— 
Jarria ft Hairteaa — Number Please — Jeuks A I lion 
(Last Half)— Mowatt A Mullen— LocUe A Tost— 
Three Musical Qoeeaa — Hudson Slaters. 
BAST ST. LOrjra, ill. 
Erser's (First Half)— BaaU ft Allen— Hope Ver- 
non—Logan. Dunn ft Haael— Klmlwa Jspe. (Last 
Half)— Slgsbee'a Dogs Vesta Lewis A On.— Wells 
A .Crest— Barto A Clark. :< 1 

FORT WATEE, IBB. 
Baw Falaos (rirtt HlK)— dirt from Sttrland— 
Harry Sterling — Piano Korera — Jay Baymood — 
■Cheyenne Days." (Last Half )— FoIUa Staters ft 
Lo Boy— bssssmI Csntlar — Hsrry ft Etta Connelly— 
Edith Clifford— Roberts. Pearl ft Straw— Emma 
Francis A Arabs. 

ORANTTE OTTT. ILL. 
'Waahiagtea (April 30)— Jack Lory A Olrls— 
CeeU A Mack. (First Half)— Childhood Days— 
BlcaneU. (Last Half )— MUe. D'A m ee Jack Get- 
die. 

GREEN BAT. 
Orpheana (Lest Half) — Hoahl 
—Mile a Minute. 

KINGSTON, CAM. 
Grand (Laat Half )— Melroy Slaters— Carson ' 
— Gambler Broa. - 

SOEOMO. IBS. 

Slpe (First Half) — ArosMla Duo — Folll Sisters 

Leroy — Girl on the MagaStne— Roach ft "McCurdy — 

SkaUog Bears. (Last Half)— Gu-1 from Starland 

— Sulllran A Meyers — John Geiger— The Brlaata. 

LOOABBFOBT, XJTD. 

Colonial (Last Half)— Stanley A Dale— "Girl on 

the Maaaalne." 

LATATETTE, IBB. 
Family (Last Half) — Togan ft Genera— Dieon 
Girls — "Piano Movers'* — Jay Raymond — "Rising 
Generation." 

EOBSOB. CAN. 
Grand Opera (First Half)— Claire, Haason ft 
Four — Roberta. Pearl A straw — Four Jacks and a 
Queen— Hip A Napoleon— Mason A Austin. (Last 
Half)— Jack A Jill— Leonard A Haley— CM Dees 
A Girls— Ed A Mln Foster— Jonla's Hawaliaru. 
'afOLXBE, ▼?-*- 
Palaos (First Half)— "Recklees Duo"— NmUt 
Moat— Darld 8. Hall A Co.— Walmaley A Myers— 
"The New ModeL" (Last Half)— Eary A Eary— 
•■Remnants"— Ben Ben ny— R esists. 
sttt Txra ii a* rr WIS. 
Palaos (First Half)— Cbiyo ft Chlyo— Bertie 
Heron — Derseh ft Bnasell — Daniels ft Walt er s 
Jsrrow— "MUe s Minute." (last Half)— Cornelia 
A Wllhnr— Jack Larler— 1B19 Wlatesgardea Baeoa 
Brooks A George — Sylrla Loyal ft Co. 
MADISON WIS. 
(lint Half)— Kurt ft Edith Enema— 
McCormack ft Wallace — Bert Lewis — World Danc- 
ers—Jack Larler. (Last Half)— Walter Baker ft 
Co. — Van Bros. — Boganny Troupe — Harry 
Mualeal Ma 



i 



Maw Balnea (First Half )— Bean A Church Sisters 
-Mabel Harper ft Co. — And erson ft Coines. 



Orpheum (First Half) — Cbadwlek ft Taylor- 
Dorothy Doyle — Chlahobn ft Breen — Shea ft Bow- 
man — . Johnson, Baker ft Johnson. (Laat Half) — 
Frank Shields— Knight A BawteBe — Mel »•». «■....» — 
Chung Hwa Four— Chaa. Moratl A Co. — Leon 81a- 

BAIXBXv-ZB, BtlBB. 

BUen (First Half)— Frank Shields— Knight ft 
Sawtelle — Camiile, Personl ft Co. — Chung Hwa Four 
—loon Bisters. (Last Half )— Chadwlck ft Taylor 
—Dorothy Doyle — Chlaholm A Breen— Shsa A Bow- 
man— Johnson, Baker ft Johnson. 

HAMILTON, CAB. 
Street — Welsh A Edwarda — Sampson A 
1 Noll— Dixon A Psnli-^Josie 
Ftynn's Minstrels. 

HOBOXZB. V. J. 
lorrio (First HAITI— Three Macks— Morris ft 
Weston. (Last Half) — Naynon's Birds— Connolly 
A Francis — Dorothy Burton A Co. 
MONTREAL, CAB. 
Leew's Tsasnti A Jeason— Anstm Stewart Trio- 
Regal ft Ma ck I f sale Seed— "Help. Police." 
. ■ NEW BOCHELLE, B. T. 
l asts ' s (First Half) — Gorman Bros. — Chaa. Me- 
Ooods ft Co. (Last Half) — Orben ft Dixie — Brady 
ft Maboney. 

PAOVTDEBCE, R, I. 

Emery (First Half) — Wastlka A Dndesstudy— 

Gray A Graham — Ward ft CnTlan sssBsB Four. 

(Last Half)— Dewltt A QmtDer— Wtlter BaMwln, 

It., ft Co.— Bertrt m ftOaxton— Jons ciark * Co, 

Loew's (Hist Half)— Cornelia ft Adele— Dewltt 
ft Centner— Walter Baldwin, Jr.. A Co. — Bertram 
A Barton— John Clark A Co. (Last Half) Was- 
tlka A Understudy — Ward A Cullen — Gray A 
Orahass— Oeo nre A . Mack— Bums Bear. 
SOUTH HFTUt.ynrn- pa_ 
LeeWs (First Half) — Nsynon's Birds— Henry A 
Moore. (Last Half)— Stan Stanley Trio— Althers 
ft Bead. 

TORONTO, CAB. 
Tessas S lisst CT a j l uu A Clayton— Peirce ft 
ft Tobin— "BIDows's 




Pn£la*Jre> on Tnoroowniaro Wbera Ne-sr rrufesniwisl 



of Bis; PnTilahrng House) Are) BsUBS Httsd Up. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



April 16,. 1919 



INSURE YOUR MATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 



REGIS TER YOU R ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be retained to yon aa 
lowlsdgBiest, aad for fotare reference. The contribution abonld be signed plainly by the 
or im aendhur the came, and abonld be endorsed by the stage manager of the i ' 



show or 



Address your contributions to 



The Registry Bureau, 



NEW YOBJt CUPPER, UM Busiai. New York 



NEW YORK CLIPPER REGISTRY BUREAU: 
Enclosed pi— a s) find copy of Bay. 



for Registration. 

NAME . 

ADDRESS 



CERTIFICATES ISSUED 



128J- Howard ft Lee Aa 

123*— Edna W. Bennett Title 

1295— Wilson C McCarty Sce nar io* 

1296— Sam Goldberg .Lyrics 

1297— Emmett'a Surprise............ ......Act 

1298— Ceo. Howard ..Play 

1299— Howard D. Martel Song Poem 

UOO-Evan. R. Mackenzie Sketch 

1301— Horace Haws Song Lyric 

1302— Amanda Hendricks Songs 

1303— Johnnie Ayers , Act and Dance 



1304— Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Darrow Billing 

1 306— Magical I rving & Co Act 

1306— Bettie TiUord .". '. Songs 

1307— Oscar Snyder Lyric 

1308-R. B. Gibbs Musical Show 

1309— Henry E. Spinner.. ....Songs 

1310-E. H. Faaenda ....Song 

1311— Richard Murray :.Play 

1312— Richard Anders "Act 

1313— Catherine Van Cook Song 



»«ORBEN & DIXIE — 

the Jack of Heart* and the Queen of Spades 

LOEW CIRCUIT 



MONA GRAY & SISTER 

Two Girls and a Piano 

MGR. HARRY RICHARDS DtR. LEW COLDER 



PAYT0N, HOWARD $ LISETTE 



"Six Foe* of Comic Uproar." 



Work m One. 



Dir-, Chaa. Bornharrpt 



CUT CLIFF 

Mccormick and winehill 

The Jars Boys from Dodo Direction — Lerwb A Cordon 

Bl«««««««««««aaaaaaaaas^sssw— ■■■■■■■■•^■^■•^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■••"^■■■■■■■■■^■^■^■■•■■■■■■^^^■^■^■^■^■^■■" 

""* NETTIE 

DIRECTION— WENONAH TENNY 

JOHNNIE' HERBIE 

WRIGHT & WALKER 

DIRECTION— BRUCE DUFFUS 

ROSE & ARTHUR BOY LAN 



"«« MYERS and KNISE 

Of VAUDEVILLE 



IW SONG AND DANCE INNOVATION 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



BROUN and JACKSON 



LOEW CIRCUIT 



"At the Training Quarters" 



hark: LEVY 



FRANCHINI BROS. 

EQUILIBRISTS— HAND-TO-HAND BALANCERS— DIRECTION— PALY SANDERS 

VIOLA GILLETTE 



BURLESQUE NEWS' 

(Continued from pages IS and S) 



SURPLUS OF SMALL 
BITS SLOWS UNION 

SQUARE SHOW 

The show offered last week at the Union 
Square was not np to the previous week's 
abow. Its construction was not as well ar- 
ranged. It was a bit slow wltb four or Ave 
table bits almost following the other in the 
first act- While these bits were good a better 
variety of different kinds of bits would hare 
polished off the show ranch better. 

The numbers were well arranged. The 
first part was called "The Midnight Cab- 
aret." "Hot Dog— Coney Island" followed. 

The "robbing" bit, when Button sold the 
restaurant to Mackey and Spencer, was well 
done. This started off with Mackey at one 
table and Spencer at the other. 

Then another table scene followed with 
Mackey and Spencer baying a meal and wine 
for Miss Lorraine. Sntton wanted Mackey 
to pay, but he had. only a nickel. Spencer 
was no better off, but after Miss Lorraine 
had left the, room he discovered her purse, 
which bad-enough money In It to pay the 
check. 

A drinking bit followed at another table 
between Miss Lorraine and Sntton; one had 
water and the other wine. Sntton gave a 
clever recitation on liquor and Miss Lor- 
raine on water. Both were well done and 
were appreciated. 

The "yes-no" bit followed. Francis, as 
the devil, instructed Spencer and Mackey 
that when they wanted anything they should 
not take It when it was offered to them, 
but should say no, or In other words, act 
contrary to their own desires, under penalty 
of going to the warm place. This idea was 
carried out several times after this, in bits 
In the first act. 

Another drinking bit followed with the 
girls trying to dope the drinks so that they 
could get the bank roll of the men they 
were drinking with. Spencer opened with 
Babe Wellington at one table, which was 
followed by Mackey and Miss Dix at • the 
other table with Spencer as the waiter. 
This second scene was done in pantomime. 
Miss Dix wore an evening sown and It so 
Improved her appearance that one would 
hardly know her as the same person. She 
should always wear, when it is possible, a 
long dress when doing bits. 

The "apple" bit went over well as done by 
Mackey and the Misses DeVeauz and -Dix. 

Francis, Mackey, and Spencer put a lot 
of comedy In the William Tell bit. 

The finale of "the first part waa a comedy 
band with Sutton as the leader. The entire 
company participated In this scene. 

Spencer, Mackey and the Misses Lorraine, 
Dix, Wellington and DeVeanx appeared in 
the "Lemonade and Hot Dog" bit. The 
"water" bit wait over well as done by 
Mackey, Francis. Spencer and Mica Dix. 

The "follow the leader" bit. with Spencer 
and the Misses DeVeanx, Dix and Quinn 
doing a lot of stunts, caused amusement. 

Button did straight in the first part and 
a Dutch eccentric part in the burlesque. 
Francis did the devil in the first part and 
straight in the burlesque. Mackey, Spencer 
and the Misses Lorraine. Wellington, Dix 
and DeVeanx were seen In their usual role. 
Miss Pearson was missing from the cast on 
account of sickness. 

The chorus worked well in the numbers, 
but for some reason or other did not have 
the punch and did not get over the way 
they should have. SID. 



ENGAGE MAUD ROCKWELL 
Fred Stair has engaged Maud Rockwell 
aa prima donna for his Summer stock at 
the Star, Toronto. 



BRICMONT OUT OF ARMY 

flhirk Bricmont received his honorable 
discharge from the United States Army 
last week at damp Lee. 



For Novel tie* 




SHOE SHOP 



M MIL •■»«* 

154 W.dSASUltT.EastoIB'wayOpa.L 



A. FURMAN 

Tfaeatric.1 Costamer for the Best 

No thing t oo bi g nor too assail. Vaasarrflla 
■ Esiuss Duilisi|in. Everyone famished 
Salesroom— less- Br— shrew. Ractc 
Roots «s. New York 



■ at J* ■ SBBBBBBt SBBBBBBS, " *"■* laff| MM ML Malst 

wigs maAs 



RESERVE THEM AHEAD 

Manager William Rife of the Casino, 
Brooklyn, has received a letter from 
Bonere, France, asking him to reserve seats 
some night during the first week in May 
for the following boys, all sergeants and 
members of Company A, 305th Infantry: 
John J. Smith, Joe Ripperger, Ed. Mc- 
Gowan, Ben Leider, Ed. McCurdy, Jack 
Stark, George. Darenbnrg, Bill Ryan, 
Walter Chapin, John Tobin, Jack Down- 
ing, Tom. Roe and Joe Via Cava. Rife re- 
flied that the boys can see the show at 
is expense aa soon as they get back. 

CONWAY AND COLLINS RE-SIGNED 
Drew and Campbell have re-signed Jack 
Conway and Jim Collins for the "Liberty 
Girls" next season. They, have also en- 
gaged the "Runway Four 1 .' and Marcia 
Ray, an ingenue, who will make her in- 
itial appearance in burlesque with this 
show. Contracts for a new book and new 
equipment of every description were given 
out by the owners of the show while they 
were in New York last -week 



STONE AND PILLARD TO LEAD 

The _ Theatrical Two, an organization, 
will give their annual ball this, year at 
McLaughlin's Bayside Casino, Sheepahead 
Ray, on May 9. George Stone and Etta 
IHllard will lead the grand march. John 
P. Bond and Thomas P. Darcey are in 
charge of the programme. i .. « 

HASTINGS SIGNS CARRIE FTNNELL 
Carrie Finnell has been engaged by 
Harry Hastings as soubrette for his 
"Kewpie Dolls" next season on the Amer- 
ican Circuit. She is at the National Win- 
ter Garden at present and is considered 
one of the best soubrettes in burlesque. 

RENE COOPER'S SISTER DIES 

Rene Cooper was compelled to leave the 
Al. Reeves Show in Paterson last week to 
to St. Paul on account of the death of 
her sister. Salli» Stewart is rilling in for 
her in the soubrette role during her 
absence. ■ .-' 



fer 



WILL WELP CLOSES 

Will Welp, who opened with "Cheer Up 
America" two weeks ago, in Philadelphia, 
closed with the show hist Saturday at 
Miner's in the Bronx. Lea Hayes re- 
joined the company, doing his old .part. 



Tea* 



RE-SIGN JOE BROWN 

Joe Brown, who is working opposite 
Harry Cooper in the "Sporting Widows," 
waa signed np last week by Jacobs and 
Jexmon for two years more. 

REEVES SIGNS TWO 

Harry Marks Stewart and Harry S. La 
Van have been engaged by AL Reeves to 
be featured with his show next season. 



ACTS 



plays,; 

Terms for a 
OAMBf F. 



SUmp 



p se h - m 



LARGEST THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER IN N. Y. 

Telephones 125 J ob<lM * 

PLerc*-Arrow Tracks 

JOSEPH F. REILLY 

Office, 437 to 443 W. 31st 
NEW YORK 

S. HEFFEANAN, GastL Mgr. 



VVTLLIAM F. (Bffly) HARMS 

- HOBOKEN, N.J. 

THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 
a* - T. B. O 



WILLIAM HUSSELL MEYEBS 



Refe 



Vaudevtl'e Author 

aafldtag. aTew Task. 
Eddie Leonard. Geo. Fi 



April 16, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 




MRS. O'GRADY IS 
QUIZZED BY 

FILM MEN 

EVASIVE ANSWERS ARE GIVEN 



Mrs. Ellen A. CGrady, Fifth Deputy 
Police Commissioner, -was challenged last 
week by the Association of Motion Pic- 
ture Advertisers to answer ten questions 
propounded by the association, but she 
evaded answering directly all except one 
of them. The questions -were drawn by 
the association in an effort to refute 'the 
charge made by the Deputy Police Com- 
missioner that immoral films were being 
shown by exhibitors to the moral detri- 
ment of audiences, especially young girls 
and children. 

Mrs. CGrady endorsed Sunday" motion 
pictures, mentioning that pictures were 
"high art and the greatest power for edu- 
cation in the world." 

The first question was: "Can and will 
yon name ten theatres in New York City 
in which, to your knowledge, salacious pic- 
tures have been shown T" To which the 
Deputy Commissioner replied: "To begin 
with, look at the stacks and stacks of 
letters on my desk received from min- 
isters, school teachers and principals, 
mothers — all persons of good society, en- 
dorsing my stand. Let the general public 
answer the first question." 

The second question asking her to name 
three salacious films that have been shown 
in New Tork during the last year was an- 
swered with the remark, "I am not going 
to be a medium of advertising those pic- 
tures." 

Question No. 3, asking the Deputy Com- 
missioner to "name one salacious film you 
have seen or known to have been shown 
which the National Board of Review en- 
dorsed 1" she answered! "I have seen a pic- 
ture where a man attacks a girl in the 
most bestial manner, using his teeth to 
tear the young girl's clothing." 

To the fourth question, "Can you name 
one moving picture exhibitor who makes 
it a practice to exhibit suggestive or im- 
moral films T" she replied: "The general 
public will answer that." 

Says Parents Are Lax 

Question No. 5 asks her: "Do you set 
yourself up as a better judge of films than 
the parents of children who attend the 
theatre t" She answers by saying: "The 
parents never see half the pictures their 
children see." 

To the sixth question asked her, "Do you 
know that 60 per cent of the films shown 
in the theatres of Greater New York 
are later shown in schools, churches and 
forums throughout America}" Mrs. 
0*Grady said: "In my mail today are let- 
ters from school principals, a clergyman 
and professional people, endorsing and 
praising my stand against objectionable 
pictures." 

The seventh question:- "Can you produce 
one child of the many you speak of who 
has been so ruined by films T" and Mrs. 
CGrady answered: "I can produce twenty 
girls, but I hesitate to do that." 

To question No. 8 — "Can you, and will 
you, produce any film in which the word 
'vamp' appears and name the film, or 
where it was used?" Mrs. CQrady re- 
plied, "An actress, Theda Bara^played the 
part of a vampire in 'A Fool There Was,' 
and the young girls seeing that now use 
the word 'vamp,' meaning looseness of 
morals." 

Question No. 9 — "Are you aware of the 
law which gives the license Commissioner 
the right to close any theatre showing- an 
indecent picture V The Deputy Commis- 
sioner answered by saying: "Ask the 
License Commissioner, he will answer 
that." The same reply covers the tenth 
question, which is' almost similar in tone. 



SUES UNIVERSAL DIRECTOR 
Philadelphia, April 8. — Cathleen Car- 
rol Evans brought suit today against Mel- 
ville S. Forrester, said to be the chief di- 
rector of the Universal Film Company, 
for breach of promise to marry her. Judge 
Shoemaker, in the Common Pleas Court, 
issued a capias against the defendant, fix- 
ing bail at $500. 

Miss Evans alleges that Forrester and 
herself became engaged after a short court- 
ship in November, 1918. They were sup- 
posed to be married last Christmas, she 
says, but alleges that Forrester's manner 
to her became cold and she gradually be- 
came satisfied that her affections had been 
trifled with. 



HODKINSON CHANGES POLICY 

The W. W. Hodkinson Corporation 
changed its entire sales policy last week 
when it sent out telegraphic orders to all 
representatives in the thirty Pathe offices 
that all productions, past and future, 
marketed through the Hodkinson organiza- 
tion, ore to. be offered and sold to ex- 
hibitors singly, on their individual values 
and merits. 

This means that only one release at a 
time can be sold by the company. They 
will offer as the first, "As a Man Thinks," 
with Leah Baird, in August. This ' will 
later be followed by the first of the Zane 
Grey productions, "Desert Gold." 

MARGUERITE CLARK STARTS WORK 

Marguerite Clark left New York last 
week for the Coast, where she will work 
on "Girls," at the Hollywood Studios, this 
being the first picture she has made there 
in several years. She has completed 
"Come Out of the Kitchen," and will be 
directed by Walter Edwards in "Girls." 
The cast is not yet known. At the same 
time, Dorothy Dalton is coming East 
from Culver City to make her next Ince 
picture with an Eastern background. 

DIRECTOR MARRIES STAR 

Los ANGELES, April 12. — Bertram 
Bracken, director, and Margot Cullen Lan- 
dis, a screen star, were married here this 
week and, in the excitement of the moment. 
Bracken forgot their honeymoon tickets. 
After they had arrived at the steamer at 
San Pedro they obtained permission to go 
aboard by long-distance telephone. Judge 
Hawkins, who placed Bracken on proba- 
tion one year ago for speeding, performed 
the marriage ceremony. 



FAIRBANKS COMPLETES CONTRACT 

Douglas Fairbanks' has completed his 
last Famous-Players production, a seven- 
reel feature called "Knickerbocker Buck- 
aroo." Mary Pickf ord's last with the same 
company was "Capt. Kidd, Jr." D. W. 
Griffith has one more to finish after he 
completes "The Chink and the Child" for 
the Art-craft banner. These pictures will 
terminate the contracts of these three of 
the "Big Four" combination. 

DEFEAT SUNDAY FILM BILL 

Trenton, N. J., April 1L — Assembly- 
man Hyland's bin permitting local option 
on motion picture shows and other amuse- 
ments on Sundays, after 1 P. M., was de- 
feated here yesterday in the Senate by a 
vote of 12 to 5, the same vote by which 
the sports bill, was defeated. 



GETS SCHULBERC'S JOB 

Ralph O. Proctor has been signed to 
fill B. P. Schulberg'e place as Hiram 
Abraxas' assistant with the United Artists' 
Association. He has been the Western 
District manager of Pathe, and resigned to 
come to'New York. 

RIALTO TO CELEBRATE 

The third anniversary of the opening of 
the BJalto will start on April 20. Hugo 
Biesenfeld will celebrate the birthday of 
the theatre with a pretentious display of 
motion pictures. ' 



EXHIBITORS TO 

PAY UNIFORM 

TAXRATE 

S PER CENT ON FILM RENTALS 



FILM FLASHES 



A uniform tax clause to be inserted in 
al contracts with exhibitors for the ex- 
hibition of motion pictures on and after 
May 1, .1919, was agreed upon last Fri- 
day at a meeting of the Distributors' 
Division of the National Association of the 
Motion Picture Industry. • 

Under the clause, as adopted at the 
meeting, exhibitors will pay a tax of 5 per 
cent on all film rentals. This must be 
paid to the Government at the end of each 
month, in accordance with the tax imposed 
on motion picture- rentals by the Govern- 
ment in the new revenue bin. 

The tax clause that will be attached to 
all contracts reads as foUows: 

"The exhibitor agrees that as long as 
section 906 of the Revenue Act of 1918 
shall remain in force, the exhibitor shall 
pay to the distributor in addition to nil 
other charges, a sum equal to five (6) per 
cent of the gross film rental, or in the 
event of a percentage booking, a sum equal 
to five (5) per cent of the distributor's 
share, for all pictures delivered and (or) 
exhibited under this contract on and after 
May 1, 1919, such five (5) per cent to be 
added to the bill for said film and to be- 
come due when the other items on said 
biU become due. The exhibitor further 
agrees that any default in the payment 
of said five (5) per cent shall be consid- 
ered a default in .the same way as the 
non-payment of any other moneys due 
under and pursuant to this contract.' 

"In view of the fact that the old tax 
of % cent per foot, which the distributors 
were required to pay under the 1917 law; 
will be rescinded as of May 1, 1919, tie. 
charge of 15 cents per reel per day will 
no longer be collected by the distributors, 
but in its place the 5 per cent tax will be 
collected, beginning May 1, 1919. 

"The following companies were repre- 
sented at the meeting: Famous Players- 
Lasky Corporation, First National Exhib- 
itors Circuit, Fox Film Corporation/ Gold- 
wyn Distributing Corporation, Interna- 
tional Film Service, Inc., Metro Pictures 
Corporation, Pathe Exchange, Inc., Select 
Pictures corporation, Triangle Distributing 
Corporation, Universal Film Manufactur- 
ing Company, Yitagrapb, Inc., and World 
Film Corporation." 



"The Sawdust Trail" will be released by 
Path* April 20. 

Jack A. Pegler will manage the Atlanta 
Pathe exchange. 

■William C. MonsT supports Emmy Wehlsn 
In "The Spender." 

Larry Bemon's next Vltagraph company will 
be "Passing the Buck." 

Alex Yokel has been elected vice-president 
of Briggs Pictures, Inc. 

Grace Darling will appear In a Rothapfel 
production coming soon. 

Gertrude Astor will be seen In 'The Chat- 
terbox," with Prlicllla Dean. 

Ruby LaFayette will support Eddie Polo In 
"Cyclone Smith Bides Alone." j 

Katherlne Adams will support Barle Will- 
iams in bis next Vitagraph. production. 

Harry Hollander has arrived In New Tork 
to work for some Hasten 01m exchange. 



SUE OVER FEATURE 

A suit has been started by the Mitten- 
thal brothers against William F. Stoermer, 
Ernest E. Gagnon and William Bielinberg, 
promoters of motion pictures, for $1,200, 
which the plaintiffs claim is due them 
upon promissory notes. Maurice Bungard 
is acting as the attorney for the Mitten- 
thals, and the case is being tried in the 
municipal court, 

The Mittenthals declare that the de- 
fendants purchased a feature picture 
from them called "The Law of the North- 
woods," and paid part of the. price in cash, 
the remainder to be paid in notes. They 
allege -that the latter obligation has not 
been met by the defendants. The latter 
say they were to have paid the Mitten thai 
Brothers 25 per cent of the profits as the 
balance, and that the plaintiffs had agreed 
not to sue them. 



MARY MILES MTNTER SUES 
Ixys Ajjgeles, April 1L — Mrs. Pearl 
ReQly, mother of Juliet Reilly, otherwise 
known as Mary MOes Minter, brought 
suit this week in the United States Dis- 
trict Court against the American Film 
Company to recover $4,125, alleged hock 
' pay due her daughter. ■ - 



Dorothy Phlulps will soon be seen In a 
new Universal feature called "Destiny." 

Frank X. Flanagan Is the latest ahort 
story writer added to tbe Goldwyn staff. 

Sylvia Brfeamer and Robert Gordon will 
star In G. Stuart Blackton's next production. 



Dorothy Phillips Is working on "The Bight 
to Happiness," under the direction of Allen 
HoUobar. • < ' 



Tarklngton Baker and Harry M. Berman 
of Universal have gone to Chicago on 
business. 



June Caprice and Crelgbton Hale have 
completed "O Boy" and have started on a new 
production. 



Milton Sills returns to Goldwyn as Pauline 
Frederick's leading man In a coming pro- 
duction. - - 



"The Follies Girl," the last Olive Thomas 
production for Triangle, will -be released 
April 2T. 



Tbe Independent Sales Corporation has 

irchaae" 
lvlded.' 



Burchased the Canadian rights to "A House 



The Pathe, Albany, exchange. Is moving to 
larger quarters, from 398 Brosdway to 35-87 
Orange Street. 

Carter De Haven and Flora Parker nave 
been signed by "Smiling Bill" Parsons for 
Capitol Comedies. 



"The Perils of Thunder Mountain" com- 
pany have returned to Los Angeles after a 
- number of weeks otr location. - 



Montagu Love and Enid Marker win star 
In the ninth of the stage Women's War Belief 
films called "She's Everywhere." 

Leon Netter of the Maaterpiee Film At- 
tractions, Cleveland, has secured the Ohio 
rights to "The Spreading- Evil.; 1 

Tom Spry of the Boston Universal Ex- 
change spent two days In New Tork last week 

conferring with H. M. Berman. 



Clara Horton will be tbe leading woman 
In the next Rex Beach picture for Goldwyn. 
Cullen Landls plays opposite her. 

The New Tork World will Issue an art 
study of Ruth Roland with their paper Sun- 
day when tbe Tiger's Trail" will be released. 

Arthur S. Kane, " general manager of 
Select Motion Pictures Corp. has returned 
from a six-weeks' trip In the South and 
Middle- West. 



Constance Talmadge In "The Veiled Ad- 
venture," Marlon Davies In "Getting Mary 
Married" and Alice Brady In "Bedhead" 
will be released this month by Select. 

Anna lather and Charles Hutchinson have 
completed the "Great Gamble" serial for 

Western Photoplays, Inc. and returned from 
the South last week with the company. 

Sydney Alnsworth, "Walter MeNeznars, 
Ernest Spencer. Colin Kenny. Wilton Tay- 
lor, BlTiM Bonnet, Hallam Cooler, Bast 
Sprotte and Louis Cheung are the sup- 
porting east of Clara Horton and Cullen 
Landls in a coming Rex Beach production. 



34 



THE :N£W I.T-ORK CLIPPER 



Ofldi 16,:i919 



WANTED 

People Is an lines. AirDt mat cu book and 
wildcat and sot afraid of work for »m«Il one 
nighter, spring and tSnnuner S*t«ou. Pissa Apri l 

:ff. rttat- all In n™t letter. ADAH W. rUEHI, 
M Bradford St.. Acbara, B. T. 

fttlW fw GiMMVAl DRAMATIC COMTART 

■kirn, BAH FOt CE». BOS. 
That era do Jnrenllea, one doabllng Una or Spe- 
cialties preferred. Cornet Flayer for B. 4b O. 
Moat Join at once. Bebearsal April lath. TKAJTK 
K. emiVAaT, Qianiras Dramatic fi ei i i na nj. Aak- 

CHORUS COSTUMES 

that have been used! Bench* and aolA. Unit 
be in sets and suitable tor Musical Comedy 
and Burlesque. Adiise iullj- ELLEN REUJLV, 
Cedar Grove, N. J.) A few sets for sale. 



Music Publisher Wants 

.cornwoodrnt In Eisty at/. TJ. 8. and Canada. 

To art is Local gtvr|muutTt. 
■ tte ' i aii kaa i aaaajtS MMaswa , Bat If pas are 

mtrreued In Url> rraitsnon 

Don't 1st tail offer ft or Ton. 

p— «H"i— * and Dnrreoffnlsed Writeri, 
- We an alsars In tar Market for sue. 

Ws psj spot Cash Bonss sad Bojaltj. 

UNIVERSAL MUSIC PUB. COMPANY 

WILL HlCUTAlY. rrev 



Bask or andsrai aefeKsce on Jaaraest. 



MONEY WRITING SONGS 




TSB 

atad ea tka 

taaWB. Balsa 
rjarlsaart, (aw. 



book, only ess af 



W 



IGS 

OUTH 
HILK 



(fair 11.00 Portoald. Uasar beat 
■ rtli Cearoj. 315 tart Flttt It, 

Toupee* Make-Up 

Send for Price Lilt 
a SHINDHELM 

lli W. ettfc S t. New Yert 



JAMES MADISON 

WRITES FOR 
NORA BAYES 

For exclusive] material call at my 
downtown office, 1493 Broadway 



MADISON'S BUDGET NO. 17 

contain* a libera} assortment of my latest 
anaaMa anwan bj acta - for two males, acta for 
male and female and also for three chafac- 
ters, minstrel lint parti, 200. elnrle gage, a 
une-act farce for 9 people; also a lot of new 
parodies I'tc Jnst written on late songs. 
.Price OHB DOUJB. Back laenee all aolo. 
Bend orders to JAMBS MADISON, 1002 Tlrird 
Avenue. New York. 



PARODIES 



any soar, any character. 

10c each, t for 26c. Unsay 
Back Oatraetee. Bxclnxrte sketches, etc., writ- 
ten. Terma and referencea for stamp. XABT 
XaTATXB, also Bread Street, Providence, B. X. 




NEW YORK 1554 Broadway m 46 -St 
CHICAGO State * Mohboe Sts 



FEATURE FILMS 



"MARIE, LTD." 

Select. Fin RWt 
Cast 

Drina milord AUee Brady 

Colonel Lambert .Brook Loaee 

Blair carton LmlleAutten 

Marie Billiard Mrs. Ou His se BWman 

Adelaide Joiephine Whittei 

Zelie. Q lady t Valerie 

Story— Dramatic Scenario by Jane Martin ; 
directed by Kenneth Webb; features Alice 

Brady. _ ; 

This picture holds interest through Its 
fashionable scenes and excellent acting by 
Alice Brady. There Is en added Interest to 
"mere man.'* when the methods of Firth 
Avenue milliners are exposed, supposedly the 
practice of some dealers being; to charge an 
extraordinary Urge price to men buying bats 
for women and then spilt the overcharge 
with the women, thus giving the weaker sex 
the ever-nettled pin money. 

The film opens on a> trans-continental train 
speeding across the prairies, with Drina, Hll- 
llard, daughter of Marie HI 11 lard, who has 
left her home in the West to become • Mew 
York milliner, seated In a coach near Blair 
Carson, a young New York business man 
returning East. Canon blocks an attempted 
train robbery and la wounded. His wonnds 
are dressed by Miss Hllllard. They part in 
New York, when Miss Hllllard goes to the 
store to take np her future work by assisting 
her mother who bad paid her expenses 
through college. - ■_:■■ _- r s 

Colonel Lambert, who Is fond of buying 
hats for Zelie, a popular chorus girl, falls in 
love with Miss Hllllard, after meeting her 
several times at the millinery store. Mrs. 
Billiard is anxious to have the match take 
place, especially as the firm Is on the verge 
of bankruptcy. Zelie then becomes Jealous 
of Miss Hllllard and telle the Colonel of the 
methods of Mrs. Hllllard In overcharging. 
The Colonel uses this information as a 
wedge to force Miss .HuHard to marry him, 
threatening to expose her mother. 

Canon, wbo is supposed to be the sweet, 
heart of the Colonel's daughter, la waiting 
for Miss Hllllard at the store and overhears 
the conversation. He goes to the room, 
laughs at the Colonel's threats to expose aba. 
uuTlard and wins the daughter, himself . 
Mrs. Hllllard at once ceases to overcharge. 

There are several scenes along Fifth 
Avenue and in New York restaurants. 

Boac Office Value ■ -.. (ggj 

One day. ->. 

"A REGULAR FELLOW" 

Trianglo Five Reels. 

Cast "■. "ste - 

Dalian Pemberton Taylor Hrftaae* 

Virginia Christy.. WHHtasf JWUr 

I.ady Wetteott Bona Phillip* Holme* 

Count Eugenia Frank Leigh 

Mr: Chritty .IAUian Langdon 

Story— Comedy. Written by Daniel Canon 
Goodman. Directed by Christy ~ 

Photographed by Sam Landers. 



"A Regular Fellow" serves Its purpose aa 
far aa allowing Taylor Holmes to employ his 
talents aa a comedian la concerned. The 
story is not so good In quality, bnt little 
things may be overlooked in a picture of this 
sort. 

Dallon Pemberton. a woman hater, who is 
to inherit a fortune upon marrying Virginia. 
Christy, decides to avoid her and runs away 
to Buenos Ayres. There he- falls In love with 
Virginia, whose name la unknown to him. 
When she leaves for New York, he follows, 
after having had his pockets gone through 
by a thief. 

Financially embarrassed, he finds It Im- 
possible to secure passage aboard the ship on 
which Virginia la sailing and atowa away. 
Upon arriving In New York, he la arrested 
and locked up aa a auspicious person. He is 
put into prison with some thieves, who make 
their escape, take htm along with them and 
burglarise the house of Virginia. 

They also discover that Lady Westcott and 
Count Eugenia, thieves, have already en- 
tered. Dallon, In a general mix-up, manages 
to frustrate the efforts of an of tie thieves. 
When Virginia's mother arrives he finds out 
the real identity of the girl whom he has 
been following. AH Is explained and the film 
ends with tee usual love scene. 



OLYMPIC THEATRE; NEW YORK. WEEK APRIL 7 

WHITE 



WITH "AMERICANS" ____■■■ 

SPEED, MERIT, TALENT INVITES OFFERS 



SHERMAN & ROSE 



Clever Dancing Act 

. . IN VAUDEVILLE 



BAL'SDREADNAUGHT 

A GOOD TRUNK AT 
A VERY LOW PRICE. 

BAL'S XX 

OUR STANDARD TRUNK 
FULLY GUARANTEED. 

BAL'S STAR 

OUR TRUNK DE LUXE 

TRUNKS 



WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

145 West 45th St., 

or * 

4 West 22nd St. : 
NEW YORK CITY 



Hlgti Class 

SECOND HAND GOWNS 

L GOODMAN 
2315 S. State St, Chicago, 111 



Wardrobe Prop Tranks, V 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also a ice 



Innovation sad Fibre Ward 

code itttoka, $10 and SIS. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunk ■ 
and Bal Trunks. 
Parlor Floor, a W. jut 3L, New York Cety 



C L I P- 

BUSINESS. 



INDEX 



Advertisements not I muling one line in 
length will be pu b l i s h ed, property classified, la 
this Index, at the rate of 110 for one year 0t 

issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be seat free to each advertiser while the 

advertisement ia running, 



Joseph A. O'Brien, 1«S Broadway, New York 

Edward Doyle. Attorney, 40 Merchants Bank 

Bids., Indianapolis, Tnd. 
James S. Kleinman, Equitable Bids".. 1st 

B'way, New York City. 
P. L. Boyd, 17 No. L. Salle St., Chicago. 

MUSICAL CLASSES. 
A. Braunaelsa, 10TJ Napier Ave.. Vl-l****** HOT, 
N. Y. 

MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 
Chaa. L, Lewis, 49 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. • 

SCENERY 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

ssi-savsB South Hl»h feWCatssaftwaa. «X 

De Flesh Scenic Studio, 447 Balsey St., Brook- 
lyn- Phone Bedford SS94T. 

SCENERY FOB. HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, »19 Spring Garden St, PUtsdel-' 
phis. Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Wa. W. Delaaey, 117 Park Bow, New York, 



j. a G«. toAABiK&ar*- *■*■ 

Boston Kegslit Co.. 387 Washington St, Bos- 
ton, Mass 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
A. W. Orstner Co, 634 Ith Ave. (41st St), 

VBNT1UIJ0QU1ST nCJJRES. 
Ben Hobson, 271 West 150th St, New York 
City. 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES. 
August Gessuzuler et Sans, HI W. 43ad St, 



TAYLOR TRUNKS 

C. A .Tavlor Trunk Works 



Read The Clipper 
Letter List 



"PITFALLS OF A BIG *21TY» 

' -'Fet 'ITvwstseaa. i* 

. ',- -.Cast.:.... 

Molly Moore' ....... ... . . . Olaiy Broebteett 

Jerry Sullivan William Scott 

BfUe Davit .WOKoes Sheer 

Marion Moore Neva Qerber 

Dave Oarrity ............... ..At Fremont 

Ted Pemtberton, .......... . Athton Deurkolt 

Alice rembertan...... ....... .Janlt WiUon 

Story— Drarcatlc. Written by Bennet H. 
Cohan, featuring Gladys Brock well. 



This la a fairly good picture, that is lia- 
ble to have its whole run spoiled by the 
wretched, title given it While -the plot is 
partly worked around crime, the title has 
nothing whataover to do with the story and 
la very mlaleadlng. 

Jerry and Spike are two criminals Just 
released from the' penitentiary. Spike has 
decided to go back to bis" life of crime, 
while Jerry, due to a letter received from 
Molly, the girl he loves,- has decided to 
go straight, as she la doing the same. 
Jerry meets Molly and gets a Job as a 
laborer. _. 

Molly has bought a restaurant, mainly 
to support her sister, watt; does not know 
of Mnay*B old life. Heryslster Marion Is 
about to leave school for?;' a vacation and 
has. been invited to stay- with her chum, 
Alice Pemberton. She accepts, but wants 
to visit her sister Molly for a few days 
before doing so. She goes to Molly and 
stays In her house for a while. 
- Spike finds out about Marlon and wants 
to meet her. He follows her Into the 
house and tries to kiss her, and Molly, on 
hearing the noise, rushes upstairs from the 
restaurant and makes him leave the prem- 
ises. Molly then begs Marlon to go to her 
friend's, which she does. In the meantime 
Jerry has been keeping on the straight 
path. 

Marlon arrives at the Pemberton's and 
some time later accepts Ted Pemberton's 
proposal. On the evening that she is to be 
engaged Spike calla on Molly and threatens 
to expose the fact that she Is Marion's sis- 
ter unless she helps him rob the Pember- 
tons' house. Again she forces him to leave, 
but later in the evening, fearing for Ma- 
rlon, she rushes to the Pembertona' house 
to compel spike not to rob the place. She 
finds him there, and as they are talking a 
policeman catches them. Spike escapes 
and Molly is arrested. At the station-house 
she refuses to talk, but Garrity, a plain- 
clothes man wbo loves her, thinks that 
Jerry Is the young man who escaped. He 
goes for Jerry and accuses him. Jerry pro- 
tests his Innocence and asks Garrity to 
give him five minutes alone with Molly to 
find out who it was. Garrity does so and 
Jerry learns that it was Spike and prom- 
ises not to tell for Molly's sister's sake. 
He goes to Garrity and tells him of his 
promise, but says that Garrity may follow 
him. He rushes to Spike's hang-out and 
a thrilling fight ensues. 

Finally Garrity arrives on the scene- with 
a number of policemen. Spike shoots one. 
Terrified by his crime be confesses all, and 
Molly Is set free. Garrity hushes up the 
police about ber sister and ia best man at 
the wedding. 

"THE FOLLIES GIRL" 

Triantie— Five Reels 
Cut 

Don .Olios Thomas 

Ned .Wattaee MaoDonald 

Edward Woodruff. -.....«.. WOttam V. Mono 

Vina Claire JfeDoiecIl 

Frederic Bay Griffith 

Batil .........................Lee Phelps 

£<can* ...J. P. Wild 

S tor y Comedy drama. Directed by Jack 
Dillon. Written by W. Carey Wonderly, 
' scenario by Charles Mortimer Peck. Photo- 
graphed by Steve Norton; features Olive 
Thomas. ■ - 



"TAe Follies Girl" ia a comedy drama, 
poorly written, not very well staged and 
poorly acted. Most of the characters exag- 
gerate horribly In their work and the plot 
itself is ridiculous.- - 

Edward Woodrnff Ilea dying. Hut three 
cousins. Nina, Frederic and Basil, who expect 
to. inherit the Woodrnff fortune, await his 
death with much glee. The old man con- 
stantly calls for his granddaughter, the only 
Child of his daughter, who had left bis house- 
hold and died. Nina plana to have a girl 
Introduced as Woodruff's daughter, inherit 
the money and then pay the pseudo grand- 
child.. She tells Swsnn, Woodruff's old com- 
panion and an attorney, about the scheme, 
omitting the explanation' of her plan. The 
wife or .Ned, Woodruff's grandson, disowned 
for marrying out of bis class. Is then intro- 
duced to the Woodrnff household aa "Doll'* 
of the follies. As soon ai she appears, 

Woodruff takes on a new lease of life and 
noon recovers. Ail of Nina's plana are frus- 
trated, and finally, after "Doll'' has won a 
place In Woodruff's heart, It Is disclosed that 
ahe la Nod's wife and an ends happily. 
Beat Office Value 
One day. 



PLAYS % 

» K e 'Tl i Maid or a 



ON ROYALTY 



ALICE ROWLAND 

Bex 81, Bt Tinea, ■. T. 

Maid or Gain," (foft-lortc). 



WANTED--ACTOR 
Double brass or string. One to pat on small 
cast pieces. One show week at a beautiful 
in the-' Catskuis. > DAN SHERMAN. 
Center. N. Y. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



VIRTUOUS MEN- 
SMASHING BIG SUCCESS 

Read What Those Who Know Say:— 



Should prove profitable success." — Wid?s. 

lift is gorgeously staged— has at least six big punches." 
1 — Harriet Underbill, N. Y. Tribune 

"It has the greatest fight I ever saw, even including 'The 
1 Spoilers.' The audience will eat it up." — 

— Robert E. Webteh, Managing Editor, M. P. News 

llf t is a big melodrama, with excellent comedy relief— pos- 
* sesses real entertainment qualities— the ball room 

scenes are the most extensive ever shown on the screen." 

— Edw. Weitzel, Associate Editor, M. P. World. 

Mf here are many exciting and thrilling scenes which will 
* appeal to movie audiences— has great comedy relief 
and wonderful mob and fight scenes." 

—W. Stephen Bush, Billboard. 
a '117' ill make big money for the exhibitor." 

* * — Morris Kashin, Managing Director, 

Symphony and Broadway Theatres, New York 

« A spectacular forest fire marks one of the high points. 
« E. K. Lincoln is admirable selection for the star." 

—Wid's. 



in star role, 



umerous Mob Scenes- 
by Ralph Ince 



ill of them realistically directed 

E. K. Lincoln was seen to advantage 

—M. Head, N. Y. Herald. 



«Ctrong melodramatic appeal — full of action— extraordi- 
"-' nary fight scenes — photographic effects excellent- 
acting of a high order — a sure fire climax." 

—-Helen Rockwell, Exhibitor's Trade Review. 

<<|t is a real entertainment — is sure to be a big box office 

a success." 
— Henry Cole, Exec. Secy., M. P. Exhibitors' League of N. Y. 

«P"very man, woman and child should see it." 
*■" — Paul Sweinhart, Managing Editor, N. Y. Clipper. 

«\7 irtuous Men" is big melodrama with rapid series of big 
* punches. The production is extraordinarily staged 
and excellently played by notable cast. 

Quigley, Man. Editor, Exhibitor's HmraU-Motography. 



MDip«snorting melodrama well acted — photography su- 
*^ perb — fight scenes worth twice the price of admission." 

m — Mark Vance. 



A Flood of Letters, Wires and Phone Calls from State Right Buyers from Coast to 

Coast has Followed the First New York Presentation of 

•'VIRTUOUS MEN" 

The Inaugural Ralph Ince Film Attraction Starring 

E. K. LINCO